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ANNUAL REPORT - 1986 f� t., 041 s E. WTI. �..:. ..__-..:...---' � ......_....._.---- .-. . . _.. ._ ......._-.-._......._... ,a ot�l -I Fram 'ingham D - ►Tw S /�M; s 0 I 1 COR'ORATEO i I 1 1 ANNUAL REPORT 1986 TOWN OF FRAMINGHAM TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION Cover Design — North High School Graphic Arts Students: Warren Vegas, Kevin Clark, Jeff Prag GeneralInformation ............................................................................................................. 5 Sources of Information ............................................................. TownOfficials .............................................................................. Reports of: Selectmen and Executive Administrator ............................ ............. 13 [ ....................................... Town Clerk ADMINISTRATIVE DEPARTMENTS i Reports of: Treasurer-Collector ......................................................................................................... 14 TownAccountant ............................................................... ........... 16 ................................. Exhibits 1-6, Schedules 1-6 ............................................................................................. 16 Framingham Retirement System42 ............................................. TrustFunds ................................................................................................................ 42 Town Counsel ...................................... 44 Purchasing Department Boardof Assessors ................................................................................................... ... 44 Abatements ....................................................................................... .... Personnel Board and Director ............................................................................................ 47 Ia 1 SAFETY SERVICES Reports of: PoliceDepartment .......................................................................................................... 48 AnimalControl ........................................................................................................... 49 FireDepartment ............................................................................................................. 50 AmbulanceDivision ..................................................................................................... 52 CivilDefense ......................................................... .................... Emergency Preparedness Program ................................. ............. 53 Department of Weights and Measures .................................................................................. 53 HUMAN SERVICES Reports of: Human Relations Commission and Fair Housing .................................................................... 54 South Middlesex Latin Emergency Service ..................... Board of Health and Health Department ................ ... 55 ................................................... Veteran's Benefits and Services .......................................................................................... 62 GravesRegistration ...................................................................................................... 62 Burial Agent ............................................................................................................... 62 Housing Authority ............................ ............. 62 Youth Services ........... .. .............................................................................................. 69 ' Cemetery Trustees (Edgell Grove) 3 EDUCATIONAL DIVISION Reports of: School Committee .................................................................... 72 . ....................................... Superintendentof Schools ................................................................................................. 72 j Elementary Ed., Secondary Ed., Pupil Personnel Services, Guidance and Social Work, Psychological Services, School Health, Dept. of Special Ed., Work Study, Transitional Bilingual A Bus. Operations Bldg. & Bldg. &Grounds South Middlesex Regional Technical School .................................... .............. 79 ........................ LibraryTrustees ............................................................................................................. 80 P Directorof Libraries ........................................................................................................ 81 PLANNING AND ENGINEERING DIVISION Reports of: PlanningDepartment .........................................................................................I............. 82 A PlanningBoard .............................................................................................................. 83 Standing Committee on Planning&Zoning ........................................................................... 85 RealProperty Committee ................................................................................................. 85 Department of Building Inspection ...................................................................................... 85 EngineeringDepartment ................................................................................................... 87 T Conservation Commission ................................................................................................ 87 T MAINTENANCE DIVISION Reports of: Superintendent of Town-Owned Buildings ............................................................................ 88 Commissioners of Public Works ......................................................................................... 88 TreeWarden .................................................................................................................. 89 Management Information Systems Board ............................................................................. 89 PARK AND RECREATION DIVISION Reports of: Park and Recreation Department Director ............................................................................ 91 ParkCommission ........................................................................................................... 91 Loring Arena Committee .................................................................... 92 i i Re i i LEGISLATIVE DIVISION Town Meeting Membership and Attendance Record ...................................................................... 93 Reports of: Government Study and Rules Committee .............................................................................. 95 CapitalBudget Committee ...................................................................................................... 95 , Re I MISCELLANEOUS Pa JurySelection ...................................................................................................................... 96 ElectionResults '86 ............................................................................................................... 96 Historical Commission ........................................................................................................... 100 4 GENERAL INFORMATION 2 TOWN OF FRAMINGHAM 2 Location: One half the distance between Boston and Worcester. I 3 Area in Square Miles: 25:65 9 Population: 61,241 0 1 Framingham, the largest municipality in the East governed by a strong Town Government structure, is strategically located at the junction of five major state routes. It is in the center of the recently titled Metro- West area in Middlesex County; this district is expanding in both the residential and commercial fields faster than any other section of the State. 2 Assessed Valuation: Real Estate 3 $2,938,991,900.00 Tax Assessed 5 47,007,823.00 5 Personal Property $59,257,800.00 i 5 Tax Assessed 1,288,855.35 7 Tax Rate Per Thousand: Residential 7 $13.88 Commercial/Industrial $21.75 Town Offices: Town Government Administration Memorial Building, Memorial Square School Administration Offices 454 Water St. 8 Library Administration 8 Main Library&Adm. — Lexington Street 9 Saxonville Branch, 10 Nicholas Rd. 9 Park & Recreation Dept. Bowditch Athletic Field House, Union Ave. Danforth Museum of Art, 123 Union Ave. Hours: Wed.-Fri. 12-4:30 p.m. Sat. & Sun. 1-4:30 p.m. Suggested admission fee: $2.00 for adults; $1.00 for sen- iors &students; 1 .50 for children 6-12 yrs. 1 For information on exhibitions and special events, call 626-0050 2 For information on special classes call 872-0858. Registration of Voters: Town Clerk's Office, Room 23, Memorial Bldg. Weekdays 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Special sessions before elections. Applicant must be an American citizen — native or naturalized, 3 18 yrs. old and a resident of Framingham. 5 5 , Registered Voters: Republicans 3,081 Democrats 12,617 Independents 13,817 Total 29,515 Polling Places: Precincts 1 &413 Hemenway School '6 Precinct 2 Potter Rd. School '6 Precinct 3 North High School (Anketell Lobby) 0 Precincts 4A, 7, & 10 Brophy School Precincts 5 &6 Walsh Middle School (Gym) 5 Precincts 8 & 9 Juniper Hill School 7 Precinct 11 Memorial Bldg. (Downstairs, right E side) N Precincts 12A& 13 Mass. Nat. Guard Bldg. Concord St. E & Normandy Rd. Precinct 12B Memorial Bldg. upstairs - right side Precinct 14 Memorial Bldg. upstairs - left side K Precinct 15 Keefe Vocational School Precinct 16 Memorial Building downstairs - right A side Precinct 17 Woodrow Wilson School A B High Schools L North High, "A" St. 620-4963 South High, Flagg Dr. 626-9192 N Middle Schools Farley, Flagg Dr. 626-9167 Walsh, Brook St. 626-9180 S, Elementary Schools Barbieri, Dudley Rd. 626-9187 Brophy, Pleasant St. 626-9158 Charlotte Dunning, Frost St. 626-9155 Fi Hemenway, Water St. 626-9149 Fi Juniper Hill, Upper Jocelyn Ave. 626-9146 ar George P. King, 454 Water St. 626-9138 Miriam McCarthy, Flagg Dr. 626-9161 Potter Rd., Potter Rd. 626-9140 Mary Stapleton, Elm St. 626-9140 Woodrow Wilson, Leland St. 626-9164 Park and Recreation Department Office: Park Department Bldg., Bowditch Field, Union Ave. Phone: 620-4834 Call for information on sports instruction classes, supervised playground and beach activities, supervised athletic events. Details on many of their programs may be obtained by checking the Sports section of the Middlesex News or by listening to W.K.O.X.-A.M. 1190 on the dial. Playgrounds: Anna Murphy, Cove& Lake Ave. Potter Rd. School Arlington St. &Gordon St. Reardon Pk., Brownlea Rd. Bates Rd., off Hollis St. Roosevelt School, Fay Rd. Brophy School St., Pleasant St. South High, Guadalcanal Rd. Butterworth Park, Grant & Bishop Walsh Middle School, Frost St. Danforth St. Woodrow Wilson School, Beaver St. Furber, Fairbanks Rd. Winch Park, "A" St. Hemenway School, Water St. Apple St., Bethany Rd. Inter-Faith, off Second St. Brookwater School, off Water St. Mason Park, Maple& Franklin Juniper Hill School, Jocelyn Ave. Mt. Wayte, Chatauqua St. Long Field, Dudley Rd. Oakvale, Burbank Cir. Temple St. Woodfield, Sloane Dr. Officials of the Park Department have organized camp activity at two locations in Town. For more information call the Park and Recreation Dept. (620-4834) late in the spring. Beach Locations: Lake Waushakum, Nipmuc Rd. Saxonville Beach, Lake Rd. Learned Pond, Shawmut Terr. Only Framingham residents and their guests are permitted to use these beaches. 6 Tennis Courts: Bowditch Field (4) Mary Dennison (4) Winch Park (6) Barbieri School (2) Butterworth Park (4) Anna Murphy, Mipmuc Rd. (2) Woodfield (2) Farley Middle School (2) Walsh Middle School (4) Framingham State College (10) Keefe Vocational School (4) Attendants at Winch, Bowditch & Walsh, July- Labor Day Athletic Fields Bowditch Field, 475 Union Ave. Baseball, Football, Track, Hockey& Ice Skating, Tennis & Basketball Long Field, Dudley Rd. Softball (Little League), Baseball, Playground equipment Mary Dennison, Beaver St. 2 Softball Fields, Baseball, Football, Soccer, Playground equipment Winch Park, "A" St. Baseball, Softball, Soccer, Lacrosse, Playground equipment, Basketball South High School Baseball, Softball, Soccer, Lacrosse, Playground equipment, Basketball Walsh Field, Brook St. Baseball, Softball, Soccer, Track, Tennis, Playground equipment, Basketball Farm Pond Cookout Area, Dudley Rd. Fireplaces, Picnic Tables & Benches available for Framingham residents. Permits for their use by organizations and groups must be obtained in advance at the Park & Recreation office. 'ised the ion. 7 SOURCES OF INFORMATION Emergency 911 Fire Department 620-4951 Police Department 872-1212 Emergency Calls for Home Heating Fuel: South Middlesex Opportunity Council 620-1230 R; Animals, Inspection of Dog Officer 620-4870 Assessments Assessor's Office 620-4858 Bicycle Licenses Police Dept. 620-4920 JC Bills, Payment of Town Accountant 620-4825 Jc Birth Certificates Town Clerk 620-4862 P] Building Permits Building Official 620-4838 By-Laws Town Clerk 620-4862 Callahan Senior Center, Lexington St. 620-4819 Chamber of Commerce (So. Middlesex), 600 Worcester Rd. 879-5600 M Checks Town Treasurer 620-4868 Death Certificates Town Clerk 620-4862 Dog Control Dog Officer 620-4870 Dog Licenses Town Clerk 620-4862 A� Election Information Town Clerk 620-4862 Entertainment Licenses Selectmen's Office 620-4811 Executive-Administrator Selectmen's Office 620-4811 Fishing& Hunting Licenses Town Clerk 620-4862 Health Information Health Department 620-4827 Jc Hospital, Framingham Union, Lexington St. 879-7111 Housing Authority, Brady Dr. 879-7562 Investigation (Police Dept.) Detective Bureau 620-4923 Library(Adm. Office), Lexington St. 879-3570 Lt Licenses (Marriage) Town Clerk 620-4862 (F Licenses (Liquor, Vendors) Selectmen's Office 620-4811 Lights (Street) Selectmen's Office 620-4811 Milk Inspection Health Department 620-4827 Mortgages, Personal Property Town Clerk 620-4862 A; Park&Recreation Programs Park & Recreation Office 620-4834 Plumbing Permits Health Department 620-4827 Purchasing Agent Purchasing Dept. 620-4805 Rape Unit Police Department 620-4923 At Resident Listing Town Clerk 620-4862 Schools, Supt. of, Water St. 620-9117 Sewers Public Works, Sewer Div. 620-4899 Streets Public Works, Highway Div. 620-4891 Dc Taxes, Information on Tax Collector 620-4866 Town Counsel Office in Memorial Bldg. 620-4802 Tree Maintenance Tree Department 620-4832 Veterans' Benefits Office in Memorial Bldg. 620-4842 Jo Voting Registration Town Clerk 620-4862 Ra Water Division Public Department 620-4897 Weights&Measures, Sealer of 620-4838 Wiring Permits Building Official 620-4838 Mi Jo. Wi 8 TOWN OF FRAMINGHAM TOWN OFFICIALS TOWN MEETING MODERATOR (Elected) Richard Allen Term expires 1987 70 SELECTMEN 58 (Elected) 20 John F. King Term expires 1987 25 John F. DelPrete Term expires 1988 62 Philip B. Ernst Term expires 1989 38 62 EXECUTIVE-ADMINISTRATOR i 19 (Appointed by Selectmen) N Matthew P. Clarke Term expires 1988 58 52 CHIEF OF POLICE 70 (Appointed by Selectmen) 52 52 Arthur F. Martins Term indefinite I I FIRE CHIEF I I (Appointed by Selectmen) i2 Retiring in May 1987 ?7 John J. Hancock Term indefinite II i2 CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR !3 (Appointed by Selectmen) �0 Lt. Dominic Ferrazzi Term indefinite i2 (Framingham Police Dept.) 1 � TOWN COUNSEL 1 (Appointed by Selectmen) '2 Aaron Bikofsky Term expires 1989 q '7 TOWN ACCOUNTANT �5 (Appointed by Selectmen) 3 Arthur F. Gallagher Term expires 1987 2 7 TOWN TREASURER&TAX COLLECTOR 9 (Appointed by Selectmen) I Donald J. Croatti Term indefinite 6 2 TOWN ASSESSORS 2 (Appointed by Selectmen) 2 John Liberatore Term expires 1989 2 Randolph Kincaid Term expires 1987 1 8 TOWN CLERK B � (Elected) Michael J. Ward Term expires 1987 DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL (Appointed by Personnel Board) John Harland Term expires 1987 PURCHASING AGENT (Appointed by Selectmen) William B. Forrestal Term expires 1987 9 - i BUILDING COMMISSIONER (Appointed by Selectmen) Richard P. McIntosh Term expires 1988 Ann Dan, PLANNING DIRECTOR Luk( (Appointed by Selectmen) Frederick S. Taintor Term expires 1989 HOUSING AUTHORITY DIRECTOR Hen( (Appointed by Housing Authority) Rayr John P. Murphy Term indefinite Rayr Rob( TOWN ENGINEER Rob( (Appointed by Selectmen) Fred Sergeant Term expires 1987 ASST. TOWN ENGINEER Ann( (Appointed by Selectmen) Henr Joseph Champagne Term indefinite JoAr Char DIRECTOR, PARKS & RECREATION Geor (Appointed by Park Commission) Clar( William D. Carey Term expires 1988 Barb Sheil DIRECTOR, PUBLIC HEALTH John (Appointed by Board of Health) Phyll Robert T. Cooper Term indefinite Edw, Karel DIRECTOR, VETERANS' BENEFITS & SERVICES (Appointed by Selectmen) James R. Gavin Term indefinite Wald EXEC.-ADM. HUMAN RELATIONS Josel (Appointed by Selectmen) Mild( Ria McNiff Term indefinite Mary Dern CALLAHAN SR. CENTER DIRECTOR Edwa Albert McCarthy, Interim Dir. Bruct SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS (Appointed by School Committee) Retiring in July 1987 Paul Rigas Rigopoulos Term indefinite John Robe DIRECTOR OF LIBRARIES Henr (Appointed by Library Trustees) John James C. Flaherty Term indefinite Richa COMMISSIONERS OF PUBLIC WORKS (Elected) Anthony M. Colonna Term expires 1987 Clair( William Dickson Term expires 1988 Dianr Agnes C. Esty Term expires 1989 John David DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS Dana (Appointed by Commissioners of Public Works) James Hanscom Term indefinite DIRECTOR OF TREE DEPT., PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION Willia (Appointed by Selectmen) Robei William Tupper Term expires 1988 Edwa Andr( 10 BOARD OF HEALTH (Elected) Ann G. Arvedon Term expires 1987 Dana E. Cunningham Luke Tedeschi Term expires 1988 Term expires 1989 PARK COMMISSION (Elected) Henry Brandolini Term expires 1987 Raymond Garbarino Term expires 1987 Raymond Swanecamp, Jr. Term expires 1988 Robert J. Salvi Term expires 1988 Robert L. Brown Term expires 1989 TRUSTEES OF LIBRARIES (Elected) Anne P. Foran Term expires 1987 Henry B. Fortier Term expires 1987 JoAnne Thompson Term expires 1987 Charles Sposato Term expires 1987 George P. King, Jr. Term expires 1988 Clare F. Friel Term expires 1988 Barbara Wilson Term expires 1988 Sheila Burke Fair Term expires 1988 John L. Hinter Term expires 1989 Phyllis Jachowicz Term expires 1989 Edward J. Burton Term expires 1989 Karen Kiley LaChance Term expires 1989 SCHOOL COMMITTEE (Elected) Waldo B. Lyon Term expires 1987 Joseph P. Conlon Term expires 1987 Mildred L. Katzman Term expires 1987 { Mary DiManno Term expires 1988 Dennis W. Cardiff Term expires 1988 j Edward W. Foran Term expires 1989 I Bruce E. Cohen Term expires 1989 j REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE (Framingham Representatives—Elected) Paul J. Farley Term expires 1987 John J. Donovan Term expires 1987 Robert T. L. Merusi Term expires 1988 Henry B. Fortier Term expires 1988 John J. Regan Term expires 1989 Richard J. McDonald Term expires 1989 PLANNING BOARD (Elected) Claire Burke Cahill Term expires 1987 Dianne M. Shea Term expires 1988 John Acton Term expires 1989 David D. Nobilini Term expires 1990 Dana E. Cunningham Term expires 1991 HOUSING AUTHORITY (Elected) William D. Oleson Term expires 1987 Robert Jachowikz Term expires 1987 Edward W. Convery Term expires 1989 Andrew J. Rogers Term expires 1991 w i I 11 1 PERSONNEL BOARD (Appointed by Moderator) Alan Kaplan, Ch. Term expires 1987 Raymond Meserve Term expires 1988 Norman Powers Term expires 1988 Deborah Blumer (Rep. of Finance Com.) Term expires 1988 David Bell Term expires 1989 Barry Bograd Term expires 1989 ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS Se: (Appointed by Selectmen) wa William F. Celorier, Jr. Term expires 1987 as John Flynn Term expires 1988 Arnold D. Mindick Term expires 1989 scl ASSOC. ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS reg (Appointed by Selectmen) In Margaret Carlson Term expires 1988 cai Joseph Tosti Term expires 1989 vac i FINANCE COMMITTEE the (Appointed by Moderator) Albert Cullen Term expires 1987 ST Robert Halliday Term expires 1987 Ar. James Dwyer Term expires 1988 Jol Ronald A. Porter Term expires 1988 Peter TenBroeck Term expires 1988 CQ L. Ward Franzen Term expires 1989 Deborah Blumer Term expires 1989 dui Esther A.H. Hopkins Term expires 1989 An CAPITAL BUDGET COMMITTEE (Appointed by Moderator) 1 Placido Andronico Term expires 1987 F Marc Alpert Term expires 1988 John McPhie Term expires 1988 Harriet Wittenborg Term expires 1989 c Michael Fabbri Term expires 1989 COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS FE] (Elected) 1 Alan F. Harrington Term expires 1987 in Richard W. Hohmann Term expires 1988 aut. in F TRUSTEES OF EDGELL GROVE CEMETERY ( (Elected) Y Sally M. Brown Term expires 1987 F Julian T. Hargraves, Jr. Term expires 1988 F George Willis Term expires 1989 Nancy F. Bianchi Term expires 1990 E Geoffrey E. Fitts Term expires 1991 Fed Tov CEMETERY TRUSTEES F (Appointed by Selectmen) Edward Wheet Term expires 1989 on Joseph Croci Term expires 1989 Act imp Orlo H. Coots Term expires 1989 thrc be a Fed pro; aid may D strai 12 ANNUAL REPORT OF been proved that form and structure is secondary to the efforts of people in maintaining stability and 7 THE BOARD OF progress. Without the contribution of dedicated 8SELECTMEN employees and large numbers of volunteers, Fra- 8 mingham would lose its place of prominence in 8 FOR THE YEAR OF 1986 MetroWest. On behalf of all our citizens, the Board 9 of Selectmen thank everyone who contributes to mak- 9 ing our Town a great place to live and work. During their April 14, 1986 meeting, the Board of Selectmen reorganized for the next year. John F. King was elected Chairman with Philip B. Ernst designated TOWN CLERK 7 as Clerk. John F. DelPrete completed the membership. 8 The Board met weekly except for an alternate week 9 I respectively submit my Annual Report for the schedule during the summer months. A total of 44 regular meetings and one special meeting were held. year of 1986. Framingham registered voters had the In addition, three evenings were spent interviewing opportunity to vote with the new electronic voting 8 candidates for the Police Department to fill seven machines on the April 7th Town Election. At this vacant positions. election 2,515 registered voters went to the polls and 9 voted for the candidates of their choice. The State Streets layed out by the Selectmen and accepted at Primary was held on September 16th, 1986 with 757 the Annual Town Meeting were: Republicans and 4,905 Democrats voting at this time. STREET FROM TO The State Election was held on November 4th and 7 Arthur Street Willis Street End 18,323 voters cast their ballots at this time. 8 John McQuinn Waveney Road Cul de Sac The Annual Town Meeting was held on April 23rd, 8 Circle 1986 with a warrant of thirty-nine articles which were 8 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ACT — PL93-383 completed in five sessions. There was one zoning by- 9 Community Development Funds totalled $513,249 lav`' (Article 36) and this was approved by the Attor- 9 during 1986. These funds were allocated by the ney General on May 19, 1986. Four special town 9 Annual Town Meeting for: meetings were called this year — the first one being Administration $ 74,150 on January 28, 1986 consisting of eight articles and Housin completed in one session. The one zoning by-law was 1 g 259,750 approved by the Attorney General on February 11, Public Facilities Improvement 85,000 1986 (Article 4). On March 25, 1986 a special meeting 8 Acquisition 15,000 0000 was held and had three articles approved and was 3 Transportation 5 9 Services completed in one night. A warrant with eight articles 23,500 was called for June 17th and one zoning by-law (Arti- 9 Contingency 5,849 cle 6) was approved by the Attorney General on FEDERAL REVENUE SHARING August 4, 1986. The last special meeting was held on The final payment of revenue sharing was received October 21, 1986. This warrant consisted of thirty- in October, 1986. The 1986 Annual Town Meeting three articles and completed in five sessions. Six zon- 3 authorized use of the funds expected to be available ing by-law articles were sent to the Attorney General in Fiscal Year 1987, to finance operating expenses of: and he approved them on January 13, 1987 (Articles Council on Aging Operating Budget $193,328 25, 27, 28, 30, 32, and 33); two general by-laws (Arti- Youth Commission Operating Budget 80,941 cles 5 and 6) were also approved at that time. 7 Human Relations Operating Budget 75,672 I Police Department Salaries 750000 Total revenue collected by this office was 3 $59,895.37 and this was turned over to the Town 1 Total $1,100,,000 Treasurer. This sum included the dog fees which Detailed records of receipts and expenditures of amounted to $1,421.75, fish and game fees were l Federal Revenue Sharing funds are available in the $936.15. The monies collected for the upkeep of the Town Treasurer's office. dog kennel was $1,894.00 and the balance of this For the past several years, State Aid has increased amount was from the daily transaction of this office. 1 on a regular basis, reflecting the healthy economy. Vital statistics recorded for 1986 were as follows: 1 Action of the voters in the November election Resident births were 732, resident deaths were 556 I mposed a limit on the funds which can be raised and resident marriages were 387. Total registered vot- through taxation. The result of this limitation could ers for 1986 were 29,515. be a leveling of State Aid, if not a reduction. Loss of Respectfully submitted, Federal Revenue Sharing funds combined with the Michael J. Ward, Town Clerk prospect of no increase or even possible decreases in aid could mean that maintaining current service levels may be impossible in the near future. During the years of adjustment to the fiscal con- straints of Proposition 2V2 and rapid growth, it has 13 ADMINISTRATIVE DEPARTMENTS f TREASURER/COLLECTOR To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and an increase of $168,000.00 for Fiscal 1986, the reason i The Citizens of the Town of Framingham: being, prompt collections and immediate investment I present herewith my report of taxes, assessments of all monies collected. and departmental bills collected in the Fiscal year Once again we did not have to borrow funds in 1986, for the period July 1, 1985 thru June 30, 1986. anticipation of Revenue. The Treasurer/Collector's Office is proud of its My sincere thanks to fellow department heads, and collection results and continues to strive for improve- my dedicated employees for their help and co-opera- ment. Although we again, saw significant drops in tion this past year. interest rates, our interest earnings increased to Very truly yours, $625,000.00 on general interest and $196,000.00 on Donald J. Croatti Collectors interest, for a total of $821,000.00. This is Treasurer/Collector 1986 Real Estate Taxes $42,897,157.90 1986 Personal Property 1,257,470.20 I 1985 Real Estate Taxes 1,084,817.68 1985 Personal Property 40,930.07 I 1984 Real Estate Taxes 122,474.94 1984 Personal Property 866.27 1983 Personal Property 66.48 I 1979 Personal Property 316.20 I 1986 Motor Vehicle Excise 2,255,410.49 F 1985 Motor Vehicle Excise 1,512,122.25 1984 Motor Vehicle Excise 59,021.24 1983 Motor Vehicle Excise 3,848.14 Public Works Incinerator 355,653.94 Water Rates 1,840,369.26 Water Misc. 26,288.32 Water Liens 1986 56,757.66 Water Liens 1985 7,239.54 Water Liens 1984 1,228.55 Sewer Rates 1,645,614.29 Sewer Misc. 28,822.32 Sewer Liens 1986 33,533.09 Sewer Liens 1985 4,324.70 Sewer Liens 1984 797.70 Interest on Taxes 187,002.91 Interest on Excise 9,356.73 Paid After Abatement 36,452.85 Fees 82,205.31 Cost on Taxes 2,549.40 Cost on Motor Vehicle 21,117.30 Misc. Cost 48.00 $53,573,863.73 14 ANNUAL FISCAL REPORT OF THE TOWN TREASURER Cash Book Balance, Audited July 1, 1985 $11,865,238.76 �n Cash Receipts Fiscal Year 1986 91,148,527.37 it $103,013,766.13 in Cash Disbursements, Fiscal Year 1986 $87,693,285.94 id Cash Book Balance July 1, 1986 15,320,480.19 x- $103,013,766.13 S, ti 'r FINANCIAL REPORT FEDERAL REVENUE SHARING Balance, Per Audit June 30, 1985 $ 438,782.75 Cash Receipts from U.S. Government 1,193,954.00 Interest Earned 69,651.16 Total Available Funds $1,702,387.91 j Less Expended on Approved Warrants 990,962.77 Balance June 30, 1986 711,425.14 Federal Funds Invested 711,425.14 Respectfully Submitted, Donald J. Croatti Town Treasurer I 1 15 TOWN ACCOUNTANT EXHIBIT 1 BALANCE SHEET JUNE 30, 1985 ASSETS AND OTHER DEBITS LIABILITIES,RESERVES,AND FUND BALANCE CASH AND INVESTMENTS LIABILITIES Cash—General 541,497,242.55 Agency Control(Schedule 1) S 283,280.24 Cash—Revenue Sharing 711,425.14 Temporary Loans Investment—Block Grant 111,812.50 Bond Antic.Note 325,000.00 Petty Cash 250.00 Antic.of Reimbursement 66,000.00 TOTAL CASH AND INVESTMENTS 515,320,730.19 TOTAL LIABILITIES 5674,280.24 REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES RESERVES Real Estate Petty Cash S 250.00 FY 86 51,480,949.01 Motor Vehicle Excise 1,129,214.98 FY85 186,768.13 Water Receivables 304,885.84 FY84 31.78 Sewer Receivables 233,682.25 1,667,748.92 Departmental Receivables 347,848.81 Intergovernmental Receivables 3,845,792.46 Peraoaal Property Tax Title/Foreclosure 130,851.62 FY86 57,338.30 Taxes Deferral 7,982.65 FY85 22,306.73 Total Reserves 6,000,508.61 FY84&Prior 135,011.08 214,656.11 PROVISION FOR TOTAL REAL AND PERSONAL ABATEMENTS AND PROPERTY 1,882,405.03 EXEMPTIONS 1,492,981.42 Loam Authorized and Unissued 2,400,000.00 MOTOR VEHICLE EXCISE Levy of 86 811,955.81 FUND BALANCE Levy of 85 140,059.23 Surplus Unrestricted 8,310,366.94 Levy of 84&Prior 177,199.94 Encumbrances 3,199,407.70 TOTAL MOTOR VEHICLE Over/Underestimated(Sch.4) 57,562.56 EXCISE 1,129,214,98 Overlay Surplus 80,000.74 TOTAL GENERAL FUND WATER RECEIVABLES BALANCE(Exhibit 2) 11,647,337.94 Rates 281,957.06 Revenue Sharing Restricted 711,635.73 Miscellaneous 18,656.98 Liens 4,271.80 Revenue Sharing Encumbrances 751.69 TOTAL WATER RECEIVABLES 304,885.84 TOTAL REVENUE SHARING FUND BALANCE(Exhibit 3) 712,387.42 SEWER RECEIVABLES Total Grant Fund Balance Rates 217,442.00 (Exhibit 4) 1,508,322.70 Miscellaneous 13,947.05 Total Revolving/Reserved/Reserved Funds Liens 2,293.20 8 TOTAL SEWER RECEIVABLES 233,682.25 (Exhibit 5) 1,231,987.31 Total Trust Funds Balance DEPARTMENT RECEIVABLES 347,848.81 (Exhibit 6) 353,492.6' TOTAL LIABILITIES, INTERGOVERNMENTAL RESERVES,AND FUND RECEIVABLES 3,917,121.31 BALANCES $26,021,298.31 TAX TITLE/FORECLOSURE 130,851.62 TAX DEFERRAL 7,982.65 OTHER DEBITS Overlay Deficit 68.70 Prepaid Vacation 21,506.93 Loans Authorized 2,725,000.00 TOTAL OTHER DEBITS 2,746,575.63 TOTAL ASSETS AND OTHER DEBITS 526,021,298.31 16 LONG-TERM DEBT BALANCESHEET JUNE 30, 1986 Net Funded or Fixed Debt 53,840,000.00 Debt Inside Limit $2,755,000.00 Debt Outside Limit 1,085,000.00 TOTAL $3,840,000.00 53,840,000.00 AMORTIZATION SCHEDULE LONG-TERM DEBT JUNE 30, 1986 Dae in FY Principal Interest Total 87 S 930,000.00 $193,197.50 $1,123,197.50 88 900,000.00 142,425.00 1,042,425.00 24 89 650,000.00 97,150.00 747,150.00 90-93 1,360,000.00 106,875.00 1,466,875.00 $3,840,000.00 5539,647.50 54,379,647.50 3.61 1.4; ).00 ?.6' 1.31 f C 17 EXHIBIT 2 STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE JUNE 30, 1986 Variance Favorable Funs REVENUES (Schedule 2) Budget Actual (Unfavorable Real and Personal Property Taxes FY 85 Add (Net of 1,493,249.00 Overlay) $44,717,203.00 $44,752,791.46 $ 35,588.465 Motor Vehicle Excise 2,962,000.00 3,774,770.02 812,770.0: Licenses 285,000.00 313,841.98 28,841.9E Fines 453,000.00 454,636.77 1,636.7 A4 General Government 102,000.00 109,007.86 7,007.8E Protection/Persons& Property 404,000.00 445,199.39 41,199.35 Less Health and Sanitation 1,656,000.00 2,262,031.96 606,031.9E Highway 39,000.00 17,875.75 (21,124.2' Fun( Library/School 46,000.00 35,516.69 (10,483.31 Recreation 196,000.00 199,584.83 3,584.8: Interest 520,000.00 625,831.69 105,831.65 Public Enterprise 1,558,000.00 1,940,791.59 382,791.55 In Lieu of Taxes 162,000.00 209,234.32 47,234.3 Interest/Costs on Taxes 367,000.00 377,958.53 10,958.5: Refunds Prior Year + Miscellaneous 66,000.00 244,978.44 178,978.4+ Cherry Sheet 13,906,307.00 13,880,064.68 (26,242.3 Other Financial Sources: Bonding 325,000.00 325,000.00 — Other 504,857.00 523,541.89 18,684.84 Net Change Tax Title 78,185.83 78,185.83 TOTAL REVENUES $68,269,367.00 $70,570,843.68 $2,301,476.61 EXPENDITURES (Schedule 3) General Government 9,433,408.14 8,479,262.95 954,145.14 Protection/Persons& Property 10,077,977.93 9,819,312.03 258,665.9E Health 258,374.97 252,935.33 5,439.64 Public Works 9,761,303.04 8,933,193.13 828,109.91 Park and Recreation 926,403.33 890,294.84 36,108.44 Miscellaneous Depts. 25,966.00 19,658.07 6,307.9.' Human Services 40,690.60 40,325.70 364. Unclassified 7,187,712.10 7,112,813.56 364. Library 1,188,316.66 1,166,928.54 21,388.1 School 29,678,095.82 29,215,172.67 462,923.1 Other Financing Uses State/County Assessments (Schedule 4) 1,862,331.00 1,804,768.44 57,562.5 Overlay Deficit 113,951.00 113,950.50 .5 TOTAL EXPENDITURES $70,554,530.59 $67,848,615.76 $2,705,914.8. Excess of Revenues over Expenditures (2,285,163.59) 2,722,277.92 5,007,391.51 Fund Balance 7/1/85 8,925,110.02 8,925,110.02 — Fund Balance 6/30/86 $ 6,639,946.43 $11,647,337.94 $5,007,391.51 :l 18 EXHIBIT 3 REVENUE SHARING STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS, DISBURSEMENTS AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE net FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1986 able Fund Balance 7/1/85 able $ 438,782.75 Add: Revenue 464 Entitlements $1,193,954.00 L0: Interest 69,651.16 1,263,605.16 .9E 7• Available 1,702,387.91 '.8( QLess Expenditures (Schedule 5) 990,000.49 .9( (.2( Fund Balance 6/30/86 $ 712,387.42 .31 8i .6S .5S .3: S: .4� .3: .8S .8: 6 i i .9( .6= .9. .4< .9: A � A .1: .1` .5c .5i .8: 5 5 19 EXHIBIT 4 Set GRANTFUNDS 1 STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS, DISBURSEMENTS l AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE TC FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1986 WS Balance Transfers Balani 7/1/85 Receipts Dr(Cr) Expenditures 6/30/1 TO GENERAL GOVERNMENT MBTA Reimbursement $ 49,534.75 $ 57,271.98 $ $ 86,160.43 $ 20,646,; SCHI State Census 32,162.20 14,709.51 17,452;Do; Energy Resources 7,745.72 6,007.58 13,415.17 338. Enc Right To Know Law 5,895.00 5,895. Tea Waushakum Pond (Clean Lake) 3,409.27 3,409.27 Sch Off Street Parking Program 111,795.04 82,686,96 29,108. Bro Bar TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT $ 95,337.67 $ 178,483.87 $ — $ 200,381.34 $ 73,440.; Dui Her HUMAN SERVICES Jun COA Grants Mc( #3 46.45 46.45 Pot #5 1,261.78 1,261.78 Stal #6 8,169.84 8,132.11 31: Wil: #7 4,165.26 4,165.26 Met #8 16,888.00 5,999.46 10,888, Met #9 3,000.00 3 000. Cha Title III 3,859.40 3,188.20 '671. Cha Villers Foundation 7,853.40 5,558.25 2295. Cha Villers Foundation #2 1,97880 1:978 .8 Grai DECS (2,211.18) 19,592.78 25,577.79 (8,196. Con CCOP 7,748.65 21,829.48 21,498.10 8,080. Con Arts Lottery 7,102.88 21,620.00 18,315.84 10,401. Diff TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES $ 34,137.08 $ 88,768.46 $ — $ 93,743.24 $ 29,162. Diff Ease E.C. LIBRARY E.C. Dog Fund 3.00 1,008.50 292.50 719. E.C. Library Network 209,123.86 21,023.00 230,146.86 Extr (Operating Acc't) 379.63 379.63 Sum LSCA 525.54 490.37 35. In St Intro TOTAL LIBRARY 209,652.40 21,402.63 1,008.50 231,309.36 754. Job Re-E MISCELLANEOUS RefuSkill Block Grant 78,847.31 681,799.87 4,731.88 667,467.07 97,911: Tran Grants Affiliated With Block Grant 4,731.88 (4,731.88) Tran Dr. Palmer 65.98 65, Care. TOTAL MISCELLANEOUS $ 83,645.17 $ 681,799.87 — $ 667,467.07 $ 97,971. Catal Voca PUBLIC WORKS Com; Highway Cont Art#32 - '85-Chap. 90 102.29 102.29 Disac Chapter 335 48,866.23 2,459.76 34,889.49 16,436 Dist. Chapter 637 443,947.22 34,083.03 8,713.46 469,316 E.C.] Chapter 811 305,548.74 305,548. Extra Art #31 - '86 Chap 90 191,101.00 191,101.00 Sumr Fram TOTAL HIGHWAY $ 492,915.74 $ 533,192.53 $ — $ 234,806.24 $ 791,302. Incen Incen E.C.I -J 20 Sewer Farm Pond A22 '81 25,222.42 3,623.63 21 598.79 Inspections 119,854.00 119,854.00 TOTAL SEWER $ 25,222.42 $ 119,854.00 $ - $ 123,477.63 $ 21,598.79 Water Isa Art #33-'85 -Town Water 296,171.50 256,258.86 39,912.64 0/1 TOTAL WATER $ - $ 296,171.50 $ - $ 256,258.86 $ 39,912.64 SCHOOL DEPT. 16'. Dog Tax ii, 2,830.89 1,008.50 2,373.00 1,466.39 18 Energy Resource 2,685.31 2,685.31 15 Teachers Pay 211,581.00 211,581.00 School Improvement Council 42,500.00 (42,500.00) 18 Brophy School 5,890.00 4,847.64 1,042.36 Barbieri School 6,710.00 6,058.53 651.47 4- Dunning School 4,610.00 4,606.54 3.46 Hemenway School 4,360.00 3,812.51 547.49 Juniper Hill School 4,250.00 4,248.97 1.03 ` McCarthy School 5,340.00 3,119.08 2,220.92 Potter Rd. School 4,260.00 4,152.65 107.35 Stapleton 3,820.00 2,613.42 1,206.58 Wilson Sch000lol 3,260.00 2,874.75 385.25 Metco Unassigned 184,151.23 388,831.83 (23,147.34) 335,108.02 214,727.70 ,g Metco Assigned 23,147.34 23,147.34 0. Chap I Comp Co-op '84 27,144.63 43,846.00 (30,147.49) 39,893.14 950.00 1. Chap I Comp Co-op '85 100,003.00 95,126.53 139,587.02 55,542.51 5 Chap I Comp Co-op '86 64,979.04 (64,979.04) g Grant Related Comp Co-op Inc 1,950.00 1,305.80 644.20 6 Comp. Repair& Mtc. ? 6,140.00 3,450.44 2,689.56 ;� E 0 Continuim '86 258,230.00 241,235.90 16,944.10 ; 7. Diffusion 85 9,141.63 29,644.99 38,368.09 418.53 Diffusion '86 42,684.05 37,780 + 2. .14 4,903.91 Ease '86. + 72,266.86 62,155.43 10,111.43 E.C.I.A. Public '84 ( 29) 29 , . E.C.I.A. Public '85 279289 1,146.98 3,433.90 505.97 ` 9, E.C.I.A. Public '86 29,152.50 28,827.47 325.03 Extra Chance '86 399,385.00 (8,704.00) 335,692.81 54,988.19 Summer Prep '86 40,258.00 8,704.00 3,038.72 45,923.28 5. In Service Ed. Grant 6,942.00 6,000.00 942.00 Intro. To Compute Drafting '86 11,694.00 11,180.80 513.20 4 Job Site '86 2,408.00 297.46 2,110.54 Re-Entry '86 26,921.49 24,776.08 2,145.41 Refugee Children Trans '84 34.55 33.47 1.08 Skill Training '86 2,408.00 228.24 2,179.76 `r 1 Trans Prog Refugee Children '85 1,304.31 Trans Prog Refugee Children '86 1,129.80 174.51 s Career Counseling Expl. '85 1,401.42 13,705.49 1 1,612.49 3,093.00 ! 1. Catalyst '85 1,401.42 80 Vocabulary Development '85 196.90 225. 196.9595 1 Computer Tech Update '85 89.85 89.85 Continuim '85 26,193.29 1,904.00 28,097.29 Disadvantaged '85 7,117.00 7,117.00 Dist. Ed '85 .17 .17 E.C.I.A. Private '85 1,146.98 (1,146.98) j 1 Extra Chance'85 22,723.49 (3,241.00) 19,482.49 Summer Prep '85 32 700.05 3,241.00 35,941.05 1 Fram. Writing Project '85 221.46 221.46 Incentive Grant '85 Incentive Grant '86 699.00 699.00 E•C•I•A. Private '86 12,215.00 12,215.00 ; 5,060.50 4,235.05 825.45 21 Nutrition Learning Ctr. '85 482.76 482.76 Pride Basic '85 15.29 58,992.67 59,007.96 Training '85 249.53 249.53 Re-Entry '85 1,052.01 1,052.01 Special Ed. '85 6,146.97 6,146.97 Substance Abuse Trng. '8( 1,475.00 1,475.00 Vocab. Develop. '86 1,475.00 1,475.00 TOTAL SCH OOL $ 387,054.22 $1,819,031.66 1,008.50 $1,752,919.78 $ 454,1741 TOTAL GRANTS $1,327,964.70 $3,738,704.52 2,017.00 $3,560,363.52 $1,508,322.' v G z c tn > M ur � w :za w � z a 0 w a 22 00 0 O M 8 00 N 00 00 M 00 I I I I t wq I w 00 00 yq N pp� O O4 ID M M O O O N M 000 000 O, Qa, N N 00 I- W) �I t� 00 N f � vl v1 V1 V'1 M J 6A M r M � N N I I v1 N N '� N 9 1 .' b9 ei! er9 � I V 00 00 M M Q p r r Y1 M 00 M M 4 4 V1 h 1 Q�n Mem MEA 00 00 60q boq p� p� i a N 888O� � 7 8O O � S � w U O Y O N N 000 ONO 10 ;7 r vi vl �G 7A z M oG ^ � � �l („yQ bogq r N m M r�i 0 p ^ N Amo .n > Az � 8 8 8 8 8 8 z 0.4 F-4 8 S wl ,a., z N ^ I N N I tAf xawzw M Gil z C00 g et ^ N 00 O O z x U 00 g a c\ 00 M - ^ a boq zboq w � a r o 0 ~ U u I QU O C O of u H 41 y D U C A N Y NUQ 'u = oG eW oo c O G O C O .� 30 O .0. � '� •� .O N p !! -6 O a 7 v' uF-- cowrxv, ` aa ° .0 V) as = �° ¢ s 23 o N V I OHO^ 00 ppppp ��pp �pp b9 � `� 8000 �D `GNrnvi ... 0 -- tom o0ef r. rn ry V o0 1/l "D O M 1p o0 v 00 r O� XQ NOOpp�� NO+ v1 -- a0fn �p00 00 o0oNrn � O -•goo � oNOM � 000 �+ 7 O vii per+ m � Mro o 00 h f` N t+en � 0% r+ Edwa wq W, Cente Old S 'T 4n 00 00 o� N o ri -. 'Wt 'Rt n v Frost E o� oov '": IR gro �or` rr, v� r` N o OidB °' Orn 1n a� r� rn 00 O p� Net o� oo r— 1n �p 00 6 Oo �p 8o� vinONrrviNNO Mellec N O� N et �D N 00 O 00 r oo t� -=of = IT Phipp. Stone Conse Scott 1 g = � 000 - 0 10p C, � � � g o o Partric va M rn 00^ r- � N Oo rn 0C 00 C14 C71 � v W) 0000 0 W) � N Total o o ^ Io 00 00 o) o0 a _ 0 00 0 0� � N N ^ `ct to 1n O, C,4 �p a M � C4 C4 en tM r4 (7, f` r- 8 yy O vl N O ^ ^ M et � b9 &05 S S S w r � n et C O O r rA N N I ���pp [r .. . O fA y� ppppp pp pp b9 v00 00 80Q90g0 � � ef � vr N8O 1nN W) 00 et O N O f-- 000 � M 0M NT 00 en N N N N 00 vvi C� r N ^ N v I N ON oo v� ry G O 1n b9 _^ 6q v� O z p V1 Q c a > 0 ¢ E U ° � O _ > E ocW5 0 � u � oo ° Eao ° 0o O ; ° cti C •-^ ' O U ° r Y c y " >,• � c u 3 a Q r�n � au U � -°� v°, Z< < zWa` Uc� m3 n 24 EXHIBIT 6 TRUST FUNDS STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS, DISBURSEMENTS AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1986 Balance Balance 7/1/85 Receipts Disbursements 6/30/86 Edwards Cemetery $ 19,712.27 _ Center Common 614.60 $ 1,125.49 $ $ 20,889.37 Old South Cemetery 1 12489 104.05 640.09 Frost Cemetery . — 1,228.94 Old Burial Ground 202.11 36.78 — 238.89 Mellen Fund 9,172.06 487.41 — 9,659.47 Phipps Fund 4,578.19 1,289.81 603.65 5,264.35 Stone Fund 599.76 745.00 245.00 1,099.76 Conservation Fund 686.25 1,292.00 1,675.00 303.25 Scott Fund 15,029.45 1,152.52 243.70 15,938.27 I 288,429.00 30,788.29 28,541.97 290,675.32 Partridge Fund � 10,110.37 671.77 3,227.18 7,554.96 Total $350,258.95 $37,770.22 $34,536.50 $353,492.67 6 2; SCHEDULE 1 AGENCY ACCOUNTS STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS, DISBURSEMENTS AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1986 Real FY Balance Balani Persa Federal Tax 7/1/85 Receipts Disbursements 6/30/E FY State Tax $(200,722.36) $ 6,918,058.45 $6,971,533.16 $(254,247,( ( 67,115.60) 2,187,508.98 2,202,600.84 Les Group Insurance 287,401.28 1,010,748.33 929,587.69 (368,561.E County Dog 4,019.30 3,984.75 4,250.25 3,753.E Tailings 16,095.42 11,164.86 75.50 271184.' Moto Water Deposits 28,864.57 58,382.92 31,244.11 56,003.: FY Sewer Deposits 18,750.00 62,321.19 29,735.30 51,335.E FY Trench Deposits 74,670.00 33,200.00 3,200.00 104,670,( FY Bid Deposits 8,225.00 FY Bid Deposits Legal _10,000.00 1,700.00 11,7 8'225 00.00 Planning Escrow 43,914.96 610.00 44,524.96 TOTAL AGENCY — Licem $(224,052.57) $10,2879679.48 $10,228,451.81 $ 283,280.2 Sele Tom Plar Seal Zon Con Sign Fines Cou Park Genera Tow Tow Purc Protect Polic Fire Dog Amb Build Health Healt Recyc Sewer PW S Sewer Sewer Sewer 86 85 84 Incine Highwa; Chapt 26 SCHEDULE 2 REVENUE - DETAIL JUNE 30, 1986 Real Estate Library/School 35,516.69 FY 86 — Billed $44,931.245.20 Recreation 199,5 84.83 in Personal Property 1/1 FY 86 — Billed 1,314,795.26 Interest on Investments 625,831.69 7•( 46,246,040.46 Public Enterprise 7,; Less Overlay 1,493,249.00 Water Rates 1,833,415.92 44,752,791.46 Water Misc. 42,149.92 Motor Vehicle Excise Water Liens86 56,757.66 1.: FY 86 2,241,712.84 85 7,239.54 FY 85 1,472,830.86 84 and prior 1,228.55 1.( FY 84 56,378.18 1,940,791.59 ( FY 83 and prior 3,848.14 In Lieu of Taxes 209,234.32 3,774,770.02 _ Licenses Interest/Costs on Taxes 377,958.53 Selectmen 195,241.96 Refunds& Miscellaneous Town Clerk 53,994.07 Non-Contributory 125,754.02 Planning Board 38,425.45 LIFT 41,848.75 Sealer 5,069.50 Miscellaneous Refunds 72,709.01 Zoning 18,741.00 Legal Settlement 4,666.66 Conservation 1,225.00 244,978.44 Sign Review Board 1,145.00 Cherry Sheet 13,880,064.68 313,841.98 Fines OTHER FINANCIAL SOURCES Court 353,053.00 Bonding Parking 101,583.77 Parking Garage .200,000.00 454,636.77 Arena Roof 125,000.00 General Government 325,000.00 Town Owned Buildings 101 783.11 Other Town Engineer 5,082.00 Sale of Real Estate 471,000.00 Purchasing 2,142.75 Parking Meters 1,300.00 109,007.86 State Aid to Library 32,557.00 '1 Protection of Persons and Property Other 18,684.89 Police 18,705.66 523,541.89 a Fire 20,406.00 Net Change in Tax Title j Dog Officer 4,393.00 Redemptions 127,008.94 Ambulance 111,393.73 Takings (48,823.11) Building/Wire 290,301.00 78,185.83 !!! 445,199.39 70,570,843.68 Health and Sanitation Health 14,686.90 Recycle 636.14 Sewer Entrance 55,613.65 PW Sanitation 109,150.13 Sewer Rates 1,640,268.04 Sewer Misc. 48,201.47 Sewer Liens 86 33,533.09 85 4,324.70 84 and prior 797.70 Incinerator 354,820.14 2,262,031.96 Highways Chapter 90 17,875.75 27 8 � ° 8 v010 LO N — SNN cq 8 N N M O� b9 8 8 8 8 880 � 0 88 � vc'i O 00 00 N S O O 08 W) r4 r r r N e �o O O% �c N p M vl vl 00 .M. 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'd O > O Q o0 00 00 °�° a V V 0 C� 3 E"" S C C � () � (.� p 00 C U c� U �j N ,,._, N Q: aVUN .r � a CVl .4. 4: z W ayi GQN � �pN i V y y v �i� ` p . a b �� n C O O pAYcat � atZ :ft ►� DUZZV) < < QQQQQQQ Q i o G a U 0 38 I ^ 00 � r rJ Vl (7 00 J � 000 � � M I N r- �Np a0 � d N fA b9 � vM O O� O O O S N fn ON r0 t'VO N r p E kn O N o0 00 O �c O^ sf O t� M Z 0 O O� O O� p p N9 f19 O O 8 \0 000 I 9 cf MN OHO 0 r C O O a10 v) N -- N N O\ N N \O Q b9 b9 604 � V C S S OL O C O ,Q p C I 8 O m N b9 � O 8 8 8 S 8 8 1 m 00 Y1 0-08 6 o 25 12 nv, . 00 O N M O �! N � M vi oo Q N N 00 �p p S p p 69 EA I.I I 00 C O\e0 000 O S O O N ., O 00 \D O O vi r- 0 00 b " � M N z OCT O W a V4 69 6! 3 ,,,,, co 4" c ° o E o° c 00 c = 00 c o ` vvvcU_ C 7 >0 .a Q0 000 O= `o � 00 npE wW� � - = , °O44V 00 00 aaomm < oW o ?oT T U s o� V ra � O O O � � r'� crja .� M AMM z O r r r 3 z a x e QQ QQ Q Q QQ < `X O 39 E G SCHEDULE 4 SCHEDULE OF STATE/COUNTY ASSESSMENTS FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1986 Balance Balance 7/1/85 Appropriation Expended 6/30/86 CK County Tax FY 86 $842,199.00 $766,165.44 $76,033.56 PI FY 85 $33,640.58 (33,641.00) (. County Hospital FY 85 828.98 (829.00) (, Special Ed. T( FY 86 56,720.00 62,865.00 (6,145.00) FY 85 23,370.00 (23,370.00) gl State Audit FY 86 3,295.00 3,295.00 Health Insurance Elderly FY 86 15,672.00 15,672.00 State Park FY 85 (1.00) 1.00 Metro Planning FY 86 11,491.00 11,491.00 Air Pollution Control FY86 12,867.00 12,867.00 MBTA FY 86 920,087.00 932,413.00 (12,326.00) FY 85 (12,491.00) 12,491.00 TOTAL STATE/COUNTY $45,347.56 $1,816,983.00 $1,804,768.44 $57,562.56 ASSESSMENTS TC 40 SCHEDULE 5 REVENUE SHARING FUNDS APPROPRIATION FY '86 Closed to CIOs BalanceRevenue PROTECTION TO PERSONS & 7-1-85 Appropriation Expended Encumbered Sharing j (. PROPERTY Police (,( Salaries & Wages $ $745,386.00 $745,386.00 $ $ TOTAL PROTECTION $ — $745,386.00 $745,386.00 $ — $ — HUMAN SERVICES Council on Aging Salaries& Wages 136,675.00 124,273.72 12,401.28 Administration 10,667.00 10,242.41 110.20 314.39 Mtce. &Operations 2,901.00 2,343.74 229.62 327.64 Special Functions 7,384.00 6,979.44 314.96 89.60 Administration '85 381.46 353.31 28.15 Human Relations Salaries & Wages 30,698.00 28,420.27 2,277.73 Administration 1,457.00 1,322.35 35.00 99.65 Mtce. &Operations 35.00 26.00 9.00 Administration '85 207.91 173.47 34.44 Youth Commission $ (: Salaries & Wages 72,050.00 66,784.99 5,265.01 Administration 3,425.00 3,363.09 61.91 Mtce. &Operations 322.00 271.65 50.35 Administration '85 60.05 60.05 TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES $649.42 $265,614.00 $244,614.49 $751.69 $20,897.24 j GRAND TOTAL REVENUE $649.42 $1,011,000.00 $990,000.49 $751.69 $20,897.24 SHARING FUNDS r i I' i i 41 RETIREMENT BOARD Sidney W. Lebewohl appointed by Retirement Board term expires 1988 t Arthur P. Gallagher Y member ex-officio term expires 1987 Charles P. Porcello t elected by membership term expires 1989 t 0 Our annual report will be submitted as soon as our asset valuation becomes available. T a a P COMMISSIONERS OF fc T TRUST FUNDS el d W BALANCE SHEET d June 30, 1986 T Assets tc Cash Invested $105,047.42 Securities 4,614.50 St. Total Assets $109,661.92 Fund Balance Edgell Library $ 50,765.62 Edgell Grove Cemetery 11,327.48 Joint Funds 47,568.82 $109,661.92 Gf Fa TRUST FUNDS IN CUSTODY Al OF COMMISSIONERS AK Di. STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS, DISBURSEMENTS AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE Ba For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1986 Al Balance Balanc, Su 7/01/85 Receipts Disbursements 6/30/8( 1 Edgell Library Fund $ 53,464.70 $ 4,100.92 $6,800.00 $ 50,765.6: Ro Edgell Grove Cemetery 10,511.27 816.21 — 11,327.41 Joint Funds 47,375.75 3,193.07 3,000.00 47,568.8; Ge Total $111,351.72 $ 8,110.20 $9,800.00 $109,661.9; 42 TOWN COUNSEL Nancy & John Flynn et als v. Ronald Covell (Bay Bank) and Zoning Board of Appeals. Middlesex Superior Court. The legal matters of the Town of Framingham have G. Ronald Pearson v. Framingham Police Depart- been handled by Aaron K. Bikofsky in his sixth three ment. Middlesex Superior Court. year appointment as Town Counsel. Ronald West v. Framingham Retirement Board. As required under the By-Laws governing the duties Contributory Retirement Appeal Board. thereof, the Town Counsel has attended meetings of the Board of Selectmen, Town Meetings, the meetings Isadore Cutler v. Department of Public Works. Middlesex Superior Court. of all other Boards, Committees and Commissions as requested, and all special municipal hearings. The Yola Femia v. Zoning Board of Appeals. Middlesex Town Counsel has been available to all Town Boards Superior. and Officials and has made an effort to be generally available to meet with citizens or groups who have a Kevin e Leach v. Town of Framingham, et al. particular problem in dealing with the Town. Essex Superior. During 1986, the Town Counsel has rendered 49 Charles Papavasiliou v. Zoning Board of Appeals. formal opinions, drafted and reviewed Articles for all Middlesex Superior. Town Meeting Warrants; prepared all Warrants for Robert E. Reifsnyder et al v. Zoning Board of elections and Town Meeting and has effected all legal Appeals. Middlesex Superior Court. documents as required by Town Meeting action. Julie DePasquale, et al v. Town of Framingham. The office of the Town Counsel has been charged United States District Court. with the responsibility for all administrative/clerical Herbert Ham duties for the Sign Review Board. pe v. Town of Framingham. As counsel to the Zoning Appeals, the Board of F&W Natick Mall, et al v. Planning Board et al.Town Counsel has attended hearings when requested Middlesex Superior Court. to do so and drafted the decisions for 156 cases. Edward J. Shagory, et al v. Zoning Board of Attached for your information is a list of the out- Appeals, et al. Middlesex Superior Court. standing cases involving the Town. David Isaacs v. Town of Framingham. Middlesex Aaron K. Bikofsky Superior Court. Town Counsel Charlotte D. Fox v. Town of Framingham and Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Framingham Dis- trict Court. Stephen F. Martin v. Paul M. Blakely, et al. LEGAL DEPARTMENT Worcester Superior. OUTSTANDING CASES Charles Muto, et al v. Zoning Board of Appeals. Middlesex Superior Court. Walter Callahan v. Town of Framingham. Tort. John B. Griffith & Mark M. Isiel, Tr. of Common- Generally continued. First District Court. wealth Center Trust vs. Zoning Board of Appeals. Campanelli, Inc. v. Planning Board (Dinsmore Middlesex Superior. Farm Estates). Middlesex Superior Court. Azurde Penrice - Claim (School). Union Petroleum Corp. v. Zoning Board of Betsy DiNitto vs. Town - Claim. Appeals. Middlesex Superior. Constantino Papavasiliou et al vs. Zoning Board of John D. & Mary Seaver v. Zoning Board of Appeals. Middlesex Superior Court. Appeals. Middlesex Superior Court. William E. Shepherd vs. Town and Paul Shastany. Arthur Grontzos v. Zoning Board of Appeals. First Middlesex Superior. District. Roy Capra, et al vs. Zoning Board of Appeals. Mid- Michael McCarthy v. Louis V. Ceddia & Zoning dlesex Superior. Board of Appeals. First District Court. Framingham Trust Co. vs. Zoning Board of Appeals. Henry J. Todiglione, et al v. Zoning Board of Middlesex Superior. alanct Appeals and Anthony De Angelis, et als. Middlesex Superior Court. James J. Bain vs. Town. Middlesex Superior Court. I 304 Phyllis M. Vogel v. Zoning Board of Appeals & John Cleveland vs. Town of Framingham. Middlesex 4 765.6: Robert& Helen Ross. Middlesex Superior Court. Superior. 1274 Town of Framingham v. Edward P. Kirley & Albert & Joyce Cullen vs. Zoning Board of Appeals. ,68.8: George Vrusho. Middlesex Superior Court. Middlesex Superior Court/Framingham Division. ')61.9: 43 4 F Insurance for the past few years has required cor Ralph D. Valentini, Adm. vs. Town of Framingham stant monitoring in order to have adequate coveral (Police). Middlesex Superior Court. and at the same time keeping the cost within reason The Titan Roofing Co., Inc., et al vs. Town of Fra- We are preparing to go on line with the Town's ne mingham. Department of Labor& Industries. computer and look forward to entering the informi Shirley Curtis. vs. Town of Framingham. Worcester tion that will increase the efficiency of the Purchasir. Superior. Office. Sun Refining & Marketing vs. Planning Board. Mid- William P. Forrim dlesex Superior Court - Land Court. Purchasing Age: Lee Mencoboni vs. Zoning Board of Appeals. Carl & Sarah Jane Engman vs. Zoning Board of Appeals, et al. First District Court. First Baptist Church of Framingham vs. Zoning Board. Middlesex Superior. Congregation Beth Sholom & Community Center, BOARD OF ASSESSORS Inc. vs. Richard McIntosh, et al. Middlesex Superior Court. Town of Framingham vs. Dennis Paul. Middlesex Gentlemen: Superior. The Board of Assessors submits herewith t: Annual Report beginning Jan. 1, 1986, and endi: Dec. 31, 1986. Property and Taxes Assessed as of January 1, 1986: A Tax Rate: A $13.88 Residential/Per $1000 of Valuation A $21.75 Comm/Ind. Per $1000 of Valuation A PURCHASING Valuation: B Real Estate $2,938,991,900. DEPARTMENT Tax Assessed 47,007,823. B Valuation: B Personal Property 59,257,800 B To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: Tax Assessed 1,288,855 B I hereby submit the report of the Purchasing Motor Vehicles Assessed: B Department for the year 1986. Total Number of 1985 Bills sent out in 1986 7,0 B The total dollar volume of purchases and contracts Total Tax Assessed for same 237,154. B was $12,950,059 of which $1,511,310 was with Fra- Total Number of 1986 Bills sent out in 1986 60,(0 C mingham contractors and businesses. Total Tax Assessed for same 3,676,931r CC The volume of work completed during the year Total Motor Vehicle Tax Assessed 3,914,085 C included: 10,318 Purchase orders processed C Total Number of Persons and Partnerships C 118 Advertised Bids Assessed in Real Estate 17,4 40 Executed Contracts C: Daily phone and written quotations as Total Number of Persons and Partnerships C: needed. Assessed in Personal Property Cl Through negotiation and selective bidding times Respectfully submitt: C' and procedures (i.e.) the right time of year and John L. LiberaV C' extended contracts, we have had substantial cost sav- Randall J. Kinc: G Cl ings for the Town. Board of Assess Di D( Di Dt 0 Dc Dt Dt Fa Fa Fe Fe 44 ed cor overai ABATEMENTS AND EXEMPTIONS GRANTED IN 1986 ,ason n's ne FOR FY'87 zformi Number of No. Abated chasir. No.Filed Category Granted Tax 232 Real Estate 124 $225,922.66 orristz 16 Personal Property 13 20,176.37 g Age: 118 Surviving Spouse 67 11,725.00 44 Hardship 38 9,771.34 1 38 Blind 38 18,954.39 368 Over 70 322 161,000.00 588 Veterans 584 124,795.05 3 Widow of Fireman or Police Officer 3 2,100.00 killed in line of duty is Totals 1407 1189 574,444.81 ith t: ABATEMENTS GRANTED IN 1986 FOR FY'87 endi: Ablondi, Anna Est. of 11 Ellis St. $ 43.02 A 1986: Abu, Anthony& Rose Mary 1290 Worcester Rd. 2,238.08 C Acton, Karen 24 Parmenter Rd. 161.00 C Alfano, Vincent& Henrietta 25 Barber Rd. 81.89 C Alluzzio, Greg& Matilda 31 Whitney Ave. 130.47 A Bacon, Harold S. & Jean E. 82 Edmands Rd. 396.97 A i,900. Bellefeuille etal, Francis 95 Parmenter Rd. 419.17 B r,g23: Bernas, C.J. & D.E. 93 Parmenter Rd. 424.72 A Berte, Aldino& Maria 1060 Waverly St. 33.31 C Briggs, Larry& Jane 54 Flanagan Dr. 159.64 B I x,800, Brossi, David A. & Joseph S. 36 Brossi Cir. 3,855. 442.77 A Brossi David A. & Joseph S. 29 Brossi Cir. 483.02 A Brossi, David A. & Joseph S. 25 Brossi Cir. 383.08 A 7,4, Brown, Bruce R. 731 Grove St. RR 4,289.10 H+A 1,154, Bugden, William F. & Barbara A. 35 America St. 49.97 A 60,(0 Cadorette, Edmund N. & Judith A. 87 Johnson St. 66.62 A Cain, Ashby&Mary 50 Linda Ave. 141.58 A ' i,930Cohen, Gerard&Sherryl 680 Salem End Rd. 237.34 B 1,085 Cameron, Paul A. (DuShane Inc.) 40 Cochituate Rd. Unit #37 472.20 A r Carey, Bernard 112 Londonderry Rd. 98.55 B s; Chiappini, Ernest 17'' 176 Waverly St. 249.86 A Chumbanis, Rita& Persepho 25 Rose Lane 65.23 B Civitenga, Dulio& Barbara 230 Danforth St. 86.05 B Clark, Gilbert P. & Diane O. 499 Central St. 38.86 A )mitt Cohen, Gerard H. & Sherryl 3 Lantern Rd. 384.47 C berat Commonwealth Center Trust 959 Concord St. 18,045.97 A i Kinj Concord Place Realty Trust 92 Concord St. 635.10 D t ,ssess Croatti, Louis J. 80 Bethany Rd. 177.66 A Dennison Manufacturing Company Arthur St. 5,163.45 A DeNorscia, Christine (O'Brien, Jr. eta]) 11 Weld St. Unit #33 112.42 A DuShane Inc. (S& P Realty Trust) 40 Cochituate Rd. Unit #41 472.20 A DuShane Inc. (Capone, John & Donna) 40 Cochituate Rd. Unit #17 464.33 A Chimino, Anna 29 Bridges St. 93.52 B Donoghue, Dennis & Francis 18 Brookfield Terr. 12.49 A DuShane Inc. (Indresano, Anne) 40 Cochituate Rd. #21 464.33 A DuShane Inc. (Conti, Paul) 40 Cochituate Rd. Unit #9 456.46 A Falconer, George&Gertrude 351 Singletary Ln. 87.44 A Farese, Romeo C. &Susan B. 46 Westgate Rd. 180.44 A Fedor Family Trust 263 Worcester Rd. 809.10 C Feindel, Clifford &Genevieve 50 Nixon Rd. 1,160.37 A 45 t First Hudson Partnership 1552 Concord St. 1,683.45 E First Hudson Partnership 1564 Concord St. 127.41 A Flaherty, Paul & Maryann 499 Concord St. 127.41 A Framingham Motor Lodge Trust 1626 Worcester Rd. 18,811.57 B Framingham Site One Trust 21 Blandin Ave. 25,932.52 B Glick, Allen M. 518 Union Ave. 2,697.00 E Goodman, Leon& Phyllis 10 Lantern Ln. 277.60 B Guertin Realty Trust 280 Irving St. 8,541.22 A Gusha, Nicholas J. & Bernice 1151 Worcester Rd. 199.94 A Halloran, Jr., Andrew J. &Ann L. 56 Park St. 204.45 C Heaton, Myles & Lillian 16 Brigati Terr. 94.38 A Iodice, Gregory J. &Sheila J. 9 John McQuinn Cir. 173.50 B Jagher, Jack S. & Sandra C. 41A Flanagan Dr. 689.84 A Kahn, Stephen& Janet Peddleton 7 Cider Mill Rd. 90.22 A Lerman, Steven H. & Sarita F. 3 Upton Rd. 15.26 B' Lightbody, Russell &Catherine 26 Curtis Rd. 27.76 Aj Liberatore, Arthur& Matthew 12 Charles St. 314.67 A n Lyle, Barry W. & Charlene G. 277 Edmands Rd. 345.61 A in Malette, Gerald J. & Mary B. 14 Lomas Cir. 204.03 A cc Malkin, Donald J. 115 Beaver St. 4,647.97 A T Marelle Realty Trust I Sheehan Cir. 702.32 A w Martins, Emilio 33 Cherry Rd. 351.16 A Ic McCarthy, Robert M. & Lisa 17 Kings Row Lane 320.63 B B Melco Corp. of Mass. Inc. 125 Newbury St. 667.73 G is Montalbano, Edward (Altobelli, Nicola) 732 Waverly St. 168.96 A ct Northeastern Realty Trust 26 Purchase St. 184.60 A m Molloy, James & Mary 18 Brigati Tern. 112.42 A al Montal, Agnes 51 McAlee Ave. 8.32 A D Montesi, Maria 785 Waverly St. 133.24 A L. Moro, Stephen A. & Joan M. 3 Huron Dr. 326.26 A Morrison, Peter A. & Nancy E. 8 McAdams Rd. 204.03 A ar Nardini, Doris&Armando 47 Wilson ve. 278.99 A N Nikiforov, Victor 128 Stonybrook Rd. 123.53 A df Northeastern Realty Trust 256 Edgell Rd. Rear 173.50 A sr Nunes, Edward 489 Potter Rd. 43.03 A P1 Pascucci, Salvi A. 17 Aleda St. 131.86 A re Phalen, Robert J. & Rita 99 Higgins Rd. 113.82 A kf Pergakis, Robert F. (DuShane Inc.) 40 Cochituate Rd. #8 456.56 A ea Progressive Development Rlty Trust 600 Worcester Rd. 9,646.12 E m Rain Realty Trust, Abraham Rain 3 MacLean Dr. 140.18 B Rousseau, Jr., Albert (Rhodes R.) 20 School St. 602.39 E Sarno, Joseph& Bonnie 32 Willis Ave. 44.41 A A Schiappa, Frank& Mary 41 Flanagan Dr. 106.87 A la Schirmer, Gertrude 7 Claudette Cir. 47.19 ( re Scionti, Santo& Helen 4 Aleda St. 51.35 A in Sisle, Mitchell E. & Roselyn 43 Joyce Rd. 180.44 A hi Sixteen Thirteen Concord St. Rlty Trust 1609 Concord St. 160.95 E re Slade, Edward & Bertha Brackett Rd. off 322.02 A M Smookler, Edward & Phyllis 700 Edgell Rd. 522.83 A al Snow, Ruth W. 29 Wayside Inn Rd. 1,268.63 A to Sokolov, Hyman B. 30 Hollis St. 854.77 E en St. Andre, Donald &Ameida 5 Clark St. 81.88 a, ex Steinberger, Leon H. &Thea R. 3 Sheehan Cir. 410.84 E H Superson, Irene 51 Ledgewood Rd. 29.14 r Tarara, Joseph 3 Kara Ann Dr. 771.73 A % The Sixth Trust 130 Worcester Rd. 31,237.34 r he Thomas, Bernard F. & Diane 423 Belknap Rd. 374.75 r wi Tomasina Dameri Trust 1 Poplar Pl. 133.25 E of Tordiglione, Henry J. 596 Union Ave. 94.38 E m Vaughan, Helen 106 Jean St. 235.95 th Ward, Harriet G. Oak Pl. RR 126.70 A ar Wittenborg, Harriett 49 Wayside Inn Rd. 578.79 pr na 46 i E Wood, Diane M. 10 Springhill Rd. 190.16 A A Yates, Gordon&Kathleen 23 Crest Rd. 198.48 A A Yes Realty Trust, William J. Simpson, Sr. 52 Gorman Rd. 116.59 A B Coding: B A Computer Billing Error E Building Razed or Removed E B Overvalued Building F Exempt Property 1/1/86 B C Overvalued Land G Appellate Tax Board Case A D Unfinished Building 1/1/85 H Chapters 61, 61A, 61B A C A B A PERSONNEL BOARD as coordination of benefits, disputed claims, hospital A audit disputes and the Town has received a credit of B $94,835 which was applied to a recent December bill- A The composition of the membership of the Person- ing. Potential savings that have been identified A nel Board has been changed at a Special Town Meet- amount to over$200,000. A ing held in October 1986. The Personnel Board is still Pay Plans: A comprised of five members who are appointed by the Collective bargaining agreements have been reached A Town Moderator. However, the Finance Committee with the Police, Fire and Library. Each contract is for A which normally assigned a representative will no two years to expire June 30, 1987 and call for pay A longer be required to do so. The fifth member of the raises of 5% each year. The union representing the B Board will serve a normal three year term. David Bell Deputy Fire Chiefs is presently being negotiated G is the current Chairperson and Raymond Meserve, the through the Federal Mediation and this first contract A current Clerk of the Board. Alan Kaplan, a long term has yet to be settled. A member is joined by new members, Barbara Shapiro, Non-bargaining employees received a 5% wage A appointed in July and Barry Bograd, appointed in A December. increase on July 1, 1986. Sick leave buy-back, an amended Merit Payment Plan and A y pro-rata vacation A Legislation: were specific benefits added to the overall fringe ben- A The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) was efit package. A amended under new law (P.L.99-150) effective November 13, 1985. This amendment of the FLSA Workers' Compensation: A delayed coverage until April I5, 1986. To provide a 1986 brought the implementation of the new Mas- delayed smooth transition at a department head meeting, the sachusetts Workers' Compensation Law (Chapter 572 purpose of the Act and how it impacted on the Town of the Acts of 1985). The Town of Framingham, as a A regarding overtime, compensatory time and record- self-insurer, was required to adapt its workers' com- A keeping requirements was discussed. It is still very pensation program in order to comply with the A early to assess the impact the FLSA may have on changes as they became effective throughout the year. l municipalities. All the provisions of the new law are now in place. B E The Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation The Town (as well as all Massachusetts employers) A Act (COBRA) (P.L.99-272) of 1986 was signed into will be required to contribute to the finding of the A law on April 7th. This federal law contains provisions newly created Department of Industrial Accidents. regarding the application of hospital (Medicare A) This department replaces the Industrial Accident insurance tax to all new Town and School employees Board which was funded entirely by the State. The A A hired as of April 1, 1986. Each new employee is new law has strict time limits that must be met in E required to contribute 1.45% of his/her gross pay for order to avoid costly fines. It also puts more emphasis A Medicare insurance tax each pay period. The Town is on occupational rehabilitation for those employees A also required to match the 1.45% employee contribu- Whose injuries prevent them from resuming their pre- tion. If this law is amended to include all current vious occupations. In summary, the new law will be 1� employees as well, this could become a significant more expensive for employers but it is intended to be A expense to the Town. more equitable and efficient. 1 Health Insurance• The Town of Framingham continues to employ r In February of 1985 Insurance Cost Control (ICC) Buckler, Irvin& Graf, Inc. of Winchester, Massachu- was retained to aid in the cost containment of our setts to assist with its claim processing. The Personnel r health programs. That initial contract has expired and Department continues to emphasize safety through its r we have renewed our contract with ICC for one year Town-wide Safety Committee in order to control the E effective July 1, 1986. The role of ICC has been to number and severity of work-related injuries. 1 monitor our payment of claims in an effort to lessen In summary, 1986 brought many challenges to the the financial impact of health coverage on the Town Personnel Board and Personnel Department. New r and its employees. ICC has identified and acted on major legislation has impacted on all the Town's prospective claims and plan design changes, in coordi- departments, boards and commissions to achieve nation with the Personnel Department, in areas such desired results. A sincere thank you to all concerned. 47 i SAFETY SERVICES M be POLICE DEPARTMENT ARRESTS FOR DRUNKEN DRIVING 1984 - 427 t 1985 - 415 I respectfully submit the annual report of the Fra- 1986 - 300 mingham Police Department for the calendar year ending December, 1986. POLICE INVESTIGATED ACCIDENTS ► During the past year, the Department continued to 1984 - 1,808, including 2 fatal accidents +' allow and encourage members of the Department to 1985 - 1,820, including 7 fatal accidents attend various seminars and training sessions con- 1986 - 1,700, including 6 fatal accidents ducted by the Massachusetts Criminal Justice Train- MOTOR VEHICLE CITATIONS ing Council. 1984- 20,178 IN-SERVICE TRAINING 1985 - 21,122 The Department's annual in-service training for 1986 - 19,374 1985 consisted of the following: POLICE COMPUTER (1) State mandated suicide prevention training, conducted by Framingham Police Department 1986 was highlighted by the inception of the use of a computer system, generously donated by the Prime Captain William George. , Computer Company, within the Framingham Police (2) Motor vehicle law update and review, con- Department. Special thanks go to Off. Robert Sam- ducted by Massachusetts Registry of Motor buchi, along with Lt. Dominic Ferrazzi and Off. Den- Vehicles Inspector Joseph Casella. nis Hayes, for the extensive hours and extra effort put (3) A block of instruction from the well known forth to make this system operational. street survival seminar, conducted by Wellesley ACTUAL OFFENSES I Police Department Lieutenant Donald Whalen. 1984 1985 1986 (4) State mandated Cardio-pulmonary and first Manslaughter 0 1 1 responder recertification conducted by retired Murder 0 1 0 Framingham Police Department Lieutenant Larceny 1,392 1,479 1,515 Edward Harrington and Framingham Police Homicide by MV 0 7 6 ' m Department Sergeant Joseph Gately. Rape 26 15 14 er (5) State mandated firearm's proficiency recertifi- Robbery 13 21 33 cation, conducted by the Framingham Police Burglary 386 561 453 fc Department's firearms instructors Ptlm. Wil- Auto Theft 327 380 326 R liam Pease and Douglas Bevilacqua. Vandalism 918 829 1,112 hf SAFETY BUREAU I would like to extend my personal thank you to all ? S; members of the Police Department, Auxiliary Police, at The Safety Bureau was again very active in con- Honorable Board of Selectmen Finance Committee ducting lectures in the Town's schools, checking and all the other Town Departments for their school busses and taxi cabs. Lieutenant Robert Foley assistance during 1986. m in charge of the Safety Bureau, attended numerous ci meetings of many Town boards relative to safety A special thanks to the citizens of Framingham who ti, matters. assisted many times in the apprehension of criminals at during the year, the news media for their cooperation, m PERSONNEL and the Massachusetts Department of Public Safety B 1 - Chief for their invaluable assistance during the year. t1 3 - Captains Respectfully Submitted, m 9- Lieutenants Arthur F. Martins, Chief m 12 - Sergeants J; 76- Patrolmen 10- Civilians A sl it ci n c; 48 ANIMAL CONTROL #2681, An Act to improve Animal Control, Lt. Fer- razi from the Framingham Police Department on how I respectfully submit the annual report of the Ani- to better cooperate between the animal control and mal Control Department for the year ending Decem- police departments, what law infractions we can ber 31, 1986. arrest on, etc. and Eddy Donayan, author of the PERSONNEL Shattered Badge, a book on stress in the police department. He is the founder of a world-wide stress 1 - Dog Officer/Animal Inspector program. This is to name a few of our guest speakers, 2 - Assistant Dog Officers there have been many more. 1. Number of phone calls received: a) Complaint calls - 6,908 In August I started a show called ADOPT-A-DOG b) Lost pet calls - 506 on the cablevision network. The taping is once a week c) Found pet calls - 335 and takes approximately '/z an hour. The show airs 2. Number of unleashed dogs picked up - 518 three times a week for %z an hour. In the first portion 3. Number of stray&abandoned pups -43 of the show I introduce the dog's good points as well 4. Wildlife picked up from residents' property - as being informative. We try to give some helpful tips 63 on each show, usually concerning the leash law, licen- 5. Number of dead animals picked up and dis- sing of your dog, dogs in heat, biting dogs, and what posed of- 84 to do, are some examples of past shows. The second 6. No. of injured picked up - 37 portion of the show is hosted by Dr. Migday or a 7. No. of animal bites reported - 118 member of her staff. They do fifteen minutes on a pet 8. Avg. no. of dogs maintained at kennel - 6 tip, for example, winter hazards, antifreeze poison- ing, or holiday hazards, such as tinsel and ornaments. 9. Number of adoptions - 105 10. Citations issued: People have been calling and we are getting many 3 i1 (a) Unleashed - 481 good responses. Dogs returned to rightful owners and 1e , adoption rates are going up; dogs are not kept at the Off f Unlicensed - 262 kennel for as long a period of time. Also people are 1 11. Ogg Hour Calls handled by Framingham Police becoming more aware of the importance of the leash law and licensing their dogs which I mention con- it , 12. Total board and sale - $5,915.00 stantly. This year I hope to have MSPCA officials as 12. County reimbursement - $1,620.00 13. Number of dogs licensed - 1,851 guests on the show. I have had several dog officers on � the show; those from Holbrook, Southboro, Welles- Respectfully submitted, ley, Canton and Hingham, to name a few. Carole Farrington To help get the point across that people have to Dog Officer license their dogs we are trying a different method. In addition to above, the Animal Control Depart- For those who continue to let their dogs run free and ment, to better serve the community has attended sev- not license their dogs, when we pick the dog up they eral meetings throughout the year. can no longer just come to the kennel and retrive their dog with a small fine. They now have to purchase a The second Tuesday of every month there is a Nor- license as well. In order to comply with Chap. 140 folk County Meeting held at the Dedham Courthouse. Sec. 151. The way we do this is to make an appoint- We are starting off the new year by having a meeting ment with a vet of their choosing and bring the dog here at the Town kennel, the purpose of which is to there. The dog gets the shot, we return to the kennel get more area towns involved. Ashland, Southboro, and they go to the town hall to get their license and Sudbury, Wayland and Natick have been invited to then come to the kennel to reclaim their dog and then attend, as well as those who normally attend. pay their fines. The dogs are locked into their stalls at On the first Wednesday of every month ACOAM night to prevent them from being stolen back. meets. ACOAM is the Animal Control Officers Asso- During the year we were on call for the Southboro ciation of Mass. and incorported in 1980. Their func- dog officer. On one occasion we were involved in a tion is to educate and maintain excellence among the dog shooting which we turned over to the MSPCA. : animal control officers throughout the state. The g Many cruelty charges were handled by the MSPCA a meetings are usually late afternoon and early evening. including the investigation of cat killing and Board members and other members are invited. As consumption. the recording secretary, I keep all the records of each Barn Inspection had to be done twice this year as meeting. I am newly elected so the record keeping by f myself will actually take place at our next meeting in the books were late, so in June of 1986 I did 1985 January. inspections. In October of 1986 I did 1986 inspec- tions. We have a total of 30 barns in Framingham, The ACOAM has workshops which are held at the with 28 cows, 16 heifers, 13 calves, 70 horses, 5 pon- Ashland 4-H building four times a year. We have had ies, 13 goats, 37 sheep, 33 swine, 244 birds divided ; such guest lecturers as Mr. Colona, the clerk of courts into 8 flocks, 1 burro, 2 mules and 1 donkey. u in Framingham, to review the proper procedure for court complaints and Attorney Mike Gatlin from Fra- mingham on liability on the job and what we can and i cannot do, Senator Golden on Legislation House Bill f 49 FIRE DEPARTMENT Engine #4: 1970 Maxim, 1000 G.P.M. pumper is in excellent condition. A diesel engine as well as body eq replacement was done in recent years to extend the fo I hereby submit to you the annual report of the fire length of service. This apparatus is located at the Hol- ar department for the year ending December 31, 1986. lis St. Station. PERSONNEL Engine #5: 1964 Maxim, 1000 G.P.M. pumper and Wi 1 - Chief foam unit. This pump is in fair condition. It is co 5 --Deputy Chiefs located at the Concord St. Station. Replacement of 9 - Captains this vehicle is scheduled for 1987. 21 - Lieutenantsco Engine #6: 1986 Pierce, 1250 G.P.M. dual stage 1 - Supt. of Fire Alarm pumper was placed into service in January 1987. This 1 - Head Mechanic excellent pumper was a gift to the Town of Fra- an 1 -Administrative Aide mingham from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts an 144 - Fire Fighters for the protection of the vast amount of State prop- is 2 - Vacancies erty located in Framingham, thus saving the Town RETIREMENTS $125,000.00. to During the past year nine fire fighters have either Engine #7: 1980 Continental, 1250 G.P.M. dual Wl retired or resigned. Promotions, and appointments stage pumper. This pumper is located at the Water St. lig from Civil Service lists have filled all but two posi- Station and is in excellent condition. to tions which will be filled in the very near future. Eight a f Aerial Tower #1: 1974 Sutphen, 85 foot aerial plat- in new appointees completed the seven week training form is diesel powered and located at the Concord St. and indoctrination course at the State Fire Academy, Station. This apparatus is in good condition. l and four will start in January. Others will follow as bo space is available. Ladder #2: 1964 Pirsch, 100 foot aerial ladder iOL located at the Hollis St. Station is in fair condition. Po FIRE STATIONS This is diesel powered, being converted in 1980. res Concord Street Station - Headquarters (1961): This Ladder#3:'Originally a 1964 Maxim 100 foot aerial are station is in good condition. Money has been appro- ladder which was completely refurbished in 1985 with I priated for roof replacement in the spring. Interior a new Pierce tractor. Much body and compartment Fa painting will be done at this time by Keefe Tech. work was done on the trailer section. This aerial is thi Worcester Rd. Station (1968): This station is in stationed at Worcester Rd. and in excellent condition. cle good condition. Repair work was done in the front RESERVE APPARATUS f and rear parking lot as well as landscaping to make Foi this a very attractive building. Engine #8: 1955 Maxim, 750 G.P.M. pumper We located at the Hollis St. Station is in fair condition. Watson Place (approx. 1890): Extensive repairs and This is used as a foam tender for the foam truck and remodeling have taken place over the past years. is loaded with an additional supply of foam. This I Some roof work is planned in 1987. This station is in apparatus also serves replacement duties. adc good condition. Engine #9: 1967 Maxim, 1000 G.P.M. dual stage strz Hollis St. Station (approx. 1889): Extensive remod- pumper located at the Water St. Station. This pumper this eling has also been done at this station. New overhead is in fair condition. This pumper is used to replace °1d doors for the apparatus floor and rear garage have first line apparatus, while under repairs, and by off- T been installed this past year. Keefe Tech. completed duty fire fighters when called back for emergencies. the interior painting and this station for being 97 years old, is in good condition. Engine #10: 1961 Maxim, 750 G.P.M. pumper located at the Water St. Station is in fair condition. Water Street Station (1961): This station is in excel- This pumper is also used for replacement service and lent condition. The roof work will be done this com- extra duty when needed. ing year. DEPARTMENT VEHICLES APPARATUS Chief's Car: 1983 Ford Sedan is in excellent condi-' Engine #1: 1986 Pierce, 1250 G.P.M. dual stage tion. This is housed at Watson Pl. Station. pumper was delivered and placed in service at the Inspection Car#1: 1980 Ford Sedan is in fair condi- Worcester Road Station in February 1986. This is an tion and housed at Hollis St. Station. excellent piece of apparatus. Inspection Car #2: 1982 Ford Ranch Wagon, Engine #2: 1984 Pierce, 1250 G.P.M. dual state housed at the Water St. Station, is in fair condition. pumper is in excellent condition. This apparatus is N located at Watson Place Station. Deputy Chief's Car: 1983 Ford Ranch Wagon, housed at Concord St. Station, is in fair condition. Engine #3: 1973 Maxim, 1250 G.P.M. single stage This wagon will be replaced this year. pumper is located at the Hollis St. Station. This is diesel powered and in good condition. 50 I in Fire Alarm Service Truck: 1980 Ford diesel, Box 371 - 1610 Worcester Rd. removed (building 'dy equipped with a servi-lift elevation platform, is used razed). :he for fire alarm and traffic light repair, maintenance, ol- and installation. This vehicle is in good condition. In addition to regular duties of maintaining and installing the fire alarm and communication system, Mechanic's Truck: 1980 G.M.C. Pick-up with a the following services and repairs were made to traffic nd walk-in loading cap installed. This truck is in fair signals: is condition. a. 253 calls for repairs of traffic signals. of 3 b. 36 traffic sinal knockdowns. Pick-up Truck #1: 1973 /a ton Dodge is in poor g condition and used only when necessary. c. Re-lamping of approximately 1100 traffic f ,ge bulbs. lis Pick-up Truck #2: 1985 Ford, with 4-wheel drive d. Re-lamping and maintenance of 24 school .a_ and a I ton body. This vehicle is used for inspections zone lights. tts and department operations. The 4-wheel drive feature e. On-going program of replacing old cable p is very beneficial for many operations. throughout the Town. j vn Rescue #1: 1976 Ford F-350. This vehicle responds f. Running cable for new boxes in developments to all accidents and emergency calls. It is equipped and new construction. This is done at the ial with the "Jaws of Life" and other specialized tools, developer's expense. >t lights, and generators. Also carries a cascade system FIRE ALARMS to refill self contained breathing tanks at the scene of a fire. Located at the Hollis St. Station, this vehicle is During the year 1986 the fire department responded it- in fair condition. to the following number of alarms: 't' Rescue Boats and Trailers: The department has 4 Still alarms 4,721 boats mounted on trailers which are located at var- Box alarms 621 er ious stations. Each unit is equipped with 4'/z horse ADT alarms 42 n• power motors. These boats are used for search and Total 5,384 rescue operations and other water emergencies. All The alarms received were broken down into the fol- al are in good condition. lowing categories: th Ambulance #1: 1986 modular body mounted on a Residential 78 nt Ford chassis, diesel powered, was placed in service Mercantile g is this past year and is in excellent condition. This vehi- Industrial I I Z. cle operates from the Concord St. Station. Miscellaneous 36 Ambulance #2: 1984 modular body mounted on a Grass/Brush 206 er Ford chassis. This ambulance operates from the Motor Vehicles 106 n. Worcester Rd. Station and is in good condition. Mutual Aid 84 id FIRE ALARM DIVISION Non-fires: is During the past year 17 new boxes have been False 170 added. We now have a total of 573 boxes in service at Investigation/Assistance 1,552 strategic locations throughout the Town. Included in Medical Assist 3,133 ,e this number are 254 master boxes which protect indi- Total 5,384 j r vidual properties. :e Causes of fires: f- New master boxes added in 1986: Careless smoking 80 182 - 1101 Worcester Rd. Children with matches 127 Defective heating 14 'r 219- 161 Worcester Rd. Electrical defects _ 55 a >. 229 205 Newberry Street Spontaneous ignition 3 d 259- 965 Concord Street Incendiary 35 p 293 - 233 Cochituate Rd. Burning without permit 5 381 - 1610 Worcester Rd. Miscellaneous 75 436 - 7 Columbia St. Unknown 15 ►- 456- 82 Herbert St. 516 -92-100 Concord St. Careless cooking 36 i_ 619 - 155 Hartford St. Investigations and inspections made by the fire pre- 628 - 188 Concord St. vention bureau during the year 1986 were as follows: 638 - 130 Worcester Rd. Commercial 237 658 -40-60 Worcester Rd. New Construction &system testing 313 New street boxes: Oil burner inspections 193 2433 - 28 Perry Henderson Dr. License inspections 258 2434 - 40 Perry Henderson Dr. School fire drills and inspections 115 Fire investigations qg 3435 - 52 Perry Henderson Dr. Complaints 243 i 51 it Permit inspections 183 At the present time the Fire Department operates Underground tank registration 256 two ambulances, 24-hours a day for emergency serv. Talks to special groups 40 ices only. Unless for some unusual occurance, each is Training classes given to hospital staffed with E.M.T.I. technicians as the department and nursing home staff 15 has 14 certified, 3 awaiting final examination, and s Seminars and schools attended 35 are in the final phase of training. In addition th( Smoke detector inspections (26B,C,F) 653 department has 18 E.M.T.'s who are very capable ir. of Meeting and plan review 405 assisting the E.M.T.I.s. As per State law all othei cc Group homes inspections 136 members of the department receive training and re ha In-service inspection by engine co. 236 certification yearly as first responders. There are ver in 135 few, if any, cities or municipalities in the State wh( Inns, hotels, and motels 107 can match these figures. The department also has at Hospitals, nursing homes, and clinics on-going training program. As can be seen, the ge Permits granted: department places high emphasis on medica th of Fuel oil permits 165 53 assistance. ge ge L.P. Gas permits Blasting permits 47 INFORMATION/RECOMMENDATIONS fu 87 Sy Tank registrations Powder permits 26 Avery important step has taken place regarding th( Fire alarm permits (26C) 187 site of an additional fire station in the north-west sea Certificate of compliance (26F) 1542 tor. The developers of 9/90 (former Town land fil. ge Miscellaneous permits 46 site) have agreed to donate to the Town of Fra D( mingham, the necessary land for the construction o in, AMBULANCE/RESCUE DIVISION this building. Several possible locations are being con du During the past year the ambulance has responded sidered in the 152 acre site, and final selection will b: De to the following emergency calls: by thepresent Fire Station Committee prior to bein; of 439 presented to Town Meeting. A station, off the eaea,, o i Heart, ,lung, stroke bound lane of Route #9 combined with the propose Motor vehicle accidents road work planned for this area, makes this a ver Pc Medical assistance 508 attractive location. Pending the possible developmer m( Fractures, lacerations, traumas, back at the country club and Macomber property in th ei injuries, and burns 505 future, this could become a major station combinin Cl Births, pregnancies, &OB-GYN 21 both engine and ladder companies. ter Assistance at fire scenes 19 Drug abuse, overdose 143 I have requested in this year's budget money tt Total transports 2,420 replacement of the department's 1964 Foam-Pump( in combination. This apparatus has served the Tow` m` Non-transports: well, but due to costly repairs, frequent breakdown. Emergency calls with no transport 339 and problems with replacement parts, it is losing i', Cc Emergency calls with aid, no transport 374 dependability. The new modern up-to-date foan I Total calls received 3,133 pumper will combine foam and a much needed hale Mutual aid received 42 system. Mutual aid sent 34 It is with mixed emotions that I conclude my fin. report as Chief of the Department. I have not on The department's E.M.T.s have continued to con- enjoyed the position but feel very privileged ar duct the blood pressure screening program. We urge honored to be at the head of such a fine privilege mer all residents to participate in this excellent, free-of- I wish to express my sincere thanks and appreciate( charge clinic. They have also conducted courses in to the various Boards, Departments, Committees, at ear first aid, C.P.R. and fire safety to civic groups, schools, scouting and other Town departments, much to Town Meeting members who have always assist not only the Department but me as well. Again I sa dir of this on their off-duty time. Any organization, or "Thank you." Sel group, interested in any of the above may contact the Respectfully submitte To department for further information. Special emphasis John J. Hancock,'Chi 191 has been placed on instructions to retarded individu- Framingham Fire De als both in schools and homes. ( 1 1 F d 52 I rates serv. CIVIL DEFENSE DEPARTMENT OF ch is DEPARTMENT WEIGHTS & MEASURES menr rnd 6' 1 th; During 1986 the Emergency Preparedness Council To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: f )le it of the Civil Defense Dept., Town of Framingham l other continued to meet monthly to consider details of In compliance with Section 34, Chapter 98, General d re- handling possible disaster scenarios which may occur Laws, I herewith submit my annual report of the ven in the Town. Department of Weights and Measures for the year whc ending December 31, 1986. as ar While Selectman Ernst was present in the Emer- th; gency Operations Center during Hurricane Gloria in This department started the year with the full per- the fall of 1985 he noted that the Center was in need sonnel of two people and for the first six months was edica able to test and seal all weighing and measuring of a new, modern communications system. At his sug- devices as required by State Statute. All complaints gestion the Annual Town Meeting of 1986 voted , funds which have been used to install an up-to-date received from consumers on purchases of any com- system adequate to handle disaster situations. modity, whether food or heating were investigated ,g th( and brought to satisfactory conclusions to parties t sec- The Town owes thanks to one member of the Emer- involved. d fil. gency Preparedness Council, Albert Bergeron, Fire Fra Department member, who volunteered to become On July 7, 1986, Mr. Frederick J. Rousseau, on o' involved in the Radiological Response course con- Inspector of Weights and Measures retired after forty con ducted in Lawrence by the Massachusetts Civil Years of service with the Town of Framingham. This Defense A left the department with only one person to finish the till b; Agency. He is now the Radiological Engineer year. By setting priorities in order of importance, all bein of the Civil Defense Department of the Town of Fra- e easmingham. Residents of the Town also owe thanks to the testing and sealing of the rest of the weighing and pose; other members of the Council, representatives of the measuring devices within the Town were completed. Police Fire, Tree Engineering and Health Depart- Some s in oche ye and store inspections were not i ver g g p made as in other years. pmen ments who continue to work as volunteers with repre- in th sentatives of the Greater Framingham Red Cross I wish to thank all Town Boards for their coopera- binin. Chapter, Framingham Union Hospital, and the Ama- tion and especially the Executive-Administrator, Mat- teur Radio Association. thew P. Clarke for his assistance during this period of As in three time. ey t6 previous years two seminars were held umpf in the Library Program Room on methods of handl- Respectfully submitted, Tow ing potential problems relating to hazardous or toxic Mario G. Bartolini sown: materials or from low-level nuclear situations. The Inspector of Weights and Measures + ing i� Council will repeat these seminars: foan March 18, 1987 - Management of Radiation Acci- hale dents - lecturer: Thomas O'Connell, Radiation Control Program, Mass. Dept. of Health. y fin. April 21, 1987 - Identification of Hazardous Mate- )t on rials - lecturer: Dep. Thomas Potenza, Fra- A ar mingham Fire Department. -tmer sciatic Nurses and E.M.T.s attending these seminars will es, ar earn credits on their Continuing Education Programs. assist The Civil Defense Director, his assistant, his coor- n I sa dinator, and Council members wish to thank the Selectmen, members of the Finance Commitee, and mitte Town Meeting members for their support during Ch 1986. ,e De; 53 HUMAN SERVICES r C HUMAN RELATIONS EMPLOYMENT , There were 3 employment complaints this year. • COMMISSION SMILES still has a Job Developer who helps the His- • The Human Relations Commission was established panic community members find appropriate • by Town Meeting in 1970 and is under the authority employment. • of the Board of Selectmen. The Commission is We want to express our thanks to the town commit- responsible for handling complaints from minorities tees, departments and boards which cooperated w;th • group people and working to improve the quality of us in our work in 1986. • life for those who may be subject to intolerance in the Commissioners: • Town of Framingham. Housing, employment, handi- Glenda Thomas, Chairperson • capped affairs and Hispanic needs are the major areas Alice Bubello • in which the Commission works. Robert Anspach TOTAL COMPLAINTS Anna Bush • The total number of complaints received by the Salome Farias • Commission in 1986 was 305. Complaints included 4 Rev. Mark Ferrin • Blacks, I1 Hispanics, and 1 Asian. The breakdown of Hilda Lubin • complaints is as follows: Susan Conner Christopher McElroy • Housing 200 Marion Slack • Employment 3 Respectfully submitted, • Handicapped 7 Human Services 95 Ria McNiff, Administrator HOUSING f Of the 200 Housing complaints received, 3 were referred to the MCAD and 197 were handled by our r office. SOUTH MIDDLESEX In April of 1986, Town Meeting defeated an Article LATIN EMERGENCY F submitted by the Fair Housing Committee which dealt with zoning changes related to the need for SERVICES, INC. L apartments. N On October 28, of 1986, a tenant workshop was L The South Middlesex Latin Emergency Services, L held to inform tenants of their rights. Inc. (SMILES) began operating its program in March E The Housing Mediation Board has met monthly to 1978, sponsored by the Human Relations Commis- S hear and settle complaints received by that Board. It sion. The Framingham Municipality provides I; has successfully mediated 28 complaints during the SMILES with funds for administrative expenses. This past year. is contingent upon the annual town meeting's HANDICAPPED approval. SMILES was founded by a Board of His. panic-American Community people. The Board is 1 The Human Relations Commission received 7 com- responsible for setting SMILES' policies and adminis• ti plaints from handicapped individuals in 1986. The trative procedures. Commission office continues to arrange for Interpret- SMILES' primary purpose is to improve the quality li ers for the deaf to be present at Town Meetings. of life for Hispanic-Americans by helping them to b HISPANIC COMMUNITY help themselves, and by orienting and directing them a towards involved citizenship. SMILES also serves as a R SMILES day care program located in the old Roo- (� sevelt School has been a great success. It has linkage between the town government agencies and k expanded and now serves 20 children. The day care the community representing the only identifiable link center now has its permanent license. 40 people fin- to non-Hispanic services. ished the semester of English classes this year. The SMILES' philosophy is best expressed in terms of classes are being funded with Community Develop- the vital services it provides in the areas of job place o ment Block Grant funds through the library which ment, health referral, housing assistance and educa• %% conducts the classes. tion and training referrals. C a 54 COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT funds for the Job Development Project until Decem- SMILES has provided referrals, translations and ber of 1987. Not only does the project assist clients in mediation services to the following town agencies and finding suitable employment, it also provides services organizations: in the areas of: • Framingham Schools • Resume preparation/cover letter • Framingham Police Dept. • Job-search techniques �I • Parks& Recreation Dept. • Interview preparation • Job Bank ear. • Town Clerk His- • Planning Dept. • Referrals to jobs and/or training � -fate • Framingham Board of Health • Mediation • Framingham Housing Authority • Emergency Transportation • Town Personnel Office • Translation/Interpretation Services mit . Hospitals (FUH, LMH)) The project placed 27 (4 months only) clients in • Human Relations Commission 1983, 54 in 1984, 53 in 1985 and 55 in 1986. • Dept. of Unemployment Security SMILES and the Hispanic community area recia- • Women, Infant& Children Program (WIC) tive of the Framingham Annual Town Meeting, the • Private Physicians Dept. of Public Welfare Board of Selectmen the Human Relations Commis- sion Landlords and Real Estate and a number of town agencies and organiza- • South Middlesex Opportunity Council (SMOC) tions for their continued support and concern. • Youth Guidance Center Board members: • Trinity Mental Health Santos Pagan, President • Metro SW Employment and Training Jacinto Marquez, Vice-President I Administration Robert McQueeney, Treasurer • Registry of Motor Vehicles Marta del Valle, Secretary • Salvation Army Maria L. Marquez ted, • Local Industry Candida Aloyo ator SERVICES Alfonso Lebrun Angel Matos In 1986 SMILES assisted the community as Bricio Baez follows: George Norton E New clients 151 'Amauri Abreu Total cases 1,621 Jesus Telles Housing Assistance 156 Dr. David F. Grabau Employment Placement 55 Respectfully submitted, Employment Assistance 618 Argentina Arias, Legal Referrals 28 Executive Director Miscellaneous 430 Health Referrals 81 ices, Utilities Assistance& Referrals 79 arch Education/Training Referrals 63 BOARD OF HEALTH i mis• Social Services 111 ides Income Tax Preparation 28 f This ng's SMILES DAY CARE CENTER In the annual election Dr. Luke G. Tedeschi was elected to his fifth term on the Board of Health, join- His- The Day Care Center was opened in October of d is 1985. Funds to administer the program are provided ing Ann Arvedon and Dana Cunningham. At the meeting held finis, through the Department of Social Services (DSS), the in April, Dana Cuningham was elected Voucher Program and private tuition. The day care is to serve as Chairman. ality licensed for 30 children of which in 1986, 11 were The preservation and promotion of health, as n to basic (DSS), 8 were protective DSS, 10 were voucher always, is the goal of the Board of Health. To this hem and 9 were private. The day care is housed at the old end we continue in our efforts to immunize against as a Roosevelt School, now Mass Bay Community College flu and pneumonia at our annual clinics.. We are and (Framingham campus). It rents two classrooms and a available daily for immunization against communica- link kitchen from MBCC. ble disease for our school children. We participate in SMILES JOB DEVELOPMENT PROJECT the T.B. Clinic and the Well Child Clinic at Fra- mingham Union Hospital. Our blood pressure clinics S of The Job Development Project began in September are heavily attended and appropriate referrals are lace of 1983. The project is run by one job developer made when necessary. Our rabies immunization pro- uca• which has been funded until February 1987, by the gram has been expanded to include cats due to the Community Development Block Grant. As of Janu- marked increase of rabies in these animals. We urge ary of 1987, SMILES is a participating agency of all residents to have their cats immunized against Metrowest United Way, which has approved the rabies. 55 i The Board of Health has petitioned the State, New Establishments/Takeover 96 through the Office for Children, to become a desig- Complaints Investigated 84 nated community for the local licensure of day care Trash, Rubbish, Garbage, etc. 27 centers. It is expected that licensing and inspection of day care centers will begin in 1987. The Board of Other Environmental Health Inspections: Health feels that local licensure will be a benefit to Swimming Pools 422 the children of the town: Whirlpools 197 Public Beaches 21 Although the "Seat Belt Law" was repealed in Water Testing 45 1986, this Board continues in its concern for passen- Air Pollution I ger safety, and urges the use of seat belts by all occu- Water Pollution 5 pants of motor vehicles. Insect & Rodent Control 15 1986 saw an unusually large number of subdivision Complaints 8 plans needing review and approval for safety and san- Schools/Day Care 49 itary concerns by the Board of Health, as required by Animals 28 th the State Subdivision Control Act. Hazardous Waste 20 to C1 Concerns in the areas of asbestos and radon have Housing Code Inspections: fi Lead Paint Inspections 36 been evidenced by the many calls received from anx- Housing Inspections 376 sc ious residents. Inspections are made when warranted SiPr and appropriate information distributed. ecton 8 Housing Inspections 236 dr Related Housing Inspections 56 ti, In 1986, in conjunction with the Department of Court Appearances 29 ar Environmental Quality Engineering, the Board of Court Cases I I di Health took an active role in the investigation and Housing Complaints 162 th mitigation of hazardous materials and spills into the Trash, Rubbish, etc. 96 pr environment. Leaking underground storage tanks T continue to be a source of contanmination of both el soil and ground water. These leaking tanks caused ni two major incidents in the Town in 1986. New regula- tions passed by the Legislature in 1986 will help to PUBLIC HEALTH minimize this type of spill in the future. NURSING RSING The Board of Health expresses it's appreciation to the staff, the medical profession, and all other depart- ments and agencies for their cooperation and assist- The public health nursing staff provides staffing ance during the past year. for clinics sponsored by the Board of Health. These Respectfully submitted, clinics are used for screening and health promotion. Dana Cunningham, Chairman In addition, the nurses conducted health promotion visits to families with new-born children and to senior Ann Arvedon, Secretary Luke G. Tedeschi, M.D. citizens. The public health nurses are charged with investiga. tion and surveillance of communicable diseases within the community. School nursing services to parochial ENVIRONMENTAL schools are also provided by the Board of Health, HEALTH Immunizations are administered by the public health nurses for childhood diseases, as well as for influenza and pneumonia. The environmental health section of the Board of NURSING STATISTICS Health is concerned with inspections under, and the enforcement of, the State Sanitary Code. The major No. of subdivisions of this section include: inspection of Home Visits (Type) Patients Seen food establishments, inspections of bathing areas New Born Infants 369 (beaches, swimmingPremature Infants 41 pools, and whirlpools), and housing inspections. This section also investigates Health Promotion and Assessment 412 water and air pollution complaints. Mosquito and Surveillance of Communicable Disease 115 algae control programs are conducted under the direc- No. No. of tion of the Public Health Administrator. Clinics Clinics Patients Seen ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH STATISTICS Well Child Clinics 44 -- Senior Citizens Health 80 1968 Food Related Inspections: Lead Screening 48 5 Retail Food Stores 584 Flu Clinics 2 1422 Food Service Establishments 1284 Pneumonia Clinic 2 55 Retail Milk Inspections 532 Pulmonary(TB) 7 111 Other Food Related Inspections 40 Mantoux Tests Given 337 56 >6 Immunizations DENTAL STATISTICS i4 Childhood Diseases 290 Total Number of Clinics Held During Year 113 .7 School Health School Visits Total Number of Visits by Children to Clinic 322 Schools (3) 160 Number of Individual Children with :2 One or More Visits During the Year 200 17 Number of New Children Treated I in Clinic (Ist Visit) 39 .5 CHILDREN'S DENTAL Number of Phophylactic Treatments 164 1HEALTH PROGRAM Number of Amalgam Restorations: 5 Permanent Teeth 116 5 Decidious Teeth 95 8 Number of Pulpotomies 8 9 The Board of Health Dental Health Program is a Number of Composite Restorations 13 8 three-fold approach to the epidemic problem of den- Number of Extractions: 0 tal disease in children. Through screening of school Permanent Teeth 0 children in the classroom, dental anomalies are identi- Decidious Teeth 21 fied. This screening provides information as to the Number of Patients X-rayed 54 0 scope of the problem. The second part of the dental Number of Stainless Steel Crowns Set 2 6 program, dental education, provides the school chil- Number of Sealants Placed 32 6 dren with educational presentation and demonstra- Total Number of Dental Health 6 tions to encourage proper methods of oral hygiene Lessons Given 428 9 and good nutritional habits. The third division is Total Number of Children Screened I devoted to preventative and restorative dental care, to by Hygienist 10,082 2 that segment of school children whose families cannot 5 provide them with dental care in the private sector. Of the above number, the following action taken: The target population for this care is the families not Number of Children Requiring Treatment eligible for Medicaid, but whose family income does (referral forms sent home) 301 not allow the expenditure for private dental care. Number of Forms Returned 183 Clinic 93 Private 90 Ting hese ion. tion nior :iga• thin phial 1 Llth, alth :nza , of lecn 369 J 41 412 115 of een 968 5 422 55 111 1 331 , 57 1 II� l 1986 DEATHS OF RESIDENTS BY CAUSE, SEX AND AGE TOTAL MALE FEMALE CAUSES OF DEATH DEATHS d'r O o rn ACCIDENTS: Vehicle 7 4 3 I 4 1 l ACCIDENTS: Other 5 2 3 2 2 1 BLOOD 6 BLOOD FORMING ORGANS 2 1 1 z DISEASES OF CIRCULATORY SYSTEM 328 143 185 2 2 35 2381 51 DISEASES OF DIGESTIVE SYSTEM 15 6 9 1 S 9 ' DISEASES OF GENITOURINARY SYSTEM 10 2 g 2 6 2 DISEASES OF RESPIRATORY SYSTEM 67 27 40 ! 50 16 DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM 6 SENSE ORGANS 3 1 2 1 3 ENDOCRINE, NUTRITIONAL, METABOLIC, IMMUNITY 1 1 1 ILL DEFINED AND UNKNOWN CAUSES 13 7 6 4 3 5 1 INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES 13 7 f' 1 1 10 j 1 INJURY AND POISONING 1 1 1i NEOPLASM 87 41 46 6 13 68 SUICIDE 4 3 1 1 1 1 1 TOTAL 556 244 312 6 2 3 17 7619T671 1986 DEATH OF NON-RESIDENTS BY CAUSE, SEX AND ACE Tr­ TOTAL MALE FEMALE H 4 T A > > CAUSES OF DEATH DEATHS ° V o o � a , V1 N N 1 C O > J C ACCIDENTS: Vehicle 3 3 2 1 ACCIDENTS: Other 1 I 1 ACQUIRED IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME 1 I l I BLOOD 6 BLOOD FORMING ORGANS I 1 l � DISEASES OF CIRCULATORY SYSTEM 184 76 108 2 5 27 128 22 DISEASES OF DIGESTIVE SYSTEM 13 5 8 j3 8 2 DISEASES OF GENITOURINARY SYSTEM 12 4 8 11 I DISEASES OF RESPIRATORY SYSTEM 39 14 25 1 31j 7 DISEASES OF NERVOUS SYSTEM 6 SENSE ORGANS 2 1 1 2 � ENDOCRINE, NUTRITIONAL, METABOLIC, IMMUNITY I — I 1 INFECTIOUS 6 PARASITIC DISEASES 6 4 2 2 13 1 NEOPLASM 51 24 27 I I2 17 30 2 SUICIDE 6 5 1 I 4 1 TOTAL 320 138 182 2 3 Ifl 55 215 35 58 1986 DEATHS OF FRAMINGHAM RESIDENTS BY SEX AND AGE AGE AT DEATH MALE FEMALE TOTAL - Under 1 month. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 4 4 1 month to 1 year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 2 -- 1 to 2 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 0 0 3 to 4 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 2 2 5 to 9 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 0 0 — 10 to 14 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 0 0 15 to 24 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1 7 25 to 34 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 4 8 35 to 44 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 4 10 45 to 54 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 12 28 55 to 64 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 17 53 M 65 to 74 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 56 110 75 to 84 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 105 178 85 to 94 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 93 133 95 and over. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 13 21 -- 244 312 556 ------------------------------------------------------------- DEATHS OF NON-RESIDENTS OCCURRING IN FRAMINGHAM BY SEX AND AGE AGE AT DEATH MALE FEMALE TOTAL Under 1 month. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 2 2 1 month to 1 year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 0 0 1 to 2 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 0 0 3 to 4 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 0 0 5 to 9 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 0 0 10 to 14 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 0 0 15 to 24 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1 4 25 to 34 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1 6 35 to 44 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 5 12 45 to 54 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 3 17 i55 to 64 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 21 44 65 to 74 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 26 50 75 to 84 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 49 94 85 to 94 years. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 63 79 95 and over. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 11 12 138 182 320 ---------------------------------------------------------------- TOTAL DEATHS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 382 494 876 59 1986 REPORTED CASES OF DISEASES DANGEROUS TO THE PUBLIC HEALTH l TEN YEAR PERIOD i DISEASE 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 386 AMEBIASIS 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 I CHICKENPDX 433 402 436 118 148 354 460 149 201 75 BITES: OTHER ANIMALS 21 63 32 45 14 24 14 21 13 7 CAMPYLOBACTER 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20 DOG BITES 162 177 136 126 102 97 91 93 60 9 ENCEPHALITIS 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 p GERMAN MEASLES (RUBELLA) 8 7 9 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 GIARDIASIS 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 HEPATITIS 15 13 19 10 7 17 17 14 13 I LEGIONELLOSIS 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0I MEASLES 3 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 0 2 MALARIA 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 _L MENINGITIS 8 4 1 2 1 3 1 8 2 MUMPS 4 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 SALMONELLOSIS 26 41 35 21 19 29 29 30 35 8 SCARLET FEVER 8 7 11 15 6 11 3 4 STREP THROAT 120 111 166 119 114 121 66 78 97 0 TUBERCULOSIS (ALL FORMS) 2 8 6 4 6 3 2 4 4 5 WHOOPING COUGH 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 �_ YERSINOSIS 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 TOTAL 810 836 853 464 419 659 687 409 436 7 1518 1986 REPORTED CASES OF DISEASES DANGEROUS TO THE PUBLIC HEALTH BY MONTHS DISEASE a a = = w o TOTAL G z o 1986 AMEBIASIS 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 a CHICKENPDX 25 49 49 71 81 54 13 1 I 9 5 17 375 BITES: OTHER ANIMALS 0 1 0 2 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 CAMPYLOBACTER 0 l 2 0 1 2 1 4 3 3 1 2 20 DOG BITES 1 3 4 4 4 8 6 9 6 6 2 6 59 GIARDIASIS 2 2 1 0 0 0 1 2 2 1 1 0 1 12 HEPATITIS 2 0 I 1 1 1 0 2 2 0 0 1 11 MEASLES 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 MALARIA 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 MENINGITIS 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 I 4 MUMPS 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 SALMONELLOSIS 4 1 1 0 1 4 1 I 4 1 0 0 18 TUBERCULOSIS (ALL FORMS) 0 0 1 1 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 YERSINIOSIS 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 TOTAL 35 57 61 78 92 73 24 21 �1821 M929 518 60 1987 LICENSES AND PERMITS ISSUED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH FIVE YEAR PERIOD 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 -- Ice Cream Mfg. 16 9 14 16 25 Food Service Permit 480 455 419 490 418 _. Retail Food Certificates 7 8 15 4 -- Milk License 20 182 189 89 118 Removal/Transp, of Garbage 14 8 8 17 8 Massage Lic. (Est/Ther.) 5 2 9 1 8 Motel/Camp License 11 12 13 14 10 Permit to Keep Animals 18 5 10 7 10 - Swim Pools/Whirlpools 33 34 29 29 32 Appl. Prior to Soil Tests 14 14 9 12 15 Septic Tank Permits 7 26 17 20 12 Subdivision Review 3 1 9 5 17 Disp. Works Inst. Permits 6 9 1(1 z- 1 -1, Syringe License 1 1 3 2 Well Permits 4 18 12 19 16 Funeral Directors LIcenses 10 10 10 10 10 Burial Transp. Permits 801 785 780 751 796 Military Affidavits Filed 126 Fees Turned into General Fund: $13654. $15130. $13789. $15153. $15444. i 61 VETERANS' BENEFITS GRAVES REGISTRATION AND SERVICES To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: The Veterans' Graves Registration Officer's Report 01 for the year ending December 31, 1986 is herewith tc The Veterans Benefits and Services Report for the submitted. year ending December 31, 1986 is herewith submitted. The recording and caring of graves of veterans in D The Veterans Benefits and Services Department our 7 cemeteries continued throughout the year. A provides a myriad of services to the veteran popula- total of 2,391 flags were placed on graves for Memo- tion and their dependents. Additionally we coordinate rial Day and appropriate ceremonies were conducted all of the veteran related ceremonial events, provide on both Memorial Day and Veterans' Day. secretarial services to the Veterans' Council and 1986 R marked my start of a two year term as Secretary/ On June 14th, Flag Day, a flag burning ceremony Treasurer of the Middlesex County Veterans' Services was held. All the flags that had been taken off the Agents Association. graves the previous year were properly disposed of during the ceremony. This ceremony will become an The year 1986 has been an especially busy one for annual event. this Department. the continued erosion of federal benefits coupled with the implementation of the Gov- Respectfully submitted, ernor's Homeless Program has resulted in a tremen- James R. Gavin or dous increase in demand for service work. Graves Registration Officer to June was a very active month during which this th Department was relocated to Room 207 in the Memo- E) rial Building. The new quarters, although smaller, are Pl very bright and comfortable. I extend my sincere fo thanks to the Superintendant of Town Owned Build- HOUSING AiJTHORITY of ings and his staff for the excellent work in renovating be the new office. The Department was instrumental in reactivating To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: interest in putting Framingham back in the "parade pr' circuit." I am serving as Co-Chairman of the newly Submitted herewith is the Annual Report of the fo formed Celebration Committee which is in the process Framingham Housing Authority for the year 1986. 68 of formulating some exciting plans for a gala celebra- The Annual Meeting of the Authority was held on ho tion of Flag Dy/Weekend 1987. April 8, 1986 and the following organization was be My sincere thanks to the Board of Selectmen and voted: fir ot] all Town Departments for their support and Robert J. Flynn, Chairman pr cooperation. Edward F. Convery, Vice Chairman Respectfully submitted, Earl J. Haley, Treasurer William D. Oleson, Member ha James R. Gavin, Director Andrew J. Rogers, Member thf Veterans Benefits& Services Elaine Hixon, Executive Director tin Programs administered by the Authority are: me Family Housing BURIAL AGENT Chapter 200-1 110 Units Chapter 200-2 75 Units Locations: Concord Street, Anzio, Arsenal, Corre- To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: gidor, Guadalcanal, Normandy, Pearl Harbor and St. The Veterans Burial Agent's Report for the year Lo Roads. ending December 31, 1986 is herewith submitted. Elderly Housing There were 191 deaths in our veteran population, Chapter 667-I 25 Units 96 burials in Framingham cemeteries and 95 out-of- Chapter 667-2 40 Units town burials. Chapter 667-3 80 Units Chapter 667-4 80 Units The Burial Grants coordinated thru Federal and Chapter 667-5 120 Units State Agencies continue to keep the expense to the Chapter 667-6 84 Units Town at a minimum. However, the Town did have Chapter 667-7 72 Units the expense of one burial this year. Chapter 667-8 64 Units Respectfully submitted, Locations: Everit Avenue and Grant Street, John J. James R. Gavin Gallagher Drive, Arsenal, Guadalcanal, Normandy, Burial Agent Oran and Cochituate Roads and Rose Kennedy Lane. 62 1�T txl Rental Assistance The Executive Office of Communities and Develop- Chapter 707 96 Units ment has again funded the Framingham Housing Chapter 707 Emergency Access 25 Units Authority for Job Training & Youth Experience The units are located in privately owned buildings Employment. This year through the cooperativeeffort of Metro South/West Employment & Training ' port on scattered sites in Framingham and surrounding Administration, tenants were able to graduate as child with towns. care providers to work at home or at day care centers. Programs administered in conjunction with the US Total grants to the Framingham Housing Authority S in Department of Housing and Urban Development are: for this and previous employment and training pro- A grams, including an on-site infant and toddler Day mo- Mass. 0028-001 125 Units Care Center amount to $456,490.00. cted Mass. 0028-002. 110 Units Locations: Beaver Street and Carlson and Pusan The rental assistance program has increased in Roads and John J. Brady Drive. scope to include "25 Emergency Access Units" for ony' homeless families and a new venture to provide help the Rental Assistance to the "working poor" single person, for rental I of assistance in a rooming house facility. an Section 8 402 Units U.S. Housing Act of 1937 as amended The Framingham Housing Authority continues to These units are located in privately owned buildings pursue funds to provide affordable, safe and sanitary ted, housing for persons of low income by modernizing its Ivin on scattered sites in Framingham and surrounding property thru funds provided by HUB and EOCD for 'icer towns. the benefit of the citizens of Framingham. Funding for the 705 Family Housing Program in The Framingham Housing Authority experienced the amount of $1,248,000 has been approved by the Executive Office of Communities and Development. the loss of Chairman, Attorney Robert J. Flynn, who Plans to build, buy or convert properties in the town passed away November 19, 1986, after serving as counsel and commissioner. for the purpose of renting these units to local families of low income. The grant received will provide 16 2-3 The cooperation extended by the various Town bedroom dwellings. departments and your honorable Board continues to The Authority was successful in purchasing the be of grat assistancce to this Authority in accom- property at 83-85 Alexander Street to provide housing plishing its goals. the for special needs applicants through the state funded Respectfully submitted, I 689 Program. This property will be rehabilitated to Edward F. Convery, Acting Chairman on house eight handicapped persons and is presently Earl J. Haley, Treasurer vas being designed by Stein-Williamson Architectural William D. Oleson, Member firm, Boston, Mass. The Authority at present has two Andrew J. Rogers, Member { other facilities under the same 689 special needs Robert J. Jachowicz, Member I program. Elaine Hixon, Executive Director fi Funding for the conversion of the Memorial School has been increased to the amount of $2,900,000 for the purpose of housing 66 persons in a congregate set- ting designed for frail elderly. Construction is to com- mence Spring of 1987. + li its its + re- st, i its i its its its I its I its its its J. Y• 63 FRAMINGHAM HOUSING AUTHORITY BALANCE SHEET 200-C DECEMBER 31, 1986 CASH . ASSETS Administration Funds C. Petty Cash $ 23,666.86 Revolving Fund Advances 50.00 — 9,000.00 $ 32,716.86 � p ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE Shelter Rent 12,029.80 — Debt Service Subsidy 39,957.70 51,987.50 D FISCAL AGENT FUNDS D1 Debt Service Fund 1,426.35 _ Debt Service Trust Fund 671.82 State Treasurer's Account D] 13,600.00 67.685.67 INVESTMENTS -- Investments 484,553.51 T_( Debt Service Trust Fund 1,090.00 485,643.51 DEFERRED CHARGES Prepaid Insurance 12,270.29 At DEVELOPMENT COST Development Cost 2,176,000.00 Less: Dev. Cost LiquidationDI 1,794,000.00 382,000.00 TOTAL ASSETS FI: $980,316.33 LIABILITIES AND RESERVES ACCOUNTS PAYABLE Accounts Payable — Revolving Fund $ $ 1,923.40 ACCRUED LIABILITIES _ Payments in Lieu of Taxes 6,660.00 RE Matured Interest and Principal 40,561.00 47,221.00 TC DEFERRED CREDITS Residents Prepaid Rents 273.00 FIXED LIABILITIES Bonds Issued 2,176,000.00 Less: Bonds Retired 1,794,000.00 382,000.00 RESERVES Debt Service Reserve 82,302.50 Unamortized Bond Premium 4,496.12 Sale of Property 13,600.00 Operating Reserve 303,255.43 Prior Year Surplus 403,654.05 RESIDUAL RECEIPTS (DEFICITS) 145,244.88 TOTAL LIABILITIES AND RESERVES $980,316.33 64 FRAMINGHAM HOUSING AUTHORITY BALANCE SHEET 667C DECEMBER 31, 1986 ASSETS CASH Administration Funds $ 2,633.48 Revolving Fund Advances 19,950.00 $ 22,583.48 6 ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE Shelter Rent 1,388.00 Other 81.84 1,469.84 0 INVESTMENTS Investments 339,188.78 DEFERRED CHARGES Prepaid Insurance 33,573.00 I DEVELOPMENT COST 7 Development Cost 8,494,000.00 j Less: Dev. Cost Liquidation 775,000.00 7,719,000.00 TOTAL ASSETS $8,115,815.10 l ACCOUNTS PAYABLE LIABILITIES AND RESERVES � Accounts Payable — Other $ 7,212.27 Accounts Payable— Revolving Fund 5,123.22 12,335.49 DEFERRED CREDITS Residents Prepaid Rents 436.00 FIXED LIABILITIES Grants Issued 7,719,000.00 Notes Issued 775,000 00 Less: Notes Retired 775,000 00 Less: Bonds Retired 7,719,000.00 RESERVES Debt Service Reserve 186,022.00 Operating Reserve 225,846.41 Prior Year Surplus 411,868 41 I RESIDUAL RECEIPTS (DEFICITS) (27,824 80) TOTAL LIABILITIES AND RESERVES $8,115,815.10 I 65 FRAMINGHAM HOUSING AUTHORITY BALANCE SHEET 689C DECEMBER 31, 1986 ASSETS CASH Administration Fund $ 79.89 INVESTMENTS Investments 27,800.21 Deferred Charges - PREPAID INSURANCE 464.91, DEVELOPMENT COST Development Cost 369,000.00 TOTAL ASSETS $397,345.13 1 LIABILITIES AND RESERVES I ACCOUNTS PAYABLE _ Other $18,539.00 Employee Payroll Deductions 18,950.01 Revolving Fund 411.01 RESERVES Operating Reserve 9,172.10 RESIDUAL RECEIPTS (Deficits) 397,345.13 TOTAL LIABILITIES AND RESERVES $397,345.13 7 FRAMINGHAM HOUSING AUTHORITY BALANCE SHEET 707 DECEMBER 31, 1986 ASSETS CASH $153,232.06 ADVANCE TO REVOLVING 500.0( INVESTMENTS 27,401.66 PREPAID INSURANCE 3,247.20 TOTAL ASSETS $185,380.9: ACCOUNTS PAYABLE LIABILITIES $ 9,954.79 STATE SHARE — UNALLOTED 103,744.74 SURPLUS 70.681.34 TOTAL LIABILITIES $I84,380.9,' 66 FRAMINGHAM HOUSING AUTHORITY BALANCE SHEET SECTION 8 DECEMBER 31, 1986 ASSETS 189 CASH General Fund $89,256.70 1.27 ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE HUD 13,679.00 1.91 Other 55,884.66 69,563.66 ADVANCES 1.00 Limited Revolving Fund 11,000.00 11,000.00 13 INVESTMENTS General Fund 244,994.19 LAND, STRUCTURES AND EQUIPMENT Land, Structures and Equipment 5,239.17 TOTAL ASSETS $420,053.72 .Ol LIABILITIES AND SURPLUS 1f ACCOUNTS PAYABLE Vendors and Contractors $7,496.14 .13 RESERVES Unreserved surplus (12,852,585.31) Operating Reserve — Section 8 HAP Projects 401,157.81 Project Account — Unfunded — Section 8 HAP Projects 418,243.04 (12,033,184.46) Cumulative HUD Annual Contributions 12,445,742.04 Book Value of Capital Assets Conveyed to Homebuyers 412,557.58 TOTAL SURPLUS AND LIABILITIES $420,053.72 Q C 06 00 66 2_0 9_1 1 14 19 11 67 FRAMINGHAM HOUSING AUTHORITY BALANCE SHEET MASS 281/2 DECEMBER 31, 1986 ASSETS tov CASH ice; General Fund $ 50,478.39 Its Change Fund 25.00 $ 50,503.39 res ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE inginc Tenants 8,811.50 as ; Other 12,210.73 21,022.23 tha ADVANCES yot Limited Revolving Fund 10,000 00 1 INVESTMENTS Fra General Fund 72,976.12 apI DEBT AMORTIZATION FUNDS nli` Debt Service Fund 390.08 Ad Advance Amortization Fund 570.11 wit Deposits with HUD 394,888.32 395,848.51 tees LAND, STRUCTURES AND EQUIPMENT I Development Cost 6,721,467.33 prc Less: Development Cost-Contra 1,609,050.65 5,112,416.68 Tw Dei Land, Structures and Equipment 1,687,353 48 6,799,770 16 tiol TOTAL ASSETS $7,350,120.41 tiol fro ma: LIABILITIES AND SURPLUS ser, ACCOUNTS PAYABLE S Vendors and Contractors $ $ 6,552.69 NOTES PAYABLE cen Project Notes — Non HUD 4,761,000.00 inv, ACCRUED LIABILITIES iml Payment in Lieu of Taxes 29,098.77 DEFERRED CREDITS sev Tenants Prepaid Rents 410.00 con RESERVES C Unreserved Surplus (2,036,227.58) hot Operating Reserve 106,883.17 feel Total Surplus from Operationspar (1,929,344.41) Cumulative HUD Annual Contributions 4,482,403.36 mo Book Value of Capital Assets Conveyed to Homebuyers 2,553,058.95 I TOTAL SURPLUS AND LIABILITIES hav $7,350,120.41 cou alsc I Edi ent am pro heli the. 68 YOUTH SERVICES Project DEPTH, a teen theatre frogram on drug and alcohol use, performed to 1,640 teens and parents during the year. The Youth Coordinator's Office (Y.C.O.) is the Court Involved Youth Program: Teens on proba- town youth department which offers a variety of serv- tion that have not benefited from more traditional ices to adolescents aged 12-21 and to their families. counseling programs are referred to our Court Out- Its programs have developed over the past 13 years in reach Program. Twenty-six youths have participated response to the needs of youth and the gaps in exist- in this intensive program which involves counseling, ing services offered in Framingham. Y.C.O. services outreach, activity groups, and family work. The include programs for the troubled adolescent as well Court Outreach Counselor also provides advocacy as programs that are more preventative in nature and and service coordination for these youth. that encourage participation from any Framingham youth or parent. Prevention Programs: Seminars for middle and high school students on concerns prevalent to this age The Youth Coordinator's Office is governed by the group have been an important vehicle to help youth to Framingham Youth Commission, a 5-member board address issues before they become problems and iden- appointed by the town Selectmen. The Youth Com- tifying those youth who need further help. 690 youths mission also draws on the expertise of the Youth participated in workshops this year. Advisory Board, 12 high school students who work with the Youth Coordinator to identify the needs of Generations, a Y.C.O. sponsored cable T.V. pro- teens and to evaluate Y.C.O. services. gram run by teens, produced shows throughout the year on topics such as missing children, teen preg- Located at 50 Lawrence Street, Y.C.O. services are nancy, suicide and available youth services. provided by five full-time and two part-time staff. Two of these staff are paid through contracts with the Funds from the Community Development Block Dept. of Public Health/Division of Drug Rehabilita- Grant enabled the Y.C.O. to run a summer theatre j tion and one through the Middlesex Juvenile Proba- program at the Beaver Street Housing Project, which tion Department. The ability to generate funding served 25 children. from multiple sources has enabled the department to Information and Referral: Over 350 people needing maximize services while providing quality and free information or referral to appropriate services were services to Framingham youth. served in 1986. Services provided to youth in 1986 include: Community Development: Y.C.O. takes leadership Counseling: One hundred and twenty three adoles- in developing a community response to issues affect- cents were seen in counseling this year. Families were ing youth through community organizing, program involved in the majority of cases in recognition of the development, public outreach and coalition building. important role of the family in an adolescent's life. The Youth Coordinator also works closely with other i youth service agencies to coordinate delivery of qual- d Group Work: Activity and treatment groups gave ity services to town youth. seventy four youths an opportunity to share common f concerns, give mutual support and learn coping skills. Submitted by: Outreach: Y.C.O. counselors work day and evening Youth Coordinator Virginia Roberts, M.S.W. hours, are available to meet with youth wherever they i feel most comfortable, and work closely with schools, Youth Commission parents and community agencies to make services Leona Ittleman, Chairperson more accessible to youth. Nancy Daniels 5 Drug and Alcohol Treatment: Forty seven youths John HowlandWilliam Kiley having problems with drugs and alcohol were seen for Regina Ryan counseling. Groups for children of alcoholics were also provided. Drug and Alcohol Education: The Y.C.O. Drug Educator/Counselor reached 1,790 teenagers and par- ents by providing drug education in school classrooms and to church and community groups. Training was provided to 30 professionals who work with teens to help them identify substance abusing teens and refer them to the help they need. s 69 EDGELL GROVE CEMETERY To the Inhabitants of the Town of Framingham: The Trustees have met as required for the transac- The Trustees of Edgell Grove Cemetery submit tion of business of the cemetery and have made fre- herewith their report for the year of 1986. quent inspections of the premises. Following the Town election at which Geoffrey E. The financial report of the Treasurer of Trustees is Fitts was elected a Trustee for the term of five years, submitted herewith: the Trustees organzied by electing George G. Willis, Respectfully submitted: Chairman, Geoffrey E. Fitts, Treasurer, Nancy Bian- George G. Wills chi, Clerk, Julian T. Hargraves, Jr. as Assistant Nancy F. Bianchi Treasurer and Sally M. Brown, Vice Chairman. Sally M. Brown Geoffrey E. Fitts Julian T. Hargraves REPORT OF THE TREASURER OF EDGELL GROVE CEMETERY For year ending December 31, 1986 Balance ending December 31, 1985 Shawmut Community Bank $ 1,288.44 Sale of Family Lots $19,550.00 Sale of Single graves 4,200.00 23,750.00 Interments 29,350.00 Foundations 3,639.00 Miscellaneous 399.00 33,388.00 57,138.00 Invested on Savings & Invested Funds Accounts: Income Perpetual Care Funds 38,376.30 38,376.30 Addition to Care Funds Family Lots 10,450.00 Single Graves 2,850.00 13,300.00 Savings transferred to checking account: 73,500.00 $183,602.74 PAYMENTS — 1986 Care of grounds, buildings and burial services: Payroll: Caretaker $76,845.55 Truck, tools and equipment 1,652.94 Grave liners 4,296.00 Materials and Repairs 5,920.15 Miscellaneous 564.63 $ 89,279.27 Utilities 2,435.63 Repairs: Chapel 21,785.00 Tomb 540.00 Caretaker's house 5,602.00 9,912.78 Administration: Payroll 9,177.50 Office Supplies 735.28 27,927 00 Perpetual Care Funds Paid to Town Family Lots 9,740.00 Single Graves 2,850.00 12,590.00 Perpetual Care Fund Framingham Savings Bank 38,376.30 70 $180,520.98 Balance: December 31, 1986 Shawmut Community Bank $ 3,081.76 Edgar Newell Fund (1-350029-3) 6,912.15 Helen Jennison Fund (1-350030-1) 25,704.81 Ella M. Hastings Fund (1-350032-7) 4,441.72 Thomas Portmore Fund (1-500084) 6,915.98 Z- Term Certificate (350033-5) 44,748.25 e Term Certificate (1-350031-9) 34,055.81 Framingham Savings Bank (79-001461-7) 26,702.79 is $152,563.27 1: Is " INVESTED FUNDS ACCOUNTS n :s 12/31/85 12/31/86 Int. 's Edgar Newell Fund 1-350029-3 $ 6,476.90 $ 6,912.15 $ 435.25 Helen Jennison Fund 1-350030-1 24,086.04 25,704.81 1,618.77 Ella M. Hastings Fund 1-350032-7 4,162.05 4,441.72 279.67 Thomas Portmore Funds 1-5000084 6,507.85 6,915.98 408.13 Framingham Savings Bank 1-104177 18.98 18.98 -0- Term Certificate 1-350033-5 41,930.15 44,748.25 2,818.10 Term Certificate 1-350031-9 31,911.12 34,055.81 2,144.69 Framingham Savings Bank 79-001461-7 57,430.50 26,702.79 4,012.67 $172,523.59 $149,481.51 $11,717.28 s 71 ni er EDUCATIONAL . , ' n( nc th of W1 SCHOOL COMMITTEE g Y gr of Arts and English with a view not only examining these of elements of our curriculum as individual entities, but UI also as they are interrelated into the total framework hi A strong commitment of time and energy is a pre- of our programs for children. sil requisite for a well-balanced and vital school system We are currently having the Administration provide cc in the 1980's, and this year's School Committee has us with structural studies of both our high schools so been both hard-working and tenacious in this regard. that if and when the decision is made to consolidate to We held forty-four meetings of the full committee; into one we will have at our disposal sufficient infor- w: nearly a dozen sub-committee meetings; we met on an mation about the facilities to make a determination as ar ad hoc basis with the Finance Committee and the to which will better serve our needs for the future. ar Board of Selectmen; and were in attendance at all One major factor that will affect not only the conti- gr meetings of the Annual and Special Town Meetings. nuity of our programs but the entire educational com- su The result of these efforts has been a great many munit during the coming la accomplishments, some of which are readily seen and Y n g Year d the retirement of the er measurable and others which will not be seen until Superintendent of Schools and several of our top administrators. Although we recognize the retirement some point in the future. is a well-deserved milestone in the personal and I For instance, we worked at length to modify our professional lives of these dedicated individuals, we ar transportation policy, which resulted in our being will nonetheless miss their leadership and council. We to able to lower the mileage limits for children in the feel certain we speak on behalf of our entire commu- W elementary schools so that more of them are eligible nity as we wish them well upon entering into this next h, for busing. This accomplishment was achieved in con- phase of their lives and we send our assurance to the gr cert with the Board of Selectmen and the Safety Offi- town that we will do our best to replace them with pc cer in response to the tremendous increase in speed highly qualified and dedicated new leaders. he and congestion on our town's streets. We thank the town for its continued supportto of We worked to avail ourselves of the many financial public education and we affirm our commitment to fr benefits of the new School Improvement Act (Chapter the process as well. isi 188) which has resulted in our providing teachers with ac salary enhancements both through professional devel- Respectfully submitted, iti opment grants and the Horace Mann Teacher Pro- Mildred L. Katzman, Chairman cc gram. Another of this statute's provisions involves Mary DiManno, Vice-Chairman Tl providing individual schools with supplemental funds Waldo B. Lyon, Secretary do Ti for students and teachers through their School Dennis W. Cardiff Bruce E. Cohen ha h, Improvement Councils. Eachchool in Framingham Joseph P. Conlon ca has a Council established and we have applied for our Edward W. Foran ar ar full apportionment of these monies. We worked to implement many of the recommen- dations of our Middle School Program Review Com- th mittee which we believe has resulted in theSUPERINTENDENT OF th development of a more cohesive and better-balanced w middle school program and has SCHOOLS h, P g provided us with a more week-defined perspective of our system. El We worked closely with the Townwide PTO Coun- (RIGAS P. RIGOPOULOS) (I cil in the study of seat belts for school buses and this August 1987 marks the end of thirty-seven years of study resulted in our deciding that when the next bid service as a teacher and administrator in the Fra- mi specifications go out for our transportation fleet we mingham Public Schools. For more than five of these pa will obtain estimates for the costs of buses both with many years I have had the privilege and honor to stt and without seat belts and can consider the matter serve as Superintendent of Schools. de further in the coming year. I have enjoyed the many challenges of the position de We received the first set of state assessment scores and have tried to meet these challenges in or which tested our curriculum in grades 3, g providing g 7 and 11. and ensuring effective education for the students in The administration is currently analyzing the results our schools. As an educator, I have always believed in $6 in order to modify or refine our programs if necessary education as an investment, not as an expense, for the Fe to better meet the educational needs of our children. value of education, although often discussed in terms set We have also directed the Administration to do a cur- of its worth to the individual, must be perceived more tic riculum assessment in the areas of Reading, Language broadly as an investment which benefits our commu- Pr 72 I nity and society as a whole. Our public schools are the During April of 1986, all third, seventh and elev- engines of a free society, institutions to be cherished, enth grade students in the Framingham Public nourished, and must be given the highest priority. In Schools participated in the Massachusetts Educational the past alarms were sounded by a few eminent gurus Assessment Program. Testing included a comparison of education. I believe that the education evolution of the student scores similar to student scores we need now and in the future will come from the throughout the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. grass roots concerns of the customarily silent majority The results of the tests have been reviewed by the se of good, patient, contributing citizens. They will rise School Committee, parents and the total staff. Dur- st up and demand educational quality that can produce ing the 1986-87 school year, changes in curriculum rk highly informed, socially mature, thoughtful, respon- and other aspects of the education program will be sible people. They will perceive education not as a implemented with the aim of improving our total edu- ce cost but as a wise investment paying huge dividends. cational program. ;o I see our schools becoming more effective transmit- This year the Massachusetts Department of Educa- te ters of our heritage and increasing influential places tion implemented their School Improvement Program r- where our population becomes more unified in spirit at the elementary level. This program included sup- i is and in our understanding of our freedoms, liberties, plementary state funding for all elementary schools at and responsibilities. I predict our schools will place a the rate of $10 per pupil. Parents, teachers and the i- greater emphasis on a common value system including school administrator of each of our nine elementary simple honesty, truthfulness, cooperation, respect for schools designed creative programs that were funded 1 law, patriotism, and recognition of the rights of oth- under the school improvement concept. The same `e ers. These ethical matters are most essential. program will be expanded to the secondary level dur- p ing the 1986-87 school year and the same procedure of it Having been a part of this educational investment, having individual school staff and parents develop d I shall always be grateful to so many for their support creative programs that will eventually be approved by e and cooperation which have been given me during my the School Committee and funded by the State. e tenure as Superintendent. The enthusiastic support with which teachers and many others have favored me Over an eight-year period, declining enrollment and I has been an inspiration and a great comfort. I am reduction in force stabilized our staff to the extent e grateful to our fine teaching, administrative and sup- that we did not hire any new teachers for eight years. I port services staff in our schools. I extend to all my With the leveling off of enrollment over the past two heartfelt thanks for I shall never forget the warm and years, we have employed ten new teachers to replace touching expression of their kindness, courtesy and staff members who have retired. It appears that this f friendliness. I am articular) trend will continue in the foreseeable future. 1 � particularly indebted by my admin- istrative assistant and to our central office staff. I In order to keep abreast of exemplary programs in admire them for their professional and personal qual- surrounding communities, the Directors of Elemen- ities and appreciate the splendid fashion in which they tary and Secondary Education have joined The Edu- ' cooperated with me in the performance of my tasks. cational Cooperative (TEC) and meet monthly with i Their faith and loyalty were my greatest assets. My assistant superintendents from Wellesley, Walpole, debts to others are many. The governing bodies of the Wayland, Westwood, Natick, Holliston, Norwood f Town of Framingham and the community at large and Needham to discuss the public education in gen- have always demonstrated their support for our edu- eral and share ideas and programs that can improve i cational programs and our school system, for which I our educational program. am most thankful. A greatly improved system of contacting substitute While I do look forward to my retirement, 1 know teachers in grades kindergarten through twelve went that I shall miss my daily contacts with all and I know into operation during April of 1986. A part-time that the memories of thirty-seven years in education employee has been hired to operate a centralized call- will remain with me always. It is indeed an honor to ing system that streamlined the procedure of contact- i have served as Superintendent of Schools. ing substitutes. All administrators and department ELEMENTARY EDUCATION heads feel that the new system saves a great deal of (Dr. Alvin L. Collins, Director) the substitute's and administrators time and is much more efficient than having twenty different adminis- On October 1, 1986 the enrollment in the Fra- trators competing for the same subs on the same mingham elementary schools was 4,122 students com- morning. pared to the previous year's enrollment of 4,187 students. The difference of 65 students is the smallest Under Chapter 188, $69,300 of entitlement funding decline in a number of years. We project that the in the form of Horace Mann grants was received by decline will be even smaller and will level off in 1989 the Framingham Public Schools. After a great deal of or 1990. screening, thirty-eight of our teachers in grades kin- dergarten through twelve were given grants to work The elementary schools received a planning grant of on individual and small group proposals that should $6500 to study our Early Childhood Program. During have a positive effect on school curriculum and meth- February of 1987, the results of that study will be pre- odology of teaching. sented to the School Committee with recommenda- tions for possible changes in the Early Childhood The school year 1986-87 with State Assessment test- Program in the Framingham Public Schools. ing, generous funding under Chapter 188 and many 73 improved programs certainly has been exciting for the tests were administered to all students in grades 3, 6 staff and students. We have every reason to believe and 9. Results are being compiled by the state and will that this exhuberance will continue and can only be received during the spring of 1987. result in the on-going improvement of a fine educa- Summer workshops during 1986 were most produc- • tional program. tive. Our teachers worked in a number of specific • 1 subject areas in order to continue our process of I revising and updating all curriculum areas. SECONDARY EDUCATION (Arthur DelPrete, Director) Specific workshops this past summer were: ext During 1986, our secondary enrollments began to • S.A.T. Test Preparation col stabilize. North High enrolled 1,339, a decline of 20 • Mathematics Basic Skills students. South High enrolled 1,044, a decline of 35 • Computer Applications I students. • Advance Computer file • Middle School Computer Curriculum the For our two middle schools, Farley enrolled 630 • Industrial Arts Dept. acc students and Walsh enrolled 623 students. Revised Computer Aided Design incl Projections indicate that enrollments will continue (CAD) mic to decline slightly each year with the two middle Graphic Arts Composition gua schools stabilizing at about 500 students in each Numerical Control Machines rev: school. Robotic Activities gift • The Research Paper Our two high schools will continue to enroll over • Modern Language Review I two thousand students through at least 1989. The • preliminary Report - Farley Survey of mer Long Range Planning Committee of the School Com- School Climate mittee has continued to review enrollments carefully I each year in order to best determine if and when fur- * American Government Units for U.S. tea(Writing Skills/Word Processing the cher consolidation of secondary schools should be History Survey I and II his implemented. • Stress Management and Coping Skills At this time the secondary administration continues • Advanced Word Processing 1 the to recommend maintaining two middle schools indefi- In addition to these summer workshops, the state nitely and two high schools until total high school has provided our commuity with $69,300 to fund D enrollment is under 1,900 students. Horace Mann Grants during the 1986-87 school year. D' The passage of the Public School Improvement ActA' of 1985 by the state legislature has resulted in the Over seventy-five teachers have developed propos- M implementation of a number of new programs in our als for workshops, curriculum development or other -Ai school system. innovative programs for our schools. -TI The Horace Mann Grant Program will provide Tt The Massachusetts State Assessment Tests were excellent incentives and recognition to our talented -M administered to all students in grades 3, 7 and 11. staff members as they continue their efforts to -St' Students were tested in Reading, Math and Science and scores were compared with state averages and improve and re-energize our programs. The state "C� other similar communities. should be commended for establishing this most Cl Ar effective program. Every effort should be made to Our results were as follows: encourage the state to continue to fund the Horace T den MASSACHUSETTS STATE ASSESSMENT AVERAGE SCORES imn STATE FRAMINGHAM M Grade Reading Math Science Reading Math Science reth 3 1300 1300 1300 1330 1320 1320 PUl 7 1300 1300 1300 1330 1330 1320 (Ma 11 1300 1300 1300 1390 1380 1350 P As noted above, Framingham students scored well Mann Grant Program in future years. drer take above state averages in all areas. Our extensive program of in-service education -to Review committees have been established in all courses for our teachers continued this past year. Our ize schools in order to analyze the assessment results in department sponsored courses during the spring and sery more detail. fall semesters: proi These tests are most helpful in appraising current • Math Problem Solving an e curriculum and establishing base line data for future • Teaching the Troubled Child and curriculum analysis and planning. • Nutrition Update tr°° • Science Refresher T The second phase of the state testing program • Commodore 64 - More Uses (2 courses) 'Cour involved the state takeover of basic skills tests. These ling 74 6 • Word Processing in Lex (2 courses) education personnel, school nurses, and a work study ill . Suicide Prevention coordinator. Reports by those who provide direction • Computer Programming for Beginners and supervision to pupil personnel services appears c- • Intermediate Computer Programming elsewhere in this annual report, and will serve to dem= :ic • Using the Computer for Record Keeping and onstrate the scope and complexity of the services pro- of Report Writing vided throughout the Framingham Public School • Advanced Word Processing System. For me to expand on them would be a dupli- We project a continued strong interest in the cation of effort. extension course program with increased interest in When I retire on August 31, 1987, I shall have com- computer application courses in specific subject areas. pleted thirty-five years in the Framingham School The Middle School Program Review Committee Department as a Special Education teacher, Supervi- filed its final report with the school committee during sor of Special Classes, Director of Special Education, the Superintendent, and Director of Pupil Per- the spring of 1986. Major recommendations that were sonnei Services. I have always considered it a privilege Per- accepted for implementation by the school committee to be a part of this system and to have participated in included a revised philosophy of education for the its growth from a small system to one of the largest in middle schools; expansion of the elective modern lan- guage program from three to five periods per week; a the state. I would like to think I have contributed to that growth in some small measure. I hasten to add, revised six day program schedule; and a program for however, that the Framingham School System is the gifted and talented students in grades seven and eight. result of the combined and cooperative efforts of The middle school principals and staff will imple- many individuals and groups too numerous to men- ment these changes as of September, 1987. tion here. To all, I give my sincere thanks for their During 1986, our secondary staff was saddened by support, encouragement, cooperation, and, most the untimely death of Mr. Richard Farley, a veteran especially for their dedication to and interest in teacher at Walsh Middle School. He will be missed by children. his many friends, fellow teachers and students. I shall miss the many bonds of friendship which I would also like to acknowledge the retirement of have developed over the years, and my best wishes go the following secondary staff members: with you in the years to come. ate i nd -Donald St. Andre- North High School GUIDANCE AND SOCIAL WORK SERVICES fi r -Dante DeFazio - Farley Middle School The Department of Counseling and Social Work Augustus Luparelli - Director of Industrial Arts Services is staffed by twenty-six guidance counselors, I os• Barbara Weinstein - Walsh Middle School eleven school adjustment counselors (social workers) ier Anthony Coppola- North High School and two Career Information Para-Professionals. The -Thomas Cairney-Farley Middle School demands made on the time and skills of staff mem- ide -Thomas Murphy-South High School bers continue to increase each year, and their case- ted -Marion Ewald - Walsh Middle School loads reflect the increasing severity of the problems to -Stella Driscoll - Walsh Middle School that confront our youth at all levels. ate -Catherine Walker-South High School Counseling and Social Work Services are available ost -Chandler Creedon -Walsh Middle School in all schools and to all students; and counselors and to -Angelo Insalaco -Director of Physical Education social workers are an integral part of each school's ace Their contribution to our schools and to our stu- professional team. They consult with teachers and dents over their man administrators; provide counseling to individual and y years of service is small groups of students; work closely with parents; immeasurable. conduct assessments; participate in school evaluation We wish them many happy, healthy years of team activities; participate in (Core) TEAM evalua- retirement. tion meetings; and serve on individual school and sys- PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES temwide committees. (Mary A. Mespelli, Director) Of major significance has been their involvement, Pupil Personnel Services are available to all chil- over the past two years, in the Child Assault Preven- dren, in all grades, and in all schools. These services tion Program. All elementary counselors and ten of take many forms but each has as its singular purpose the eleven social workers have been involved in the ion -to maximize learning for each student, and to equal- organization, training, pilot study, implementation of )>u ize educational opportunities for all students. The that program. In March, the program was imple- ind services are provided by highly trained and qualified mented in all kindergartens and in grade one through professionals who recognize the right of each child to six in all elementary schools. In December, the gro- an education, and who have dedicated their individual gram was presented to all second and fifth graders as and combined talents to facilitate the goals of educa- a refresher and to all elementary students new to this tion in the Framingham Public School System. system. Throughout each phase of this project, the contributions of counselors and social workers have Those who provide these services are: guidance been significant, and their professionalism of the counselors, social workers, school psychologists, bi- highest calibre. They are to be commended for their lingual and english as a second language staff, special time, effort, and, most especially, for their skill in 75 dealing with a program of this nature, and the system people. It may save one of their lives! We also distrib- det is to be commended for its support of this and similar uted materials for the "Great American Smoke-out." Edi programs. Dr. Avery and Dr. Whitcomb perform sports physi- T cals at the high schools prior to every sport season, DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES but this year we also started doing them in the spring plel (Dr. Miriam Redlo, Coordinator) at the middle schools. They were done only for grade tem In 1968, the Department of Psychological Services 8 students who would be going on to North or South Res was increased by one full time school pshychologist. High Schools. We had reasonable success in getting in The deparment now consists of a Coordinator who the students interested in the sports. In doing this, we rate also provides direct services, eight school psycholo- were aided by some of the coaching staff who took uni gists (four of whom are full time and four are half time to talk to the classes. stru thr( time), and one half time pshychological assistant. Our nurses were all re-certified for CPR during an cap School psychologists continue to perform the much In-Service program, and two of our nurses partici- ices requested psychological evaluations of referred stu- pated in a three day summer workshop on "Recom- out dents who are experiencing learning/behavioral diffi- mended Procedure for Sports Physical Exami- As culties in school. Consultation to school personnel, nations." The results were concise and to the point. and and treatment services are increasing. Two Boston University Nurse Practitioner students all This year, the addition of one psychologist has were with us during the fall. Spe allowed additional time in each school. Now, each The fall is always a busy time in our school health 11 psychologist spends approximately two days in each rooms. During this time, all are tested for rele building. There was also a large change in staff in Vision and Hearing at the middle and high schools. cial 1986 but careful recruiting of new personnel permit- Head checks are completed at the elementary schools afte ted an easy and successful transition. and new students' records are received. All elemen- teer tary schools hold "Health Days" during which they School psychologists are actively involved as mem- check vision and hearing, heights and weights, and F bers of important committees, workshops, and have a visit from the town's dental hygienist. This app professional organizations. In 1986, several Horace fall, we started our yearly immunization survey for (P.1 Mann Grants were awarded to groups including the state. We were 100% immunized as mandated by for school psychologists. Also, psychologists were chair- state law, as usual. The persons of workshops, including "Retention" and $25: "Revision of CAPP Program for Kindergarten Stu- This year we decided to hold our "Flu Clinics" for dents." Active involvement in the current committee locally in individual schools. This worked out very app to evaluate the curriculum as a result of the Mass. well. We gave 83 shots without asking our nurses to am( Assessment Scores is also ongoing, as well as in the work overtime. tion Pre-School Grant Committee planning for programs All of these special programs must be run, along ing in this area. with CORE'S, parent conferences, grade level physi- Prol cal examinations, and taking care of the sick and Ir DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL HEALTH SERVICES injured. Our nurses also go into the classroom as dem (Marcia Buckminster, Supervisor) requested, to teach on other health-related subjects. Dec The School Health Services Department is staffed Tutoring demands channeled through this office in by eleven full time school nurses and two part time 1986 increased. There seems to be an increase in eo- Prot school physicians. The demand for school health tional problems in our youth. There has also been an 502. related services continue to be great and the staff's increase in the number of pupils being certified by the 502.; response to those demands continues to be exemplary. state to take psychotropic drugs during school time. 502.. Our nurses participated in Pre-school Screening for These are duly prescribed by a physician and given by 502., children with suspected special needs and in Kinder- an R.N. 502., garten Screening in all of our schools. This takes a A Framingham school nurse is a very busy profes- 502.. great deal of time, both in planning and implementa- sional. Both, Boston University and Boston College 502.1 tion. My thanks to Carol Getchell who helped me nursing facilities have requested our help in precept- 502.' schedule these screenings. ing their students because they hear such great things 502.1 In February, Sylvia Neighbors from the Mass. about Framingham's School Health Services. Department of Public Health, Division of Maternal Ye and Child Health, came out to certify new nurses and of 1, substitutes to screen for scoliosis. This was an excel- DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL EDUCATION Servi lent program and I hope to have her come to Fra- (Joseph H. Haughey, Acting Director) In mingham in 1987 to give our staff nurses a refresher December of 1986 marked the completion of twelve Conti course. years of operating the Department of Special Educa- the I At the high school level, our nurses ran a program tion under the mandates of Chapter 766. Conti of Breast Self-Examination for the girls and Testicu- The Framingham School System can reflect on the the a lar Self-Examination for the boys. This was done with past twelve years with a great deal of pride in respect POssi films from the American Cancer Society. The self- to the programs and services it has effectively pro- envir examination is an important tool to give our young vided for its handicapped students, and with equal 76 determination is committed to maintaining effective DEPARTMENT OF TRANSITIONAL programs and services to meet the needs of Special BILINGUAL EDUCATION Education students now and in the future. (Helen F. Brody, Director) i- The Special Education Department provides a com- a, The Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) Pro- g plete program of services throughout the entire sys- gram (including English As A Second Language) and le tem from the pre-school level to the high school level. the Transitional English As A Second Language Pro- h Resource rooms have been established in all schools gram for Limited English Proficient (LEP) Low Inci- ig in addition to a total of nineteen substantially sepa- dence Population, Refugee and other non-TBE e rate classrooms, specifically designed to address the students operate under mandates of legislation of k unique needs of students requiring a more highly both the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the structured program, which have been established Federal Government. throughout the system. Moreover, low incident handi- ,n capped students are provided Special Education serv- Chapter 71A (TBE Act) of the General Laws of the i- ices through the Project ACCEPT Collaborative or Commonwealth of Massachusetts requires each city, 1- out of district day residential placement facilities. town, or school district in the Commonwealth with an i- As has been the case in past years, a number of new enrollment of twenty or more LEP students in any I t. and/or modified programs were implemented in 1986, language classification to provide a full time program is all designed to maximize the learning potential of of TBE. In Framingham such instruction is provided Special Education students. for the Hispanic linguistic group, while Low Inci- dence Populations, Refugees, and other non-TBE stu- In a continuing effort to provide meaningful and dents, receive a full time program of Transitional )r relevant services for special needs students, the Spe- English As A Second Language. S. cial Education Department continues to provide an Is after school activity program for approximately four- These programs offer full time instruction to speak- j teen adolescent mentally retarded students. ers of other languages until such time as they achieve y For the eleventh consecutive year the Department a level of proficiency in the aural comprehension, id Y P speaking, reading and writing of English which will is applied for two Special Education entitlement grants enable them to compete with their English speaking )r (P.L. 94-142 and P.L. 89-313) which provided funds peers and to be transferred into the standard curricu- )y for a number of supplemental programs and services. lum program. The P.L. 94-142 request was approved for a total of $255,510 and the P.L. 89-313 proposal was approved Both, the TBE/ESL and TESL Programs encom- for a total of $26,250. Additionally, the Department passing Grades Kindergarten through Twelve are pro- rY applied for, and received, an Incentive Grant in the vided on the Elementary, Middle, and High School to amount of $13,840 which was applied to the educa- levels at a grade appropriate facilities. Program staff tional cost of a Framingham youngster who is resid- consists of a Program Director, Bilingual Secretary, lg ing in a group home and attending a special day Certified TBE and ESL Teachers (includes one 't_ program. department head), Teacher Aides, a Home/School f Liaison Worker, and a Parent Advisory Council ; id In respect to the delivery of direct services to stu- I Coordinator. Bilingual Special Education personnel as dents by prototype, the information below is as of for the appropriate linguistic groups are assigned to C December 1, 1986: the program through the Department of Special Edu- in I cation and Pupil Personnel support services offered Prototype Number to the program include Bilingual Social Workers and in 502.1 Regular Education with Modification 122 Guidance Counselors. he 502.2 Up to 25% of time in Special Education 503 e 502.3 Up to 60% of time in Special Education 161 In addition to its prescribed course of instruction, )y 502.4 Self-contained Class 210 the department has participated in two very innova- 502.4(1) Self-contained Class (Separate Facility) 0 tive and successful programs. The first is Project 502.5 Private Day School 43 EASE (Early Access through School Experience), a s 502.6 Residential Placement 5 Title VII ESEA Federally funded Pre-School Program to 502.7 Home/Hospital Program 18 for Limited English Proficient children who lack the 502.8 3 and 4 year olds 14 experience necessary for success in their future school Total 1076 achievement. The project's goal is an early interven- tion strategy designed to ease the transition, ensure Year end reviews were conducted in May and June more positive academic and social experiences and Of 1986 for all students receiving Special Education better prepare the participants for entrance into the Services. school system at the Kindergarten level. In summary, the Department of Special Education The second is a Collaborative Project: Minority ✓e continued to function in an effective manner during Identification, between Framingham South High a- the past year and remains firm in its commitment to School and Massachusetts Bay Community College. continue to provide special needs students between This project attempts to attract and expose identified 1e the ages of 3 and 22 the highest quality of education students to the fields of Science, Math, and Allied ct Possible within the least restrictive educational Health related fields and thereby attempt to address o- environment. the historical under representation of minorities in al 77 these fields by exposing them and preparing them for These improvements to our facilities benefit many these critical professions; motivate students to pursue residents of Framingham, first, to our school age chil- higher education with the goal of establishing their dren and then to many others who use our schools presence in the aforementioned professions; introduce after school hours, evenings, weekends, and holidays Limited English Proficient students to, and equip for programs such as sports, swimming, religious T them with, general computer awareness and their meetings, satellite college classes, adult evening edu- cha applications in order to be able to take full advantage cation, day care centers, head-start programs, educa- Hol of the possibilities of new technologies. tion of handicapped persons, musical programs, and WORK STUDY PROGRAM school dances, school plays, and school fairs that fea- imn (Eugene F. McCarthy, Coordinator) ture crafts, art and furniture built by school children. schi Additional engineering studies recently completed the During 1986, a total of 174 students entered the will provide the needed back-up for extending the the Work Study Program at Framingham North and financial impact of major repairs over a period of reoi South High Schools. The status of the program, as of three to five years through careful long range plan- less December 31, 1986, is as follows: ning, coordinated with the all important educational h South North long range plans to assure the best facilities possible hen January 1986 graduates 7 1 throughout the period involved. of June 1986 graduates 23 5 The Buildings and Grounds Department looks for- Del: Returned to full schedule 12 10 ward to serving the needs of our teachers and admin- eves Left for evening school 4 6 for Left for employment 6 4 istrators as an integral and important part of a tion Left undecided 5 3 winning team that continues to provide our children of Framingham the best available educational system se Moved or transferred 5 1 wer anywhere. Currently on Work Study 70 12 regi TOTAL 132 42 We wish to express our sincere appreciation of K Students at both high schools continue to use Town Meeting support in the past and look forward ciat the Work Study Office as the main source of to a bright and fulfilling future. pro, finding part time job opportunities in the commu- BUSINESS OPERATIONS con nity. The number of job postings this year were (Chester B. Adams, Jr., Director) inte much greater than in any other year that I have a S Meeting the objectives and goals of the Fra- experienced. This reflects the low unemployment mingham Public Schools requires a managerial team pro' rate in the Metro West area. I expect that 1987 approach which can apply the resources and expertise 198 should follow a similar pattern. of many people to resolve the issues with which we bees Graduating seniors who were not planning to must contend in order to provide educational services bee continue their education had very little difficulty for the students of the Town. As a member of this evai finding entry level positions in area businesses. In team, Business Operations provides both line and prel fact, we were unable to fill all the requests that we staff managerial support. Line support involves fiscal A had for graduates. responsibility and control; supervision of Computer ena A number of area employers came to the Services, Food Services and Transportation. ticil schools with career and employment information The Computer Services section recently completed a Sen for interested students. The starting wage for three (3) year program which is providing expanded and most positions is well above the state minimum offerings for students and improved management nun wage of $3.55 per hour. The average starting information services. mal wage is in the $4.50-$5.00 per hour range. fun The Food Services section continues to be used as a wril I would like to express my thanks to adminis- statewide example of an efficient and effective pro- exis tration, faculty, students, and employers for their gram, both in variety of its offerings and its fiscal T help and cooperation in making the Work Study management. tior Program a success again this year. The Transportation section has been expanded to at I BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS meet the requirements of changes in policy. Providing was (Russell R. Mollica, Director) safe transportation and walking routes continues to tote be a major concern of the school department and cloE Continuing improvements are being made to our public safety officials. stat Public School Buildings and Grounds using various financial sources including: our regular budgets, State Staff support, relating to the above mentioned mg, Grants for Roof Replacements and Energy Conserva- areas, is provided to all components of the school Sys- des tion Measures, Playground Equipment at several tem, as an integral part of the program planning C schools funded through efforts of our active PTO process. Sch organizations, Improvements to our Athletic Fields In summary, our managerial team is meeting the fore by Town Parks and Recreation and installation of educational needs of the students and has a keen A t Handicapped Ramps through Federal HUD funds to awareness of the obligation it has to the Town in gen- disc allow wheelchair access to all of the schools used for eral, both educationally and financially. the elections. pro 78 r i A third segment of Chapter 188 addresses the eval- i l 1iy KEEFE TECHNICAL_ uation of educational personnel. New evaluation pro- Is SCHOOL cedures were established in a joint effort with the rs Keefe Teachers Association and have now been imple- is The past year has been a period of significant mented. These procedures will insure that all non-ten- ured professional staff will be evaluated a minimum i i- change for Keefe Tech. In January, Paul Bento of i I- Hopkinton was appointed Superintendent-Director of six times per year. This complies not only with the s, and assumed the responsibilities of that position mandates, but also with the spirit, of Chapter 188. I- immediately. Mr. Bento had previously been the New three year collective bargaining agreements school's Academic Coordinator since 1972. Following were signed with all four employee groups prior to the ,d the appointment of the new Superintendent-Director, opening of the school in September. These agreements i ie the School Committee approved a comprehensive will enable the School Committee to more accurately )f reorganization that is providing a more efficient and forecast budget needs and trends in the years to come. less costly administration of the school. Salaries and benefits continue to reflect an average of 1 the four towns that make up the Regional District. 11 In February the school was subjected to a compre- le hensive Chapter 74 Program Review by the Division A major undertaking was completed by the School of Occupational Education of the Massachusetts Committee during the year by updating and codifying Department of Education. These reviews are done all of the Committee's policies. This effort involved a ever and assess each vocational 1_ y five years program review of all School Committee minutes back to 1973, a for adequacy of facilities and equipment, qualifica- with subsequent discussion and adoption of each sec- n tions of staff, appropriateness of courses of study and tion of the policy book. The revision is now complete n several other standards of approval. All programs and being reviewed quarterly for additions and were found to be in compliance with these State changes. regulations. We have been making a continual effort to keep d Keefe Tech is accredited by the New England Asso- equipment, facilities and materials current to meet the d ciation of Schools and Colleges. This accreditation changing needs of the employers of our graduates. process includes a comprehensive review by a visiting During the past year we received more than $400,000 committee of educators every ten years, following an in state and federal grants, including a large amount intensive one year self-study by the school. In March, received on a competitive basis. Over half of the a Steering Committee was established to begin this money obtained was devoted to the purchase of new �- n process in anticipation of the evaluation visit in April, equipment. Vocational programs benefitting from this effort include Drafting, Electronics, Electrical ,e 1987. Every vocational and academic program has j ,e been reviewed in detail and all courses of study have and Data Processing. ;s been updated. The staff is anxiously awaiting the The Data Processing Advisory Committee worked is evaluation visit and is confident that the school is well for over a year reviewing the school's computer d prepared to receive three days of detailed scrutiny. needs. Their work culminated in November with the 11 A new Faculty Senate was established in March to School Committee's award of a bid for a new Prime 'r enable staff members to voice their concerns and par- Computer. This machine will meet the needs of our E ticipate actively in the decision-making process. The students, provide all administrative services and be a Senate is composed of twelve elected representatives available for use by our member towns. Installation is d and twelve alternates and has already addressed a expected to be complete by March, 1987. it number of issues. The Senate's concern over summer The School Committee has established as one of its make-up for courses failed by students led to a grant goals increased collaboration and articulation with funding curriculum development for these courses. A post-secondary institutions. It is our intention to have a written curriculum and a set of teacher guidelines now at least one post-secondary option available for each I- exists for all summer make-up work. educational program the school offers. These agree- Ll ments will enable our students to obtain college cred- its implementation of the Chapter 188 Educa- its for the technical knowledge gained while at Keefe tional Reform Law has also progressed very smoothly o at Keefe during the past year. A competitive process and condense the time needed to obtain any advanced 8 was established to select Horace Mann Scholars and a degree. o total of ten teachers were so identified prior to the Perhaps the most distressing issue facing the school d close of the school in June. These teachers will share is the need for a roof replacement. The present roof is state grants totalling nearly $11,000, and began work- leaking badly and considerable deterioration has d ing in September on a variety of innovative projects occurred. The School Committee has retained an designed to further strengthen the school's programs. architect to give an assessment and recommendations g Chapter 188 mandates the establishment of a for replacement. It is anticipated that a sizable bond School Improvement Council and that group was issue will be needed in the near future to correct the formed under the leadership of the building Principal. problem. The Committee has also been conducting an e A total of over $9,000, received from the state for evaluation of the now-closed swimming pool facility ° discretionary use by that Council has been devoted to and a determination of the future use of that complex the strenghthening of the school's remedial reading will be made in early 1987. program. 79 Our Evening School program continues to attract tion of the Board took place with Clare Friel as D] District residents in record numbers. Approximately Chairman, Phyllis Jachowicz as Vice-Chairman, 1500 students each semester take courses designed to Joanne Thompson as Treasurer and Sheila Fair as Fr appeal to all interests and needs. This community Secretary. se, service is completely self-sufficient and we now dis- April 1986 saw the approval of our budget at the tribute over 40,000 descriptive brochures each annual Town Meeting. The budget included a much 14 semester. needed increase in our book budget. We also received M The school's daytime enrollment as of the begin- State Aid, allocated to fund many of our programs. Fr ning of school in September was 913 students. This National Library Week was a success. A big thank- lat represents a decrease of 22 students from the previous you, on behalf of the Board, to our hard working sir year, reflecting the decline in high school age children lin committee. in the four town District. The student decline would th have been greater without the addition of eighteen The summer saw the return of the library being students from the town of Natick. The regional center open Saturdays from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. This met servicing Natick is closing in June 1987 and the town with great success. Our patrons appreciated the F) has decided to send students to Keefe on a tuition extended hours and the circulation figures support lib basis. It is estimated that seventy students from this. m( Natick will be attendingKeefe in 1987, offsetting fur- enc g At Saxonville, we said good-bye and thank you to 19 ther the projected enrollment decline due to District Rosemary Waltos, our Branch Librarian. We wel- an demographics. Natick is currently studying the possi- comed Mary Wasmuth to our system as the new Sax- Int bility of a permanent affiliation with Keefe. onville Branch Librarian. Our new addition is being sai The current Keefe enrollment from Framingham is heavily used and the circulation and services continue 610 students, including 149 in Grade Nine. We con- to increase. tinue to enjoy an excellent working relationship with Libtha The Minuteman Library Network continues to sta the Framingham Public Schools. Together we can flourish with all 20 libraries on line for circulation pr provide excellent options for the high school age control. Efforts are now underway to make holdings to youth of the District. of the network available on line to all our users. ies The members of the Keefe Technical School Com- In December of 1986 the Board approved changes m� mittee are: in our material selections policy. In early 1987 video Po Ashland cassettes and compact discs will be available for loan. gr, John Lavin These improvements allow us to be current in our 191 Francis Klonsky resources and provide even better services to the Holliston public. lis] Yvonne Giargiari Finally, 1986 brought some very special monies to $3, Richard Lanoue the Framingham Public Library in the form of State Mt Hopkinton grants. The first allowed the library to be involved in pr( English as a Second Language (ESL) courses that are exi Ruth available to the public. The second project is a liter- lies Georgea BuchholzBchacy program, Literacy Unlimited. This program is Framingham jointly sponsored by the Framingham Public Library pr( John Donovan and the Framingham Civil League. We were honored col Paul J. Farley and proud to have Governor and Mrs. Michael the Henry Fortier Dukakis attend the dedication of this program at the in Richard McDonald library on Janaury 16, 1987. The Board would like to Robert Merusi thank Jan Harrington, our Community Services ads John Regan Librarian, for all her hard work and effort on this lat Respectfully submitted, project. im Paul Bento On behalf of the Board, I would like to thank He Superintendent-Director Chuck Flaherty, our Director, Tom Gilchrist, our adi Keefe Technical School Assistant Director, and every member of our staff for Inc another successful year. I would also like to thank the BOARD OF LIBRARY "Friends of the Library" for their support and gener- osity. Finally, thank you to our patrons and I ask for TRUSTEES your continued support to make 1987 another suc- cessful year for the Framingham Public Library. Respectfully submitted, The year 1986 was an exciting and eventful one for Clare F. Friel, Chairman the Board of Library Trustees. With the April elec- Board of Library Trustees tion, the Trustees welcomed the return of Edward "Tip" Burton and veteran members, Phyllis Jachow- icz, Karen LaChance and John Flinter. Reorganiza- 80 as DIRECTOR OF LIBRARIES ANNUAL REPORT tions. Carpeting paid for by the Friends of the Fra- in 1986 was a very busy and productive year for the mingham Library, added a warmth that has been as Framingham Public Library as library usage grew in much appreciated by our patrons. Usage at the several areas. branch increased 9% over 1985. he Materials circulation reached 483,151 an increase of In July, the Trustees approved a change in our cir- ch 14,465 over 1985. The most recent figures from the culation policy which shortened the loan period of ed Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners show bestsellers and new fiction from 21 to 14 days. Framingham to be second only to Brookline in circu- Because our resources are limited and demand for these materials is so high, it is our belief that this ik_ lation per capita (7.26 to 8.38) for communities of change will make these materials available to more ng similar size. It should be noted, however, that Brook- patrons than was possible under the old policy. line spends almost twice as much per capita to reach these somewhat higher circulation figures. These are but a few of the many programs and ngservices that the Framingham Public Library provided iet Our budget for FY 87 increased somewhat over he FY'86. Most important was a $10,000 increase in our in 1986. As always, I wish to thank the patrons, staff, Trustees and Friends for their continued support and M library materials budget. This 8% increase in our the many Town Departments for their cooperation. materials budget corresponds exactly to the average increase in the price of a hard cover book from 1984- to 1985, the most recent time period for which figures el- are available. The purchasing power provided by the FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC tx- municipal appropriation has, therefore, stayed the LIBRARY STATISTICS ng same. ue Framingham Public Library......... Framingham, MA In order to meet the growing demands of our users, Year Founded.............................................1855 the library has made use of grants, donations and Name of Director ...................... James C. Flaherty to state aid, all of which increased in 1986. State Senate Assistant Director....................... Thomas Gilchrist on President, William Bulger introduced a bill this year Population served, 1980 census ....................65,113 igs ' to provide significant increases in aid to public librar- Library Appropriation per capita ................. $14.21 ies. Although the bill failed to gain final passage, Number of Hours open during ;es many of its components were funded. One such com- the week ................................ (10 months) 67�/z eo ponent provided grants for new and innovative pro- (July and August) 64V2 ten• ' grams and Framingham received three such grants in Number of Library Agencies ..............................2 ur 1986. hePERSONNEL The first provided $9,859 for the teaching of Eng- lish as a Second Language. The second provided Full-time staff................................................31 to $3,550 to establish a program to encourage mothers at Part-time staff...............................................16 ite ; MCI Framingham to read to their children. The third Part-time pages..............................................17 in provided $4,730 to include a writing component to the CIRCULATION OF ire existing Literacy Unlimited Project funded by an ear- LIBRARY MATERIALS -r- lier federal grant. Literacy Unlimited provides one on is one tutoring for adults who cannot read. All of these 1985 .....................................................468,686 1986 . .483,151 pry projects have received high praise from the library • •••••••••• � ed community and have once again demonstrated that Framingham Public Library.......................336,025 j the library Saxonville Library ...................................141,648 1) iel y is a leading educational and cultural center Nursing Homes ..........................................5,478 he in Framingham. to Although the major construction involved with the FINANCIAL STATEMENT ;es addition to the Saxonville Branch was completed in Town Appropriation ............................$1,100,278 its late 1985, the library patrons began to appreciate the State Aid to Libraries ................................34,594 improvements in 1986. On February 2nd, an Open Additional State Aid to Libraries.................. 18,877 House attracted over 200 people to the branch. The Income from Funds................................... 34,448 ur added space allowed the staff to make materials much Fines, Fees, Program Room Rental, or more easily available and to add to the existing collec- Photocopy machines, etc. ........................ 38,026 he A ;r- or ic- d, an :es J 81 a 6 PLANNING AND ENGINEERING 1 t 7 PLANNING formance during 1986 with the previous year: f 1985 1986 In S DEPARTMENT Annual ridership(total) 104,422 163,302 Ridership distribution: F Elderly&Handicapped 60.1010 53.3% I Adult(non-elderly) 16.7% 26.1% r The Planning Department's major activities during Student z3.z% zo.6% v 1986 were as follows: Gross cost of service $225,406 $260,521 Q Fare Revenues -S 45,023 -$ 40,197 f 1. Land Use and Environment Net cost of service $180,383 5220,324 (operating deficit) (a) Assisted the Standing Committee on Planning -S 31,923 4110,128 a and Zoningin its ongoing review and updating of the MBTA reimbursements 1 g g P g $1ag,46o 5110,196 Town's Zoning By-Law. cost to Town f f (b) Reviewed four major proposed developments Net cost per passenger: $1.72 $1.34 d under the State's environmental review process. All passengers 51.87 $1.44 Elderly&Handicapped $1.34 51.17 (c) Coordinated the Town's continued participation Adult(non-elderly) $1.61 $1.31 in the federal flood insurance program by providing Student e information on flood hazard areas as necessary to The increase in the operating deficit, as well as a sub- n Town departments and to the public. stantial portion of the ridership increase, reflects a required contract arrangement with Marathon Line s (d) Reviewed and submitted comments to the Plan- l for service between downtown Framingham and the ning Board on several applications for site plan F Route 9 mall area. review and subdivision plans. 2. Housing (b) Applied for additional MBTA funding for a t third LIFT route along Route 135 to Hopkinton. t Administered the Housing Rehabilitation Assist- Service will be provided along this portion of the t ance Program providing technical and financial assist- LIFT system at no cost to the Town. ance for the rehabilitation of 51 housing units with a (c) Continued to work closely with the Callahan 8 total of$150,448 in grants provided and an additional Senior Center, Busy Bee Transportation, Inc., South $20,419 in private rehabilitation funds invested. Middlesex Association for Retarded Citizens, and C 3. Economic Development Greater Framingham Association for Disabled Citi- g (a) Administered a grant received under the Massa- zens in the development, scheduling, land operation L chusetts Community Development Action Grant Pro- of transportation programs for the elderly and n gram for development of an industrial access road handicapped. n and improvement of public infrastructure near the 5. Parking intersection of Herbert and Eames Streets. The envi- (a) Completed the expansion and renovation of the c ronmental review process was completed during the public parking lot on Hollis Court. F summer, and an increase in the grant amount from $220,000 to $400,200 was secured to fund environ- (b) Coordinated the planning for development of a mental mitigation measures. Construction is sched- public parking garage in the downtown, funded in F uled for the spring of 1987. part by a $1.9 million state grant. Development of the F (b) Applied for and received renewal of Fra- garage was delayed substantially by difficulty in c mingham Center's designation as a Commercial Area implementing hte land swap which had been approved r Revitalization District (CARD). The CARD designa- by Town Meeting in November 1985. A revised land swap arrangement, approved by Town Meeting in tion enables area businesses to participate in State b financing programs and makes the area eligible for October 1986, has been implemented. Design work is i1 State funding of off-street parking improvements. now underway, and construction is expected to begin ti in the late spring of 1987 and be completed in early 4. Transportation 1988. d (a) Continued to administer the "LIFT" Town- (c) Applied for and received a State Off-Street wide local bus system, funded in part by grants from Parking Program grant for $155,000, to expand park- the MBTA. During 1986, the four LIFT buses pro- ing and realign traffic circulation in the Framingham P vided 12,678 hours of service and carried a total of Center business area. The proposed design is now s 163,302 passengers. The average gross cost of service being coordinated with the state Department of Pub- a was $1.59 per passenger, of which 15% was paid by lic Works, and construction is expected to be com- h fares. The following statistics compare system per- pleted during the spring and summer of 1987. A 82 I. 6. Surplus Property Disposition health clinic for the Hispanic community; classes in Assisted the Real Property Committee in evaluating English as a second language; and alcoholism support the disposition of several small parcels. services. 7. Open Space and Recreation 9. Miscellaneous (a) Received State approval of an application for (a) Continued to coordinate and monitor the Cen- funding under the Clean Lakes Program for a diag- trex telephone system for Town offices. nostic/feasibility study of Waushakum Pond. The (b) In cooperation with the Town-Owned Buildings z study, which began in March 1986 and will be com- Department, administered a $25,515 grant from the pleted by November 1987, is being carried out by Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy Resources 70 IEP, Inc., of Northborough. The study will result in for energy conservation related improvements to the 10 70 recommendations for actions designed to improve the Memorial Building and the Farley Memorial Annex. water quality of the pond, and will enable the Towns 7 of Framingham and Ashland to receive state funding Frederick S. rector n Planning Director for carrying out such actions. (b) Prepared an update of the Town's Open Space !8 and Outdoor Recreation Plan, initially issued in 1980. �6 This plan must be updated every five years in order for the Town to remain eligible for discretionary state funding programs for land acquisition and open space is development. 31 (c) Worked with staff of the Sudbury Valley Trust- ees on the local plan for the Bay Circuit Greenbelt, a PLANNING BOARD major regional open space development program. a Applied for and received a state grant of $10,000 to 1e study the flora and fauna of the Sudbury River, to As a result of the April election, Dana Cunningham 1e locate point sources of pollution, and to identify was elected to a five year term on the Board, replac- potential access points to the river. ing John M. Dumalac who did not run for re-election: a (d) Worked with the Sudbury Valley Trustees and He joined Board members John Acton, Claire Burke the state Department of Environmental Management Cahill, Dianne M. Shea and David Nobilini. At its i' acquire an agricultural ie to ac q g preservation restriction on meeting of April 8, 1986, the Board reorganized and the Hanson Farm in northwest Framingham. voted John Acton as Chairman, Dana Cunningham, 8. Community Development Program Vice Chairman, and Claire Burke Cahill as secretary. `nThe Planning Board held 40 regular business meet- id Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Pro- :h (a) Administered the 'T'own's FY 1986 and 1987 ings and 19 public hearings, 7 of which were for pro- posed zoning amendments, 5 were for subdivision i- grams. Tasks include preparation of the Community hearings, one Scenic Road hearing and 6 Site Plan �n Development application, preparation of an environ- Review hearings. id mental review of all projects, and preparation and monitoring of contracts. Weekly meetings are held in Room B-31 on Tues- day evenings at 7:30 P.M., with the exception of the (b) Provision of technical assistance to individuals, months of July and August when meetings are held ie organizations, and agencies in preparing project pro- every other Tuesday. Public attendance at our weekly posals and carrying out approved projects. meetings has increased tremendously and the Board a (c) Funded and administered the following major received a great deal of input from residents attending in projects: our meetings with regard to Off-Street parking plans, ie Rehabilitation and Preservation: Provision of finan- Site Plan Review and new subdivisions. in cial and technical assistance to property owners and During the year 1986, the Board acted on 87 ;d renters for housing rehabilitation. Approval Not Required Plans (81-P), 5 of which were id disapproved, 5 no action taken and signed by the in Architectural Barriers Removal: Construction of a Town Clerk. A total of 10 Off-Street parking plans is barrier-free entrance to the Callahan Senior Center; were pPlan processed, 4 of which were approved, 8 Site P installation of wheelchair ramps at 30 sidewalk loca- in tions throughout the Town. Review, 4 of which were approved, totalling 2,698Plan j ly new parking spaces. Filing fees collected for these Public Facilities: Installation of new overhead plans was a combined total of$16,099.00. et doors at the Hollis Street Fire Station. There were 18 new subdivisions submitted during k- Public Services: Job development services for His- the year, 9 of which are commercial subdivisions and M panic residents and local employers; transportation 9 residential subdivisions. One new subdivision and 7 M services for the elderly and handicapped (3 projects); pending from the previous year were approved by the b- alcohol and drug education workshops for parents in Board while the remaining 17 are still in the planning n_ housing developments operated by the Housing stages. Filing fees collected for these subdivision plans Authority; outreach services for a satellite mental totalled $32,827.50. 83 SUBDIVISION LOCATION NO. LOTS ACTION BY BOARD Belport Farms Off Belknap Rd. 40 Signed 7/3/86 Pine Ridge Estates Ext. of Leslie Rd. 12 Signed 11/28/86 Metrowest Ind. Park Commercial Signed 6/24/86 Lanes End Estates Off Gates St. 47 Signed 1/14/86 Gaslight Estates Off Lanten Rd. 15 Approved 11/18/86 The Elms Off Pleasant St. 8 Signed 2/18/86 Femia Rd. Subd. Femia Road 10 Signed 4/8/86 Barn Bridge Off Edmands Rd. 4 Signed 10/28/86 n Westpark (Commercial) 90 Worcester Rd. Pending a Sagebrook Estates Winch/Grove Sts. 6 Pending Stonegate Farms Salem End Rd. 26 Withdrawn Holmes Trans. Park Rte. 30/Burr St. Pending (Commercial) Route 9/90 Crossing Fram/Southboro Line Pending I (Commercial) Sunset Drive Extension Same 8 t Withdrawn Church St. Village Church Street 8 Pending t Nobscot Farms Off Edgell Rd. 5 Pending 350 Irving St. Trust Irving St. Pending F (Commercial) It Pending t Clark Hill Bishop&Arthur Sts. (Commercial) a Fafard Office Park Pleasant St. Connector Pending (Commercial) The Mountain-Bose Corp. 100 Mountain Rd. Pending (Commercial) c Shoppers' World Worcester Rd. Pending + t (Commercial) r I Fram. Business Center Worcester Rd. Pending (Commercial) I Temple Street Temple Street 10 Pending Macomber Farm Estates Salem End Rd. 34 Pending t Belknap Village Grove St./Belknap Rd. 8 Pending The Planning Board has been assisted by their Con- Acton, Community Development Committee; David sulting Engineer William R. Domey, P.E. Mr. Domey Nobilini, Real Property Committee and Dana Cun- is present at all Planning Board meetings for consul- ningham, Real Property Committee, Management tation and he reviews applications in conjunction with Task Force Committee and is a member of the Board other Town Boards to help expedite the review proc- of Health. ess. He makes field and other special investigations as We wish to thank the individuals of the Town, par- specifically requested by the Planning Board. ticularly the elected and appointed Town officials t Board members have served on the following com- who have assisted the Board during the year. mittees: Dianne Shea, Fair Housing Committee, Respectfully submitted, t Metrowest Growth Management Committee; John John Acton, Chairman e Dana Cunningham, Vice Chairman t Claire Burke Cahill, Secretary L Dianne M. Shea s David Nobilirii r I S 5 I c C 84 STANDING COMMITTEE Town-owned property at the corner of Irving and Arlington Sts. A hearing was scheduled on the matter ON PLANNING for the first meeting of 1987. The Committee wishes to thank Arthur Noonan, AND ZONING Planning Department representative for his appear- ance at each meeting, acting as counselor in their The Standing Committee on Planning and Zoning decision making. met for nine monthly meetings during the year, with The Committee also notes with regret the resigna- an average attendance of eleven members per session. tion of Marjory Piper, faithful Town Meeting mem- Several new members were elected at the Annual ber and Real Property Committee member for many Town Meeting. years. This past year was an active one for zoning issues, with the Committee sponsoring a number of Articles. BUILDING AND WIRE There were 3 zoning Articles for the Special Town t Meeting of June 17, 1986, and 15 zoning Articles for DEPARTMENT the Special Town Meeting of October 21, 1986. These Articles involved: dimensional changes (Floor Area 1986 was again a very busy year for this Depart- Ratio), land re-zoning (Framingham Country Club, ment. The value of construction has more than dou- Macomber property, and Clark's Hill). Two substan- bled from the preceding year. The total number of tive changes were: redefining the Open Space District, permits issued continues to increase at a steady pace. and the impetus for a Master Plan on Zoning. The gas/plumbing permit fees have dropped to a Currentiv there are seven proposed changes in the more proportionate ratio. The wiring permit fees Zoning By-Law sponsored by the Committee for the show a steady increase. The other permits issued by Annual Town Meeting in April 1987. Several of these this office reflect a steady increase, in both fees and changes are a consequence of discussions with both numbers. The Certificates of Inspection showed an the Zoning Board of Appeals and the Planning increase over last year, almost double. Board. 1986 generated income from fees in the amount of The Committee wishes to thank R. Taintor, the almost one-half million dollars. The Building Depart- Planning Director, and his department, for invaluable ment showed a profit of approximately $216,000.00, technical assistance throughout the year. which should please the Treasurer. H.G. Taylor, Chairman As I complete my second year as Building Commis- W.F. Welch, Clerk sioner, I would like to take this opportunity to pub- licly thank all of the Town Boards, Departments and Committees that we have dealt with during the year, f id for the fantastic cooperation and communication that n- REAL PROPERTY was demonstrated. dCOMMITTEE I would also publicly acknowledge each and every- C one of my staff, without whose support and dedica- tion this Department could not function as well as it �r' On January 23rd, 1986 the Real Property Commit- does. I repeat, I consider myself fortunate indeed to tls tee considered the subject matter of Arts. 1, 2, and 3 be associated with one of the best, if not the best, of the warrant of the Special Town Meeting relating Department in the Town of Framingham. I thank you d, to the settlement of problems emanating from Gen- all. an eral Motors receiving property originally owned by ANALYSIS OF 1986 BUILDING PERMITS an the Town of Framingham. The Committee voted Ty unanimously to support the Public Works Commis- New Buildings No. Amount ea sion recommendations in Arts. I and 2. Art. 3 Single Dwellings *153 $13,708,800.00 ini received 7 favorable votes; 1 abstention. (See the Business 13 47,547,000.00 Town Meeting Journal for wording of these articles.) Duplexes ** 5 495,000.00 The agendas of the February 6th, March 6th, April Total New Buildings 171 $61,750,800.00 { 3rd, and June 5th were filled with decisions on small *Total Single Dwelling Units 153 sites of Town-owned properties which were in the **Duplex Dwelling Units 10 warrant of the Annual Town Meeting. These were dis- Total Dwelling Units 163 posed of with little discussion. During the September 4th meeting, Arts. 12, 13, Alterations and Additions and 14 of the fall Special Town Meeting were Dwellings 371 $ 4,542,650.00 discussed. Business 197 $13,371,050.00 As 1986 ended the agenda of the Committee was Total Alterations and 568 $17,913,700.00 very light concerning the disposition of a piece of Additions 85 w i Miscellaneous Renovate Town Building I Antennas/Dishes 5 $ 9,800.00 Solar Panels 1 2,000.00 Aluminum Siding 1 1,000.00 Signs 85 359,276.00 Barn/Convert to two 1 200,000.00 Swimming Pools 57 365,739.00 Condos Satellite Antennas 1 4,000.00 F Business Storage Shed 3 30,600.00 Tool Sheds 41 46,853.00 F Boiler 1 3,000.00 Trailer/due to Fire 2 4,000.00 J Coal/Wood Stoves 57 41,818.00 Temp. Ramp 1 400.00 J Cabanas 2 4,000.00 Tents 7 9,600.00 J Construction Trailers 2 15,200.00 Vinyl Sidings 98 932,656.00 A Conversions to Two-Family 6 21,800 Wheel Chair Lift 1 7,000.00 V Child's Playhouse 1 800.00 Total Miscellaneous 504 $ 3,386,526.00 Canopy 1 8,000.00 Chimney 4 14,600,00 GRAND TOTAL 1,243 $83,051,026.00 Elevators/Repairs 21 1,253,800.00 BUILDING PERMITS Foundation Only 19 154,000.00 OTHER PERMITS Fire Escapes 8 26,050.00 1986 F.H.A. Renovations 3 60,800.00 Greenhouses 4 30,000.00 Total Wire Permits 1,238 Gazebo 1 1,250.00 Total Gas Permits 619 Residential Garages 22 224,700.00 Total Plumbing Permits 711 Re-roofing 15 41,340.00 Total Occupancy Permits 173 Razes/Partial Razes 28 148,000.00 Total Certificates of Inspection 93 Retaining Wall 2 16,000.00 Total Elevator Inspections 162 Raze Single Dwelling& 1 4,000.00 Garage FIVE YEAR RECORD OF BUILDING ACTIVITY IN THE TOWN 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 Number of Permits Issued New Buildings 85 117 211 168 171 Alterations and Miscellaneous 802 797 851 959 1072 Total Building Permits 887 914 1,062 1,127 1,243 Valuation on Permits New Buildings $12,833,000.00 $21,342,600.00 $42,716,827.00 $16,895,220.00 $61,750,800.00 4 All others 9,588,134.00 10,442,215.00 11,482,465.00 18,147,615.00 21,300,226.00 Total Valuations $22,421,134.00 $31,784,815.00 $54,199,292.00 $35,042,835.00 $83,051,026.00 5 Fees Received and Turned Over to General Fund Building Permits $108,747.00 $151,881.00 $253,768.00 $170,022.00 $425,609.00 Wire Permits 20,328.00 21,040.00 25,203.00 28,310.00 33,159.00 Gas Permits 7,560.00 8,680.00 17,041.00 45,258.00 10,484.00 Occupancy Permits 1,155.00 1,155.00 1,915.00 2,095.00 1,835.00 Elevators 3,160.00 3,540.00 3,860.00 3,260.00 3,240.00 Certificates 2,400.00 1,655.00 2,550.00 1,980.00 2,370.00 Plumbing Permits 12,691.00 15,319.00 29,836.00 45,030.00 19,926.00 Total Fees $156,041.00 $203,270.00 $334,173.00 $295,955.00 $496,623.00 6 86 l ENGINEERING 7. Reviewed Subdivisions and Parking Plans includ- ing Field Checks of same and Sewer Testing DEPARTMENT and Water Testing. PERSONNEL: 8. Updated many Plans Fred W. Sergeant Richard B. Cooney 9. Upgraded Street Lighting Joseph P. Champagne James P. Wakeman 10. Processed Deeds and updated John R. Bertorelli James R. BrownAssessors Plans James C. Steele Lorraine M. Perry including new condominiums. Adelmo Pontremoli Anna L. Bagley IL Prepared abutters lists for various departments Walter J. Yusikones 12. Traffic Counts — various locations The following is the report of the Engineering Department for 1986: 13. Repairs — Fire Station Doors. 1. Prepared Street Acceptance and Survey Plans and 14. School Distances checked ' Descriptions for the following streets: 15. Microfilming of all Plans Arthur Street 16. Provided services to many Town departments Harmony Lane John McQuinn Circle 17. Researched deeds in the Registry and Land Old Central Turnpike Court. 2. Prepared Plans and Specifications for the 18. Updated Town Sewer, Water, Drain, Conserva- following: tion Land, Index, etc., Plans Traffic Signals — Arthur St./Grant St. 19. Soil tests, Water Observations, Merchant Road, — Concord St./Watson Pl. Western Avenue. — Concord St./Fire Station Soccer Field — Winch Park CONSERVATION Roof Repairs — Schools &Town Buildings 3. Prepared Plans or Cost Estimates for the COMMISSION following: Framingham Center Improvements Stop Sign Detail — various intersections Activity of the Conservation Commission contin- Bond Estimates for Sub-Divisions ued at a high rate during 1986. Approximately fifty Sidewalks — Singletary, Concord Street Hearings were held under the Wetlands Protection Island — School St./Old Conn. Path Act and an Order of Conditions was issued for each. j Parking Garage — Downtown Four parcels under jurisdiction of the Conservation Press Box — Bowditch Field Commission have been cleaned by the Park Depart- Police Case — Hollis St./Hollis Court ment personnel. Emergency Generator — Hollis Fire Station Property acquired this year — Parcels at Mt. 4. Administered the following Contracts: Wayte. Parking Lot — Hollis Court Roof— Loring Arena Development rights to Hanson Farm have been obtained through Town, State and other finances. 5. Surveyed the following: Snow Dump — Merchant Rd. Projects under review are the Shoppers World, Street Line — various locations Nine-Ninety Development and many others. Sewer Inverts — various locations MEMBERS ARE: Elevations — various locations Harold Adler, Chairman Tree Locations — various locations Alan P. Bascom, Vice Chairman Vertical Control, Townwide Alden Seltzer Elevation checks in subdivisions A. Joseph Paolim Gravel checks in subdivisions Robert G. Venne 6. Court Appearances David A. Robertson Joseph L. Simonelli i 87 W ' th MAINTENANCE sh W G TOWN-OWNED More good news in 1986 was the virtual absence of Bi snow at both ends of the year. Of course there were a is BUILDINGS few small storms, and other periods of freezing tem- Ri peratures which caused night-time or early morning wq DEPARTMENT icing, but the milder weather made our life easier, ba enabled us to get more maintenance work done, and ai save the Town at least $195,000. Town Owned Buildings Department continued its Again in 1986 the Town Meeting voted funds for en efforts in maintaining and improving Town Buildings sidewalk replacement in the downtown area. In the Th during the year 1986. In the Memorial Building, new offices for the Veterans and Data Processing along summer we put new sidewalks on Concorde Street in with a new peripherals and computer room were set and Union Avenue northward to Frederick Street and res Proctor Street. Merchants and shoppers seem pleased lo( up. with this improvement. Our Chapter 90 program dur- In the Farley Memorial Annex, the renovation of ing the summer saw new surfaces on all of Grant the burnt out section was completed. Electric meters Street, on Beaver Street, from Waverly Street to the in were also installed on each floor of the building. bridge, on Old Connecticut Path from Sealtest Drive me( to the town line and from Concord Street to Newbury yr In energySavin e. measures, a new efficient oil e burner wasinstalledin the Old Edgell Library. To Street; and on Winter Street, from Fountain Street to ser stabilize the use of electricity in the Main Library, a the Cushing Hospital entrance. we capacitor was installed. In the Farley Memorial We also continued our stone-seal treatment of co: Annex Gymnasium, interior storm windows were put neighborhood streets. This year we worked in four vei over the windows thru a state grant energy fund. areas: from Lawrence Street to Essex Street between Concord and Bishop Streets: the Musterfield section; The Department wants to thank our personnel for CO] Waushakum: and a small areak Lake ae the performance of their duties and to express its streets oppositeap gratitude to the other Boards and Departments for off Pleasant Street. This is an important program, CO] because it restores and maintains our residential their cooperation during the year. in€ streets. Although the process is a nuisance to the resi- fol Eugene J. Oliva, Superintendent dents, it does provide us with a durable riding surface Town Owned Buildings Department with a longer life than some other processes. net bu The 1986 Town Meeting also voted to renew the the street construction program. We undertook to rehabi- we litate Indian Head Road using the pavement reclama- pla tion or "hammermilling" process. This improvement sio also included the installation of a sidewalk along the an, road. Under the same program we resurfaced A Street tes COMMISSIONERS in Saxonville. And as we write we are preparing to 1 sign an Agreement for engineering services to design len OF PUBLIC WORKS the reconstruction of Lockland Avenue. ac( While the work crew was in town we also put a new WE surface on Fay Road. However, this job was the final ho': Our cover design this year depicts the installation step in the installation of a sewer main in Fay Road, tak of a new young tree under the recently-established which was begun the year before. for tree-planting program. The Town Meeting for FY86 vIn our continuing effort to correct drainage prob-' d voted $15,000 to begin this program. We first under- lems we installed small drain systems in Nixon Road, abs took a professional survey to determine the areas of need throughout the town and the best type of tree Grove Street, Carter Drive, and Parker Road. We nes regret to report that revision to the plans for a new wh for each location. In the spring we had 39 trees planted, at least 2 in each precinct. Again, in the new Fountain Street bridge have delayed the project for hay another year. As we end 1986 we have advertised for We budget which began in July there was another $15,000. This time we made a full planting, of 57 bids, so construction should be under way in 1987. pr( trees to compare what effect, if any, the different sea- As we promised last year, during the summer we occ sons would have on tree growth. We appreciate the replaced the second half of the deck on the Wickford interest and concern of Town Meeting members for Road bridge. Sud the esthetic and economic value of trees and we wel- the come the comments of all citizens on the results of Two major sewer projects which have been in the the this program. works for a long time seem ready to become reality. See 88 4 i We have been assured of state and federal funding for our Henry Street yard and they continued almost ' the Farm Pond Interceptor, the town has voted its without pause to carry on their regular duties. Thanks share, and the plans await a final consent by Conrail. to the cooperation of the Finance Committee and the We expect that construction will be underway soon. Special Town Meeting we have replaced the motor For several years Community Development Block vehicles, tools, and materials lost in the fire. Grant funds have been allocated to the Beaver Dam Once again we offer our thanks to the town boards, Brook sewer interceptor. A major aspect of the plan committees and officials and private citizens who is a crossing under the railroad tracks near Guild have worked with us to meet the needs of a growing Road. Since the CDBG funds will cover this phase, and active community. we have put it out to bid as a separate contract. The Anthony M. Colonna balance of the project is eligible for state and federal aid. William R. Dickson Agnes C. Esty We have continued the analysis of extraneous flows COMMISSIONERS OF PUBLIC WORKS entering our sewer system, as mandated by DEQE. The current stage involves monitoring testing devices in manholes which indicate variations in flows. The results will indicate where we will concentrate our local inspections for illegal connections. TREE WARDEN Again this year the MWRA made a substantial increase in our sewer assessment, forcing us to increase our local rate by 15¢ per unit. We have January - Seemed to be calm for the beginning of already received notice that our fee for the next fiscal Winter. year will increase by more than 15%. We are repre- sented on the Advisory Board which monitors the work of the Authority, and we are well aware that the trees; due to an ice storm, were hardly getting caught cost of controlling and reducing water pollution is up from last September's storm (Gloria). very high. March - Framingham was awarded Tree City U S A The question of solid waste disposal becomes more for 1985, meeting all requirements for the award. i complex, costly, and controversial; however, it Hopefully we will receive an award for 1986. appears that the problem is greater in some other April - Constituted an Arbor Day celebration with communties than it is in Framingham. With the clos- tree planting at the Downtown Library, Saxonville ing of our landfill, we had to find a new disposal site Library and McCarthy School. for incinerator ash. Fortunately, we were able to May - Presented a full bloom of spring negotiate an agreement with a private business to y p g planting burn some of their waste in exchange for space in program in all precincts, in which a total of 38 trees their private landfill, plus a fee. Under a state order were planted. we have engaged a consultant from New Jersey to September - Two members of the Tree Department plan and oversee certain tests for dioxin in the emis- enrolled in a class for Arbor culture at the Mass. Bay t sions from the Incinerator. It remains to be seen if Community College. any modification of the plant will be mandated by the November - Fall tree planting program began. We t test results. again planted a total of 58 trees among all the I Private citizens felt the impact of one of the rob- 1 p p precincts. lems this summer when buyers of scrap metal stopped accepting the material because of stricter state laws. December - Donation of four Christmas trees by We in turn had to refuse the hundreds of items house- town people so everyone can have a joyous and color- holders threw away until we could find someone to ful holiday season. take them from us. Not surprisingly, the new contrac- Looking forward to a prosperous '87. for now requires payment from us. Again we must express our dismay and concern about the delays and impediments along the way to a e new central garage. With the exception of MCI itself, V which has been very cooperative, other state agencies r have frustrated us throughout the planning process. MANAGEMENT r we know the Committee is working diligently on the INFORMATION SYSTEMS project, and we are still hopeful that we can make e occupancy in this decade. BARD We want to take this opportunity to commend the Superintendent and staff of the Sewer Division for e their reaction to the devastating fire which destroyed The Management information Systems Board their headquarters building in the early morning of (MISB) has continued the automation of Town busi- September 16. We made temporary space for them at ness functions in accordance with the guidelines of 89 the Information Systems Plan adopted at the 1985 (7) Payroll: Implemented a Payroll sys- 03/87 Annual Town Meeting. During the past year, the fol- tem for all Town Departments. lowing have been accomplished by the Data Process- (8) Ad Hoe Requests: The Data Processing Dept. has ing Department, under the direction of the MISB: responded to several ad hoc requests from Town DATE Departments. All applications were developed (1) Installed D.E.C. Microvax II Com- 05/86 using our ADMINS Data Base software. puter including one 600 1pm printer a. Sanitation Billing/Collection: - Provides billing and 20 terminals covering 10 and collection functions for commercial inciner- departments. ator usage. (2) Installed the ADMINS Data Manage- 05/86 b. Animal Control Administrative System - Provides ment System from Management reporting, maintenance, and inquiry functions. Information and Training, Inc. c. Personal Property Administrataive System - Pro- u (3) Installed Equinox communications 10/86 vides file maintenance and inquiry functions. a network capable of connecting more d. Health Dept. File Managment System - Provide file 8 than 40 terminals. 8 maintenance reporting and inquiry functions. � (4) Developed and conducted training 09/86 courses for departmental personnel; (9) Police Dept. - Provided administrative and techni- installed eight (8) microcomputers. cal support to the Police Dept. in the installation a All microcomputers have word proc- and development of their computer system. 1 essing software, and where needed, Computer operations are now part of the daily a they have spread sheet and terminal routine and are providing significant efficiency s and productivity increases. Major applications emulation capabilities. which are now operational include citations, a The following departments have microcomputers warrants, evidence, and arrests. t v installed: Software FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS - FY'87 1 a. Planning Lotus, WordPerfect Real Estate Tax Billing and Collection I b. Legal Department WordPerfect Motor Vehicle Excise System c. Finance Committee Lotus, WordPerfect Parking Tickets d. Selectmen's Office WordPerfect Assessing Functions e. Health Dept. Lotus, WordPerfect e f. Personnel Lotus, WordPerfect g. Data Processing Lotus, WordPerfect h. Engineering Lotus, WordPerfect 1 Respectfully submitted, t (5) Water/Sewer Billing: Implemented a 06/86 MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS Water/Sewer Billing System. The new BOARD 1 system replaces the manual system Otis A. Gates, Chairman which depended on antiquated Joseph Cooper equipment. Charles Merchant (6) Financial Accounting: Implemented a 06/86 William Dickson 1 Financial System including general Bruce Cohen ledger, accounts payable, vendor file, ' encumbrances, and budget operations. 1 i 90 PARK 1 RECREATIONAL , / i l RECREATION PARK MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT DIVISION 1 ' The past year the Recreation Department discontin- 1986 proved to be another successful year for our _ ued one of its longest running services due to the lack Maintenance Department. The work load consisted of } of participation of our residents. The supervised play- maintaining over 300 acres of land, all athletic fields ground program which once consisted of 24 play- including school fields, parks, playgrounds, 36 tennis grounds has been reduced over the past decade due to courts, 3 town beaches, and 9 outdoor basketball waning interest. courts. In addition, we are responsible for lining all The program was finally terminated this past year athletic fields for school events, youth leagues, and 1 and replaced with an "all day" summer camp at two recreation leagues, and all grounds maintenance of locations in the town. The new concept seems to be town owned buildings including public works pump- appropriate for the eighties. The camps consist of on- ing stations. y site activities and transportation to various contracted The department employees number 14 full-time, S activities such as bowling, swimming, and roller skat- and 10 summer laborers. ing. One field trip is planned for each of the three 2 We appreciate the assistance given to us by the week sessions that the Recreation Department offers Engineering Department and the Public Works during the summer. All staff is budgeted through the Department. Recreation Department and fees are charged at a pre- registration to cover the cost of the activities. William D. Carey, Director The Recreation Day Camps have been met with overwhelming success. Growth in participation is PARK COMMISSION expected. Beach staff has been greatly improved due to higher pay scales instituted this past year. We have been able The Park Commission reorganized in April 1986. I, to fill all positions with properly certified staff. We Robert Brown was re-elected to the Park S are continuing to improve our traning techniques to Commission. :) help the young staff deal with the many difficult situ- p � ations that arise at our public beaches. At the first meeting of the Park Commission after election day, Robert Salvi was elected Chairman, and ,rr Many of the planned recreation programs through- Robert Brown, Clerk. it n out this past year have been oversubscribed. Waiting Many of the townspeople both young and old took lists exist for golf, skating, basketball, gymnastics, n and many other activities. advantage of our many recreational programs includ- ing the swimming pool at the Farley School and the The Danforth Gym and the Farley Pool are full Farm Pond area for picnics and outings. time facilities operated by our department that have The Park Commission will continue their efforts to provided many recreational opportunities for our resi- provide the best park areas and recreation programs dents this past year. for the Town in order to meet the requests of the Thanks goes to the WKOX, Middlesex News, Com- majority of its population. munity Cablevision, The Tab, and Newswest for help- The Commission wishes to extend their thanks to ing to keep our residents informed of our services. all those who co-operated with the department in any Robert Merusi way. Superintendent Recreation Robert Salvi, Chairman 91 E.F. LORINGThe people of Framingham can be justly proud of a clean, efficient, well managed facility due to the dili- MUNICIPAL ARENA gent efforts of the management and staff at the Arena. COMMITTEE Our thanks to all Town Departments who have contributed their support to our facility during the past year. To: The Honorable Board of Selectmen Below is a brief financial statement for your Members of Town Meeting consideration. As in the past several years the E.F. Loring Arena 1985/86 Approp. &Transfer $220,111.00 has generated sufficient income to return to the Town Total Net Income as of 6/30/86 199,931.84 the total amount of the budget which was voted by Total Expenditures as of 6/30/86 195,315.99 Net Profit $ 4,615.85 Town Meeting for the operation of the Arena. We are pleased to report that our goal was achieved in spite Respectfully submitted, of the fact public skating discontinued. Peter B. Brassard, MD Chairman 92 i a �e LEGISLATIVE DIVISION to le TOWN MEETING 1 YEAR li Barred,Alice C.,37 Blackberry La. 6 n Stanley N., 101 Angelica 9 MEMBERSHIP Goldman,Ralph F.,45 Fox Hill Rd.. 9 Meliere,Kenneth A.,42 Angelica Dr. 5 34 PRECINCT 1 j9 PRECINCT 5 ELECTION 3 YEARS 35 ATTENDANCE RESULTS Bubello,Charles M.,451 Brook St. 9 86 3 YEARS Marquis,Arthur,26 Swanson Rd. 7 10 d, Anthony,Theodore C.,Jr.,Edgell Dr. 9 88 Swidler, Nancy J.,28 Swanson Rd. 8 % D Bloomfield,Gerald L., 1347 Edgell Rd. 9 64 Wlodyka,Edmund E., 10 Park Ave. 11 93 DelPrete,Arthur E.,Jr.,41 Nixon Rd. 8 103 In Hyte,Hannah-Fay, 15 Edmands Rd. 5 79 2 YEARS Fearon,Warren,72 Nicholas Rd. 4 2 YEARS Naditch,Gerald H., 16 Pamela Rd. 8 Benerjee,Teri S.,248 Winch St. 8 Tolland,Joseph G.III, 18 Park Ave. 7 Fingold,James M., 14 Bayberry Ln. 9 Welch,William F.,5 Park Ave. 10 Pinn,Sheila Ann,29 Juniper La. 11 Piper,Marjory R., 1304 Windsor Dr.(Res.12/68) 1 YEAR 8 Alpert,Marc S., 16 Cider Mill Rd. 10 Fogarty,Norman, 13 Joseph Rd. 3 1 YEAR Frank,Philip L., 135 Brook St. 6 Leis,Michael D., 177 Edmunds Rd. 10 Howland,Donna L.,5 Scott Dr. 10 Quirk,Maryanne,508 Windsor Dr. 4 Wittenborg,Harriett,43 Wayside Inn Rd. 10 Jones,Carl I.,8 Edgell Dr.(Q.5/6/86) 0 PRECINCT 6 3 YEARS PRECINCT 2 Eagan,Daniel J.,4 Linda Ave. 9 67 3 YEARS Harrington,Janet L.,Paxton Rd. 11 62 Tuomy,Justin M.,83 Davidson Rd. 8 5 Robinson,Joseph P.,8 Linda Ave. 8 64 Baum,Burton F.,57 Overlook Dr. 9 71 Sleczkowski,Elizabeth K.,27 Townsend Terr. 8 14 Coville, Nancy H.,53 Eaton Rd. 8 68 Sisitsky,Charles J.,52 Eaton Rd. 8 73 2 YEARS Chakaris,Harold S., 10 Geraldine Rd. 7 2 YEARS Fino,Robert H.,72 Elds Rd. 4 Gariepy,Roland E.,8 Upton Rd. 7 Harrington,Robert J.,24 Paxton Rd. 10 Shull,Stephen, 16 Sloan Dr. 11 Noonan,Mary Regina, 15 Poplar St. 3 Voght,Richard R.,301 Potter Rd. 10 f Wadsworth,Earl C., 12 Merrill Dr. 9 1 YEAR j Blum,Rita K.,36 Spruce St. 8 t 1 YEAR Fontano,Dennis D.,56 Higgins Rd. 6 Kalin,Cecily C.,78 Hemenway Rd. 10 Medvin,Shirley H.,41 Summer La. 4 Morris,Harvey L,21 Merrill Dr. 5 Speranza,John,66 Spruce St. 11 Sisitsky,Marjorie C.,52 Eaton Rd. 5 Tuomy,Joyce T.,83 Davidson Rd. 10 PRECINCT 3 3 YEARS PRECINCT 7 3 YEARS Brett,Robert W., 140 Maynard Rd. 10 100 Brundage,Eugene J.,59 Gleason St. 9 78 Marsh, Laurence,W.,8 Hickey Dr. 8 81 Casselman,Carol E.,48 Florissant Ave. 9 133 Ober,Pauline I.,4 Knight Rd. 7 105 Pascucci,Salvi A., 17 Aleda St. 9 76 Spiewsk,Judith H.,37 Berkeley Rd. 7 126 Stasik,John H., 15 Chouteau Ave. 9 138 2 YEARS 2 YEARS Crotty,Kevin P.,79 Pleasant St. 11 DiMarino,Susan K.,50 Brownies Rd. 7 Farrington,Evelyn E., 162 Edgell Rd. 10 Panzera,Linda L., 10 Chouteau Ave. 10 Ober,Richard M.,4 Knight Rd. 10 Pendergast,Kathleen M., 14 Bellefontaine Ave. 9 Winett,Joel, 10 Berkeley Rd. 7 Remillard,James F.,680 Old Conn. Path 3 1 YEAR I YEAR Bernstein,Susan P.,8 Merriam Rd. 10 Griffin,Lawrence J.,32 Brownies Rd. 9 O'Grady,Elizabeth J.,348 Belknap Rd. 0 McPhie,John M.,23 Little Farms Rd. 10 Pulster,Robert 1.,81 Salem End Rd. 7 Paul,Richard E.,933 Old Conn.Path 11 Saves,Sophie,529 Belknap Rd. 5 Woodward,Patricia E.,3 Springhill Rd. 9 PRECINCT 4 PRECINCT 8 3 YEARS 3 YEARS Lepore,Ralph T.,I Fox Hill Rd. 11 125 Baye,Inge M.,27 Ridgefield Dr. 8 % Murder,Barbara F., I1 Angelica Dr. 10 150 Cooper,Joseph Z.,23 Crestwood Dr. 10 100 Silverberg,Sheila, 10 Birchmeadow Cir. 9 103 Epstein,Armand, i Indian Head Hgts. 4 19 Waldman,James T., 1 Waveney Way 4 111 Phillips,Diana C., 113 Lockland Ave. 8 101 2 YEARS 2 YEARS Goldman,Joan,45 Fox Hill Rd. 10 Andronico,Placido, 118 Lockland Ave. 10 Marder,Ronald H., 11 Angelica Dr. 8 Barr,Myron R.,9 Highgate Rd. 9 Stone,Harvey S., 10 Nancy La. 8 Mahoney,Thomas F., 103 Hastings St. 9 Ward, Lois A., 1 Millwood Cir. 5 Stella,John,24 Sunset Dr. 8 93 I YEAR 2 YEARS Haberman,Wolf,41 Crestwood Dr. 11 Cummings,Sears,693 Concord St. 5 Halliday,Robert J.,27 Dana Rd. 10 Duan,Phyllis A.,50 Williams 10 Phillips,Eugene C.,113 Lockland Ave. 6 O'Leary,Loretta O.,55 Dinsmore Ave. 3 Wodtke,Yolanda A., 10 Pearl Harbor Rd. 6 Starr,David A.,59 Donna Rd. 6 PRECINCT 9 1 YEAR 3 YEARS Denham,James F.,19 Gorman Rd. 6 Aaron,Alan H.,31 Foster Dr. 3 21 Fair,James E.,Jr.,32 Gorham Rd. 5 Driscoll,Wanda,143 Beacon St. 10 87 Tupper,Jo Ann E.,3 Dunning Ave. 3 Dunton,Robert M.,405 Old Conn.Path 10 89 Zimmerman,Albert J.,33 Dinsmore Ave. 6 Simons,Wally,28 Greenleaf Cir. 9 91 PRECINCT 14 2 YEARS 3 YEARS Connolly,Joseph B.,3 Sylvester Dr. 10 Cintolo,Louise V.,358 Grant St. 10 ►t7 Levay,Edward T.,Jr., 13 Summer St. 11 Marino,Virginia A.,80 Kendall St. 11 35 Matthews,Frank T.,42 Foster Dr. 3 Maskell,Dana L.,21 Pond St. 8 I05 Waldman,Lawrence H.,52 Greeleaf Cir. 1 Tomasi,Janet M.,34 Mansfield t. 11 117 1 YEAR 2 YEARS Boudreau,Evelyn M.,103 Cherry St. 5 Demeritt,Raymond P.,110 Mansfield St. 11 Funk,Elizabeth L.,1242 Concord St. 7 Ferri,Kathryn L.,471 Concord St. 11 Sostilio,Louis D.,17 Howe Greenblott,Judy,33 Foster Dr. 3 Murtaugh,Joan E.,153 Newbury St. 5 Stone,Elizabeth J.,14 Arthurr St. 9 8 PRECINCT 10 1 YEAR 3 YEARS Fabbri,Brian,1%Grant St. 9 Bloch,Donald M.,668 Salem End Rd. 6 92 Ford,Barbara W.,260 Grant St. 11 Chafitz,Harvey I.,24 Gryzboska Cir. 11 85 Pollan,Natalie A.,22 Bishop Dr. 11 Larkin,Walter,1450 Worcester Rd. 9 87 Studholme,Barbara A.,42 Bishop Dr. 1 I May,Phyllis A.,1450 Worcester Rd. 10 108 PRECINCT 15 2 YEARS 3 YEARS Chafitz,Priscilla E.,24 Gryzboska Cir. 10 Berardi,Michael G.,78 Bethany Rd. l0 126 Herman,Lois L.,135 Oakcrest Dr. 9 Latham-Brown,Ernest,42 Lake Ave. I 2t Kiriey,Edwrd P., 13 Ellis St. 10 Murphy,Sharon,174 Winthrop St. 8 98 Lagerbom,James M.,30 Temple St. 9 Rastani,Richard G.,20 Berry St. 8 107 1 YEAR 2 YEARS Colonna,Dorothy A.,1500 Worcester Rd. 11 Conti,Leno R.,Jr.,50 Mellen St. 5 Hill,Dorothy E.,6 Old Wood Rd. 2 Lombardi,John W.,3 Harmony La. 9 Priver,Edith F.,1400 Worcester Rd. 5 Sawyer,Susan A.,4 Lake Ave. 0 Wright,James M.,34 Temple St. 2 Stefanini,Thomas N.,27 Dow St. 3 PRECINCT 11 1 YEAR 3 YEARS Chimeno, Nicholas J.,29 Bridges St. 9 Finn,Renee,2 Barry Dr. 4 110 Donoghue,Eileen R.,76 Gilbert St. 7 Henneberry,Walter F.Jr.,5 Barry Dr. 6 23 Magnani,Nanette Brey,70 Fay Rd. 8 Rosenber,Sandra, 10 Ricky Dr. 10 19 Pascucci,Barbara A.,54 Gilbert St. 6 Rossi,Michael M.,84 Pincushion Rd. 10 14 PRECINCT 16 2 YEARS Cohen,Edward,29 Hickory Hill La. 7 3 YEARS Maish,Ralph A.,Jr.,17 Hodder La. it Davis,Charles W.,St.,1 Aaron St. 11 63 McGrath,Richard T.,36 Fenelon Rd. 7 Havener,Robert,2 Aaron St. 10 23 Orlando,Michael H.,40 Winter La. 7 Snow,Astrid V., 115 Arlington St. 8 69 24 Tofani,Angelo J.,8 Brackett Rd. 1 1 YEAR Black,Mary L.,54 Chackerberry La. 7 2 YEARS Dickson,Patricia A.,Singletary La. 7 Mercorelli,Remo J.,32 Eames St. 11 Haagens,Mary Jean B.,16 Hickory Hill La. 11 Murphy,Yorke W.,3 Arlington St. 11 Magnus,Fredrick P.,8 Hickory Hill La. 8 Snow,Norman L.,Jr.,35 Lindsay St. 9 Tibbert,Michael F.,53 Lindsay St. 3 PRECINCT 12 3 YEARS 1 YEAR Chesmore,Richard E.,17 Warren Rd. 9 102 Boulanger,George J.,46 Irving St. 8 Ellsworth,J.Richard,40 Warren Rd. 11 108 Fabbri,Michael L.,72 Waushakum St. 8 Haley,Marion F.,349 Union Ave. 10 79 Rollins,James R.,22 Lindsay St.(died 1/22/87) 1 Taylor,Hayward G.,22 Shawmut Terr. 9 91 Tibbert,Marguerite E.,47 Lindsay St. 1 Sullivan,Philip A.,255 Hollis St.(Q.8/14/86) 4 2 YEARS Couto,Gerald,25 Dennison Ave. i 1 PRECINCT 17 Haskins,Mary G.,40 Walnut St. I1 Oliver,Donald M.,50 Prindiville Ave. I i 3 YEARS 26 Robertson,June P.,69 Dennison Ave. 10 Allen,Robert J.,68 Kendall Ave. 6 26 Romano,Jamie J.,95A Taralli Terr. 3 1 YEAR Romero,Linda M.,45A Second St. 9 25 Gibbons,Scott M.,20 Thurber St. 7 Rosenbloom,David,67B Beaver Terr.Cir. 8 22 Manders,W.Thomas,104 Walnut St. 11 O'Connell,J.Philip, 199 Warren Rd. 5 2 YEARS O'Neil,Anita P.,49 Warren Rd. 11 Mayer,Paula E.105 Second St. 3 Valle,Alice,63B Second St.(Q.10/21/86) 1 PRECINCT 13 3 YEARS 1 YEAR Dooling,Eileen M.,725 Concord St. 9 81 Jakutis,Edmund B.,42B Second St. 2 Gilbert,Lorin K.,30 Phelps Rd. 6 1 Marquez,Jose L., 134 Beaver St. 0 Natoli,Ronald A.,52 Walsh St. 10 10 Morrison,Nathan,46A Beaver Terr.Cir. 0 Raubin,Constance,50 Dinsmore Ave. 9 63 Wormley,David E.,74A Taralli Terr. 2 94 f CAPITAL BUDGET RULES AND COMMITTEE GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEES The Capital Budget Committee continued to fund priority capital projects in the Town on a level fund- ing basis. We continued to place emphasis on items of The two Committees have chosen to meet together safety and public health. During the Annual Town as they have many common members and agenda Meeting we generally approved items that were previ- items of joint interest. The Committees are studying ously included in out-year projections of last year's whether to propose shortening the ballot for Town Capital Plan. elections by removing some positions and changing p The major new item included was funding for the them to appointed positions. Farm Pond interceptor. This was conditional on the The Committees are also studying the length of actual receipt of the Federal grant. At the Fall Special Planning Board terms both on the ballot and for fill- Town Meeting we recommended funding of replace- ing interim vacancies. The Committees are also con- ment equipment requests based on knowledge of the sidering certain Town Meeting rules and procedures actual free cash available. This is a procedure that we including proposing an amendment to the timing of expect to continue in future years. notices for reconsideration. The Committee recommended and supported the Marc Alpert, Chairman article instituting a Hotel/Motel Tax in Framingham. Rules and Government Study Committees We also requested and received endorsement of a Town Meeting resolution, allocating the receipts of this tax for Capital Budget projects. Respectfully submitted, I John McPhie, Chairman Capital Budget Committee i i k i i I t i f i a 6 6 5 2 95 PI MISCELLANEOUS CI Gi R JURY SELECTION B' For information on Jury selection and program in N Middlesex County call or write: B Brian T. McNally, A Office of Jury Commissioner B' B: Middlesex County Courthouse Cambridge, Mass. 02141 SI D. B TOWN ELECTION HELD ON APRIL 7, 1986 Total vote cast 2,515 TI 1, B PRECINCTS 1 2 3 4A 4H 5 6 7 8 v 10 II 12A 12B 13 14 15 16 17 TOTAL MODERATOR,(1) 1 yr. AI Richard L. Allen 117 79 150 112 34 110 76 168 120 105 122 127 77 51 80 127 114 64 291862 Ai Blanks 28 30 46 67 12 28 25 52 25 23 91 59 30 14 16 29 47 22 9 653 W B SELECTMAN, 3 yrs (1) Philip B. Ernst 113 69 145 99 29 100 75 141 100 92 105 121 64 44 76 125 108 70 30 1706 Blanks 32 40 51 80 17 38 26 79 45 36 108 65 43 21 20 31 53 16 8 809 RI B COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC WORKS, 3 yrs. (l) William R. Dickson 111 66 137 100 30 94 69 141 103 92 115 126 74 44 70 116 104 60 30 1682 CI Blanks 34 43 59 79 16 44 32 79 42 36 98 60 33 21 26 40 57 26 8 833 B. BOARD OF HEALTH, 3 yrs. (1) Luke G. Tedeschi 111 74 137 111 33 94 76 158 107 101121 130 69 46 76 123 114 68 31 1780 SI Blanks 34 35 59 68 13 44 25 62 38 27 92 56 38 19 20 33 47 18 7 735 W: C. SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 3 yrs. (2) B Edward W. Foran 60 41 112 26 15 74 45 67 55 68 60 76 61 38 50 110 81 48 21 1108 Michael W. Mercurio 48 53 84 46 26 65 47 66 66 65 56 73 51 21 48 74 82 42 18 1031 Bruce E. Cohen 86 65 85 147 21 68 45 133 79 47 115 98 34 26 28 34 24 15 17 1167 R Arthur A. Siciliano 37 30 43 39 12 34 31 63 31 36 54 40 26 21 31 32 67 48 10 685 P' Blanks 57 29 66 98 18 31 34 107 53 36 137 83 43 22 29 60 66 19 10 997 B PARK COMMISSIONERS, 3 yrs. (1) B Robert L. Brown 87 53 115 80 21 80 57 120 86 72 112 102 60 30 55 94 94 33 19 1370 B, B George J. Boulanger 27 28 33 29 15 30 25 41 27 28 22 37 26 24 31 41 37 47 13 561 Blanks 30 28 48 68 10 27 19 59 32 26 78 47 21 10 10 21 27 6 5 572 R LIBRARY TRUSTEES, 3 yrs (4) B John J. Flinter 76 53 119 73 27 76 62 107 91 85 93 103 63 48 62 100 101 54 23 1416 Phyllis Jachowicz 86 55 119 78 27 76 61 112 95 36 93 104 64 44 76 106 106 63 26 1477 D Karen K. Lachance 83 61 122 67 29 77 57 104 87 90 94 99 67 39 69 108 103 55 22 1453 Edward Burton 4 4 6 4 3 12 2 2 14 6 3 10 2 1 73 B Blanks 335 267 424 478 101 323 224 557 307 251 572 438 234 129 177 310 334 172 81 5714 LIBRARY TRUSTEES, 2 yrs (1) Sheila B. Fair 98 63 135 88 31 85 68 130 95 94 103 120 77 46 84 117 103 66 28 1631 S Blanks 47 46 61 91 15 53 33 90 50 34 110 66 30 19 12 39 58 20 10 884 8 C LIBRARY TRUSTEE, 1 yr (1) A Charles Sposa to 96 65 132 96 32 95 70 135 98 93 95 129 77 51 77 137 114 67 29 1688 B Blanks 49 44 64 83 14 43 31 85 47 35 118 57 30 14 19 19 47 19 9 827 TRUSTEE OF EDGELL GROVE CEMETERY, 5 yrs. (1) Geoffrey E. Fitts 97 61 130 97 32 85 71 146 99 92 103 113 68 43 79 114 115 68 31 1644 A Blanks 48 48 66 82 14 53 30 74 46 36 110 73 39 22 17 42 46 18 7 871 PLANNING BOARD, 5 yrs (1) Dana E. Cunningham 97 61 127 93 30 75 68 134 94 88 100 106 62 47 72 117 107 64 30 1572 i Blanks 48 48 69 86 16 63 33 86 51 40 113 80 45 18 34 39 54 22 8 943 COMMISSIONER OF TRUST FUNDS, 3 yrs. (1) Amy Moran 1 1 1 1 4 Blanks 144 109 196 178 46 137 100 220 145 128 213 186 107 65 96 156 161 86 38 2511 Housing Authority, 5 yrs. (1) Andrew J. Rogers 95 58 138 86 31 73 64 127 95 88 104 125 76 48 83 133 120 74 31 1649 Blanks 50 51 58 93 15 65 37 93 50 40 109 61 31 17 13 23 41 12 7 866 REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL, 3 yrs.(2) Richard J. McDonald 83 63 123 77 32 87 67 121 90 91 88 113 72 44 68 120 115 68 20 1542 John J. Regan 90 53 115 68 31 78 55 101 77 84 85 87 55 41 61 98 91 63 21 1354 Blanks 117 102 154 213 29 Ill 80 218 123 81 253 172 87 45 63 94 116 41 35 2134 A true record; Attest; Michael J. Ward 96 REPUBLICAN STATE PRIMARY SEPTEMBER 16, 1986 Total votes cast 757 PRECINCTS 1 2 3 4A 4B 5 6 7 8 9 30 11 12A 12B 13 14 15 16 17 Total GOVERNOR, (1) Gregory S. Hyatt 20 22 11 8 3 15 10 13 11 12 14 12 18 12 11 14 B 5 6 225 Roya L1H. Swltzler 11 21 7 4 2 6 3 14 30 12 6 13 7 6 13 7 8 5 5 160 George Kariotis 21 13 10 5 9 13 2 14 15 13 7 9 5 7 2 5 2 4 3 159 Blanks 27 9 9 7 1 17 27 9 14 11 18 14 12 4 8 6 10 10 - 213 LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR, (1) Nicholas M. Nikitas 59 50 30 17 10 30 30 38 31 40 32 37 32 26 27 23 18 18 12 560 Blanks 20 15 7 7 5 21 12 12 19 8 13 11 10 3 7 9 10 6 2 197 ATTORNEY GENERAL, (1) Edward F. Harrington66 55 30 17 12 37 33 41 40 45 35 40 34 25 30 27 23 22 12 624 Blanks 13 30 7 7 3 14 9 9 10 3 10 8 8 4 4 5 5 2 2 133 SECRETARY OF STATE, (1) Deborah R. Cochran 59 51 25 15 10 26 32 37 34 39 34 34 30 24 26 26 16 15 9 542 Blanks 20 14 12 9 5 25 10 13 16 9 11 14 12 5 8 6 12 9 5 215 TREASURER, (1) L.Joyce Hampers 68 56 29 17 12 34 35 38 39 41 36 40 32 23 28 26 19 21 11 605 Blanks 11 9 8 7 3 17 7 12 11 7 9 8 10 6 6 6 9 3 3 152 AUDITOR, (1) Andrew S. Natsios 48 39 16 18 9 23 30 32 25 28 29 35 27 17 20 22 13 18 7 456 William Robinson 23 23 13 3 6 23 10 14 22 16 10 12 10 12 9 7 8 3 6 230 Blanks 8 3 8 3 - 5 2 4 3 4 6 1 5 - 5 3 7 3 1 71 REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS, (1) 5th District Blanks 79 65 37 24 15 51 42 50 50 48 45 48 42 29 34 32 28 24 14 757 COUNCILLOR, (1) Blanks 79 65 37 24 15 51 42 50 50 48 45 48 42 29 34 32 28 24 14 757 SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT, (1)1st Middlesex 6 Norfolk District William L. Hannah 55 49 23 18 13 35 32 41 34 37 36 36 2J 21 29 26 19 20 12 563 Catherine Clancy 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 Blanks 24 16 14 5 1 15 9 9 16 11 9 11 14 8 5 6 9 34 2 187 REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, One from each district 5th District Peter H. Garland 26 26 - Blanks 11 11 REPRESENTATIVE IN GENREAL COURT, 6th District Barbara E. Gray 71 56 19 11 32 36 36 39 37 38 375 Blanks 8 9 5 4 19 6 14 11 11 7 94 REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 7th District Blanks 48 42 29 34 32 28 24 14 251 DISTRICT ATTORNEY, (1) Blanks 79 65 37 24 15 51 42 50 50 48 45 48 42 29 34 32 28 24 14 757 SHERIFF, (1) Blanks 79 65 37 24 15 51 42 50 50 48 45 48 42 29 34 32 28 24 14 757 COUNTY COMMISSIONER, (1) Albert J. Onessimo 49 44 23 15 11 26 29 31 31 36 33 31 26 22 20 23 16 16 11 493 Blanks 30 21 14 9 4 25 L3 19 19 12 12 17 16 7 14 9 12 8 3 264 A true record: Michael J. Ward, I.— Clerk 97 DEMOCRATIC STATE PRIMARY SEPTEMBER 16, 1986 4905 total votes cast P PRECINCTS 1 3 4A 4B 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12A 12B 13 14 15 16 17 TOTAL G D GOVERNOR, (1) R Michael S. Dukakis 264 279 213• 172 94 253 262 220 233 243 204 196 139 97 247 205 242 115 151 3829 B Blanks 77 61 93 43 36 54 64 66 49 60 65 75 65 26 51 56 71 34 30 1076 A e LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR, (1) J Gerard D'Amico 101 95 99 58 41 96 105 76 93 88 99 98 79 47 103 109 157 55 77 1676 B Evelyn Murphy 231 239 193 143 79 206 215 202 179 204 168 160 118 73 169 142 142 85 90 3038 Blanks 9 6 14 14 10 5 6 8 10 11 2 13 7 3 26 10 14 9 14 191 ATTORNEY GENERAL, (1) HD James M. Shannon 231 238 217 147 93 193 231 194 196 217 192 183 142 81 217 187 230 106 141 3436 B JoAnn Showell 92 84 71 52 33 99 82 77 73 70 64 71 44 35 54 57 52 35 26 1171 Blanks 18 18 18 16 4 15 13 15 13 16 13 17 18 7 27 17 31 8 14 298 T. SECRETARY OF STATE, (1) RL Michael J. Connolly 250 257 249 155 86 224 258 199 210 250 207 197 157 101 240 215 252 120 148 3775 B Blanks 91 83 57 60 44 83 68 87 72 53 62 74 47 22 58 46 61 29 33 1130 Al TREASURER, (1) A Robert Q. Crane 201 221 194 125 72 186 227 172 176 195 174 164 125 86 201 177 221 100 132 3149 k,, Blanks 140 119 112 90 58 121 99 114 106 108 95 107 79 37 97 84 92 49 »9 1756 B AUDITOR, (1) RI A.Joseph DeNucci 154 190 184 122 69 165 182 151 145 189 163 149 113 59 165 158 222 101 118 2799 C� Maura A. Hennigan 105 84 77 48 30 85 87 85 74 86 66 68 53 40 73 62 48 22 35 1228 B: Charles C. Yancy 41 29 16 17 11 29 27 24 27 9 23 26 24 8 27 18 13 11 9 389 Blanks 41 37 29 28 20 28 30 26 36 19 17 28 14 16 33 23 30 15 19 489 C( REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS, (1) CI Chester G. Atkins 283 268 254 171 93 252 165 214 234 256 216 210 159 96 246 207 259 131 154 3968 B. Blanks 58 72 52 44 37 55 61 72 48 47 53 61 45 27 52 54 54 18 27 937 51 COUNCILLOR, (1) E� Christopher A. Iannella W: 213 208 212 125 69 191 228 159 190 219 171 154 119 83 207 180 217 104 136 3185 B: Blanks 128 132 94 90 61 116 98 127 92 84 98 117 85 40 91 81 96 45 45 1720 R1 SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT, (1) lst Middlesex b Norfolk District J: Edward L. Burke 265 277 243 156 96 244 265 223 221 257 210 213 153 93 238 212 247 119 159 3893 PE Blanks 76 63 63 59 34 63 61 63 59 46 59 58 51 30 60 49 66 30 22 1012 BI RI REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 1 from each district 5th Middlesex District 246 Bi Joseph M. Connolly 246 Gc Blanks 60 60 BI REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 6th Middlesex District Rf Blanks 341 340 215 130 307 326 286 282 303 269 2799 Da B1 REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, 7th Middlesex District 1489 g38AOaP. Magnanl 220 156 105 235 225 268 128 152 PI 51 48 18 63 36 45 21 29 311 DISTRICT ATTORNEY, (1) DI L. Scott Harshbarger268 284 247 168 104 253 267 230 225 252 221 226 145 90 210 205 231 109 129 3864 L. Stephen J. McGrail 43 34 39 31 15 34 32 39 36 31 28 25 36 21 42 39 48 22 28 623 B1 Blanks 30 22 20 16 11 20 27 17 21 20 20 20 23 12 46 17 34 18 24 418 SF SHERIFF, (1) Middlesex County Jc John P. McGonigle 179 192 184 127 65 178 197 166 184 202 168 148 117 73 146 162 165 76 82 2811 B1 Henry E. Sullivan 76 67 78 38 30 65 75 56 53 57 43 63 47 24 94 66 88 45 65 1130 Blanks 86 81 44 50 35 64 54 64 45 44 58 60 40 26 58 33 60 28 34 964 CC B1 COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, (1) Middlesex County Al Bill Schmidt 86 96 75 57 26 89 105 72 75 98 70 56 50 32 74 56 60 37 46 1260 B1 Barbara J.A. Collins76 75 63 41 27 77 74 58 67 63 67 52 36 22 64 59 46 27 38 1032 Anthony D. Pini 19 15 25 14 11 19 21 21 20 24 20 38 15 9 36 38 79 18 19 461 Paul H. Sullivan 62 56 80 45 23 43 62 53 54 50 50 56 53 37 70 63 65 42 44 1008 Cc Blanks 98 98 63 58 43 79 64 82 66 68 62 69 50 23 54 45 63 25 34 1144 J. Ch B1 Qo A true record:, ATTEST: MICHAEL J. WARD, Town Clerk Sh of YE NO B1 QU R£ YE NO BI 98 NOVEMBER 4th, 1986 ELECTION PRECINCTS 1 2 3 4A 48 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12A 12B 13 14 15 16 17 Total GOVERNOR, (1) Dukakis d Murphy 809 851 727 626 316 710 811 690 767 771 731 657 414 304 644 608 630 450 386 11,902 Rariotis d Nikltas 431 386 366 314 159 385 369 315 342 364 351 418 222 153 193 245 230 176 126 5,545 Blanks 46 55 68 35 17 55 40 58 63 38 71 38 37 36 45 41 79 29 25 876 ATTORNEY GENERAL, (1) Edward F. Harrington 672 622 551 476 267 576 588 520 552 571 544 589 334 235 332 337 291 251 170 8,478 James M. Shannon 555 597 543 440 209 508 575 475 547 550 537 473 299 229 500 509 562 365 328 8,,79;. Blanks 59 73 67 59 16 66 57 68 73 52 72 51 40 29 50 52 86 39 39 1,048 SECRETARY OF STATE, (1) Michael J. Connolly 760 809 767 577 292 686 798 624 732 768 681 612 420 309 623 599 671 452 386 11,569 Deborah R. Cochran 415 375 296 298 165 371 326 331 330 326 348 400 198 140 180 217 162 156 99 5,133 Blanks 111 108 98 100 35 93 96 108 110 79 121 101 55 44 79 78 106 47 52 1,621 TREASURER, (1) Robert Q. Crane 604 637 600 451 223 531 620 476 597 616 521 475 326 250 520 528 571 398 326 9,270 L. Joyce Hampers 568 547 460 453 237 517 517 477 477 476 521 561 287 195 295 304 277 223 170 7,562 Blanks 114 108 101 71 32 102 83 110 98 81 111 77 60 48 67 62 91 34 41 1,491 AUDITOR, (1) A. Joseph DeNucci 700 728 715 539 263 662 747 618 698 712 667 595 387 279 606 587 702 468 362 11,035 William Robinson 456 440 321 323 177 377 373 355 363 370 365 408 224 160 199 230 149 149 120 5,539 Blanks 130 124 125 113 52 111 100 110 111 91 121 110 62 54 77 77 88 38 55 1,749 REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS, (1) Chester G. Atkins 906 975 854 667 362 827 929 766 871 880 817 794 500 371 717 684 747 521 436 13,624 Blanks 380 317 307 308 130 323 291 297 301 293 336 319 173 122 165 210 192 134 101 4,699 COUNCILLOR, (1) Christopher A. Iannella 764 849 775 568 296 708 837 635 753 806 720 702 434 325 642 641 688481 394 12,018 Blanks 522 443 386 407 196 442 383 428 419 367 433 411 239 168 240 253 251 174 143 6,305 SENATOR, GENERAL COURT, (1) Edward L. Burke 837 867 768 629 343 737 802 697 808 774 716 720 447 320 627 597 662 435 392 12,178 William L. Hannah 372 344 303 270 120 344 342 286 29L 326 338 340 190 135 201 235 187 180 111 4,915 Blanks 77 81 90 76 29 69 76 80 73 73 99 53 36 38 54 62 90 40 34 1,230 REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, (1) 5th Middlesex District Joseph M. Connolly 743 743 Peter H. Garland 315 715 j Blanks 103 103 REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, (1) 6th Middlesex District 246 Barbara E. Gray 960 964 757 364 853 868 791 843 849 786 8,035 Gerald L. Bloomfield 246 252 165 101 229 255 198 242 241 264 2,193 60 Blanks 80 76 53 27 68 97 74 87 83 103 748 REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, (1) 7th Middlesex District 799 David P. Magnani 856 520 368 724 720 779 537 429 4,951 Blanks 257 153 107 158 174 160 118 108 1,235 :89 PRECINCTS 11 DISTRICT ATTORNEY,(1) 54 L. Scott Harshbarger 955 985 884 695 367 838 95i 774 903 907 859 827 498 376 703 711 736 528 430 13,927 f 23 Blanks 331 307 277 280 125 312 269 289 269 266 294 286 175 117 179 183 203 127 107 4,396 3 SHERIFF, (1) John P. McGonigle 774 859 795 582 302 723 843 642 787 807 722 705 436 324 639 659 702 484 395 12,188 11 Blanks 512 433 366 393 190 427 377 421 385 366 431 408 237 169 243 235 237 171 142 6,143 30 + COUNTY COMMISSIONER, (1) Bill Schmidt 585 634 623 444 224 539 656 508 604 596 534 496 361 241 544 523 560 392 338 9,402 Albert J. Onessimo 377 362 321 280 140 359 331 306 330 372 361 380 183 152 189 225 230 168 113 5,179 3 Blanks 324 296 217 251 128 252 233 249 238 205 258 237 129 100 149 146 149 95 86 3,742 i COUNTY CHARTER COMM. (1) John F. DelPrete 694 700 695 425 250 625 751 517 649 644 472 607 414 286 559 607 657 474 349 10,375 Chesley Oriel 327 343 251 367 144 312 278 352 316 334 428 351 154 128 179 155 146 112 87 4,764 Blanks 265 249 215 183 98 213 191 194 207 195 253 155 105 79 144 132 136 69 101 3,184 QUESTION A Shall a charter study commission be created to study the present governmental structure of Middlesex County to consider and make findings concerning the form Of government and make recommendations thereon? YES 747 777 681 567 296 706 722 672 712 683 683 674 418 283 507 510 515 356 292 10,801 NO 322 351 307 267 118 293 324 239 257 324 267 272 153 114 182 223 209 181 115 4,518 Blanks 217 164 173 141 78 151 174 152 203 166 203 167 102 96 193 161 215 118 130 3,004 QUESTION Al REGULATING OR PROHIBITING ABORTION YES 373 407 481 238 159 379 391 349 371 403 350 422 287 191 334 351 468 253 201 6,408 NO 872 853 634 720 316 732 784 681 768 739 752 651 369 274 475 497 391 353 304 11,165 Blanks 41 32 46 17 17 39 45 33 33 31 51 40 17 28 73 46 80 49 32 750 99 QUESTION 02 Government aid to non-public schools and students YES 267 290 299 176 123 237 231 257 286 265 259 286 202 122 225 241 341 171 129 4,407 NO 982 973 813 785 359 883 946 772 854 879 846 793 451 354 583 609 519 450 374 13,217 Blanks 37 29 49 14 10 30 43 34 32 29 48 34 20 25 74 44 79 34 34 699 QUESTION 03 Limiting state tax revenue increases YES 670 637 579 530 250 596 582 524 576 574 570 558 314 215 403 399 432 267 215 8,891 NO 538 574 396 389 214 485 568 464 517 525 488 461 322 234 374 428 372 327263 8.038 Blanks 78 81 86 56 28 69 70 75 79 74 95 94 37 44 105 67 136 61 59 1,394 QUESTION 84 Cleaning up oil and hazardous materials YES 906 922 815 738 354 808 876 770 863 839 824 801 500 355 616 646 655 473 382 13,134 NO 318 304 268 196 120 299 284 247 239 285 248 243 144 99 162 195 172 137 93 4,053 Blanks 62 66 78 41 27 43 60 46 70 49 81 69 29 39 104 53 112 45 62 1,136 QUESTION 85 Requiring use of safety belts in motor vehicles YES 668 694 521 555 261 571 559 559 604 546 590 551 324 222 379 392 331 231 216 8,774 NO 585 572 595 410 224 561 637 481 541 608 527 522 335 245 453 468 541 395 301 9,001 Blanks 33 26 45 10 7 18 24 23 27 19 36 40 14 26 SO 34 67 29 20 548 QUESTION 06 Voter registration by mail YES 491 500 425 384 177 443 441 403 433 430 416 393 226 150 270 324 304 219 180 6,609 NO 715 717 642 533 288 648 717 587 637 663 636 625 405 302 484 496 489 376 296 10.255 Blanks 80 75 94 58 28 59 62 73 102 80 101 95 42 41 128 74 146 60 61 1,459 QUESTION N7 (non-binding) National health program YES 763 770 715 541 298 698 771 650 695 753 695 646 434 322 598 583 595 460 372 11,359 NO 435 430 355 357 164 378 355 339 383 347 351 366 198 130 167 241 195 136 104 5,431 Blanks 88 92 91 77 30 74 94 74 94 73 107 101 41 41 117 70 149 59 61 1,533 QUESTION 08 (non-binding) National acid rain control program YES 985 996 859 752 396 873 960 831 887 892 867 931 537 377 614 676 628 480 373 13,814 NO 182 191 179 154 62 182 162 151 179 173 155 164 79 59 116 128 123 104 82 2,625 Blanks 119 105 123 69 34 95 98 81 106 108 13: 118 57 57 152 90 188 71 82 1,884 A true record: ATTEST: Michael J. Ward, Town Clerk HISTORICAL COMMISSION So far this year we have started listing the memorial squares for the Cultural Resources Inventory. Have planted the Whiting Fountain on Salem End Road at Maynard Road and purchased a National Register Plaque for the First Baptist Church, the oldest church building in town. We have also made out the National Register application forms for the Edgell Memorial Chapel in the Edgell Grove Cemetery, which are not yet complete. Molly Evans, Chairman Marjorie Maish, Secretary Bonita Bryant Ralph R. Funk Jerry Silverberg 100 i f i i r r r r I r { i i _ . i i i � Framingham PORATEO \��O I 1 C T, V SP Ar Ar Ar Ar SP Ar Ar Ar Ar Ar Ar Ar' Ar. An An An Art Art Art Art Art Art Art Art Art Art Art Art Art Art Art Art Art Art Art Framingham Town Meeting Journal 1986 TABLE OF CONTENTS COVER DESIGN:Stearns Reservoir Gatehouse Rendered by North High School Graphic Arts students: Warren Vegas, Kevin Clark, Jeff Prag TOWNOFFICIALS ...............................................................................................................6 TOWN MEETING MEMBERSHIP (Election results and attendance records) .....................................10 SPECIAL TOWN MEETING -JANUARY 28, 1986...................................................................13 Art. 1. Proposed transfer of land on Western Avenue from Public Works to Selectmen. Art. 2. Authorization for Selectmen to convey property on Framingham-Sherborn town line to Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Art. 3. Authorization for Selectmen to acquire parcel of land in Western Avenue area for Public Works garage. Art. 4. Proposal to amend zoning by-law relating to property on Merchant Road from residential to industrial. RESOLUTION: Concerning General Motors lease money, some to be allotted to Framingham. SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - MARCH 25, 1986 ......................................................................19 Art. 1. Proposed removal of officials of Weights and Measures from Civil Service jurisdiction. Art. 2. Amendment to Personnel By-Law (Fire Department). Art. 3. Transfer of funds from Free Cash to Town departments. ANNUAL TOWN MEETING- APRIL 23, 1986 Art. 1. Enable Selectmen to make appointments for Measurers of Wood, Bark, and Lumber and other Town officials under their jurisdiction. I Art. 2. Authorization to Town Treasurer to borrow needed funds. Art. 3. Payment of unpaid bills. Art. 4. Widening and relocation of streets. Art. 5. Proposal to amend Personnel By-Law. Art. 6. Adoption of new Schedule A& B of Personnel By-Law. Art. 7. Budget items. Note RESOLUTION regarding enforcement of Sign By-Law. Note RESOLUTION concerning attendance of School Committee at Town Meeting. Art. 8. Funding for Traffic Signals. Art. 9. Funding for Pension Fund FY '87. Art. 10. Funding for Public Transportation services. Art. 11. Funding for Parking Meters. Art. 12. Acceptance of funding of Title 1, Housing and Community Development. Art. 13. Funding for Public Works work on five streets. Art. 14. Funding engineering services - widening or extension of roads, pavement, drains, and sidewalks. Art. 15. Funding engineering services: sidewalks and land damages. Art. 16. Funding for drainage. Art. 17. Funding for sanitary sewers. Art. 18. Funding for acquisition of land for sanitary sewer system. Art. 19. Funding for relaying of water mains. Art. 20. Funding improvements to water system. Art. 21. Funding for pavement markings -safety program. Art. 22. Proposal to sell or lease incinerator property. Art. 23. Authorization for Incinerator Committee to enter lease for refuse disposal. Art. 24. Acquisition of Hanson Farm property. Art. 25. Proposal for estimated consideration of remuneration to Summit Point Trust. Art. 26. Funding to support Youth Guidance Center. V { 3 Art. 27A. Funding for replacement of gym floor - Walsh School. A Art. 27B. Funding for energy conservation - in various schools. A Art. 28. Transfer of Mt. Wayte property from jurisdiction of Selectmen to Conservation Commission. A Art. 29. Funding for support of Visiting Nurse Association. A Art. 30. Funding for support of Trinity Mental Health Center. A Art. 31. Funding for renovation of North High soccer field. A. Art. 32. Funding for enrichment and extension of Library services. Art. 33. Funding for added Library materials. A Art. 34. Proposal for acquisition of property. Ai Art. 35. Establishment of Apartment Zoning Study Committee. Art. 36. Amendments to Zoning By-Law. (Standing Committee on Planning and Zoning). Ai Art. 37. Amendment to Zoning By-Law (Wright). Art. 38. Recommendations to remedy housing shortage. Aj Art. 39. Proposed By-Law dealing with Tenants Rights. Ai SPECIAL TOWN MEETING -JUNE 17, 1986..........................................................................61 Ai Art. 1. Amendment to Personnel By-Law. Ai Art. 2. Funding for departmental expenses. Art. 3. Funding for Parking Control devices. Ai Art. 4. Provision to excempt Officers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures from Civil Service. Art. 5. Selectmen authorized to acquire Cochituate Rd. site by eminent domain. RESOLUTION: regarding effort to minimize growth patterns. RESOLUTION: proposed traffic and circulation plan. Art. 6. Proposal to change Arlington& Irving St. site from General Residence to Central Business. ATTORNEY GENERAL'S ADOPTION OF STATEMENT OF ART. 6. Art. 7. Proposed Floor Area Ratio Amendment. PLANNING BOARD MINORITY REPORT Art. 8. Proposal for Merchant Road - change from General Residence to Industrial. SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - OCTOBER 21, 1986 ...................................................................71 Art. 1. Personnel reclassifications. Art. 2. Personnel Board changes for membership. Art. 3. Acceptance of Senate Bill - change Sealers of Weights and Measures from Civil Service to appointment by Selectmen. Art. 4. Proposal: to allow non-residents to be appointed as assessors. Art. 5. By-Law amendment regarding newspaper publication of warrant. Art. 6. By-Law regarding publication of time and place of adjournment of Town Meeting. Art. 7. Acceptance of Block Grant funds. Art. 8. Acquisition of property on Pearl & Proctor Streets. Art. 9. Transfer of site at corner of Pearl & Proctor Streets to Francis and Louise Rivers. Art. 10. Authorization for site at corner of Pearl & Proctor Streets to be used for parking. Art. 11. Proposed acquisition of parcel of land at Pearl & Proctor Streets. Art. 12. Authorization to sell parcel of land on Dunning&Chautaqua Avenues. Art, 13. Proposal to authorize sale of Waverly St. to Russo. Art. 14. Proposal to sell Waverly St. site to Shahood. RESOLUTION: Proposal: proceeds of Hotel/Motel tax to augment Capital Improvement Plan. Art. 15. Authorization to impose local room tax. Art. 16. Funding for Town vehicles. Art. 17. A. Funding for water system improvements. B. Funding for replacement of sewer main. C. Funding for reconstruction of Concord St. bridge. D. Funding for Farm Pond Sewer Interceptor. RESOLUTION: regarding problems of parking in downtown Framingham (Panzera). RESOLUTION 1. cost recovery plan with Ashland. 2. restriction of sewer connections (Chafitz). j Art. 18. Funding for items in various departments. RESOLUTION 1 Refusal of requests for rivate roads (Marino). RESOLUTION 2 Proposal for plan on eliminate bad procedure for organization of subdivisions. RESOLUTION 3 Proposal forcing developers to obtain necessary Federal or State permits before approaching Town boards. Art. 19. Funding for Comprehensive Plan for the Town. 4 I. Art. 20. Funding for basketball court at Long Field. Art. 21. Funding for School Collective Bargaining Agreements. Art. 22. Acceptance of ruling on sprinkler systems in boarding houses. Art. 23. Proposal to discontinue Beech St. as a public way. Art. 24. Proposal for release of Lincoln St. site from Town to Framingham Union Hospital. Art. 25. Zoning classification — Clark Hill. ATTORNEY GENERAL'S approval to classification of Art. 25. Art. 26. Proposed amendment to Zoning By-Law— Plymouth Church. Art. 27. Amendments to Zoning By-Law concerning single and general residence districts. ATTORNEY GENERAL'S approval of amendments of Art. 27. Art. 28. Zoning By-Law amendment: single residence to Open Space and Recreation District. ATTORNEY GENERAL'S approval of amendment of Art. 28. Art. 29. Proposed Zoning By-Law— Single residence to Open Space Macomber property. Art. 30. Proposed Zoning By-Law amendment: Salem End Road and Gates Street. ATTORNEY GENERAL'S approval of amendments of Art. 30. Art. 31. Zoning By-Law amendment —Paul estate. Art. 32. Proposed Zoning By-Law amendment — Nanatovich property. ATTORNEY GENERAL'S approval of amendment of Art. 32. Art. 33. Amendment to Zoning By-Law regarding Business and Light Manufacturing dimensional regulations. ATTORNEY GENERAL'S approval of amendment of Art. 33. i 5 II 5 TOWN OF FRAMINGHAM TOWN OFFICIALS TOWN MEETING MODERATOR (Elected) Richard Allen Term expires 198 SELECTMEN John F. King Term expires 198 John F. DelPrete Term expires 198 Philip B. Ernst Term expires 198 1 EXECUTIVE-ADMINISTRATOR (Appointed by Selectmen) Matthew P. Clarke Term expires 198 CHIEF OF POLICE (Appointed by Selectmen) Arthur F. Martins Term indefinit FIRE CHIEF (Appointed by Selectmen) John J. Hancock Term indefinite (Retiring in May 1987) CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR (Appointed by Selectmen) Lt. Dominic Ferrazzi Term indefinite (Framingham Police Dept.) TOWN COUNSEL (Appointed by Selectmen) Aaron Bikofsky Term expires 1989 TOWN ACCOUNTANT (Appointed by Selectmen) Arthur F. Gallagher Term expires 1987 TOWN TREASURER &TAX COLLECTOR (Appointed by Selectmen) Donald J. Croatti Term indefinite TOWN ASSESSORS (Appointed by Selectmen) John Liberatore Term expires 1989 Randolph Kincaid Term expires 1987 TOWN CLERK (Elected) Michael J. Ward Term expires 1987 DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL (Appointed by Personnel Board) John Harland Term expires 1987 PURCHASING AGENT (Appointed by Selectmen) William B. Forrestal Term expires 1987 6 BUILDING COMMISSIONER (Appointed by Selectmen) Richard P. McIntosh Term expires 1988 PLANNING DIRECTOR (Appointed by Selectmen) Frederick S. Taintor Term expires 1989 HOUSING AUTHORITY DIRECTOR (Appointed by Housing Authority) John P. Murphy Term indefinite TOWN ENGINEER (Appointed by Selectmen) Fred Sergeant Term expires 1987 ASST. TOWN ENGINEER (Appointed by Selectmen) Joseph Champagne Term indefinite DIRECTOR, PARKS&RECREATION ' (Appointed by Park Commission) _ William D. Carey Term expires 1988 DIRECTOR, PUBLIC HEALTH (Appointed by Board of Health)Robert T. Cooper Term indefinite DIRECTOR, VETERANS' BENEFITS&SERVICES (Appointed by Selectmen) James R. Gavin Term indefinite EXEC.-ADM. HUMAN RELATIONS (Appointed by Selectmen) Ria McNiff Term indefinite CALLAHAN SR. CENTER DIRECTOR I Albert McCarthy, Interim Dir. SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS (Appointed by School Committee) Rigas Rigopoulos Term indefinite (Retiring July 1987) DIRECTOR OF LIBRARIES (Appointed by Library Trustees) James C. Flaherty Term indefinite l COMMISSIONERS OF PUBLIC WORKS (Elected) Anthony M. Colonna Term expires 1987 William Dickson Term expires 1988 Agnes C. Esty Term expires 1989 DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS (Appointed by Commissioners of Public Works) � James Hanscom Term indefinite DIRECTOR OF TREE DEPT., PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION 7 William Tupper (Appointed by Selectmen) Term expires 1988 7 r I I BOARD OF HEALTH (Elected) Ann G. Arvedon Term expires 1987 Dana E. Cunningham Term expires 1988 Luke Tedeschi Term expires 1989 PARK COMMISSION (Elected) I Henry Brandolini Term expires 1987 i Raymond Garbarino Term expires 1987 Raymond Swanecamp, Jr. Term expires 1988 Robert J. Salvi Term expires 1988 Robert L. Brown Term expires 1989 i TRUSTEES OF LIBRARIES (Elected) Anne P. Foran Term expires 1987 Henry B. Fortier Term expires 1987 JoAnne Thompson Term expires 1987 Charles Sposato Term expires 1987 George P. King, Jr. Term expires 1988 Clare F. Friel Term expires 1988 Barbara Wilson Term expires 1988 Sheila Burke Fair Term expires 1988 John L. Flinter Term expires 1989 Phyllis Jachowicz Term expires 1989 1 Edward J. Burton Term expires 1989 1 Karen Kiley LaChance Term expires 1989 1 SCHOOL COMMITTEE I (Elected) Waldo B. Lyon Term expires 1987 _ Joseph P. Conlon Term expires 1987 I Mildred L. Katzman Term expires 1987 1' Mary DiManno Term expires 1988 i Dennis W. Cardiff Term expires 1988I I Edward W. Foran Term expires 1989 D -: Bruce E. Cohen Term expires 1989 REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE (Framingham Representatives—Elected) Rv' Paul J. Farley Term expires 1987 John J. Donovan Term expires 1987 F Robert T. Merusi Term expires 1988 Henry B. Fortier Term expires 1988 John J. Regan Term expires 1989 Richard J. McDonald Term expires 1989 S J PLANNING BOARD C ` (Elected) r Claire Burke Cahill Term expires 1987 C Dianne M. Sheac Term expires 1988 l" John Acton Term expires 1989 l:~y David D. Nobilini Term expires 1990 F Dana E. Cunningham Term expires 1991 J HOUSING AUTHORITY (Elected) William D. Oleson Term expires 1987 Robert Jachowikz Term expires 1987 Edward F. Convery Term expires 1989 r+ Andrew J. Rogers Term expires 1991 l' 8 l:' PERSONNEL BOARD (Appointed by Moderator) Alan Kaplan, Ch. Term expires 1987 Raymond Meserve Term expires 1988 Norman Powers Term expires 1988 Deborah Blumer (Rep. of Finance Com.) Term expires 1988 David Bell Term expires 1989 Barry Bograd Term expires 1989 ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS (Appointed by Selectmen) William F. Celorier, Jr. Term expires 1987 John B. Flynn Term expires 1988 Arnold D. Mindick Term expires 1989 ASSOC. ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS (Appointed by Selectmen) Margaret C. Carlson Term expires 1988 Joseph Tosti Term expires 1989 FINANCE COMMITTEE (Appointed by Moderator) Albert Cullen Term expires 1987 Robert Halliday Term expires 1987 James Dwyer Term expires 1988 Ronald A. Porter Term expires 1988 Peter TenBroeck Term expires 1988 L. Ward Franzen Term expires 1989 Deborah Blumer Term expires 1989 Esther A.H. Hopkins Term expires 1989 CAPITAL BUDGET COMMITTEE (Appointed by Moderator) Placido Andronico Term expires 1987 i Marc Alpert Term expires 1988 John McPhie Term expires 1988 Harriet Wittenborg Term expires 1989 Michael Fabbri Term expires 1989 COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS (Elected) Alan F. Harrington Term expires 1987 Richard W. Hohmann Term expires 1988 TRUSTEES OF EDGELL GROVE CEMETERY (Elected) Sally M. Brown Term expires 1987 Julian T. Hargraves, Jr. Term expires 1988 George Willis Term expires 1989 Nancy F. Bianchi Term expires 1990 Geoffrey E. Fitts Term expires 1991 CEMETERY TRUSTEES (Appointed by Selectmen) Edward Wheet Term expires 1989 Joseph Croci Term expires 1989 Orlo H. Coots Term expires 1989 9 TOWN MEETING 2YEARS 31 Goldman,Joan,45 Fox Hill Rd. 10 MEMBERSHIP Marder, Ronald H., 11 Angelica Dr. 8 Co Co Stone, Harvey S., 10 Nancy La. 8 Ep, Ward,Lois A., 1 Millwood Cir. 5 Ph. PRECINCT 1 1 YEAR 21 El EcnON Barrett,Alice C.,37 Blackberry La. 6 An ATTENDANCE. RESULTS DeHasn,Stanley N., 101 Angelica Dr. 9 Bai Goldman,Ralph F.,45 Fox Hill Rd. 9 Ma 3 YEARS Meliere,Kenneth A.,42 Angelica Dr. 5 Ste Anthony,Theodore C.,Jr.,Edgell Dr. 9 88 Bloomfield,Gerald L., 1347 Edgell Rd. 9 64 PRECINCT 5 1 y DelPrete,Arthur E.,Jr.,41 Nixon Rd. 8 103 3 YEARS Ha Hyte,Hannah-Fay,15 Edmands Rd. 5 79 Bubello,Charles M.,451 Brook St. 9 86 Hs Marquis,Arthur,26 Swanson Rd. 7 10 Phi i 2YEARS Swidler, Nancy J.,28 Swanson Rd. 8 % Sts iBanerjee,Teri S.,248 Winch St. 8 Wlodyka,Edmund E., 10 Park Ave. 11 93 Fingold,James M., 14 Bayberry La. 9 Pion,Sheila Ann,29 Juniper La. 11 2YEARS 3 Y iPiper,Marjory R., 1304 Windsor Dr.(Res. 12/68) 8 Fearon,Warren,72 Nicholas Rd. 4 An Naditch,Gerald H., 16 Pamela Rd. 8 Dri Tolland,Joseph G. III, 18 Park Ave. 7 Du I YEAR Welch,William F.,5 Park Ave. 10 Sin Leis,Michael D., 177 Edmands Rd. 10 Quirk,Maryanne,508 Windsor Dr. 4 1 YEAR 2 Y Wittenborg,Harriett,43 Wayside Inn Rd. 10 Alpert, Marc S., 16 Cider Mill Rd. 10 Col Jones,Carl L,8 Edgell Dr.(Q.5/6/86) 0 Fogarty, Norman, 13 Joseph Rd. 3 Lei Frank,Philip L., 135 Brook St. 6 I' Ma 3 YEARS PRECINCT 2 Howland,Donna L.,5 Scott Dr. 10 Wa Tuomy,Justin M.83 Davidson Rd. 8 5 PRECINCT 6 1 Y Baum,Burton F.,57 Overlook Dr. 9 71 3 YEARS Bol Coville,Nancy H.,53 Eaton Rd. 8 68 Eagan,Daniel J.,4 Linda Ave. 9 67 Fm Sisitsky,Charles J.,52 Eaton Rd. 8 73 Harrington,Janet L.,Paxton Rd. 11 62 Gr( Robinson,Joseph P.,8 Linda Ave. 8 64 Mu 2YEARS Sleczkowski,Elizabeth K.,27 Townsend Terr. 8 14 Gariepy,Roland E.,8 Upton Rd. 7 Shull,Stephen, 16 Sloane Dr. 11 2YEARS 3 Y F Voght,Richard R.,301 Potter Rd. 10 Chakaris,Harold S., 10 Geraldine Rd. 7 Blo Wadsworth,Earl C., 12 Merrill Dr. 9 Fino,Robert H.,72 Elda Rd. 4 Chi Harrington,Robert J.,24 Paxton Rd. 10 Lai 1 YEAR Noonan, Mary Regina, 15 Poplar St. 10 Kalin,Cecily C.,78 Hemenway Rd. 10 Ma Morris,Harvey L,21 Merrill Dr. 5 1 YEAR 2 Y Sisitsky,Marjorie C.,52 Eaton Rd. 5 Blum,Rita K.,36 Spruce St. 8 s `1 Tuomy,Joyce T.,83 Davidson Rd. 10 Fontano,Dennis D.,56 Higgins Rd. 6 Chi 11 Medvin,Shirley H.,41 Summer La. 4 Kirl PRECINCT 3 Speranza,John,66 Spruce St. 11 La 3 YEARS i Brundage,Eugene J.,59 Gleason St. 9 78 PRECINCT 7 Casselman,Carol E.,48 Florissant Ave. 9 133 3 YEARS 1 Y Col Pascucci,Salvi A., 17 Aleds St. 9 76 Brett,Robert W., 140 Maynard Rd. 10 100 Hill Stasik,John H., 15 Chouteau Ave. 9 138 Marsh,Laurence W.,8 Hickey Dr. 8 81 Prig Ober,Pauline L,4 Knight Rd. 7 105 Wri 2YEARS Spiewsk,Judith H.,37 Berkeley Rd. 7 126 DiMarino,Susan K.,50 Brownies Rd. 7 r, Panzers,Linda L., 10 Chouteau Ave. 10 2YEARS Pendergast,Kathleen M., 14 Bellefontaine Ave. 9 i 3 Y 8 Crotty,Kevin P.,79 Pleasant St. 11 i, Fin Remillard,James F.,680 Old Conn.Path 3 Farrington,Evelyn E., 162 Edgell Rd. 10 Hey Ober,Richard M.,4 Knight Rd. 10 Roi 1 YEAR Winett,Joel, 10 Berkeley Rd. 7 Roy Griffin,Lawrence J.,32 Brownies Rd. 9 McPhie,John M.,23 Little Farms Rd. 10 1 YEAR 2 Y Paul,Richard E.,933 Old Conn. Path 11 Bernstein,Susan P.,8 Merriam Rd. 10 I Col Woodward,Patricia E.,3 Springhill Rd. 9 O'Grady,Elizabeth J.,348 Belknap Rd. 0 ` Mai Pulster,Robert L,81 Salem End Rd. 7 MCI PRECINCT 4 Savas,Sophie,529 Belknap Rd. 5 Orl 3 YEARS Lepore,Ralph T., 1 Fox Hill Rd. 11 125 Marder,Barbara F., 11 Angelica Dr. 10 150 .0 Silverberg,Sheila, 10 Birchmeadow Cir. 9 103 Waldman,James T., 1 Waveney Way 4 111 10 u PRECINCT 8 1 YEAR 3 YEARS Black, Mary L.,54 Chackerberry La. 7 Baye,Inge M.,27 Ridgefield Dr. 8 96 Dickson,Patricia A.,Singletary La. 7 Cooper,Joseph Z.,23 Crestwood Dr. 10 100 Haagens,Mary Jean B., 16 Hickory Hill La. 11 Epstein,Armand, I Indian Head Hgts. 4 19 Magnus,Fredrick P.,8 Hickory Hill La. 8 Phillips, Diana C., 113 Lockland Ave. 8 101 2 YEARS PRECINCT 12 3 YEARS Andronico, Placido, 118 Lockland Ave. 10 Chesmore, Richard E., 17 Warren Rd. 9 102 Barr,Myron R.,9 Highgate Rd. 9 Ellsworth,J. Richard,40 Warren Rd. 11 108 Mahoney,Thomas F., 103 Hastings St. 9 Haley,Marion F.,349 Union Ave. 10 79 Stella,John,24 Sunset Dr. 8 Taylor,Hayward G.,22 Shawmut Terr. 9 91 1 YEAR 2 YEARS Haberman,Wolf,41 Crestwood Dr. 11 Couto,Gerald,25 Dennison Ave. 11 Halliday, Robert J.,27 Dana Rd. 10 Haskins,Mary G.,40 Walnut St. 11 Phillips,Eugene C., 113 Lockland Ave. 6 Oliver,Donald M.,50 Prindiville Ave. 11 Starr,David A.,59 Donna Rd. 6 Robertson,June P.,69 Dennison Ave. 10 PRECINCT 9 1 YEAR 3 YEARS Gibbons,Scott M.,20 Thurber St. 7 Aaron,Alan H.,31 Foster Dr. 3 21 Manders,W.Thomas, 104 Walnut St. 11 { Driscoll,Wanda, 143 Beacon St. 10 87 O'Connell,J. Philip, 199 Warren Rd. 5 Dunton, Robert M.,405 Old Conn.Path 10 89 O'Neil,Anita P.,49 Warren Rd. 11 Simons,Wally,28 Greenleaf Cir. 9 91 2 YEARS PRECINCT 13 3 YEARS Connolly,Joseph B.,3 Sylvester Dr. 10 Dooling,Eileen M.,725 Concord St. 9 81 Levay,Edward T.Jr., 13 Summer St. 11 Gilbert, Lorin K.,30 Phelps Rd. 6 1 Matthews,Frank T.,42 Foster Dr. 3 Natoli,Ronald A.,52 Walsh St. 10 10 Waldman,Lawrence H.,52 Greenleaf Cir. 1 Rubin,Constance,50 Dinsmore Ave. 9 63 1 YEAR 2 YEARS Boudreau,Evelyn M., 103 Cherry St. 5 Cummings,Sears,693 Concord St. 5 Funk,Elizabeth L., 1242 Concord St. 7 Dunn,Phyllis A.,50 Williams St. 10 Greenblott,Judy,33 Foster Dr. 3 O'Leary,Loretta O.,55 Dinsmore Ave. 3 Murtaugh,Joan E., 153 Newbury St. 5 Wodtke,Yolanda A., 10 Pearl Harbor Rd. 6 PRECINCT 10 1 YEAR 3 YEARS Denham,James F., 19 Gorman Rd. 6 Bloch, Donald M.,668 Salem End Rd. 6 92 Fair,James E.,Jr.,32 Gorman Rd. 5 '{ Chafitz, Harvey L,24 Gr zboska Cir. 11 85 Tupper,Jo Ann E.,3 Dunning Ave. 3 Larkin,Walter, 1450 Worcester Rd. 9 87 Zimmerman,Albert J.,33 Dinsmore Ave. 6 May,Phyllis A., 1450 Worcester Rd. 10 108 PRECINCT 14 2YEARS 3YEARS Chafitz,Priscilla E.,24 Gryzboska Cir. 10 Cintolo,Louis V.,358 Grant St. 10 117 Herman,Lois L., 135 Oakcrest Dr. 9 Marino,Virginia A.,80 Kendall St. 11 35 Kirley,Edward P., 13 Ellis St. 10 Maskell,Dana L.,21 Pond St. 8 105 Lagerbom,James M.,30 Temple St. 9 Tomasi,Janet M.,34 Mansfield St. 11 117 ! 1 YEAR 2 YEARS Colonna,Dorothy A., 1500 Worcester Rd. 11 Demeritt,Raymond P., 110 Mansfield St. 11 Hill,Dorothy E.,6 Old Wood Rd. 2 Ferri,Kathryn L.,471 Concord St. 11 Priver,Edith F., 1400 Worcester Rd. 2 Sostilio,Louis D., 17 Howe St. 8 I Wright,James M.,34 Temple St. 2 Stone,Elizabeth J., 14 Arthur St. 9 PRECINCT 11 I YEAR 3 YEARS Fabbri,Brian, 1%Grant St. 9 v Finn,Renee,2 Barry Dr. 4 110 Ford,Barbara W.,260 Grant St. 11 Henneberry,Walter F.Jr.,5 Barry Dr. 6 23 Pollan, Natalie A.,22 Bishop Dr. 11 Rosenber,Sandra, 10 Ricky Dr. 10 19 Studholme,Barbara A.,42 Bishop Dr. 11 Rossi,Michael M.,84 Pincushion Rd. 10 14 PRECINCT 15 2 YEARS 3 YEARS Cohen,Edward,29 Hickory Hill La. 7 Berardi,Michael G.,78 Bethany Rd. 10 126 Maish,Ralph A.,Jr., 17 Hodder La. 11 Latham-Brown,Ernest,42 Lake Ave. 1 21 McGrath,Richard T.,36 Fenelon Rd. 7 Murphy,Sharon, 174 Winthrop St. 8 98 Orlando,Michael H.,40 Winter La. 7 Rastani,Richard G.,20 Berry St. 8 107 2 YEARS Conti,Leno R.Jr.,50 Mellen St. 5 Lombardi,John W.,3 Harmony La. 9 Sawyer,Susan A.,4 Lake Ave. 0 Stefanini,Thomas N.,27 Dow St. 3 11 I YEAR PRECINCT 17 Chimeno,Nicholas J.,29 Bridges St. 9 3 YEARS Donoghue,Eileen R.,76 Gilbert St. 7 Allen,Robert J.,68 Kendall Ave. 6 26 Magnani,Nanette Brey,70 Fay Rd. 8 Romano,Jamie J.,95A Taralli Terr. 3 26 Pascucci,Barbara A.,54 Gilbert St. 6 Romero, Linda M.,45A Second St. 9 25 Rosenbloom,David,67B Beaver Terr.Cir. 8 22 PRECINCT.16 3 YEARS 2 YEARS Davis,Charles W., I Aaron St. 11 63 Mayer,Paula E., 105 Second St. 3 Havener,Robert,2 Aaron St. 10 23 Valle,Alice,63B Second St.(Q. 10/21/86) 1 Snow,Astrid V., 115 Arlington St. 8 69 Tofani,Angelo J.,8 Brackett Rd. 1 24 1 YEAR Jakutis,Edmund B.,42B Second St. 2 2 YEARS Marquez,Jose L., 134 Beaver St. 0 Mercorelli,Remo J.,32 Eames St. 11 Morrison,Nathan,46A Beaver Terr.Cir. 0 Murphy,Yorke W.,3 Arlington St. 11 Wormley,David H.,74A Taralli Terr. I Snow,Norman L.,Jr.,35 Lindsay St. 9 Tibbert,Michael F.,53 Lindsay St. 3 1 YEAR Boulanger,George J.,46 Irving St. 8 Fabbri,Michael L.72 Waushakum St. 8 Rollins,James R.,22 Lindsay St.(died 1/22/87) 1 Tibbert,Marguerite E.,47 Lindsay St. 1 j Sullivan,Philip A.,255 Hollis St.(Q.8/14/86) 4 4 f I E f : { i 12 a TOWN WARRANT Tuesday, January 28, 1986 at half-past seven o'clock P.M., and thereto act on the following articles: SPECIAL TOWN MEETING January 28, 1986 Town Meeting cards were mailed on January 7, 1986. The Meeting was called to order by Moderator Richard L. Allen at 7:50 P.M. Eighty-seven Town Meeting members were present. A moment of silence was observed for the tragedy of Challenger Space Shuttle. ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the land described in this Article from the jurisdiction of the Board of Public Works to the Board of Selectmen for purposes of sale or other disposition thereof. The land, bounded and described as follows: Beginning at a point on the easterly side line of Western Avenue at the Framingham-Sherborn town line; thence northerly along a curve to the right having a radius of 1751.76', a length of 121.48' along the easterly side line of Western Avenue to a point; thence N-080-37'-00" E 1614.09' along the easterly side line of Western Avenue to a stone bound; thence S-810-23'-00" E 1467.06' by land of the Commonwealth to a point in the center Course Brook; thence 5-420-38'-00" W 1358.99' by land of the Commonwealth and along the center of Course Brook to a point; thence S-070-04'-00" W 299.70' by land of the Commonwealth and along the center of Course Brook to a point on the Framingham-Sherborn town line; thence 5-750-OS'-16" W 775.14' by land of Commonwealth and along the Framingham-Sherborn town line to the point of beginning. Said land contains 35.5467 acres, more or less, and is shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Fra- mingham, Mass. owned by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, scale 1" = 80', dated February 20, 1980, survey, by MacCarthy and Sullivan Engineering, Joseph R. Sullivan, Registered Land Surveyor". The foregoing premises are conveyed subject to and with the benefit of all rights, restrictions, and ease- ments of record, if any, insofar as are now applicable and in force. The land described herein was previously acquired in 1983 from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and was to be used as a site for a central Public Works facility. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen ARTICLE 1. 1/28/86 Voted: that the Town transfer the land described in this article from the jurisdiction of the Board of Public Works to the Board of Selectmen for purposes of sale or other disposition thereof. The said land having been declared to be surplus by the Board of Public Works. 101 voting in favor. 13 opposed. 13 NEW— T ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to convey to the Common- wealth of Massachusetts by its Division of Capital Planning and Operations the land described herein. i The land, bounded and described as follows: i Beginning at a point on-the easterly side line of Western Avenue at the Framingham-Sherborn town line; thence northerly along a curve to the right having a radius of 1751.76', a length of 121.48' along the easterly side line of Western Avenue to a point; thence N-080-37'-00" E 1614.09' along the easterly side line of Western Avenue to a stone bound; thence S-810-23'-00" E 1467.06' by land of the Commonwealth to a point in the center Course Brook; thence 5-420-38'-00" W 1358.99' by land of the Commonwealth and along the center of Course Brook to a point; thence 5-070-04'-00" W 299.70' by land of the Commonwealth and along the center of Course Brook to a point on the Framingham-Sherborn town line; thence 5-750-05'-16" W 775.14' by land of Commonwealth and along the Framingham-Sherborn town line to the point of beginning. Said land contains 35.5467 acres, more or less, and is shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Fra- mingham, Mass. owned by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, scale I" = 80', dated February 20, 1980, survey, by MacCarthy and Sullivan Engineering, Joseph R. Sullivan, Registered Land Surveyor". The foregoing premises are conveyed subject to and with the benefit of all rights, restrictions, and ease- ments of record, if any, insofar as are now applicable and in force. i Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. i SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen ARTICLE 2. 1/28/86 Voted: to authorize the Board of Selectmen to convey to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts through its Division of Capital Planning and Operations the land described in this Article and that the consideration for such transfer be not less than $1.00 and such other consideration and on such other terms as the Board of Selectmen may determine. _ Unanimous vote. ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to procure by purchase of otherwise acquire the following described parcel of land on Western Avenue in Framingham, to be used as a site for a central Public Works garage: I' Parcel A r` A certain lot of land situated in Framingham (Middlesex County) Massachusetts, shown as Parcel 1 on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in N 070 04' 00" E along the center line of Course Brook, 299.70 feet; thence i N 420 38' 00" E along the center line of Course Brook, 1358.99 feet, the last two courses by land now or fromerly of the Town of Framingham shown as Parcel 1 and Parcel 2 on the Plan; thence N 390 25' 57" E along the center line of Course Brook, 128.63 feet; thence k: N 570 29' 56" E along the center line of Course Brook, 59.43 feet; thence N 410 42' 57" E Along the center line of Course Brook, 149.74 feet, the last three courses by land of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (the "Commonwealth") shown as Parcel 4 on the Plan; thence ;' 14 f Southeasterly by a curve to the right, having a radius of 160.00 feet, an arc distance of 131.21 feet; thence Southeasterly by a curve to the left, having a radius of 350.00 feet, an arc distance of 283.92 feet; thence S 410 15' 44" E 315.25 feet; thence S 460 38' 21" E 87.93 feet, the last four courses by the side line of Merchant Road (formerly Prospect Street); thence S 280 47' 46" W 135.69 feet; thence S 100 42' 12" W 161.91 feet; thence S 060 55' 02" E 179.75 feet; thence S 750 05' 16" W along the Framingham-Sherborn town line 1565.00 feet to the point of beginning, the last four courses by land of the Commonwealth shown as Parcel 6 on the Plan. Containing 1,139,909 square feet, more or less, according to the Plan. The above described two parcels shall be used as a central public works facility and garage for the Town of Framingham; provided, however that any plans for the facility and garage, and any alterations or additions thereto. Framingham, Massachusetts," dated September 20, 1985, scale 1" = 100', prepared by Schofield Brothers, Inc. (the "Plan"), bound and described according to the Plan as follows: i, Beginning at a point at the intersection of the Framingham-Sherborn town line and the easterly side line of Western Avenue, thence running: Northerly by a curve to the right, having a radius of 1751.76 feet, 121.48 feet; thence 4 N 080 37' 00" E by the easterly side line of Western Avenue, 330.00 feet; thence N 750 38' 28" E by land of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (the "Commonwealth") shown as Parcel 2 on the Plan, 913.53 feet to a point at the center line of Course Brook; thence S 420 38' 00" W along the center line of Course Brook, 240.00 feet; thence S 070 04' 00" W along the center line of Course Brook, 299.70 feet, the last two courses by land of the Commonwealth shown as Parcel 5 on the Plan; thence S 750 05' 16" W by land of the Commonwealth shown as Parcel 6 on the Plan, along the Framingham- Sherborn town line, 775.14 feet to the point of beginning. Containing 328,062 square feet, more or less, according to the Plan. Parcel B A certain lot of land situated in the Town of Framingham (Middlesex County) Massachusetts, shown as Parcel 5 on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Framingham, Massachusetts," dated September 20, 1985, scale 1" = 100', prepared by Schofield Brothers, Inc. (the "Plan"), bounded and described according to the Plan as follows: Beginning at a point at the intersection of the center line of Course Brook and the Framingham-Sherborn town line; thence running: N 070 04' 00" E along the center line of Course Brook, 299.70 feet; thence 15 N 420 38' 00" E along the center line of Course Brook, 1358.99 feet, the last two courses by land now or formerly of the Town of Framingham shown as Parcel 1 and Parcel 2 on the Plan; thence N 390 25' 57" E along the center line of Course Brook, 128.63 feet; thence N 570 29' 56" E along the center line of Course Brook, 59.43 feet; thence N 410 42' 57" E along the center line of Course Brook, 149.74 feet, the last three courses by land of the ' Commonwealth of Massachusetts (the "Commonwealth") shown as Parcel 4 on the Plan; thence Southeasterly by a curve to the right, having a radius of 160.00 feet, an arc distance of 131.21 feet; thence Southeasterly by a curve to the left, having a radius of 350.00 feet, an arc distance of 283.92 feet; thence S 410 15' 44" E 315.25 feet; thence S 460 38' 21" E 87.93 feet, the last four courses by the side line of Merchant Road (formerly Prospect Street); thence S 280 47' 46" W 135.69 feet; theme S 100 42' 12" W 161.91 feet; thence S 060 55' 02" E 179.75 feet; thence S 750 05' 16" W along the Framingham-Sherborn town line 1565.00 feet to the point of beginning, the last four courses by land of the Commonwealth shown as Parcel 6 on the Plan. i IContaining 1,139,909 square feet, more or less, according to the Plan. The above described two parcels shall be used as a central public works facility and garage for the Town of Framingham; provided, however that any plans for the facility and garage, and any alterations or additions thereto, shall be submitted by Grantee to Grantor, through its Division of Capital Planning and Operations ! ("Division") to be placed on file; and provided further that a copy of such plans, alterations or additions thereto shall be sent to the Joint Committee on State Administration of the General Court to be kept on file. An affidavit signed by the then Deputy Commissioner of the Division and recorded with Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds stating that such items have been filed with the Clerk described herein, shall be conclusive evidence that the Parties have complied herewith. i Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. i SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen ARTICLE 3. 1/28/86 Voted: to authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept for no consideration the land described in this Article, said land located on Western Avenue which is to be used as a site for a Central Public Works Garage. Unanimous vote. i i 16 c: ARTICLE 4 To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning by-law of the Town of Framingham by rezoning from a General Residence District (G) to an Industrial District (M) a certain parcel of land contain- ing 26.168 acres, more or less, situated on Merchant Road bounded and described as follows: A certain lot of land situated in the Town of Framingham (Middlesex County) Massachusetts, shown as Parcel 5 on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Framingham, Massachusetts", dated September 20, 1985, scale I" = 100', prepared by Schofield Brothers, Inc. (the "Plan"), bounded and described according to the plan as follows: Beginning at a point at the intersection of the center line of Course Brook and the Framingham-Sherborn town line, thence running: N 070 04' 00" E along the center line of Course Brook 299.70 feet; thence N 420 38' 00" E along the center line of Course Brook 1358.99 feet, the last two courses by land now or formerly of the Town of Framingham shown as Parcel 1 and Parcel 2 on the plan; thence N 390 25' 57" E along the center line of Course Brook, 128.63 feet; thence N 570 29' 56" E along the center line of Course Brook, 59.43 feet; thence N 410 42' 57" E along the center line of Course Brook, 149.74 feet, the last three courses by land of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (the "Commonwealth") shown as Parcel 4 on the plan; thence Southerly by a curve to the right, having a radius of 160.00 feet, an arc distance of 131.21 feet; thence Southeasterly by a curve to the left, having a radius of 350.00 feet, an arc distance of 283.92 feet; a thence S 410 15' 44" E 315.25 feet; thence f S 460 38' 21" E 87.93 feet, the last four courses by the side line of Merchant Road (formerly Prospect Street); thence S 280 47' 46" W 135.69 feet; thence S 100 42' 12" W 161.91 feet; thence S 060 55' 02" E 179.75 feet; thence S 750 05' 16" W along the Framingham-Sherborn town line 1565.00 feet to the point of beginning, the last four courses by land of the Commonwealth shown as Parcel 6 on the plan. t Containing 1,139,909 square feet, (26.16 acres), more or less, according to the Plan. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. f f SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen i i 17 ARTICLE 4. 1/28/86 Voted: that the Town amend the Zoning By-Laws of the Town by rezoning from a General Residence District to an Industrial District the land described in this article. 101 voting in favor. 4 opposed. Approved by the Attorney General on February 11, 1986. Published: February 17th & 24th, 1986 RESOLUTION Be it resolved that it is the will of the Town Meeting that the Representatives and Senator representing the Framingham area make certain that the firm of General Motors pay annual lease fees based upon full fair market value established in the area by the sale of five acres of land by Anchor Motor Freight and that the same Representatives insure that a portion of this lease money come back to the Town of Framingham over and above any expected state monies. Voted: 1/28/86 Richard E. Paul, Precinct 3 Voted: that this warrant be dissolved at 9:25 P.M. as the business of this warrant was completed. 121 Town Meeting members present. 18 TOWN WARRANT TUESDAY, MARCH 25, 1986 at half-past seven o'clock P.M., and thereto act on the following articles: SPECIAL TOWN MEETING March 25, 1986 ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to present a Petition to the Great and I General Court of the Commonwealth for and on the behalf of the Town of Framingham praying that it enact a special law to be effective upon passage providing that the offices of Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures be removed from the civil service law of the Commonwealth and for the appointment of suitably qualified persons; that the Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures be appointed by the Selectmen of the Town; that the persons so appointed by the Selectmen of the Town; that the persons so appointed shall have all the powers and duties now or from time to time hereafter vested by general law in the offices of Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures; that upon the appointment and qualifi- cations of the Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures pursuant to such special law, the incum- bents of the offices of Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures shall cease to act under their authority as appointed officials; that an vacancy in such y y positions shall be filled in like manner for the unexpired portion of the said term and that the Town may establish and amend by bylaw such qualifications for appointment to said office as from time to time it may deem necessary and appropriate. The special law to be presented hereunder shall be substantially in the following form: 8 AN ACT EXEMPTING THE OFFICES OF SEALERS AND DEPUTY SEALERS OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES OF THE TOWN OF FRAMINGHAM FROM THE CIVIL SERVICE LAW AND PROVID- ING FOR THE APPOINTMENT OF THE SEALERS AND DEPUTY SEALERS OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES BY THE SELECTMEN OF SAID TOWN. Whereas the deferred operation of this act would tend to defeat its purpose, which is, in part, to provide for a speedy selection and appointment of qualified persons to fill the offices of Sealers and Deputy Sealers 1 of Weights and Measures of the Town of Framingham by reason of the retirement of the former incumbent; therefore, it is hereby declared to be an emergency law, necessary for the immediate preservation of the public convenience. Be it enacted, etc. as follows: SECTION 1. Notwithstanding the provisions of section fifty-two of G.L.C. 31, the offices of Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures of the Town of Framingham shall not be subject to the provisions of chapter thirty-one of the General Laws. SECTION 2. The present acting or temporary incumbent of the Offices of Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures of said town shall continue to serve until such time as their successors are duly appointed and qualified pursuant to this act. SECTION 3. Notwithstanding the Provisions of any general or special law to the contrary, in the Town of Framingham the Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures shall be appointed for a three year term by the Selectmen of said Town. The provisions of law relative to Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures shall apply to such offices and the persons so appointed shall have all of the powers and duties now or from time to time hereafter vested by general or special law or by the charter or by bylaws of the said town in the office of Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures. The provisions of any such charter or bylaw shall not be inconsistent with the provisions of any general law but may be in addition thereto. 19 SECTION 4. The persons appointed to the positions of Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Meas- ures shall at a minimum possess ability and experience in the field of weights and measures. They shall devote their entire time during regular business hours to the duties of the office. The term of office shall be three years from the first day of July next following the acceptance of this act by the Town as hereinafter provided, but the initial term of the first person appointed under this act shall commence upon the date of his appointment. The person initially appointed need not be a resident of the Town during his initial term, but the Town may by bylaw impose that requirement upon said person or his successor in office with respect to subsequent terms of office. The person appointed shall hold no other town office or position unless permitted by law, but may serve as an appointed member of any committee of the Town. SECTION 5. The Town may establish and amend by bylaw such qualifications for the office as from time to time it may deem necessary and appropriate. SECTION 6. Any vacancy in said office shall be filled in like manner for the unexpired portion of the term. The Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures may be removed for cause by the Selectmen after an opportunity for a hearing before the Selectmen. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen. ARTICLE 1. 3/25/86 Voted: to authorize the Selectmen to present a Petition to the Great and General Court of the Commonwealth for and on the behalf of the Town of Framingham praying that it enact a special law to be effective upon passage providing that the offices of Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures be removed from the civil service law of the Commonwealth and for the appointment of suitably qualified persons; that the Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures be appointed by the Selectmen of the Town; that the persons so appointed shall have all the powers and duties now or from time to time hereafter vested by general law in the offices of Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures; that upon the appointment and qualifications of the Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures pursuant to such special law, the incumbents of the offices of Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures shall cease to act under their authority as appointed officials; that any vacancy in such positions shall be filled in like manner for the unexpired portion of the said term and that the Town may establish and amend by bylaw such qualifications for appointment to said office as from time to time it may deem neces- sary and appropriate. The special law to be presented hereunder shall be substantially in the following form: AN ACT EXEMPTING THE OFFICES OF SEALERS AND DEPUTY SEALERS OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES OF THE TOWN OF FRAMINGHAM FROM THE CIVIL SERVICE LAW AND PROVID- ING FOR THE APPOINTMENT OF THE SEALERS AND DEPUTY SEALERS OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES BY THE SELECTMEN OF SAID TOWN. Whereas the deferred operation of this act would tend to defeat its purpose, which is, in part, to provide for a speedy selection and appointment of qualified persons to fill the offices of Sealers and Deputy Sealer of Weights and Measures of the Town of Framingham by reason of the retirement of the former incumbent; therefor, it is hereby declared to be an emergency law, necessary for the immediate preservation of the public convenience. i Be it enacted, etc. as follows: 4 SECTION 1. Notwithstanding the provisions of section fifty-two of G.L.c. 31, the offices of Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures of the Town of Framingham shall not be subject to the provisions of chapter thirty-one of the General Laws. SECTION 2. The present acting or temporary incumbent of the Offices of Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures of said Town shall continue to serve until such time as their successors are duly appointed and qualified pursuant to this act. 20 SECTION 3. Notwithstandingthe Provisions of any y general or special law to the contrary, in the Town of Framingham the Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures shall be appointed for a three year term by the Selectmen of said Town, with the advice and consent of the Personnel Board. The provisions of law relative to Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures shall apply to such offices and the persons so appointed shall have all of the powers and duties now or from time to time hereafter vested by general or special law or by the charter or by bylaws of the said town in the office of Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures. The provisions of any such charter or bylaw shall not be inconsistent with the provisions of any general law but may be in addition thereto. SECTION 4. The persons appointed to the positions of Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures shall at a minimum possess ability and experience in the field of weights and measures. They shall devote their entire time during regular business hours to the duties of the office. The term of office shall be three years from the first day of July next following the acceptance of this act by the Town as hereinafter pro- vided, but the initial term of the first person appointed under this act shall commence upon the date of his appointment. The person initially appointed need not be a resident of the Town during his initial term, but the Town may by bylaw impose that requirement upon said person or his successor in office with respect to subsequent terms of office. The person appointed shall hold no other town office or position unless permit- ted by law, but may serve as an appointed member of any committee of the Town. SECTION 5. The Town may establish and amend by bylaw such qualifications for the office as from time to time it may deem necessary and appropriate. SECTION 6. Any vacancy in said office shall be filled in like manner for the unexpired portion of the term. The Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures may be removed for cause by the Selectmen after an opportunity for a hearing before the Selectmen. SECTION 7. This act shall take effect in said Town upon its acceptance by a majority vote of the Town Meeting Members present and voting upon the question of its acceptance pursuant to an article duly appear- ing in the warrant for an Annual Town Meeting or a Special Town Meeting held following the effective date of this act. 80 voting in favor. 20 opposed. ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel By-Law of the Town by striking Sched- ule A and Schedule B thereof and by adopting in place thereof the new Schedule A and new Schedule B as presented to the Special Town Meeting on March 25, 1986. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Personnel Board ARTICLE 2. 3/25/86 Voted: to amend Schedule B - Pay Plan of the Town by striking Schedule FF and adopting in its place the proposed Schedule FF as presented to the Special Town Meeting on March 25, 1986. FISCAL YEAR 1986 FIRE DEPARTMENT PERSONNEL ANNUAL SALARY SCHEDULE JULY 1, 1985-MARCH 31, 1986 GRADE STEP 1 STEP 2 STEP 3 STEP 4 FF-1 20420 21991 22667 23340 FF-2 24741 25502 26258 FF-3 27835 28686 29540 21 r: APRIL 1, 1986-JUNE 30, 1986 i FF-1 20624 22211 22894 23573 FF-2 24988 25757 26521 FF-3 28113 28973 29835 ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to hear and act on reports and recommendations of the Select- men and other Officers and Committees of the Town and to raise and appropriate money by transfer from available funds or otherwise provide sums of money for the support of Town departments. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSORS: Board of Selectmen Finance Committee ARTICLE 3. 3/25/86 Voted: that the sum of$1,511,640.00 be transferred from Free Cash to the accounts, and to the departments specified: 1. Fire Department: Salaries and Wages $205,000.00 2. Fire Department: Overtime 10,000.00 3. Fire Department: M & O 18,600.00 4. School Department: Salaries and Wages 1,247,040.00 5. Town Owned Buildings: Special Functions 31,000.00 I ! said sums to be expended under the direction of the above named departments; and we further voted that the sum of $70,999.00 be transferred to Selectmen: Computer Operations Software; $13,972.00 from Article 17 of the Special Town Meeting of September 25, 1984; $29,379.00 from Computer Salaries and Wages; $3,914.00 from Computer M & O; $23,734.00 from Computer Hardware, said sum to be expended under the direction of the Management Information Systems Board. I r i I r , j i I I I i i 22 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING April 23, 1986 Town Meeting notices were mailed to all town meeting members on April 14, 1986. Meeting called to order by Moderator Richard L. Allen at 7:30 p.m. and voted to adjourn to April 29, 1986 due to lack of a quorum. Eight town meeting members were present. April 29, 1986 — 95 Town Meeting Members present. Meeting called to order at 7:58 p.m. Invocation by Rev. Daniel Leavitt of Plymouth Congregational Church. A moment of silence was observed for Albert L. McManus a former town meeting member. ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to choose two or more measurers of wood and bark, and measurers of lumber, and all other usual Town officials and trustees, and also any committees of the Town. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen WE REFER THIS ARTICLE TO THE SPONSOR WITH A RECOMMENDATION FOR FAVORABLE ACTION. ARTICLE 1. 4/29/86 Voted: that this article be referred to the Board of Selectmen with full power to make all appointments by the Town By-Laws and enabling Legislation. ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow money, from time to time, in anticipation of the revenue of the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1985 in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes therefore, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. i SPONSOR: Town Treasurer WE RECOMMEND FAVORABLE ACTION ON THIS ARTICLE. ARTICLE 2. 4/29/86 Voted: that the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow, from time to time, in anticipation of the revenue for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1986, in accordance with the General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and issue a note or notes thereof, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with the General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, and further voted that the town authorize the Treasurer-Collector to enter into compensating balance agreements during fiscal 1987, as per- mitted by General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53F. Unamimous vote. ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of prior years of the Town. l Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen j WE RECOMMEND FAVORABLE ACTION AND THE APPROPRIATION OF $927.03 FOR THIS ARTICLE. ARTICLE 3. 4/29/86 Voted: that the sum of$927.03 be raised and appropriated for the purpose of paying the following unpaid bill of the Town: Tennessee Gas Pipeline: Said sum to be expended under the direction of the Board of Selectmen. 23 ARTICLE 4. To hear the report of the Selectmen relative to the laying out or the widening and relocation of the following named streets, under the provisions of Chapter 82 of the General Laws, as amended, and to see if the Town will vote to accept any or all said streets for public ways, and will authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by eminent domain, acquire by purchase or otherwise acquire, any land necessary for said laying out, providing the sum or sums of money necessary to pay the cost of damages therefor and of construction thereof, direct how money shall be raised. STREET FROM TO Arthur Street Willis Street End I Harmony Lane Old Central Turnpike Cul de Sac !I John McQuinn Circle Waveney Road Cul de Sac Old Central Turnpike Fay Road End Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen WE REFER THIS ARTICLE TO THE SPONSOR WITH A RECOMMENDATION FOR FAVORABLE ACTION. ' ARTICLE 4. 4/29/86 Voted: to hear the report of the Selectmen relative to the laying out or the widening and relocation of the following named streets under the provisions of Chapter 82 of the General Laws, as amended, and to see if the Town will vote to accept any or all said streets for public ways, and will authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by eminent domain, acquire by purchase or otherwise acquire any land necessary for said laying out, providing the sum or sums of money necessary to pay the cost of damages I therefor and of construction thereof, direct how money shall be raised: Arthur Street: that the laying out of Arthur Street from Willis Street to end, as appears in the Report of the Board of Selectmen, be accepted and that the Selectmen be authorized to'take the fee in the land described in said report and for a public way. John McQuinn Circle: that the laying out of John McQuinn Circle from Waveney Road to Cul de Sac, as appears in the Report of the Board of Selectmen, be accepted and that the Selectmen be authorized to take the fee in the land described in said report and for a public way. ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel By-Law of the Town by striking sections (to be determined) thereof and adopting in place thereof the amendments presented to the FY/87 Annual Town Meeting. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Personnel Board A RECOMMENDATION WILL BE MADE AT TOWN MEETING. ARTICLE 5. 4/29/86 Voted: Indefinite postponement of this article. I' _ ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel By-Law of the Town by striking Sched- ule A and Schedule B thereof and by adopting, in place thereof, the new Schedule A and Schedule B pre- sented to the FY/87 Annual Town Meeting. t` Schedule A — Classification Plan and Schedule B — Pay Plan and recommended salaries will be mailed in i' its entirety as a supplement to Town Meeting members. I' SPONSOR: Personnel Board A RECOMMENDATION WILL BE MADE AT TOWN MEETING. I i ARTICLE 6. 4/29/86 Voted: Personnel Policy — #17 — Sick Leave Buy-Back. Upon ordinary retirement or death, the Town will buy back from a non-bargaining unit employee or his/her heirs, any unused accumulated sick leave, in accordance with the following formula: Days of unused, accumulated sick leave beyond 100 and up to a maximum of 200 shall be subject to buy- back at the rate of one for every five days remaining, with one day defined as a normal work day at the employee's prevailing rate of base pay, and a maximum payment of$2,500.00. 1� Date effective: July 1, 1986. i I 24 f i 'i MERIT PAYMENT 4/29/86 Voted: Full-time permanent, non-bargaining employees who have been at the top of their pay grade for 12 months or more may be eligible for a zero to $200.00 merit payment under the following conditions: 1. Have been employed for 5 years or more. 2. Have been at the top step of their pay grade for 12 months or more. 3. Are actively employed and on the payroll at the time payment is due. 4. Payment will be made on or after the anniversary date after completion of the annual performance review. 5. Employees who are on extended leaves-of-absence (over 5 days) for any permanent full-time basis for 3 months or more. 6. Employees whose employment is terminated for any reason prior to the date of payment are not eligible for the stipend. 7. The award of this merit payment is based upon the recommendation of the employee's supervisor and department head, the Personnel Director and the approval of the appropriate appointing authority and the Personnel Board based on standards established by the Personnel Board. 8. This merit payment is applicable to Grades M-10 and below only and all positions of the H schedule. Note: This shall be considered a non-cumulative annual benefit and will be considered at each Annual Town Meeting as part of Schedule B, Pay Plan-M and H Schedules. SCHEDULE A — CLASSIFICATION PLAN Voted: that the town amend Schedule A — Classification Plan of the Town by striking Schedule A thereof and adopting in its place the proposed Schedule A as presented to the Annual Town Meeting on April 29, 1986: 1 CLASSIFICATION TITLE FY/87 i I Activities Supervisor M-6 Administrative Aide, Fire Department FF-3 Administrative Aide, Police Department PD-3 Administrative Asst., Accounting M-5 i Administrative Asst., Assessors M-5 Administrative Asst., Board of Health M-6 Administrative Asst., Legal Department M-6 Administrative Asst., Library (E-FY/87) M-5 i Administrative Asst., Parks& Recreation M-5 Administrative Asst., Planning Board M-6 Administrative Asst., Town Clerk's Office (D-FY/86) Administrative Asst., Youth Commission M-5 Administrative Officer, Public Works M-12 Arena Assistant M-8 Arena Cashier, Parks& Recreation Cashier V-1 Arena Laborer V-3 Arena Skate Guard V-1 Ash Truck Driver W-6 Assessor M-17 Assistant Bookkeeper/Payroll Clerk, Accounting S-4 Assistant Circulation Supervisor L-6 Assistant Director Libraries M-16 Assistant Director of Public Works M-19 j Assistant Director of Summer Programs V-4A Assistant Dog Officer M-3 i Assistant Head Bookkeeper/Tax Title Clerk M-5 Assistant Head Lifeguard V-5 Assistant to the Assessor(D-FY/86) Assistant to the Executive Administrator M-6 1 Assistant to the Purchasing Agent M-9 Assistant Technical Services Supervisor L-7 Assistant to the Director of Veterans' Services(E-FY/87) M-6 Assistant to the Town Accountant M-10 I 25 NNW- Assistant Town Engineer M-17 Assistant Treasurer/Collector M-14 Assistant Youth Coordinator M-10 Audio Visual Coordinator L-5 Auto Mechanic Supervisor M-14 Auto Mechanic W-10 Back-up Bus Driver, Callahan Senior Center V-6 Bathhouse Attendant V-3 Billing Supervisor, Water Division S-4 Branch Librarian L-11 Building Commissioner M-20 Building Custodian H-4 Buyer, (D-FY/86) Carpenter/Painter H-8 Cataloger(Library-E-FY/87) L-6 Chief Inspector (D-FY/86) Children's Services Technician L-6 Children's Young Adult Coordinator/Branch L-7 Circulation Supervisor L-8 Civilian Dispatcher, Police Department M-5 Clerk, Prosecutor's Office M-3 Collection Development Librarian L-10 Collections Supervisor M-5 Community Service Librarian L-11 Computer Programmer/Operator M-6 Construction Supervisor M-14 Counselor, Youth Commission M-9 Craftworker W-8 Crane Operator W-10 Data Collector, Assessors M-5 Data Processing Administrator M-19 Deeds Clerk S-3 Deputy Building Comm. & Local Inspector M-14 Deputy Fire Chief M-18 Deputy Inspector of Weights& Measures M-9 Director of Libraries M-19 Director of Personnel M-19 Director of Public Works M-24 Director of R.J. Callahan Senior Center M-13 Director, Parks & Recreation M-17 Director of Summer Program V-5 Director of Swim Program (Instruction) V-5A Director of Veterans' Benefits & Services M-15 Dispatcher, Callahan Senior Citizen S-2 District Leader V-4. Dog Officer M-7 Employee Health Nurse (D-FY/86) — Engineering Aide I E-1 Engineering Aide II E-2 Engineering Aide III E-3 Engineer, Civil E-5 Engineer, Junior E-4 Engineer, Senior E-6 Executive Administrator M-25 Executive Coordinator PD-4 Fair Housing Assistant/Senior Clerk S-2 Finance Committee Assistant M-7 Fire Captain FF-3 Fire Chief M-23 Firefighter FF-1 Fire Lieutenant FF-2 26 i Fire Alarm Superintendent FF-3 Fire Mechanic FF-3 Fringe Benefits Coordinator M-5 Garbage & Rubbish Collector W-3 Garbage & Rubbish Driver W-6 Head Clerk S-4 Head Clerk, Financial (E-FY/86) S-4 Head Lifeguard V-5A Housing Inspector, Board of Health M-10 Human Relations Commission Administrator M-7 Incinerator Attendant W-5 Inspector for Construction of Utilities & Streets — PublicM-14 Works Inspector of Weights& Measures M-12 Interchange Driver L-2 Junior Clerk S-1 Kennel Attendant M-1 Laborer I W-2 Laborer II W-3 Lead Custodian H-5 Librarian I (D-FY/86) — Librarian II (D-FY/86 — Librarian III: (D-FY/86) — Librarian-in-Charge of Main Library (D-FY/86) — Library Aide — Technical Services L-1 Library Assistant (D-FY/86) — Library Assistant, Circulation L-2 Library Page L-0 Library Technician I (D-FY/86) — Library Technician II (D-FY/86) — Lifeguard V-313 Local Inspector M-10 Meter Attendant M-2 Meter Reader W-4 Meter Repair Technician W-7 i Motor Equipment Operator I W-4 Motor Equipment Operator II W-7 Motor Equipment Operator III W-8 Motor Equipment Operator IV W-10 Office Admin./Asst. to the Town Clerk M-8 Office Manager/Head Bookkeeper M-7 Officials, Competitive Sports V-6 Outreach Worker, Callahan Senior Center M-8 Panel Board Operator W-6 Park Maintenance Worker W-8 Payroll Clerk, Police Department M-4 Periodicals Technician L-6 Personnel Assistant M-9 Planner M-10 Planning Director M-19 Plumber/Painter/General Maintenance H-8 Plumbing& Gas Inspector M-10 Police Captain PD-4 Police Chief Paid as required by State Statute Police Lieutenant PD-3 Police Officer PD-1 Police Sergeant PD-2 Principal Clerk S-3 Program Coordinator— Callahan Senior Center M-8 Property Tax Clerk (E-FY/87) S-4 Public Health Administrator M-18 27 Public Health Nurse M-7 Public Works Clerk I W-3 Public Works Clerk II W-7 Public Works Maintenance Worker W-7 Pumping Station Operator W-10 Pumping Station Supervisor M-14 Purchasing Agent M-17 Real Property & Computer Admin., Assessors M-7 Records Clerk, Police Department M-3 Recreation Leader, Playground V-3 Recreation Leader, Specialists V-3A Recreation Leader, Swimming V-311 Reference Librarian L-8 Registered Dental Hygienist M-6 Registered Sanitarian M-11 Road Finisher W-4 Route Supervisor M-14 School Police V-59 Secretary to the Detective Bureau M-3 Secretary to the Narcotics Bureau M-3 Secretary to the Police Chief&Executive Coord. M-4 Secretary, Police Department M-3 Senior Clerk S-2 Senior Clerk/Secretarial Pool Super. (D-FY/86) Senior Building Custodian H-6 Senior Library Assistant, Children's Dept. L-3 Senior Library Assistant, Circulation L-3 Senior Library Assistant, Graphics Dept. L-3 Senior Library Assistant, Technical Services L-3 Senior Planner M-12 i Senior Registered Sanitarian M-12 Skating Arena Maintenance Custodian H-4 Skating Arena Maintenance Person M-11 Skating Arena Manager M-18 j Special Activities (Recreation) V-6 Summer Laborer V-3 Superintendent of Park Maintenance M-11 Superintendent of Town Owned Buildings M-15 Superintendent — Public Works (Highway, Water, Sewer, Sanitation) M-17 Superintendent of Recreation M-13 Supervisor of Children's Services L-11 Supervisor of Reference Services L-11 Supervisor of Technical Services L-12 Town Accountant M-19 Town Engineer M-19 Traffic Supervisor Stipend $1200, Mileage$1000 V-59 Transportation Coordinator M-5 Treasurer/Collector M-19 Tree Climber W-5 Tree Surgeon W-8 Tree Warden M-14 Vehicle Body Repair& Painter W-9 Watchman W-1 Welder W-8 Welder Layout W-9 Welder/Maintenance Worker W-7 Wire Inspector M-10 Workers Comp Agent/Employee Health Nurse M-9 Workers Comp Asst./Head Clerk M-4 Working Supervisor — Building Maintenance M-10 Working Supervisor— Custodial M-10 28 'j. Working Supervisor- Park W-10 Working Supervisor - Public Works W-10 Working Supervisor- Tree W-10 Young Adult Librarian L-8 Youth Coordinator Zamboni Machine Operator/Learner& Utility Worker V-3 Zamboni Machine Operator H-4 Reference Technician L-6 KEY (E-Year)= Position established that year (D-Year) = Position deleted that year ARTICLE 6. SCHEDULE B - PAY PLAN 4/29/86 Voted: that the Town amend Schedule B - Pay Plan of the Town by striking Schedules M, E, FF, H, S, V, V-59A, V-5911, and W and adopting in its place the proposed Schedules M, E, FF, H, S, V, V-59A, V-59B and W as presented to the Annual Town Meeting on April 29, 1986; and further voted that amended Schedule B become effective as of July 1, 1986. Fiscal Year 1987 ANNUAL SALARY SCHEDULE- GENERAL Grade Step f Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 M-1 12437 12902 13384 13887 14403 14942 238.25 247.15 256.40 266.05 275.90 286.25 M-2 13796 14309 14844 15401 15975 16570 264.30 274.10 284.35 295.05 306.05 317.45 M-3 15024 15588 16168 16771 17399 18047 ` 287.80 298.60 309.75 321.30 333.30 345.75 1f M-4 15761 16328 16918 17527 18160 18809 301.95 312.80 324.10 335.75 347.90 360.35 M-5 16618 17241 17882 18548 19243 19961 318.25 330.30 342.55 355.35 368.65 382.40 M-6 17522 18176 18855 19559 20291 21045 - 335.65 348.20 361.20 374.70 388.70 403.15 M-7 18354 19036 19746 20486 21253 22047 351.60 364.70 378.30 392.45 407.15 422.35 i 19353 20072 20821 21598 22402 23240 M-8 370.75 384.50 398.85 413.75 429.15 445.20 M-9 20343 21101 21889 22710 23557 24436 389.70 404.25 419.35 435.05 451.30 468.15 M-10 21317 22116 22942 23797 24688 25607 408.35 423.70 439.50 455.90 472.95 490.55 M-11 22402 23240 24105 25008 25941 26911 429.15 445.20 461.80 479.10 496.95 515.55 29 23489 24366 26221 25277 27200 28216 M-12 450.00 466.80 484.25 502.30 521.10 540.55 M-13 24756 25678 26636 27633 28664 29734 474.25. 491.90 510.25 529.35 549.10 569.60 26130 27105 28116 29161 30256 31384 M-14 500.60 519.25 538.60 558.65 579.60 601.25 27578 28604 29672 30783 31929 33125 M-15 528.30 547.95 568.45 589.70 611.65 634.60 29110 30199 31328 32497 33710 34968 M-16 557.65 578.55 600.15 622.55 645.80 669.90 30734 31888 33077 34312 355% 36923 M-17 588.80 610.90 633.65 657.30 681.90 707.35 32367 33573 34831 36128 37480 38879 M-18 620.05 643.15 667.25 692.10 718.00 744.80 M-19 34173 35449 36774 38148 39572 41051 - 654.65 679.10 704.50 730.80 758.10 786.40 M-20 35982 37326 38720 40169 41666 43221 689.30 715.05 741.75 769.50 798.20 828.00 37884 39295 40764 42288 43865 45505 M-21 725.75 752.80 780.90 810.10 840.35 871.75 M-22 39778 41265 42809 44404 46061 47782 762.05 790.50 820.10 850.65 882.40 915.35 41766 43331 44946 46628 48366 50173 M-23 800.10 830.10 861.05 893.25 926.55 961.15 43760 45392 47087 48843 50673 52564 M-24 - 838.30 869.60 902.05 935.70 970.75 1007.00 M-25 45746 47453 49232 51066 52975 54950 876.35 909.05 943.15 978.30 1014.85 1052.70 M-26 47713 49496 51345 53264 55252 57314 914.05 948.20 983.60 1020.40 1058.45 1097.95 M-27 49672 51527 53453 55446 57516 59663 - - 951.55 987.10 1024.00 1062.20 1101.85 1142.95 51608 53533 55532 57606 59758 61990 M-28 988.65 1025.55 1063.85 1103.55 1144.80 1187.55 f 30 Police Chief shall be compensated as required by State Statute. ADDITIONAL COMPENSATION, which compensation shall not be used in computation of overtime pay- ments or for other benefits, except retirement. 1. The Police Chief, Fire Chief, and Deputy Fire Chiefs shall each receive as additional salary, a day's pay for each of the eleven holidays. 2. The Fire Chief shall receive an annual clothing allowance of $320.00. The Deputy Fire Chiefs shall receive an annual clothing allowance of$220.00. The Fire Chief and the Deputy Fire Chiefs required by the Chief to wear full dress uniforms during the performance of their duties will receive an additional $82.00 annually. 3. The Police Chief or Fire Chief, upon receiving the following degrees in Law Enforcement or Fire Science respectively, shall be paid the following additional percentage of their base salary: A. Associate's Degree — 71/z% (total) of base salary B. Bachelor's Degree — 10% (total) of base salary C. Master's Degree or higher degree — 15% (total) of base salary This section is applicable only to the Police Chief and the Fire Chief in office as of April 23, 1980, to be effective July 1, 1980. 4. The Deputy Fire Chiefs, who have, by taking courses, earned credits in Fire Science in a degree- granting program from an accredited college or university shall receive additional compensation as educational incentive, in increments equal to the percent base pay, predicated upon the number of points earned as follows: 1 point — Each semester hour credit toward Baccalaureate or Associate's Degree 60 points — Associate's Degree 120 points — Baccalaureate Degree 150 points — Master's Degree Additional compensation for points earned shall be as follows, but not cumulative: Not less than 10 points — 11/2% of base pay Not less than 25 points — 3% of base pay i Not less than 40 points — 5070 of base pay Not less than 60 points — 71/207o of base pay Not less than 120 points — 10% of base pay Not less than 150 points — 15% of base pay Employees presently receiving additional compensation for courses not taken but credited by the insti- tution under the "Challenge" system shall continue to receive such compensation. A copy of transcript or other appropriate evidence of credits or degree earned must be presented to the Chief of the Department with copy for Personnel Department who will maintain complete and on- going records for participants. The amount of payment will be determined by the amount of base pay received in that calendar year and the appropriate percentage. 5. The Fire Chief and Deputy Fire Chiefs shall receive Hazardous Duty Pay in lieu of longevity pay- ments, in the amount of 4076 of the base salary. Payments made hereunder shall be included for the purpose of pension computation, but for no other purposes. 31 Fiscal Year 1986 ANNUAL SALARY SCHEDULE FOR ENGINEERING Grade Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 15171 15709 16262 16833 17426 18035 E-1 290.65 300.95 311.55 322.45 333.85 345.50 ' 17594 18210 18855 19518 20202 20911 E-2 337.05 348.85 361.20 373.90 387.00 400.60 19965 20852 21397 22150 22930 23731 E-3 382.45 399.45 409.90 424.35 439.25 454.60 22429 23219 24038 24882 25758 26660 ! E-4 -- 429.70 444.80 460.50 476.65 493.45 510.75 I 24803 25676 26582 27521 28485 29480 E-5 -- 475.15 491.90 509.25 527.20 545.70 564.75 26565 27501 28467 29474 30505 31575 E-6 508.90 526.85 545.35 564.65 584.40 604.90 f.. Fiscal Year 1987 FIRE DEPARTMENT PERSONNEL ANNUAL SALARY SCHEDULE July 1, 1986- December 31, 1986 Grade Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 FF-1 21449 23099 23810 24516 1 FF-2 25988 26787 27582 -,' FF-3 29238 30132 31028 �! January 1, 1987-June 30, 1987 ! FF-1 21663 23330 24048 24761 FF-2 26248 27055 27858 FF-3 29530 30433 31338 I i � r i { Z 32 Fiscal Year 1987 HOURLY WAGE- CUSTODIAN AND OTHER For employees who have been in the fourth step of a grade level of the H-Schedule for one year or over as of July 1, 1986, eligibility to Step 5 and 6 will be effective July 1, 1986 and July 1, 1987 respectively. All other employees will be eligible to attain the fifth and sixth steps based on their anniversary date for that grade level. Grade Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 H-0 7.17 7.30 7.41 7.52 7.62 7.72 H-A 7.32 7.44 7.58 7.66 7.76 7.86 H-1 8.17 8.28 8.41 8.51 8.61 8.71 H-2 8.55 8.65 8.74 8.87 8.97 9.07 H-3 8.68 8.80 8.90 9.01 9.11 9.21 H-4 8.87 8.96 9.07 9.15 9.25 9.35 H-5 9.06 9.14 9.31 9.37 9.47 9.57 H-6 9.25 9.34 9.43 9.55 9.65 9.75 H-7 9.57 9.62 9.75 9.86 9.96 10.06 H-8 9.65 9.79 9.90 10.00 10.10 10.20 H-9 9.92 10.04 10.14 10.23 10.33 10.43 H-10 10.38 10.46 10.59 10.70 10.80 10.90 NOTE: Employees on the second shift shall receive an additional 8070 on the hourly rate. Fiscal Year 1987 ANNUAL SALARY SCHEDULE- CLERICAL t Grade Trainee 1 2 3 4 5 6 11 11295 11839 12437 12902 13384 13887 14403 14942 S-1 216.40 226.80 238.25 247.15 256.40 266.05 275.90 286.25 13796 14309 14844 15401 15975 16570 S-2 264.30 274.10 284.35 295.05 306.05 317.45 15024 15588 16168 16771 17399 18047 S-3 287.80 298.60 309.75 321.30 333.30 345.75 ` S-4 15761 16328 16918 17527 18160 18809 k 301.95 312.80 324.10 335.75 347.90 360.35 Fiscal Year 1987 SEASONAL AND PART TIME PERSONNEL PAY SCHEDULE Grade Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step Rate V-1 3.55 3.65 3.75 3.85 .10 V-2 3.85 3.95 4.05 4.15 .10 V-3 4.15 4.25 4.35 4.45 .10 V-3A 4.45 4.55 4.65 4.75 .10 V-311 4.75 4.85 4.95 5.05 .10 V-4 5.05 5.15 5.25 5.35 .10 V-4A 5.35 5.45 5.55 5.65 .10 V-5 5.65 5.75 5.85 5.95 .10 V-5A 5.95 6.05 6.15 6.25 .10 V-6 33 Fiscal Year 1987 CROSSING GUARD ANNUAL SALARY SCHEDULE For those employees in the employ of the Town as of September 23, 1981, the wages and salaries paid by the Town shall be as follows: ' Effective 9/1/86 Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 V-59A Single Tour 2663 2796 2949 Extended Tour 4329 4545 4799 For those employees hired after September 23, 1981, the wage and salaries paid by the Town shall be as follows: Effective 9/1/86 Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 V-59B Single Tour 1884 1983 2087 Extended Tour 3765 3966 4174 Fiscal Year 1987 HOURLY WAGE SCHEDULE - GENERAL 5010 more than June 30, 1986 (Subject to appropriation by Town Meeting) j Grade Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 ' W-1 7.14 7.27 7.37 7.49 7.59 7.69 W-2 8.13 8.24 8.37 8.47 8.58 8.68 W-3 8.51 8.61 8.69 8.83 8.94 9.04 W-4 8.64 8.76 8.86 8.97 9.07 9.17 ' W-5 8.83 8.91 9.03 9.10 9.21 9.31 W-6 9.02 9.09 9.26 9.32 9.43 9.53 W-7 9.21 9.29 9.39 9.50 9.61 9.71 1 W-8 9.49 9.58 9.70 9.82 9.92 10.02 W-9 9.60 9.74 9.85 9.9.5 10.06 10.16 W-10 9.87 10.00 10.09 10.19 10.29 10.39 W-11 10.33 10.41 10.54 10.65 10.75 10.85 W-12 10.67 10.77 10.85 10.98 11.09 11.19 I W-13 10.94 11.04 11.15 11.28 11.38 11.48 J NOTE: Any employee employed at the Town Incinerator or as a Town Sweeper or as an Equipment Service -� Man on a second shift shall receive an additional 9% of his hourly rate, and on the third shift, an additional 11010 of his hourly rate. This Schedule effective July 1, 1986. THIS PAGE IS NOT IN THE PAY PLAN - INFORMATION ONLY Y STIPENDS OF ELECTED OFFICIALS (A Town Clerk $30,583.00 Selectmen, Chairman 1000.00 Selectmen 700.00 r-. Selectmen 700.00 I Commissioner of Public Works, Chairman 1,000.00 i' Commissioner of Public Works 700.00 Commissioner of Public Works 700.00 Board of Health, Chairman 133.00 Board of Health 133.00 Board of Health 133.00 Moderator 500.00 j 34 a STIPENDS OF OTHER TOWN POSITIONS Treasurer/Collector Parking Clerk $ ,000.00 1 Retirement Board 1,500.00 Project Accept 1,500.00 Assistant Treasurer/Collector Hearing Officer 3,000.00 Office Manager/head Bookkeeper Project Accept 750.00 Assessor, Chairman 750.00 Veteran's Benefits& Services Burial Agent 200.00 Civilian Defense Director 1,500.00 Assistant Director 500.00 ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to hear and act on reports and recommendations of the Selectmen and other officers and committees of the Town and Board of Trustees and to raise and appropriate money by transfer from available funds or otherwise for the support of schools, highways, bridges, police, street lights, parks, playgrounds, fire department, sewer department, tree warden's department, town library, wel- fare and old age assistance, cemeteries, payment of Town creditors, for a reserve fund, for any other pur- pon-s indudcd in said reports, for the payments of notes and bonds of the Town, if any, which mature before the next annual meeting, for the payment of pensions and for all other necessary expenses of the Town. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: BOARD OF SELECTMEN WE RECOMMEND THE APPROPRIATION OF THE AMOUNTS SHOWN IN THE TABULATION UNDER THE HEADING "RECOMMENDED FY/87." ARTICLE 7. 5/1/86 Voted: that the amounts set forth under Article 7 of the Finance Committee Report of April, 1986 in the column headed "FY'87 Recommended" as amended, be separately appropriated for the purposes recommended therein for a total of $71,615,120.00 and to meet such appropriation, the sum of $2,550.00 be transferred from the Sale of Cemetery Lots; the sum of $1,100,000.00 be transferred from the Revenue Sharing Account and applied to the Council on Aging Budget, the Youth Commission Budget, the Human Relations Salaries, Administration, and M & O Accounts, and the balance to the Police Department Salaries account; 1/z the Dog Tax be appropriated for the Library Budget, 1/2 the Dog Tax be appropriated for the School Department, and the balance be raised and appropriated. FY'87 Budget GENERAL GOVERNMENT VOTED ACCOUNTING: VOTED: 4/29/86 $ 98,618.00 Salaries and Wages 2,000.00 Administration Maintenance and Operations 2,500.00 Total $ 103,118.00 ASSESSORS: VOTED: 4/29/86 Elected Officials/Stipends $ 750.00 Salaries and Wages 1 1 ,130.00 2 Administration 12,150.00 55,925.00 Maintenance and Operations Special Function/Revaluation 25,000.00 Total $ 285,955.00 35 DATA PROCESSING: VOTED: 4/29/86 Salaries and Wages $ 58,838.00 Administration 6,850.00 Maintenance and Operations 8,500.00 Special Functions/Central Services 200,310.00 Total $ 274,498.00 ELECTIONS/TOWN MEETINGS: Voted: 4/29/86 Elected Officials/Stipends $ 70,348.00 Administration 31,900.00 Maintenance and Operations 11,400.00 Total $ 113,538.00 ENGINEERING: Voted: 4/29/86 Salaries and Wages $ 368,340.00 Overtime 2,000.00 Administration 4,600.00 Maintenance and Operations 5,715.00 Equipment 12,000.00 Total $ 392,655.00 FINANCE COMMITTEE: Voted: 4/29/86 Salaries and Wages $ 32,318.00 Administration 2,965.00 Maintenance and Operations 150.00 Special Functions-Reserve Fund 1,000,000.00 Total $ 1,035,433.00 LEGAL: Voted: 4/29/86 Salaries and Wages $ 43,195.00 Administration 920.00 Maintenance Operations 970.00 Special Function-Contract Legal Services 14,000.00 Total $ 59,085.00 ` PERSONNEL BOARD: Voted 4/29/86 Salaries and Wages $ 121,860.00 Secretarial Pool 47,587.00 Administration 12,580.00 Maintenance and Operations 950.00 Special Functions Employee Group Insurance 3,800,000.00 Workmen's Compensation 400,000.00 Unemployment Compensation 75,000.00 Employee Merit 3,400.00 Sick Leave Buy Back 50,000.00 Total $ 4,511,377.00 i 36 E! I PLANNING BOARD: Voted: 4/29/86 Salaries and Wages $ 34,470.00 Administration 4,190.00 Maintenance and Operations 350.00 Special Function-Consulting Engineer 9,000.00 Total $ 48,010.00 PLANNING DEPARTMENT: Voted: 4/29/86 Salaries and Wages $ 100,791.00 Administration 4,425.00 Maintenance and Operations 2,200.00 Total $ 107,416.00 PURCHASING DEPARTMENT: Voted: 4/29/86 Salaries and Wages $ 76,144.00 Administration 7,330.00 Maintenance and Operations 1,290.00 Special Functions Property Insurance 115,000.00 Liability Insurance 185,000.00 Fleet Insurance 110,000.00 Total $ 494,764.00 RETIREMENT BOARD: Voted: 4/29/86 Elected Officials/Stipends $ 1,500.00 Salaries and Wages 51,083.00 Administration 3,030.00 Maintenance and Operations 6,595.00 Total $ 62,208.00 SELECTMEN: Voted: 4/30/86 Elected Officials/Stipends $ 2,400.00 Salaries and Wages 94,442.00 Administration 3,840.00 Maintenance and Operations 7,600.00 Special Functions Law and Damages 30,000.00 Negotiations/Fact Find./Arbitration 27,000.00 Audit/Management Study 25,000.00 Printing Town Report 8,500.00 Bonds— Officers —Town 2,500.00 Celebrations 7,500.00 Animal Inspector 875.00 Rent — Parking Lots 2,200.00 Eyeglasses 600.00 Telephone — Central 60,000.00 Typewriter Replacement Program 10,000.00 Energy — Streetlighting 620,000.00 Total $ 902,457.00 37 TOWN BUILDING MAINTENANCE: Voted: 4/30/86 Salaries and Wages $ 256,811.00 Overtime 4,500.00 Administration 628.00 Maintenance and Operations 49,825.00 Equipment 1,350.00 Special Functions Contract Cleaning 45,000.00 Building Renovations 57,000.00 Energy 246,618.00 Total $ 661,732.00 TOWN CLERK: Voted: 4/30/86 Elected Officials/Stipends $ 30,584.00 Salaries and Wages 84,341.00 Administration 3,000.00 Maintenance and Operations 540.00 Special Functions-Listing of Residents 10,000.00 Total $ 128,465.00 TREASURER/COLLECTOR: Voted: 4/30/86 Elected Officials/Stipends $ 8,000.00 Salaries and Wages 267,683.00 Administration 53,550.00 Maintenance and Operations 4,390.00 Special Functions-Parking Tickets 36,200.00 Total $ 369,823.00 VETERANS' SERVICES: Voted: 4/30/86 Elected Officials/Stipends $ 200.00 f Salaries and Wages 52,620.00 Administration 2,150.00 Maintenance and Operations 79.00 Special Functions-Veterans' Benefits 175,000.00 I Total $ 230,049.00 ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS: Voted: 4/30/86 Salaries and Wages $ 13,257.00 Administration 12,500.00 Total $ 25,757.00 TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT $ 9,732,882.00 PROTECTION TO PERSONS AND PROPERTY BUILDING INSPECTION: Voted: 4/30/86 Salaries and Wages $ 244,384.00 Administration 23,105.00 Maintenance and Operations 1,285.00 Equipment 12,000.00 Total $280,774.00 38 RESOLUTION It is the will of Town Meeting that the Building Inspection Department provide a written report to Town Meeting at the first Town Meeting after January 1, 1987 on the status of enforcement of the Town's Sign By- Law. Such report may include proposed improvements in the by-law or funds desired for enforcement. Voted: 4/30/86 Marc S. Alpert, Precinct 5 CIVILIAN DEFENSE: Voted: 4/30/86 Stipends $ 2,000.00 Administration 635.00 Maintenance and Operations 500.00 Total $ 3,135.00 DOG CONTROL: Voted: 4/30/86 Salaries and Wages $ 49,668.00 Overtime 5,500.00 Administration 2,470.00 Maintenance and Operations 4,505.00 Energy 4,838.00 Total $ 66,981.00 FIRE DEPARTMENT: Voted: 4/30/86 Salaries and Wages $ 5,634,820.00 Overtime 280,000.00 Administration 16,205.00 Maintenance and Operations 136,418.00 Equipment 55,000.00 Energy 48,785.00 Special Functions Fire Alarms 5,100.00 Traffic Control & Safety 7,500.00 Gas and Lubes 17,792.00 Total $ 6,201,620.00 s HEALTH DEPARTMENT: Voted: 4/30/86 Stipends $ 2,800.00 Salaries and Wages 205,266.00 Administration 14,135.00 Maintenance and Operations 570.00 Special Functions Plant and Pest Control 3,125.00 Clinics 5,000.00 Mosquito Control 15,400.00 Total $ 246,296.00 POLICE DEPARTMENT: Voted: 4/30/86 Salaries and Wages $ 3,691,492.00 Overtime 95,000.00 Administration 44,312.00 Maintenance and Operations 118,550.00197,850.00 Equipment Energy 27,232.00 Special Functions 11,500.00 Total $ 4,185,936.00 39 SCHOOL CROSSING GUARDS: Voted: 4/30/86 Salaries and Wages $ 120,612.00 Overtime 400.00 Administration 1,000.00 Maintenance and Operations 7,280.00 Total $ 129,292.00 SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES: Voted: 4/30/86 Salaries and Wages $ 53,202.00 Administration 3,946.00 Maintenance and Operations 200.00 Total $ 57,348.00 TOTAL PROTECTION TO PERSONS AND PROPERTY $ 11,171,382.00 LIBRARIES: Voted: 4/30/86 Salaries and Wages $ 784,406.00 Administration 20,413.00 Maintenance and Operations 190,895.00 Equipment 30,000.00 Total $ 1,025,714.00 SCHOOL DEPARTMENT: Voted: 4/30/86 $ 30,032,879.00 RESOLUTION Be it resolved, that it is the wish of the Town Meeting that the School Committee present in writing to the next Annual Town Meeting a clearly delineated and predictable long range building use program. 4. Voted: 4/30/86 Richard E. Paul, Prec. 3 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS ADMINISTRATION — ALL DIVISION: Voted: 4/30/86 Elected Officials/Stipends $ 2,400.00 Salaries and Wages 893,239.00 Overtime 95,055.00 4. Overtime— Snow and Ice 81,600.00 Administration 26,520.00 Maintenance and Operations 339.205.00 Equipment 259,000.00 j Energy 781,087.00 Special Function-Gas&Lubes Town 233,841.00 ! Municipal Water& Sewer Charges 80,000.00 i Total $ 2,791,947.00 HIGHWAY DIVISION: Voted: 4/30/86 Salaries and Wages $ 713,256.00 Maintenance and Wages 310,640.00 Special Functions-Snow & Ice Removal 550,000.00 Total $ 1,573,896.00 SANITATION DIVISION: Voted: 4/30/86 Salaries and Wages $ 1,137,833.00 i Maintenance and Operations 1,091,155.00 i l Total $ 2,228,988.00 40 i SEWER DIVISION: Voted: 4/30/86 Salaries and Wages $ 281,881.00 Maintenance and Operations 1,824,208.00 Total $ 2,106,089.00 WATER DIVISION: Voted: 4/30/86 Salaries and Wages $ 425,230.00 Maintenance and Operations 1,165,860.00 Total $ 1,591,090.00 TREE DIVISION: Voted: 4/30/86 Salaries and Wages $ 123,952.00 Administration 1,855.00 Maintenance and Operations 16,725.00 Special Function Plant Disease and Pest Control 12,000.00 15,000.00 Trees Total $ 169,532.00 TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS $ 10,461,542.00 REPORT OF THE INCINERATOR COMMITTEE The committee is pleased to report that the Incinerator has continued to function on a full-time basis throughout the year. The committee has met once this year to consider the articles for Annual Town Meet- ing. The committee voted unanimously to support Articles 22 and 23. We ask that this report be accepted as a report of progress and that this committee be continued. Incinerator Committee Anthony M. Colonna, Chairman 5/6/86 Voted: that this report be accepted as a report of progress and that the committee be continued. i PARKS AND RECREATION PARK MAINTENANCE: Voted: 5/1/86 Salaries and Wages $ 304,134.00 Overtime 1,924.00 Maintenance and Operations 22,675.00 Equipment 46,500.00 18,973.00 Energy Total $ 394,206.00 p RECREATION DEPARTMENT: Voted: 5/1/86 Salaries and Wages $ 230,744.00 Administration 3,175.00 Maintenance and Operations 10,600.00 10,000.00 Equipment Special Functions Special Programs 7,018.00 Playground-Retarded 2,800.00 Playground-Handicapped 7,500.00 i Total $ 271,837.00 TOTAL PARKS AND RECREATION $ 666,043.00 ; 41 MISCELLANEOUS DEPARTMENTS ARENA: Voted: 4/30/86 Elected Officials/Stipends $ 3,100.00 Salaries and Wages 120,427.00 Administration 1,050.00 Maintenance and Operations 49,755.00 Energy 57,759.00 Special Function — Resurfacing 30,000.00 Total $ 262,091.00 CEMETERIES: Voted: 4/30/86 Salaries and Wages $ 15,614.00 Administration 53.00 Maintenance and Operations 1,300.00 Total $ 16,967.00 CONSERVATION: Voted: 4/30/86 Elected Officials/Stipends $ 1,500.00 Administration 1,000.00 Maintenance and Operations 1,000.00 Overtime 2,000.00 i Total $ 5,500.00 TOTAL MISCELLANEOUS DEPARTMENTS $ 284,558.00 HUMAN SERVICES COUNCIL ON AGING: Voted: 4/30/86 Salaries and Wages $ 145,534.00 Administration 11,984.00 Maintenance and Operations 28,426.00 Special Functions-Programs 7,384.00 Total $ 193,328.00 HUMAN RELATIONS: Voted: 4/30/86 Salaries and Wages $ 33,101.00 Administration 2,092.00 Maintenance and Operations 35.00 Special Functions Deaf Interpreter Service 1,000.00 ` Housing Mediation Board 854.00 ! S.M.I.L.E.S. 38,590.00 I i' Total $ 75,672.00 I I YOUTH COMMISSION: Voted: 4/30/86 Salaries and Wages $ 76,404.00 Administration 4,295.00 Maintenance and Operations 242.00 I Total $ 80,941.00 TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES $ 349,941.00 42 t f I UNCLASSIFIED EXPENSES KEEFE REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL Voted: 4/30/86 $ 2,858,957.00 DEBT SERVICE: Voted: 4/30/86 Payment on General Loans $ 915,000.00 Interest on General Loans 226,448.00 Payment on Water Loans 140,000.00 Interest on Water Loans 36,750.00 Interest on Temporary Loans 50,000.00 Total $ 1,368,198.00 PENSIONS: Voted: 4/30/86 Contributory Pensions $ 3,148,375.00 Non-Contributory Pensions 437,941.00 Total Pensions $ 3,586,316.00 COMMITTEES AND COMMISSIONS: Voted: 4/30/86 Capital Budget $ 50.00 Government Study 50.00 Historical Commission 200.00 Historic District Committee 50.00 Planning and Zoning 100.00 50.00 Real Property 50.00 Rules Sign Review Board 2,500.00 Total $ 3,050.00 MODERATOR: Voted: 4/30/86 $ 200.00 TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED EXPENSES $ 7,816,721.00 TOTAL VOTED UNDER ARTICLE 7 $ 71,615,120.00 ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money to install Traffic Signals at the following locations. A. Arthur Street at Grant Street B. Elm Street at Potter Road C. Concord Street at Watston Place Pass any vote or take an action relative thereto. p SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen WE RECOMMEND INDEFINITE POSTPONEMENT. ARTICLE 8. 5/7/86 Voted: that the sum of $76,000.00 be raised and appropriated for the purpose of installing traffic signals at the following intersections: A. Voted: that the sum of $41,000.00 be raised and appropriated for traffic signals at Arthur Street at Grant Street. B. Elm Street at Potter Road — Indefinite postponement. C. Voted: that the sum of $35,000.00 be raised and appropriated for traffic light at Concord Street at Watson Place and that it have only one function — the control of traffic from the fire department, said sum to be expended under the direction of the Board of Selectmen. 43 ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will authorize and direct the Framingham Retirement Board to transfer a sum of money to the Pension Fund to fund the appropriation to the Pension Fund for FY'87. 1 Pass any vote or take any action thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen and Framingham Retirement Board WE RECOMMEND FAVORABLE ACTION AND THE TRANSFER OF $276,450. ARTICLE 9. 5/1/86 Voted: that the Framingham Retirement Board be authorized and directed to transfer $285,000.00 from the Pension Reserve Fund to the Pension Fund to offset the FY'87 Pension Fund appro- priation. Such transfer to be allocated 97% to the Town and 3% to the Housing Authority. ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for provision of local public transportation services within the Town of Framingham and portions of adjacent towns; said sum to be expended under the direction of the Board of Selectmen. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen WE RECOMMEND FAVORABLE ACTION AND THE APPROPRIATION OF $140,000 ARTICLE 10: 5/1/86 Voted: that the sum of $140,000.00 be raised and appropriated for the purpose of providing local public transportation services within the Town of Framingham and portions of adjacent Towns: said sum to be expended under the direction of the Board of Selectmen. ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for acquisition and installation of parking meters in the central business district; said sum to be expended under the direction of the Boaid of Selectmen. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen $68,000 IS BEING REQUESTED. A RECOMMENDATION WILL BE MADE AT TOWN MEETING ARTICLE 11. 5/1/86 Voted: indefinite postponement of this article. ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept and expend funds in accordance with the provisions of Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended, and regulations promulgated thereunder by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen A RECOMMENDATION WILL BE MADE AT TOWN MEETING. ARTICLE 12. 5/1/86 Voted: that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to accept and expend funds in accordance with the provisions of Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended, and regulations promulgated thereunder by the U.S. Department of Housing and urban Develop- ment; and in accordance with the "Proposed Statement of Community Development Objectives and Proj- ected Use of Funds" approved by the Board of Selectmen on April 7, 1986. 44 ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for Highway construction to be used with funds available or to become available from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 90 of the General Laws; said sum to be spent under the direction of the Board of Public Works. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Commissioners of Public Works $195,211 IS REQUESTED FOR WORK TO BE DONE ON THE FOLLOWING STREETS: BISHOP STREET — HOWARD TO NATICK LINE; GRANT STREET — HOWARD TO HARTFORD; ELM STREET — WATER TO TOWN LINE; COCHITUATE ROAD — CONCORD TO WORCESTER ROAD. WE RECOMMEND FAVORABLE ACTION. ARTICLE 13. 5/1/86 Voted: that the sum of $195,211.00 be appropriated for highway construction to be used with funds available or to become available from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 90 of the General Laws, and to meet such appropriation, the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to issue from time to time, bonds or notes in the amount of $195,211.00 pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 6A of the General Laws: said sum to be expended under the direction of the Board of Public Works on the following streets: Bishop Street; Howard Street to Natick Line; Grant Street; Howard Street to Hartford Street; Elm Street; Water Street to Town Line; Cochituate Road; Concord Street to Worcester Road. Unanimous vote. ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for the original construction or reconstruction of public ways, the extension or widening thereof, including land damages, engineering services, and the cost of pavement, drains, and sidewalks laid out at the time of construction; said sum to be spent under the direction of the Board of Public Works. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Commissioner of Public Works $190,000 IS BEING REQUESTED FOR WORK TO BE DONE ON INDIAN HEAD ROAD. WE RECOM- MEND FAVORABLE ACTION. i ARTICLE 14. 5/6/86 Voted: that the sum of $288,000.00 be appropriated for the original construction or reconstruction of public ways, the extension or widening thereof, including land damages, engineering serv- ices, and the cost of pavement, drains, and sidewalks laid out at the time of construction; and that to meet such appropriation $1719246.00 be transferred from Federal and State Hurricane Reimbursements Funds; $4,050.00 from Insurance Reimbursement/Fire Loss Funds, and that the balance of $112,704.00 be raised and appropriated; said sums to be expended under the direction ofthe Board of Public Works as follows: $190,000.00 for Indian Head Road ° $50,000.00 for engineering services on Lockland Avenue $48,000.00 for "A" Street ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for sidewalk construction, including land damages and engineer- ing services; said sum to be spent under the direction of the Board of Public Works. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. i SPONSOR: Commissioners of Public Works $75,000 IS BEING REQUESTED FOR WORK ON UNION AVE. AND CONCORD ST. FROM PEARL ST. TO SANGER ST.; CONCORD ST. FROM FREDERICK ST. TO THE RAILROAD CROSSING; UNION AVE. AND CONCORD ST. FROM PROCTOR ST. TO THE RAILROAD CROSSING. WE REC- OMMEND FAVORABLE ACTION. ARTICLE 15. 5/1/86 Voted: that the sum of $75,000.00 be transferred from Insurance Reimbursement/ Fire Loss for the purpose of constructing sidewalks, including land damages and engineering services; said sum to be expended under the direction of the Board of Public Works for work on Union Avenue and Concord Street from Pearl Street to Sanger Street; Concord Street from Frederick Street to the Railroad Crossing; Union Avenue and Concord Street from Proctor Street to the Railroad Crossing. 45 ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or f otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for the purpose of constructing drains for surface drainage, including the acquisition of land or any interest in land necessary to the foregoing and including Engineering I services; said sum to be spent under the direction of the Board of Public Works. 1 Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Commissioners of Public Works. WE RECOMMEND INDEFINITE POSTPONEMENT OF THIS ARTICLE WITH THE CONCURRENCE OF THE SPONSOR. ARTICLE 16. 5/6/86 Voted: indefinite postponement with the concurrence of the sponsor. ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for improvements to the Sewerage System, including the con- struction of sanitary sewers, the acquisition of land or any interest in land necessary to the foregoing, and engineering services to be used in accordance with the provisions of Public Law 92.500; said sum to be spent under the direction of the Board of Public Works. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Commissioners of Public Works WE RECOMMEND INDEFINITE POSTPONEMENT OF THIS ARTICLE WITH THE CONCURRENCE OF THE SPONSOR. ARTICLE 17. 5/1/86 Voted: indefinite postponement with the concurrence of the sponsor. ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for improvements to the Town Sewerage System, including the construction of sanitary sewers, the acquisition of land or any interest in land necessary to the foregoing, and engineering services; said sum to be spent under the direction of the Board of Public Works. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Commissioners of Public Works WE RECOMMEND INDEFINITE POSTPONEMENT OF THIS ARTICLE WITH THE CONCURRENCE i OF THE SPONSOR. f. ARTICLE 18. 5/1/86 Voted: indefinite postponement with the concurrence of the sponsor. ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for improvements to the Town water system, including laying or J' relaying water mains sixteen inches or more in diameter and for engineering services related thereto; said sum to be spent under the direction of the Board of Public Works. i Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. (. SPONSOR: Commissioners of Public Works $228,000 IS BEING REQUESTED FOR EDMANDS ROAD. WE RECOMMEND FAVORABLE ACTION. J. ARTICLE 19. 5/1/86 Voted: that the sum of $228,000.00 be appropriated for improvements to the Town water system, including laying and relaying water mains sixteen inches or more in diameter and for engineer- ing services related thereto; and to meet such appropriation, the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 1 Board of Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to issue from time to time, bondsor notes in the amount of '!. $228,000.00 pursuant to the provisions ofChapter 44, Section 8, Clause 6 of the General Laws, said sum to be expended under the direction of the Board of Public Works to complete the work in the Northwest quadrant. 126 voting in favor. 1 opposed. I F I t J. 46 F ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for improvements to the Town water system, including laying or relaying water mains less than 16" in diameter, said sum to be spent under the direction of the Board of Public Works. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Commissioners of Public Works WE RECOMMEND INDEFINITE POSTPONEMENT OF THIS ARTICLE WITH THE CONCURRENCE OF THE SPONSOR. ARTICLE 20. 5/6/86 Voted: indefinite postponement of this article. ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for the purpose of painting pavement markings to improve highway safety; said sum to be spent under the Board of Public Works. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Commissioners of Public Works $25,000 IS BEING REQUESTED FOR THE PURPOSE OF THIS ARTICLE. WE RECOMMEND FAVORABLE ACTION. ARTICLE 21. 5/1/86 Voted: that the sum of $25,000.00 be raised and appropriated for the purpose of painting pavement markings to improve highway safety; said sum to be expended under the direction of the Board of Public Works. ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Incinerator Committee to sell, lease or other- wise transfer the land with the buildings thereon owned by the Town and located on Mt. Wayte Avenue, known as the Town Incinerator. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSORS: Incinerator Committee A RECOMMENDATION WILL BE MADE AT TOWN MEETING. ARTICLE 22. 5/6/86 Voted: that this article be referred back to sponsor. ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Incinerator Committee to enter into a lease pursuant to G.L. c.40 §4, for disposal of garbage and refuse for a period not exceeding twenty years. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSORS: Incinerator Committee A RECOMMENDATION WILL BE MADE AT TOWN MEETING. ARTICLE 23. 5/6/86 Voted: to authorize the Board of Public Works to enter into negotiations for a contract pursuant to General Laws Chapter 40, paragraph 4, for disposal of garbage and refuse for a period- not exceeding twenty years. r 47 ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money not to exceed $200,000 for the acquisition of development rights on the property known as the Hanson Farm on Nixon Road, shown on the Town of Framingham Assessor's Plan Sheet 423, Block 3, as Lots 8, 8A, and 813, under the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Agricultural Preservation Restriction Program. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSORS: Conservation Commission — Planning Department WE RECOMMEND FAVORABLE ACTION AND THE APPROPRIATION OF $200,000. ARTICLE 24. 5/6/86 Voted: that the sum of $200,000.00 be appropriated for the acquisition of develop- ment rights on the property known as Hanson Farm on Nixon Road, shown on the Town of Framingham Assessor's Plan Sheet 423, Block 3, as Lots 8 and 12D, under the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Agricul- tural Preservation Restriction Program, and to meet such appropriation $113,164.00 be transferred from the Sale of Real Estate and that the balance be raised and appropriated. Said sums to be expended under the direction of the Board of Selectmen. Unanimous vote. ARTICLE 25. To determine whether the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to grant for full, fair and adequate consideration as determined by an appraiser appointed by the Selectmen and paid by the grantee, an easement to John A. C. Wheeler, Philip Anderson and Ranne P. Warner, Trustees of' Summit Point Trust, under Declaration of Trust dated February 24, 1982, recorded with the Middlesex South Regis- try of Deeds at Book 14550, Page 280 as amended by Certificate of Appointment of Trustees dated April 1, 1982, and recorded with the Middlesex South Registry of Deeds at Book 14585, Page 163 and further amended by Declaration of Trust dated April 1, 1982, and recorded with the Middlesex South Registry of Deeds at Book 14585, Page 165, and as further amended by an Amendment of Declaration of Trust with the Middlesex South Registry of Deeds on December 27, 1982, at Book 14835, Page 125, or their successors in title, said easement being appurtenant to land in Framingham owned by said Trustees or their successors and more particularly described in a deed dated February 26, 1982 and recorded with said Deeds in Book 14550, Page 284, said easement being shown as an area labeled "Proposed Electrical Ease." on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Framingham, Mass. (Showing Proposed Electrical Easement)" dated December 16, 1985 by MacCarthy & Sullivan Engineering, Inc., to be recorded with said easement, said easement area being more particularly bounded and described as follows: NORTHEASTERLY By Old Connecticut Path, 5.71 feet; SOUTHEASTERLY By Old Connecticut Path, 18.48 feet; and NORTHWESTERLY By land now or formerly of Ranne P. Warner Trustee of Summit Point Trust, 19.34 fr I Said easement area contains approximately fifty-three square feet. 1 Said easement being for the purposes of installing, maintaining, repairing, replacing and using electrical transformers and all equipment, conduits, wires, switches, and foundations appurtenant thereto including " the right of access thereto, or to take any other action relative thereto. I Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSORS: Charles Carlson et al i' WE RECOMMEND INDEFINITE POSTPONEMENT. ARTICLE 25. 5/1/86 Voted: to indefinite postponement of this article. ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwsie provide a sum or sums of money for the Youth Guidance Center of the Greater Framingham Mental Health Association. i Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Framingham School Committee WE RECOMMEND FAVORABLE ACTION AND THE APPROPRIATION OF $77,175. ARTICLE 26. 5/1/86 Voted: that the sum of $77,175.00 be raised and appropriated for the Youth Guid- ance Center of the Greater Framingham Mental Health Assoc., said sum to be expended under the direction of the Framingham School. P 48 C I ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for Capital Improvements in various school buildings. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Framingham School Committee $252,240 IS BEING REQUESTED. A RECOMMENDATION WILL BE MADE AT TOWN MEETING. ARTICLE 27a. 5/6/86 Voted: that the sum of $109,000.00 be appropriated for replacement of the gym floor of the Walsh Middle Schooland to meet such appropriation, the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to issue from time to time, bonds or notes in the amount of$109,000.00 in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause 3A of the General Laws, and that such sum be expended under the direction of the Framingham School Committee. Unanimous vote. ARTICLE 27b. 5/6/86 Voted: that the sum of $100,000.00 be appropriated for energy conservation meas- ures at various schools, and to meet such appropriation, the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to issue from time to time, bonds or notes in the Section 7, Clause 3B of the General Laws, and that such sum be expended under the direction of the Framingham School Committee. 86 voting in favor. 29 opposed. ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the Board of Selectmen to the Conservation Commission for the purposes of Conservation and open space preservation pursuant to GL c 98c. a certain area at Mount Wayte shown on Assessors Sheet #187 Lots numbered 53L, 54L, 55L, 56L, 64L, 65L, 66L, 67L, 68L, 338, 339, 340, 343, and 346 containing approximately 0.88 acres. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Conservation Commission WE REFER THIS ARTICLE TO THE SPONSOR. NO FUNDS ARE REQUIRED. ARTICLE 28. 5/6/86 Voted: that the following land be transferred from the Board of Selectmen to the Conservation Commission for the purposes of conservation and open space preservation pursuant to GL c40 Par 8c a certain area at Mount Wayte shown on Assessors sheet #187, Lots numbered 54L, 55L, 64L, 65L, 66L, 67L, 68L, 338, 339, 340, 343, and 346, containing approximately 0.76 acres. pec Unanimous vote. ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for the purpose of paying for health services provided for residents of the Town of Framingham by the Visiting Nurse Association of South Middlesex, Inc. (formerly Community Health Service); said sum to be expended under the direction of the Board of Health. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Health WE RECOMMEND FAVORABLE ACTION AND AN APPROPRIATION OF $10,000. ARTICLE 29. 5/6/86 Voted: that the sum of $10,000.00 be raised and appropriated for the purpose of paying for health services provided for residents of the Town of Framingham by the Visiting Nurse Associa- e expended under the direction of the Board of Health. tion of South Middlesex, Inc.; said sum to b 49 ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for services provided for residents of the Town of Framingham by the Trinity Mental Health Center, said sum to be expended under the direction of the Board of Health. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Health WE RECOMMEND FAVORABLE ACTION AND THE APPROPRIATION OF $25,000. ARTICLE 30. 5/6/86 Voted: that the sum of $25,000.00 be raised and appropriated for the purpose of paying for services provided for residents of the Town of Framingham by Trinity Mental Health Associa- tion; said sum to be expended under the direction of the Board of Health. ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for the renovation of Soccer Field at North High, said sum to be expended under the direction of the Park Commissioners. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Park Commissioners WE RECOMMEND FAVORABLE ACTION AND THE APPROPRIATION OF $56,000. ARTICLE 31. 5/6/86 Voted: that the sum of $56,000.00 be raised and appropriated for the renovation of the Soccer Field at North High; said sum to be expended under the direction of the Park Commissioners. ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum or sums of monies from State Aid to Library Funds to the Board of Library Trustees for the purpose of extension and enrichment of Library Services. Said sum to be expended under the direction and control of the Board of Library Trustees. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. I SPONSOR: Board of Library Trustees WE RECOMMEND FAVORABLE ACTION AND THE APPROPRIATION OF $34,594. '} ARTICLE 32. 5/6/86 Voted: that the sum of $34,594.00 be transferred from State Aid to Libraries to the '. Library Department for the purpose of extension and enrichment of Library Services, said sum to be expended under the direction of the Board of Library Trustees. ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum or sums of monies from Additional State Aid to Libraries to the Board of Library Trustees for the purchase of library materials. Said sum to be expended under the direction and control of the Board of Library Trustees. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. 7 SPONSOR: Board of Library Trustees WE RECOMMEND FAVORABLE ACTION AND THE APPROPRIATION OF $18,877. ARTICLE 33. 5/6/86 Voted: that the sum of $18,877.00 be transferred from Additional Aid to Libraries to the Library Department for Library Materials; said sum to be expended under the direction of the Board of Library Trustees. ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money to allow the Board of Selectmen to acquire a portion of the parcel of land shown on Assessors Map 321, Block 11, Lot 2. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. l SPONSOR: Board of Library Trustees WE RECOMMEND INDEFINITE POSTPONEMENT. ARTICLE 34. 5/6/86 Voted: indefinite postponement of this article. IIs' i j f 50 ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to establish an Apartment Zoning Study Committee to prepare amendments to the Zoning By-Law relative to the development of apartments. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Human Relations Commission WE REFER THIS ARTICLE TO THE SPONSOR. ARTICLE 35. 5/7/86 Voted: indefinite postponement of this article. ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Framingham as follows: 1. In Section I.E.I., insert the following terms and definitions in alphabetical order. Development: Any man-made change to improved or unimproved real estate, including but not limited to buildings or other structures, mining, dredging, filling, grading, paving, excavation or drilling operations. Enlargement: An increase in the size of an existing structure. Extension: An increase in the amount of existing floor area within an existing building. Human Habitation: The use of a building for living purposes including working, sleeping, eating, cooking or recreation, or a combination thereof, but excluding use for storage only. Substantial Alteration: An alteration or improvement of a structure or group of structures under one ownership on the same lot or contiguous lots which results in an increase in gross floor area in excess of either 10 per cent of existing gross floor area or 5,000 square feet, whichever is the lesser amount, or which requires an addition of 10 or more parking spaces to the amount required by this By-Law prior to the alteration. The calculation of a substantial alteration shall be determined by the Building Com- missioner based on the aggregate of all repairs, improvements, extensions or enlargements undertaken within a consecutive three year term. Substantial Improvement: An alteration or improvement of a building, the cost of which, including all materials and labor, based on documented estimates or construction costs submitted by the applicant, equals or exceeds 40 per cent of the full value assessment of the building. The calculation of a substan- tial improvement shall be determined by the Building Commissioner based on the aggregate of all repairs, improvements, extensions or enlargements undertaken within a consecutive three year term. 2. In Section III.A.2.e., delete the word "Structure" and substitute therefor the words "Single-family detached dwellings." 3. In Section IILH., delete subsection 2 and substitute therefor the following new subsection 2: 2. APPLICABILITY a. All proposed development in a Floodplain District shall require a permit from the Building Commissioner. b. In addition to a permit from the Building Commissioner, any construction, enlargement, exten- sion, or substantial improvement of a new or existing building for human habitation, normally allowed by right or authorized by special permit (exception) in a land area underlying a Floodplain District, shall require a special permit from the Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA). c. In the regulatory floodway, any development or encroachment, including fill, which would result in any increase in flood levels during the base flood shall be prohibited. 4. In Section IV.A.I., delete the second paragraph. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Standing Committee on Planning& Zoning WE REFER THIS ARTICLE TO THE SPONSOR. I 51 ARTICLE 36. 5/7/86 Voted: that the Town amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Framingham as set forth in the Warrant for the 1986 Annual Town Meeting under Article 36. i 130 voting in favor. 4 opposed. Boston, Mass. May 19, 1986 The foregoing amendment to the zoning by-laws adopted under Article 36 of the warrant for the Fra- mingham Annual Town Meeting held April 23, 1986 is hereby approved. s/Francis X. Bellotti Attorney General Published in Middlesex News on May 28th and June 4th, 1986. ARTICLE 37. We the undersigned registered voters, petition to amend Section II1, A, 3 e, by deleting the first word "Structures" and substitute the words "Single residences." e. Structures in existence on March 15, 1939 may be remodeled for occupancy by not more than two families, provided that the ground area is not increased by more than twenty percent nor the height by raising the roof or otherwise, excepting only the construction of porches, bay windows or similar accessory structures not exceeding four hundred square feet in area and the addition of dormer windows or gable not over twelve feet in width upon the existing roof; this providing that the yard regulations are observed as stated in the Building Code. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Lorraine E. Wright et al WE REFER THIS ARTICLE TO THE SPONSOR. ARTICLE 37. 5/7/86 Voted: indefinite postponement of this article. i'. Explanatory statements from Planning Department Article 36 proposes certain technical amendments to the Zoning By-Law which clarify the meaning and I; intent of several terms relating to development in a floodplain and to the conversion of single-family struc- tures to two-family use. The proposed changes are as follows: t 1. Paragraph 1 of the Article inserts definitions for the following words into the section of the By-Law where important terms are defined: Development: This definition is identical to that which currently exists at Sec. III.H.2. of the By- Law. It is being moved to Sec. I.E.1. for consistency and clarity. Enlargement and Extension: These two terms are used in Sec. III.H.2. but are not defined there. Human Habitation: This term is used in Sec. III.H.2. but is not defined. The proposed definition would clarify that the intent of the By-Law is to be consistent with federal flood hazard manage- ment policies and regulations, which list specific uses that constitute "human habitation." Substantial Alteration and Substantial Improvement: The By-Law currently has two conflicting def- initions of the term "substantial alteration." In Sec. III.H.2. this term is defined in accordance with federal floodplain management regulations in order to comply with the federal flood insurance program. In Sec. IV.A.1. the term is defined quite differently for the purpose of determining when j an off-street parking plan is required. In order to retain both provisions, the floodplain provision has been given the new name "substantial improvement." In addition, two minor technical changes I` are made: (a) the terms "enlargement" and "extension" will be excluded from the definition of "substantial improvement" (although enlargements and extensions will continue to be subject to floodplain regulations); and (b) wording is added to specify that the determination regarding a substantial improvement is to be made by the Building Commissioner. 2. Paragraph 2 changes the term "structure" to "single-family detached dwelling" in order to clarify the intent of the provision regarding conversions to two-family residential use by exception (special permit). Recent and proposed conversions of non-residential structures to two-family use have prompted concerns about the potential for inappropriate use of this provision. The proposed amendment would specifically limit the application of this provision to existing single-family detached dwellings. 52 i i 3. Paragraph 3 amends Sec. III.H.2. by deleting the definitions of "development" and "substantial alteration," and by reorganizing the remaining provisions in three sub-paragraphs. 4. Paragraph 4 amends Sec. IV.A.1. by deleting the definition of "substantial alteration." The net effects of all amendments proposed in Article 38 will be to eliminate inconsistencies and ambiguities in terminology. Explanatory Statements from Planning Department ARTICLE 37 proposes an amendment to the Zoning By-Law which is similar to that proposed in paragraph 2 of Article 36, relating to conversions to two-family residential use in Single Residence districts. If Article 36 passes, Article 37 will redundant and should not be voted. If Article 36 does not pass, Article 37 may be voted with the following amendments: 1. The reference in the first sentence should be changed from "III.A.3.e." to "III.A.2.e" (this section was renumbered under Article 61 of the 1985 Annual Town Meeting). 2. The final phrase should be deleted, so that the section ends with the words "existing roof." ARTICLE 40. SECTION 1. Declaration of Purpose. The Town of Framingham finds and declares that a serious public emergency exists with respect to ade- quately housing a substantial number of its citizens due to the critical shortage of rental housing within the town. This shortage has been created and exacerbated by the lack of sufficient new rental housing produc- tion by prolonged increases in housing construction and financing costs at a rate substantially exceeding increases in personal income, or by housing abandonment. It also has been created and severely aggravated by the effect of conversion of rental housing production, such conversion necessarily reduces the rental housing stock otherwise available. A substantial and increasing shortage of rental housing accommodations, especially for the elderly, the handicapped and persons and families of low and moderate income, has been and will continue to be the result of this emergency. Unless the available stock of rental housing and those who reside therein receive further protection from the consequences of conversion of said housing accommo- dations to condominiums and cooperatives than the law now affords, thus rental housing shortage will generate serious threats to the public health, safety, and general welfare of the citizens of the Town of Framingham, particularly the elderly, the handicapped and persons and families of low and moderate income. Therefore, in order to address this emergency and to continue to provide a sufficient supply of decent, affordable rental housing in the Town, it is necessary that the Town of Framingham, in the exercise of its powers under Chapter 527 of the Acts of 1983, further regulate the conversion of rental housing into con- dominiums and cooperative. SECTION 2. Definitions. As used in this By-Law, the following words shall, unless the context clearly requires otherwise, have the following meanings: "Condominium unit," a unit in a housing condominium as that term is used and defined in Massachusetts General Laws chapter one hundred and eighty-three A. "Cooperative unit," a unit in a housing cooperative as that term is used and defined in Massachusetts General Laws chapter one hundred and fifty-seven, and one-hundred and fifty-six B. "Condominium or cooperative conversion eviction," an eviction of a tenant by the owner for the purpose of removing such tenant from a housing accommodation in order to facilitate the initial sale and transfer of legal title to that housing accommodation as a condominium or cooperative unit to a prospective purchaser or an eviction of a tenant by any other person who has purchased a housing accommodation as a condomi- nium or cooperative unit when the tenant whose eviction is sought was a resident of the housing accommoda- tion at the time the notice of intent to convert is given to convert the building or buildings to the condominium or cooperative form of ownership pursuant to this By-Law or pursuant to section four of Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 527 of the Acts of 1983; provided, however, that the eviction of a tenant for non-payment of rent or other violation of a rental agreement shall in no event be deemed a condominium or cooperative conversion eviction. "Designated Board," the body designated or appointed by the city (town) to administer the provisions of this ordinance (By-Law). 53 "Owner,"the individual who holds title to any housing accommodation, including without limitation, a partnership, corporation, or trust. For purposes of this ordinance (By-Law), the rights and duties of the owner hereunder shall be the obligation of the owner's agents or assigns. "Housing accommodation," any building, structure, or part thereof or land appurtenant thereto, or any other real or personal property rented or offered for rent for living or dwelling purposes, together with all services connected with the use or occupancy of such property, but not including the following: (i) housing accommodations which the United States orthe commonwealth or any authority created under the laws thereof either owns or operates; (ii) housing accommodations in any hospital, convent, monastery, asylum, public institution or college or school dormitory operated exclusively for charitable or educational purposes, or in any nursing or rest home for the ages; (iii) buildings containing fewer than four housing accommodations; provided, however, that two or more adjoining buildings or structures under common legal or beneficial ownership shall constitute a single build- ing or structure for purposes of this ordinance (By-Law); SECTION 3. Further Regulation of Conversions (a) Applicability of Chapter 527 of the Acts of 1983 to the extent that such provisions are not in conflict with the further regulation set forth below, in which case the further regulations shall govern. (b) Further regulations, no owner shall convert a rental housing accommodation covered by this ordinance to condominium or cooperative ownership if the rental vacancy rate in the city or town is five percent (5%) or below, as determined by the local planning board. This ban on conversions shall remain in effect until the local board determines that the housing emergency no longer exists and that the vacancy rate is five percent (5%) or above. SECTION 4. Enforcement. Any owner or other person who violates the provisions of this ordinance (By-Law) shall be subject to the penalties specified in Section 5 of Chapter 527 of the Acts of 1983. Additionally, the city (town) or any person aggrieved by a failure to comply with this ordinance (By-Law) may enforce its provisions in a civil action for injunctive or declaratory relief. SECTION 5. Severability. The provisions of this ordinance (By-Law) are severable. If any provision of this ordinance (By-Law), or the application of such provision, is held invalid, the invalidity shall not effect other provisions of this ordinance (By-Law) which can and shall be given effect without the invalid provision or application. (iv) housing accommodations in hotels, motels, inns, tourist homes and rooming and boarding houses when the owner can demonstrate that more than 50% of the actual occupants during the twelve months preceding the recording of a master deed, or the filing of articles or organization for a cooperative, (or the application for a permit) remained in residence for a period of fewer than fourteen consecutive calendar days. "Tenant," a person or group of persons collectively entitled to occupy a housing accommodation pur- suantto a rental agreement written or implied. "Vacancy rate," as applied to the rate of all rental housing stock in the Town. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Robert Brett, et al A RECOMMENDATION WILL BE MADE AT TOWN MEETING. ARTICLE 38. 5/7/86 Voted: indefinite postponement of this article. 54 ARTICLE 39. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows: SECTION ONE: Declaration of Purpose and Emergency: The Town of Framingham finds and declares that a serious public emergency exists with respect to a substantial number of its citizens. The emergency has been created by a shortage of available and affordable rental housing units. This shortage has been caused by insufficient new housing construction, condominium and cooperative conversion, increased costs of construction and finance, inflation, and increased demand for rental housing. The result of this substantial and increasing shortage of rental housing accommodations and abnormally high rents is that unless residential rents and evictions are regulated and controlled, such emer- gency and the further inflationary pressures resulting therefrom will produce serious threats to the public health, safety and general welfare to the citizens of Framingham. The emergency situation will most seri- ously impact upon families of low and moderate income, the handicapped, and elderly on fixed income. Further the continued diversity of the Town of depends upon providing housing of all tenure type. Whereas, such emergency should be met by the town of immediately and with due regard for the rights and responsi- bilities of all of its citizens. SECTION TWO: Effective Date: This act shall, take effect immediately upon passage because of the emer- gency nature of the housing crisis. SECTION THREE: Definitions: The following words and phrases as used in this ACT shall have the following meanings: Capital Improvement: Any rehabilitation, addition or improvement which appreciably adds to the value of the property or prolongs its life, or both, but not including ordinary repairs or maintenance. Class of Housing Accommodations: All housing accommodations within the town or any category of such housing accommodations based upon size, age, construction, rent location or other common characteristics. Condominium or Cooperative Conversion Eviction: An eviction of a tenant by a landlord for the purpose of removing such tenant from a housing accommodation in order to facilitate the initial sale and transfer of legal title that housing accommodation as a condominium or cooperative unit to a prospective purchaser or an eviction of a tenant by another persons who has purchased a housing accommodation as a condominium or cooperative unit when the tenant whose evicition is sought was a resident of the housing accommodation at the time the master deed or articles of reorganization for the property wherein said housing accommoda- tion is located was recorded pursuant to the provisions of Chapters 156B, 157, or 183A of the Massachusetts General Laws. Condominium Unit: A unit in a condominium as that term is defined in Chapter 183A of the General Law of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Consumer Price Index: The consumer price index for all urban consumers of the Boston SMSA as pub- lished by the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Rent Equity Board: The Board as defined in Section Four of the By-Law. Housing Accommodations: Any building, structure or part thereof of land appurtenant thereto, or any real or personal property rented or offered for rent for living or dwelling purposes, within the town, includ- ing without limitation, houses, apartments, rooming or boarding houses, and other properties used for living or dwelling purposes, together with all services connected with the use or occupancy of such property, but not including the following: (a) Housing accommodations in hotels, motels, inns, tourist homes and rooming and boarding houses i which are occupied in the majority by transient guests staying for a period of fewer than fourteen consecu- tive calendar days; provided however that the exception of said hotels, motels, inns, tourist homes and rooming or boarding houses from the above definition may be reviewed at anytime by the board. (b) Housing Accommodations, the construction of which was completed on or before the enactment date of this law. Provided, however that rental units restored after a fire, flood or other casualty shall not be exempted under this subsection. 55 (c) Housing accommodations which a governmental unit agency, or authority either: (i) owns or operates or provides a subsidy for the daily operation of the housing development; (ii) regulates the rents, but excepting units regulated by this Act or by the provisions of any general or special law of the Commonwealth authorizing municipal control or rent levels or; (iii) or subsidizes the operation. (d) Housing accommodations in any hospital, convent, monastery, asylum, public institution or college or school dormitory operated exclusively for charitable or educational purposes, or nursing homes or rest homes or charitable home for the aged, not organized or operated for profit. (e) Housing accommodations which are single family houses. (f) Housing accommodations in an owner occupied two-family or three-family home. Landlord: the individual who holds title to any controlled housing accommodation, including without limitation a partnership, corporation, or trust. For purposes of this by-law the rights and duties of the landlord hereunder shall be the obligation of anyone who manages, controls or customarily accepts rent on behalf of the landlord. Rental Housing Agreement: an agreement, oral, written or implied, between a landlord and a tenant for the use and occupancy of a housing accommodation and for housing services. Rent: the consideration, including without limitation all bonuses, benefits, gratuities, or charges contin- gent or otherwise, demanded or received for, or in connection with, the use or occupancy of a housing accommodation, for housing services, or for the transfer of a lease of a housing accommodation. Services: repairs, replacement, maintenance, painting, providing light, heat, hot and cold water, elevator service, window shades and screens storage, kitchen, bath and laundry facilities and privileges, janitor serv- ice, refuse removal, furnishings and any other benefit, privilege or facility connected with the use or occu- pancy of any rental unit. Services to a rental unit shall include a proportionate share of services provided to common facilities of the building in which the housing accommodation unit is contained. Tenant: A tenant, subtenant, lessee, sublessee or other person, entitled under the terms of a rental housing agreement to the use and occupancy of any housing accommodation. SECTION FOUR: Rent Equity Board f (a) The selectmen shall appoint a Rent Equity Board of not less than five (5) members, and for such term as the selectmen determine. At least two of said members shall be representative of landlords and two i �k members representatives of tenants. !' (b) Members of the Rent Equity Board shall receive no compensation for their services, but shall be I reimbursed by the town for necessary expenses incurred in the performance of their duties. (c) The Rent Equity Board, hereinafter called the Board, shall be responsible for carrying out the provi- sions of this by-law, shall hire, with the approval of the official, such personnel as are needed, shall promul- gate rules and regulations as will further the provisions of this by-law. Nothing in this section shall prohibit town meeting from amending these by-laws. (d) The Board may make such studies and investigations, conduct such hearings, and obtain such informa- tion as is deemed necessary in promulgating any regulation rule or order under this by-law, or in administer- ing and enforcing this by-law, or in administering and enforcing the By-law and regulations and orders promulgated hereunder. For the foregoing purposes, a person may be summoned to attend and testify to produce books and papers in like manner as he may be summoned to attend as a witness before a court. Any person who rents or offers for rents or acts as broker or agent for the rental of any controlled rental unit may be required to furnish under oath any information required by the Board and to produce records and other documents and make reports. Such person shall have the right to be represented by counsel, and a transcript shall be taken of all testimony and such persons shall have the right to examine said transcript at reasonable times and places. (e) The board shall be funded by an amount registration fee charged annually per unit, to be paid by each landlord. (1) Additionally, a fee set by the board shall be charged to hear any action brought before the board by f the complaining party. L I: 56 p is I SECTION FIVE: Maximum Rent Level (a) The maximum rent for a unit coming under this Act shall be the rent charged the occupant for the month six months prior to the passage of the Act. If the rental unit was unoccupied at that time, but was occupied at any time prior to that date, the maximum rent shall be the rent lawfully charged therefor for the month closest to six months prior to the effective date of this ordinance. If the maximum rent is not other- wise established, it shall be established by the Board. Any maximum rent may be subsequently adjusted under the provisions Section. SECTION SIX: Rental Adjustments of Rent Levels (a) The Board is empowered to make such individual or general adjustments either upward or downward, of the maximum rent for any controlled housing accommodation or class of controlled housing accommoda- tions as may be neccessary to assure that rents for controlled housing accommodations are established at levels which yield to landlords a fair net operating income. (b) The following factors, among other relevant factors, which the Board by regulation may define, shall be considered in determining whether a controlled rental unit yields a fair net operating income: (1) increases or decreases in property tax bills; (2) unavoidable increases or decreases in operating and maintenance expenses; (3) capital improvement of the housing unit as distinguished from ordinary repair, replacement and maintenance. The board shall adopt an amortization schedule for approved capital improvements. (4) increases or decrease in living space, services, furniture, furnishings or equipment. (5) substantial deterioration of the housing units other than as a result of ordinary wear and tear. (6) failure to perform ordinary repair, replacement, and maintenance. (c) For the purpose of adjusting rents under the provisions of this section, the rent Equity Board may 1 promulgate a schedule of standard rental increases or decreases from improvement or deterioration in spe- cific services and facilities. (d) The Board may refuse to grant a rent increase under this section if it determines that the affected rental unit does not comply with the state sanitary code, any applicable municipal codes, or by-laws, and if it is determined that such a lack of compliance is due to the failure of the landlord to provide adquate repair and maintenance. The Rent Equity Board may refuse to grant a rent decrease under this section, if it determines i that a tenant is more than 60 days in arrears in payment of rent unless such arrearage is due to a withholding of rent under the provisions of Section Eight A of Chapter Two Hundred and Thirty Nine of the Mass General Law. (e) The Board may remove maximum rental levels, established under this section and Section V, for any class of controlled rental units if in its judgment the need for continuing such maximum rental levels no longer exists because of sufficient construction of new housing accommodations which are comparable to the rental level of the applicable class of controlled housing accommodations or because the demand for housing accommodations has been otherwise met. Any maximum rent level removed under this paragraph shall be reimposed or adjusted and reimposed upon a finding by the board that a substantial shortage of rental units exists in the town and that reimposition of rent control is necessary in the public interest. Any action under this paragraph shall be subject to hearing and notice requirements as set forth in this by-law. SECTION SEVEN: Rent Adjustment Hearings (a) The Board or the Administrator shall consider an adjustment of rent for an individual controlled housing accommodation upon receipt of a petition for adjustment filed by the landlord or tenant of such accommodation or upon its own initiative. The Board or the Administrator shall notify the Landlord, if the petition was filed by the tenant, or the tenant if the petition was filed by the landlord, of a receipt of such petition and of the right of either party to request a hearing. If a hearing is requested by either party, or the action is undertaken upon the initiative of the Board or the Administrator or at the least one member of the board or its designee prior to the decision by the Board or the Administrator to grant or refuse a rental adjustment. Notice of the time and place of the hearing shall be furnished to the landlord and the tenant. The Board or Administrator may consolidate petitions relating to controlled housing accommodations in the same building, and all such petitions may be considered in a single hearing. 57 (b) On its own initiative, the Board or the Administrator may make a general adjustment, by percentage, of the rental levels for any class of controlled housing accommodations within a municipality. Prior to making such adjustment, public hearing shall be held before the administrator and before at least a majority of the Board. Notice that an adjustment is under consideration, a description of the class of housing accom- modations which would be affected by the adjustment and the time and place of said public hearing shall be published three times in at Jeast one newspaper having a general circulation within the town. (c) Notwithstanding any other provision of this section, the Board or the Administrator may without holding a hearing, refuse to adjust a rent level for an individual housing accommodation if a hearing has been held with regard to the rental level of such unit within twelve months. (d) If the Rent Equity Board's investigators report is properly introduced in evidence the landlord or the tenant has the right to cross-examine the investigator. (e) Hearings required by paragraph (a) shall be conducted in accordance with the provisions of Section Eleven of Chapter Thirty A of the General Laws except that Requirements (7) and (8) of said section Eleven shall not apply to such hearings. (f) The provisions of Chapter Thirty A of the General Laws shall be applicable to the Rent Equity Board, established under Section Four, as if said Board were an agency of the Commonwealth, including those provisions relating to judicial review of an agency order. SECTION EIGHT: Evictions (a) No person shall bring any action to recover possession of a controlled housing accommodation unless: (1)The tenant has failed to pay the rent to which the landlord is entitled. (2) The tenant has violated an obligation or covenant of his tenancy not inconsistent with Chapter 93A of the General Laws, this by-law, regulations issued pursuant thereto; other than the obligation to surrender possession upon proper notice and has failed to cure such violation after having received written notice thereof from the landlord; (3) The tenant is committing or permitting to exist a nuisance in or creating a substantial interference with the comfort, safety, or enjoyment of the landlord or other occupants of the same or other occupants of the same or adjacent accommodations; (4) The landlord of a two and three family owner occupied building wants to gain possession o the accommodation for use and occupancy by a son, daughter, son-in-law, daughter-in-law, grandchild, parents or grandparents. (5) The tenant has refused the landlord reasonable access to the housing accommodation for the purpose of making repairs or improvements required by the laws of the Commonwealth, or any political subdivision thereof, or for the purpose of showing the rental unit to any purchaser or mortgagee. (6) The tenant, who had a written lease or rental agreement which terminated on or after this by-law has taken effect has refused, after written request or demand by the landlord, to execute a written exten- sion or renewal thereof for a further term of like duration and in such terms that are not inconsistent with or violative of any provisions of 93A of the General Laws or this by-law, or the regulations issued pursuant thereto. j (b) Notwithstanding any other provision in SECTION EIGHT, plans for the creation of a condominium, or a cooperative, the conversion of a dwelling unit to a condominium or a cooperative seeking to recover possession or cooperative for any purpose shall not be the basis for the eviction of any tenant. (c) A landlord seeking to recover possession of a controlled housing accommodation shall apply to the Board for a certificate of eviction. Upon receipt of such an application, the Board shall send a copy of the application to the tenant of the controlled rental unit together with a notification of all rights and procedures available under this section. If the Board finds that the facts attested to in the landlord's petition are valid and in compliance with paragraph (a), the certificate of eviction shall be issued. (d) A landlord who seeks to recover possession of a controlled housing accommodation without obtaining such certificate of eviction shall be deemed to have violated this By-law, and the Board may initiate a criminal prosecution for such violation. (e) Notwithstanding the provisions of this section the United States, the Commonwealth, or any agency or i political subdivision thereof, may maintain an action or proceeding to recover possession of any housing accommodation operated by it if such action or proceeding is authorized by the statute or regulation under which such units are administered. 58 C° i h (f) The provisions of this section shall be construed as additional restrictions on the right to recover possession of a controlled housing accommodation. No provision of this section shall entitle any person to recover possession of such an accommodation. The Board may issue orders which shall be a deference to an action of summary process for possession and such order shall be reviewable as herein provided. (g) When parking has been provided as a service or under a lease in a controlled housing accommodation, no landlord shall deprive the tenant of parking or reduce the level of such service, without first obtaining an effective certificate of eviction under this section. (h) Upon a decision of said board concerning the granting or withholding of a certificate of eviction, either party concerned may appeal to the District Court within the jurisdiction of which the housing accommoda- tion involved is located. SECTION NINE: Removal from Rental Housing Use. (a) Removal regulated. No owner or other person shall remove from the market any controlled housing accommodation, unless the board after a hearing grants a permit. The board may issue orders and promul- gate regulations to effectuate the purposes of this section, and to prescribe the procedure for applications, notice, hearings, and the granting and withdrawal of permits. (b) Prohibited acts by developers. After effective date of this By-law, no owner of a building for which a condominium master deed has been recorded shall directly or indirectly sell, offer for sale, or agree to sell any controlled housing accommodation therein, unless the board has granted a removal permit for that unit, or unless the sale or offer is to, or the agreement is with, a current tenant of the unit who holds an exemption certificate. The board shall issue an exemption certificate to any person who files wit it an affidavit in a form prescribed by the board, stating that the tenant is a current tenant of the unit, that he occupied it as a tenant before effective date of this By-law, and that he intends in good faith to occupy it indefinitely as its owner. No person shall file a false affidavit under this subsection. Nothing in this subsection shall prevent an owner of a building or any portion thereof from conveying his entire interest in the building in good faith to one purchaser, who shall then be subject to the provisions of this subsection to the same extent as the original owner. (c) Considerations. In deciding whether to grant a permit under this section, the board shall consider: (1) The benefits to the persons sought to be protected by the Act and by this section; (2) The hardships imposed on the tenants residing in the unit proposed to be removed, including any mitigating provisions made by the applicant; and (3) Any aggravation of the shortage of decent rental housing accommodations, especially for families of low and moderate income and elderly people on fixed incomes, which may result from the removal. (4) The board shall not grant a permit for any unit which has been damaged by fire, flood, or other casualty unless the permit is a temporary permit for rehabilitation or is a permit to demolish the unit, until the unit has been occupied as a lawful unit for at least two years following such damage. (d) Equitable relief. The board or any person aggrieved by a failure to comply with this section may enforce its provisions in a civil action for injunctive or delcaratory relief. SECTION TEN: Civil Remedies. (a) Any person who demands, accepts, receives or retains any payment of rent in excess of the maximum lawful rent, in violation of the provisions of this By-law or any regulation or order hereunder promulgated, shall be liable as hereinafter provided to the person from whom such payment is demanded, accepted, received, or retained, or to the town of for reasonable attorney's fees and costs as determined by the court. Plus liquidated damages in the amount of one hundred dollars, or not more than three times the amount by which the payment or payments demanded, accepted, received or retained, exceed the maximum rent which could be lawfully demanded, accepted, received or retained, whichever is the greater; provided that if the defendant proves that the violation was neithr willful nor the result of failure to take practicable precau- tions against the occurrence of the violation, the amount of such liquidated damages shall be the amount of the overcharge or overcharges. 59 (b) If the person from whom such payment is demanded, accepted, received or retained in violation of the provisions of this By-law or any rule or regulation hereunder promulgated fails to bring an action under this section within thirty days from the date of the occurrence of the violation, the Board may either settle the claim arising out of the violation or bring such action. Settlement by the Board shall thereafter bar any other person from bringing action for the violation or violations with regard to which a settlement has been reached. If the Board settles said claim it shall be entitled to retain the costs it incxurred in the settlement thereof, and the person against whom the violation was committed shall be entitled to the remainder. If the Board brings action under the provisions of this section, it shall be entitled to receive attorney's fees and costs under the provisions of paragraph (a) and the person against whom the violation was committed shall be awarded liquidated damages under said paragraph (a). (c) A judgment for damages or on the merits in any action under this section shall be a bar to any recovery c under this section in any other section against the same defendant on account of any violation with respect to the same person prior to the institution of the action in which such judgment was rendered. Action to I recover liquidated damaged under the provisions of this section shall not be brought later than one year after the date of the violation. A single action for damages under the provisions of this section may include all violations of the provisions of this section committed by the same defendant against the same person. SECTION ELEVEN: Criminal Penalties. (a) It shall be unlawful for any person to demand, accept, receive or retain any rent for the use or occu- pancy of any controlled unit in excess of the maximum rent prescribed therefore under the provisions of this By-law or any order or regulation hereunder promulgated, or otherwise to do or omit to do any action in violation of the provisions of this By-law or any order or regulation hereunder promulgated. (b) It shall be unlawful for any person to demand, accept, receive or retain any payment which exceeds the maximum lawful rent for one month as a finder's fee or service charge for the opportunity to examine or lease any controlled housing accommodation, and no finder's fee or service charge shall be lawful unless the person from whom the payment is demanded, accepted, received or retained actually rents or leases the controlled rental unit with regard to which payment of said fee or said charge has been demanded, accepted, received or retained. (c) Whoever willfully violates any provision of this By-law or any rule or regulation hereunder promul- gated, or whoever knowingly makes any false statement in any testimony before the Rent Equity Board, or whoever knowingly supplies the Board with any false information shall be punished by a fine of not more i than one thousand dollars ($1,000.00) for any one offense. SECTION TWELVE: Exemption from Civil Service. The personnel of the Rent Equity Board established under SECTION FOUR shall not be subject to the provisions of section nine A of Chapter Thirty of the j General Laws or Chapter Thirty-one of the Massachusetts General Laws. i i SECTION THIRTEEN: Severability. If any provision of this By-law or the application of such provision to any person or circumstances shall be held invalid, the validity of the remainder of this By-law and the application of such provision to other persons or circumstances shall not be affected thereby. I Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. i SPONSOR: Robert Brett, et al A RECOMMENDATION WILL BE MADE AT TOWN MEETING ARTICLE 39. 5/7/86 Voted: indefinite postponement of this article. 5/7/86 Voted: that this warrant be dissolved as the business of this warrant was completed at 11:57 p.m. April 23, 1986 and April 24, 1986 adjourned to April 29, 1986 for lack of a quorum. ATTENDANCE RECORD 1986 April 29, 1986 170 Town Meeting Members present April 30, 1986 167 Town Meeting Members present May 1, 1986 162 Town Meeting Members present May 6, 1986 160 Town Meeting Members present May 7, 1986 167 Town Meeting Members present A true record: ATTEST: Michael J. Ward, Town Clerk 60 TOWN WARRANT Tuesday, June 17, 1986 SPECIAL TOWN MEETING June 17, 1986 ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel By-Law of the Town by striking Schedule A and Schedule B thereof and adopting in place thereof the new Schedule A and new Schedule B. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Personnel Board Article 1. 6/17/86 Voted: that the Town amend Schedule B - FY/86 Pay Plan of the Town by striking Schedules PD and L and adopting in its place the proposed Schedules PD and L as presented to the Special Town Meeting on June 17, 1986: FISCAL YEAR 1986 ANNUAL SALARY SCHEDULE- LIBRARY L-1 11789 12229 12686 13163 13652 14163 225.85 234.25 243.05 252.15 261.55 271.30 L-2 13077 13563 14070 14598 15142 15706 250.50 259.85 269.55 279.65 290.10 300.90 L-3 14241 14775 15325 15897 16492 17106 272.80 283.05 293.60 304.55 315.95 327.70 L-4 14939 15477 16036 16613 17213 17828 286.20 296.50 307.20 318.25 329.75 341.55 L-5 15752 16342 16950 17581 18240 18920 301.75 313.05 324.70 336.80 349.45 362.45 L-6 16609 17228 17872 18539 19233 19948 318.20 330.05 342.40 355.15 368.45 382.15 L-7 17397 18044 18717 19418 20145 20898 333.30 345.65 358.55 372.00 385.90 400.35 L-8 18344 19026 19736 20472 21234 22028 351.40 364.50 378.10 392.20 406.80 422.00 L-9 19282 20001 20748 21526 22329 23162 369.40 383.15 397.45 412.40 427.75 443.70 L-10 20206 20963 21746 22556 23401 24272 387.10 401.60 416.60 432.10 448.30 465.00 61 L-11 21234 22028 22848 23704 24589 25508 406.80 422.00 437.70 454.10 471.05 488.65 L-12 22264 23096 23959 24854 25782 26745 426.50 442.45 459.00 476.15 493.90 512.35 L-0 3.90 4.01 4.14 4.24 4.37 NOTE: L-0 is pay level for Page position only. 1. Library personnel shall receive on completion of hours of credit at a graduate school of Library Science while in the service of the Town of Framingham: 12 hours credit . . . $200, 24 hours credit . . . $200, 36 hours credit . . . $200 This is to be accumulative and to be added to any step of those job qualifications which do not require a graduate degree in Library Science as a part of job qualifications. 2. Library personnel shall receive education increments - to be added to any step (not cumulative): Master's Degree, except in Library Science...........................................................................$700.00 Study beyond Master's Degree - 30 hours ............................................................................$800.00 Earned Doctorate . $1000.00 FISCAL YEAR 1986 POLICE DEPARTMENT PERSONNEL ANNUAL SALARY SCHEDULE t Grade 1 2 3 4 I January 1, 1986 PD-1 20420 21991 22667 23340 PD-2 24741 25502 26258 PD-3 27835 28686 29540 PD-4 31311 32273 33231 PD-1 20624 22211 22894 23573 PD-2 24988 25757 26521 PD-3 28113 28973 29835 PD-4 31624 32596 33563 2. A $1.00/hour differential shall be paid to bargaining unit employees for the regularly scheduled hours from Saturday at 7:45 a.m. to 4:10 p.m. (day shift only) and Sunday at 7:45 a.m. to 4:10 p.m. (day shift only). 3. Each employee of the Police Department, except the Chief, will receive additional salary for each of the eleven (11) recognized holidays as provided in Article VIII. 4. Two (2) Patrolmen designated by the Police Chief will receive $1,000.00 additional salary per year for fingerprint and photography work. 5. Up to twelve (12) members of the Police Department designated by the Police Chief, will receive $1,000.00 additional salary per year for performing the duties of detective. 6. Police Officers shall receive additional compensation as educational incentive, in increments or amounts equal to the precent of base pay, predicated upon the following: Not less than 10 semester hour credits toward Baccalaureate Degree in law enforcement — 11/2% of base pay• 62 Not less than 25 semester hour credits toward Baccalaureate Degree in law enforcement - 3010 of base pay. Not less than 40 semester hour credits toward Baccalaureate Degree in law enforcement - 507o of base pay. Associate Degree in law enforcement - 71/2% of base pay. Baccalaureate Degree in law enforcement- 10076 of base pay. Master's Degree in law enforcement or a related speciality approved in advance by the Chief and Personnel Director- 15% of base pay. A copy of transcript or other appropriate evidence of credits or degree earned must be presented to the Chief of the Department, with a copy to the Director of Personnel, who wkll maintain complete and on-going records for participants. Credit for individual courses will be given only if a grade of "C" or better is achieved. A. Employees receiving benefits/or credits toward payment under this section, who have earned such credits prior to June 30, 1980 shall continue to receive said benefits and/or credits, the details of which are outlined in Appendix A of this Agreement. B. Any employee who takes a course in this program after March 1, 1981 shall be required to earn a grade of "C" or better to claim credit even if previously participating in this program prior to March 1, 1981. C. The requirement of a grade of "C" or better shall only apply to those employees seeking payment for 40 semester hours or less. Credit claimed for the Associate, Baccalaureate or Master's Degrees, once awarded, shall be unaffected by individual course grades. The amount of payment will be determined by the amount of base pay received in that fiscal year and the appropriated percentage. Base pay shall include holiday pay, night differential, specialist pay and hazardous duty pay. Schedule B - Pay Plan (FY/87) 6/17/86 Voted: that the Town amend Schedule B -FY/87 Pay Plan of the Town by striking Schedules PD and L and adopting in its place the proposed schedules PD and 1, as pre- sented to the Special Town Meeting on June 17, 1986. f FISCAL YEAR 1987 ANNUAL SALARY SCHEDULE-LIBRARY L-1 12378 12840 13320 13821 14335 14871 237.15 246.00 255.15 264.75 274.60 284.90 L-2 13731 14241 14774 15328 15899 16491 263.05 272.80 283.05 293.65 304.60 315.90 L-3 14953 15514 16091 16692 17317 17961 286.45 297.20 308.25 319.75 331.75 344.10 L-4 15686 16251 16838 17444 18074 18719 300.50 311.30 322.55 334.20 346.25 358.60 L-5 16540 17159 17798 18460 19152 19866 316.85 328.70 340.95 353.65 366.90 380.60 L-6 17439 18089 18766 19466 20195 20945 334.10 346.55 359.50 372.90 386.90 401.25 I 63 L-7 18267 18946 19653 20389 21152 21943 349.95 362.95 376.50 390.60 405.20 420.35 L-8 19261 19977 20723 21496 22296 23129 369.00 382.70 397.00 411.80 427.15 443.10 L-9 20246 21001 21785 22602 23445 24320 387.85 402.30 417.35 433.00 449.15 465.90 L-10 21216 22011 22833 23684 24571 25486 406.45 421.65 437.40 453.70 470.70 488.25 L-11 22296 23129 23990 24889 25818 26718 427.15 443.10 459.60 476.80 494.60 513.10 L-12 23377 24251 25157 26097 27071 28082 447.85 464.60 481.95 499.95 518.60 537.95 L-0 4.10 4.21 4.35 4.45 4.59 NOTE: L-0 is pay level for Page position only. 1. Library personnel shall receive on completion of hours of credit at a graduate school of Library Science while in the service of the Town of Framingham: 12 hours credit . . . $200, 24 hours credit . . . $200, 36 hours credit . . . $200 This is to be accumulative and to be added to any step of those job qualifications which do not require a graduate degree in Library Science as a part of job qualifications. 2. Library personnel shall receive education increments- to be added to any step (not cumulative): Bachelor's degree (when job qualification does not require same) Part-time employee.........................................................................................................$100.00 Full-time employee $200.00 Master's Degree, except in Library Science...........................................................................$700.00 Study beyond Master's Degree-30 hours.............................................................................$800.00 EarnedDoctorate........................................................................................................$1,000.00 FISCAL YEAR 1987 POLICE DEPARTMENT PERSONNEL ANNUAL SALARY SCHEDULE Grade 1 2 3 4 PD-1 21655 23322 24039 24752 PD-2 26237 27045 27847 PD-3 29519 30422 31327 PD-4 33205 34226 35241 64 Additional Compensation for Police Department Personnel, which compensation shall not be used in computation of overtime payment or for other benefits: 1. An afternoon/night shift differential will be paid to Officers assigned to the afternoon and night shifts continously for a period of one week or more. Such differential shall be: Effective July 1, 1985 Afternoon shift Night Shift Patrolmen 1523.00 1623.00 Sergeants 1676.00 1776.00 Lieutenants 1848.00 1948.00 Captains 2042.00 2142.00 2. A $1.50/hour differential shall be paid to bargaining unit employees for the regularly scheduled hours from Saturday at 7:45 a.m. to 4:10 p.m. (day shift only) and Sunday at 7:45 a.m. to 4:10 p.m. (day shift only). 3. Each employee of the Police Department, except the Chief, will receive additional salary for each of the eleven (11) recognized holidays as provided in Article VIII. 4. Two (2) Patrolmen designated by the Police Chief will receive $1,000.00 additional salary per year for fingerprint and photography work. 5. Up to twelve (12) members of the Police Department designated by the Police Chief will receive S $1,000.00 additional salary per year for performing the duties of detective. I 6. Police Officers shall receive additional compensation as educational incentive, in increments or amounts equal to the percent of base pay, predicated upon the following: Not less than 10 semester hour credits toward Baccalaureate Degree in law enforcement — 11/2% of base pay. Not less than 25 semester hour credits toward Baccalaureate Degree in law enforcement — 3076 of base pay. Not less than 40 semester hour credits toward Baccalaureate Degree in law enforcement — 5016 of base pay. Associate Degree in law enforcement — 71/207o of base pay. Baccalaureate Degree in law enforcement — 1007o of base pay. Master's Degree in law enforcement or a related speciality approved in advance by the Chief and the Person- nel Director— 15% of base pay. A copy of transcript or other appropriate evidence of credits or degree earned must be presented to the Chief of the Department, with copy to the Director of Personnel, who will maintain complete and on-going records for participants. Credit for individual courses will be given only if a grade of "C" or better is achieved. A. Employees receiving benefits/or credits toward payment under this section, who have earned such credits prior to June 30, 1980 shall continue to receive said benefits and/or credits, the details of which are outlined in Appendix A of this Agreement. B. Any employee who takes a course in this program after March 1, 1981 shall be required to earn a grade of "C" or better to claim credit even if previously participating in this program prior to March 1, 1981. C. The requirement of a grade of "C" or better shall only apply to those employees seeking payment for 40 semester hours or less. Credit claimed for the Associate, Baccalaureate or Master's Degrees, once `1 awarded, shall be unaffected by individual course grades. 65 The amount of payment will be determined by the amount of base pay received in that fiscal year and the appropriate percentage. Base pay shall include holiday pay, night differential, specialist pay and hazardous duty pay. ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to hear and act on reports and recommendations of the Select- men and other Officers and Committees of the Town and to raise and appropriate money by transfer from available funds or otherwise provide sums of money for the support of Town Departments. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen Finance Committee ARTICLE 2. 6/17/86 Voted: that the sum of $77,390.00 be transferred from Free Cash to the following accounts in the FY/86 Annual Budget. Police Dept. — Maintenance and Operations $16,750.00 Libraries — Salaries and Wages $60,750.00 said sums to be expended under the direction of the above name departments; and further voted that the sum of$595,313.00 be raised and appropriated to the FY/87 operating budgets of the following departments: Purchasing Dept. — Salaries and Wages $86.00 Selectmen — Special Function — Audit/Management Study 6,000.00 Selectmen — Special Function — Central Telephone 10,000.00 Town Owned Bldgs. — Maintenance and Operations 5,400.00 Treasurer— Salaries and Wages 71.00 102,000.00 j Fire Department — Equipment 314,144.00 l Police Department — Salaries and Wages Police Department — Maintenance and Operations 5,600.00 Libraries — Salaries and Wages 74,564.00 School Department — Salaries and Wages 77,448.00 said sums to be expended under the direction of the above named departments. ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for the acquisition and installation of parking control devices in j the Hollis Court Parking Lot and in the public parking lot to be developed on the northerly side of the Fitchburg branch railroad line under the MBTA Commuter Rail Improvement Program. I Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen ARTICLE 3. 6/17/86 Voted: that the sum of $24,000.00 be transferred from free cash for the acquisition and installation of parking control devices in the Hollis Court Parking Lot and in the public parking lot to be developed on the northerly side of the Fitchburg branch railroad line under the MBTA commuter rail improvement program. 72 voting in favor. 56 opposed. i 66 ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Senate Bill 1911 exempting the Offices of Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures of the Town of Framingham from the Civil Service Law and providing for the appointment of the Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures by the Selectmen of said Town. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen ARTICLE 4. 6/17/86 Voted: that this article be referred back to the sponsor. ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to procure easements in any land necessary for the widening and relocation of a portion of Cochituate Road under the Safety Improve- ment Project, Federal Aid Project Number MOOOS (124). All of the Easements referenced as 3-1 and 3-1-T to 3-23T and 3-TE-1 to 3-TE-23, are more fully shown on Plans entitled, "The Widening & Relocation of a portion of Cochituate Road from Sta. 39+28.64 to Sta. 74+00 and Portions of Whittier Street and Burr Street" Sheets 1, 2, and 3 of 5 and also a Plan entitled "The Widening and Relocation of a portion of Cochituate Road from Sta. 32+21.96 to Sta. 39+28.64" sheet 5 of 5, dated January 1985, Revised May 5, 1986 Fred W. Sergeant, P.E., Town Engineer, Ronald R. Turchi, P.L.S. which Plans are on file in the Office of the Town Engineer and the Town Clerk. The easements are described as follows: ARTICLE 5. 6/17/86 Voted: that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to acquire by right of eminent omae4sements for widening and relocation of a portion of Cochituate Road and Concord Street; said acquisitions shall be at no cost to the Town. Said easements being the land as described in this article with the following amendments: PARCEL 3 — 21-T (Commonwealth Center Trust) Beginning at a point on the easterly location line of Concord Street and the southerly location line of a Town Right-of-Way laid out in 1978, thence runs S 621-58'-30" E, 20.00 feet; thence runs southwes- terly on a curve to the left of radius 20.00 feet, 31.41 feet to a point on the easterly location line of Concord Street; thence runs northerly by the easterly location line of Concord Street 20.00 feet to the point of beginning. '1 Said parcel contains 85.840 square feet, more or less. PARCEL 3 —TE-21 (Commonwealth Center Trust) Beginning at a point located 10 feet southerly of the southerly location line of a 40 foot Right-of-Way at lands common to and now or formerly of Commonwealth Center Trust and Cape Cod Realty Trust; thence runs N 68°-52'-30" W, 297' t feet to a point on a curve; thence runs northeasterly on a curve to the right of radius 20 feet to a point on the above mentioned southerly location line; thence runs S 681- 52'-30" E, 280' feet to a point at land now or formerly of Cape Cod Realty Trust; thence runs S 27°- 01'-53" W, 5 feet to the point of beginning. Said temporary construction easement contains 1,442.5 square feet t .033 acres. Unanimous vote. I 67 RESOLUTION Whereas, Framingham is experiencing very rapid commercial growth, and Whereas, this growth is impacting on our water and sewer capacities and is creating extensive traffic prob- lems throughout the town. Therefore, it is the sense of Town Meeting that in order to minimize the effects of this growth, the Zoning By-Laws be reigorously adhered to and that building height variances for new construction should not be granted. A copy of this resolution shall be sent to the ZBA and Planning Board. Voted: 6/17/86 Lawrence Griffin, Precinct 3 RESOLUTION Since Framingham is experiencing rapid commerical growth resulting in extensive traffic congestion through- out the town, town meeting requests the Finance Committee to recommend funding at the next annual town meeting, directed to the Planning Department for the purpose of conducting a town wide traffic and circula- tion plan. I Voted: 6/17/86 Susan DiMarino, Precinct 3 ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Laws of the Town by changing the zoning classification of the following described property from General Residence to Central Business. Said property is bounded and described as follows: Beginning at a stone bound on the southeasterly location line of Arlington Street at a point common to this parcel and land now or formerly of the Trustees of the Portuguese Recreation Club of Fra- mingham; thence running S34'-28'-05"E by and of said Trustees, eighty-two and twenty hundredths (82.20) feet to an iron rod at land now or formerly of Alan and Lynn Kwadler; thence running S54°- 29'-20"W by land of said Kwadlers one hundred nine and twenty-one hundredths (109.21) feet to a spike on the northeasterly location line of Irving Street; thence running N38°-19'-15"W along Irving Street, seventy-three and seventy-nine hundredths (73.79) feet to a stone bound; thence running north- erly along a curve with a radius of nine and forty hundredths (9.40) feet, a distance of fifteen and r thirty-five hundredths (15.35) feet to a stone bound on the southeasterly location line of Arlington Street; thence running N55°-14'-15"E, along Arlington Street, one hundred four and eighty hundredths (104.80) feet to a stone bound, being the point of beginning. I The above parcel is more fully shown on a plan entitled "Town of Framingham, Plan of Land Off Irving Street & Arlington Street — 1"=20' — March 1, 1984 — Fred W. Sergeant, Town Engineer — Ronald R. Turchi, Registered Land Surveyor," and contains 9,257 square feet more or less. Pass any vote to take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen ARTICLE 6. 6/17/86 Voted: that the Zoning By-Laws of the Town be amended by changing the zoning classification of the parcel described in this article from General Residence to Central Business. 121 voting in favor. 4 opposed. Boston, Mass. August 4, 1986 The foregoing amendment to the Zoning By-Laws adopted under Article 6 of the Warrant for the Fra- mingham Special Town Meeting held June 17, 1986, is hereby approved. Francis X. Bellotti i Attorney General 1 Published: August 8th & 15th, 1986 68 ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Framingham, Section IV.G., Dimensional Regulations, as follows: ( In Section IV.G.2., Table of Dimensional Regulations, make the following changes in the column titled "FLOOR AREA RATIO": (1) On the line titled "Business (B)", delete "0.5" and substitute thereafter "0.3". (2) On the line titled "Light Manufacturing (M-1)", delete ".5 one-story - .8 two or more" and substi- tute therefor ".3". (3) On the line titled "General Manufacturing (M)", delete ".5 one-story - .8 two or more" and substitute therefor ".3". Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Standing Committee on Planning and Zoning ARTICLE 7. 6/17/86 Voted: this article was defeated as it did not receive two-thirds vote. 84 in favor. 53 opposed. PLANNING BOARD MINORITY REPORT ARTICLE 7. PROPOSED FLOOR AREA RATIO AMENDMENT After serious deliberation and numerous calls and appointments with professional planners during the past week; I will state my reasons for support of the concept of Article 7, Proposed Floor Area Ratio Amend- ment, along with recommendations to offer to Town Meeting. Foremost and most important, the overall concept of limiting Floor Area Ratio, through responsible deci- sion making policies, in creating a By-Law to help manage the level of development in sister communities as in Framingham is a proven tool used for orderly planned growth. This concept is not anti-growth, but offers the community a means of preserving a quality of life standard and at the same time allowing growth to continue at a moderate rate. Article 7 would offer a more direct vehicle for managing the density of develop- ment in Framingham. Other communities have experienced similar growth pressures and have adopted a more strigent Floor Area Ratio By-Law than the proposed Article 7 (FAR) for Framingham. Lexington provides a good example. The Floor Area Ratio By-Law for Lexington is 0.25 "DEVELOPABLE AREA" in Office and Research Park (CR DISTRICT). This Floor Area Ratio used in Lexington is a stronger By-Law than the proposed 0.30 Floor Area Ratio for Framingham. It is important to note that the Lexington experience with Floor Area Ratio has not hurt the growth potential for the town. A town which borders Route 128 and experiences on-going commercial development. I support the concept of Article 7 with an Amendment that will show fairness to all submitted proposals currently in front of the Planning Board. I ask Town Meeting to support Article 7 with such an Amendment. Respectfully submitted, s/Dianne M. Shea Framingham Planning Board �I I I 69 I ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law by changing the district designa- tion from GENERAL RESIDENCE (G) DISTRICT to INDUSTRIAL (M) DISTRICT of the land on the Southwesterly side of Merchant Road in the Town of Framingham (Middlesex County) Massachusetts, shown as Parcel 4 on a Plan entitled "Plan of Land in Framingham, Mass." dated September 20, 1985, scale 1" = 100', prepared by Schofield Brothers, Inc., bounded and described as follows: Beginning at a point on the westerly sideline of Merchant Road at the northeast corner of the prem- I ises, thence running S 61- — 25' — 15" E, 335.39 feet; thence Southeasterly by a curve having a radius of 305.67 feet, and arc distance of 104.84 feet; thence S 41- — 46' — 09" E, 459.39 feet to a point in the middle of Course Brook, the previous three courses being bounded by the westerly sideline of Merchant Road; thence S 41° — 42' — 57" W, 149.74 feet; thence S 57° — 29' — 56" W, 59.43 feet; thence S 39° — 25' — 57" W, 128.63 feet to a point at Parcel 2, the previous three courses being bounded by the middle of Course Brook and Parcel 5, thence I N 81- — 23' —00" W, 1167.06 feet by Parcel 2 to a point at Parcel 3; thence N 47° — 51' — 47" E, by Parcel 3, 948.10 feet to the point of beginning. Containing 14 acres and 184 square feet, more or less, according to the Plan. OR ACT IN ANY OTHER MATTER IN RELATION THERETO. SPONSOR: Charles McDevitt, et al ARTICLE 8. 6/17/86 Voted: this article was defeated as the two-thirds vote did not prevail. 69 voting in favor. i 39 opposed. Town Meeting adjourned at 11:35 p.m. as the business of this warrant was completed and dissolved. A true record, ATTEST: Michael J. Ward, Town Clerk. 146 Town Meeting Members present at this meeting. �I 70 TOWN WARRANT Tuesday, October 21, 1986 SPECIAL TOWN MEETING October 21, 1986 ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel By-Law of the Town by striking Sched- ule A and Schedule B thereof and by adopting in place thereof the new Schedule A and Schedule B presented to the October 21, 1986 Special Town Meeting. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Personnel Board ARTICLE 1. 10/28/86 Voted: that the Town amend Schedule A - Classification Plan of the Town by striking Schedule A thereof and adopting in its place the proposed Schedule A as presented to the Special I Town Meeting on October 28, 1986 and further voted that the following position be instituted retroactively to August 4, 1986: Purchasing Agent/Contract Compliance Officer/ Right to know Coordinator, M-17-A. Schedule B — Pay Plan: Voted: to amend Schedule B - Pay Plan of the Town by adding the proposed Schedule M-17-A as presented to the Special Town Meeting on October 28, 1986 and further voted that Schedule M-17-A be instituted retroactively to August 4, 1986. CLASSIFICATION TITLE FY/87 M-6 Activities Supervisor FF-3 Administrative Aide, Fire Department PD-3 Administrative Aide, Police Department M-5 Administrative Asst., Accounting M-5 Administrative Asst., Assessors M-6 Administrative Asst., Board of Health M-6 Administrative Asst., Legal Department M-5 Administrative Asst., Library M-5 Administrative Asst., Parks& Recreation M-6 Administrative Asst., Planning Board Administrative Asst., Town Clerk's Office M-5 Administrative Asst., Youth Commission M-12 Administrative Officer, Public Works M-8 Arena Assistant V-1 Arena Cashier, Parks& Recreation Cashier V-3 Arena Laborer V-1 Arena Skate Guard W-6 Ash Truck Driver M-17 Assessor S-4 Assistant Bookkeeper/Payroll Clerk, Accounting L-7 Assistant Circulation Supervisor M-16 Assistant Director of Libraries M-19 Assistant Director of Public Works V-4A Assistant Director of Summer Programs M-3 Assistant Dog Officer M-5 Assistant Head Bookkeeper/Tax Title Clerk V-5 Assistant Head Lifeguard L-7 Assistant Technical Services Supervisor — Assistant to the Assessor 71 i Assistant to the Director of Veterans' Services M-6 Assistant to the Executive Administrator M-6 Assistant to the Purchasing Agent M-9 Assistant to the Supt of Fire Alarms (E-FY/87) H-8 I Assistant to the Town Accountant M-10 Assistant Town Engineer M-17 I M-14 Assistant Treasurer/Collector M-10 Assistant Youth Coordinator Audio Visual Coordinator M- 14 Auto Mechanic Supervisor M- Auto Mechanic V-6 Back-up Bus Driver, Callahan Senior Center V-6 V-3 Bathhouse Attendant S-4 Billing Supervisor, Water Division L-11 Branch Librarian M_20 Building Commissioner l H-4 Building Custodian Buyer L-6 Cataloger H-8 Carpenter/Painter Chief Inspector f L-6 Children's Services Technician Children's Young Adult Coordinator/Branch L-7 I C'.irrld%ticm.Siigervisor 11%-� 1 j Civilian Dispatcher, Police Department M I Clerk, Prosecutor's Office L-1 Collection Development Librarian M-5 Collections Supervisor M-5 Community Service Librarian M-6 Computer Programmer/Operator M-6 M-14 Construction Supervisor M_9 Counselor, Youth Commission `,�_8 Craftworker W-10 Crane Operator Data Collector, Assessors M-5 i Data Processing Administrator M-19 I Deeds Clerk S-3 M-14 Deputy Building Comm. & Local Inspector Deputy Fire Chief M-18 I Deputy Inspector of Weights& Measures M-g i M-19 Director of Libraries Director of Personnel M-19 Director of Public Works M-24 i Director of R.J. Callahan Senior Center M-13 M-17 Director, Parks & Recreation I V-5 Director of Summer Program Director of Swim Program (Instruction) V- 15 S-2 Director of Veterans' Benefits & Services 1 Dispatcher, Callahan Senior Citizen S-2 V-4 District Leader M-7 Dog Officer Employee Health Nurse E-1 Engineering Aide I E-2 Engineering Aide II E-3 Engineering Aide III E-5 Engineer, Civil E-4 Engineer, Junior Engineer, Senior M- 25 Executive Administrator M- Executive Coordinator S-2 Fair Housing Assistant/Senior Clerk S-2 1 72 i Finance Committee Assistant M-7 Fire Captain FF-3 Fire Chief M-23 f Firefighter FF-1 l Fire Lieutenant FF-2 Fire Alarm Superintendent FF-3 Fire Mechanic M-5 Fringe Benefits Coordinator M-5 Garbage & Rubbish Collector W"3 Garbage & Rubbish Driver W"6 Head Clerk S-4 Head Clerk, Financial S-4 Head Lifeguard V- Housing Inspector, Board of Health M-1100 Human Relations Commission Administrator M-5 Incinerator Attendant W-5 Inspector for Construction of Utilities& Streets — Public Works M-14 Inspector of Weights& Measures M-12 Interchange Driver L-2 Junior Clerk S-1 Kennel Attendant M-1 ILaborer I W-2 Laborer II W-3 Lead Custodian H-5 T ih�nsirn►.i . — Librarian II Librarian III Librarian-in-Charge of Main Library — I Library Aide —Technical Services L-1 Library Assistant Library Assistant, Circulation L-2 L-0 Library Page Library Technician I i Library Technician II V-3B Lifeguard M-10 Local Inspector M-2 Meter Attendant W-4 Meter Reader Meter Repair Technician W-4 Motor Equipment Operator I W-4 Motor Equipment Operator II W-8 Motor Equipment Operator III W-g Motor Equipment Operator IV W-10 Office Admin./Asst. to the Town Clerk M"g I Office Manager/Head Bookkeeper M-7 I Officials, Competitive Sports V-6 Outreach Worker, Callahan Senior Center M"g Panel Board Operator W-6 I Park Maintenance Worker W-g IPayroll Clerk, Police Department M-4 Periodicals Technician L-6 Personnel Assistant M-9 Planner M-10 Planning Director M-19 Plumber/Painter/General Maintenance H-g Plumbing& Gas Inspector M-10 Police Captain PD-4 Police Chief Paid as Required by State Statute Police Lieutenant PD-3 Police Officer PD 1 Police Sergeant PD-2 73 i S-3 Principal Clerk M-8 Program Coordinator— Callahan Senior Center S-4 Property Tax Clerk M-18 , Public Health Administrator M-7 Public Health Nurse W-3 Public Works Clerk I W-7 Public Works Clerk II W-7 Public Works Maintenance Worker VV-10 Pumping Station Operator M-14 Pumping Station Supervisor M-17 Purchasing Agent (D-FY/87) Purchasing Agent/Contract Compliance Officer/ M-17A Right to Know Coordinator(E-FY/87) M-7 Real Property &Computer Admin., Assessors M-3 Records Clerk, Police Department V-3 Recreation Leader, Playground V-3A Recreation Leader, Specialists V-3B Recreation Leader, Swimming 11-8 Reference Librarian L-6 Reference Technician M-6 Registered Dental Hygienist M-11 Registered Sanitarian W-4 Road Finisher M-14 Route Supervisor V-59 School Police M-3 Secretary to the Detective Bureau M-3 Secretary to the Narcotics Bureau M-4 Secretary to the Police Chief&Executive Coord. M-3 Secretary, Police Department S-2 Senior Clerk Senior Clerk/Secretarial Pool Super. H-6 Senior Building Custodian L-3 Senior Library Assistant, Children's Dept. L-3 Senior Library Assistant, Circulation L-3 Senior Library Assistant, Graphics Dept. L-3 Senior Library Assistant, Technical Services M-12 Senior Planner M-12 Senior Registered Sanitarian H-4 Skating tin Arena Maintenance Custodian M-11 Skating Arena Maintenance Person M-18 Skating Arena Manager V-6 Special Activities (Recreation) V-3 Summer Laborer M-11 Superintendent of Park Maintenance M-15 Superintendent of Town Owned Buildings Superintendent — Public Works M-17 (Highway, Water, Sewer, Sanitation) M-13 Superintendent of Recreation L-11 Supervisor of Children's Services L-11 Supervisor of Reference Services L-12 Supervisor of Technical Services M-19 Town Accountant M-19 Town Engineer V-59 Traffic Supervisor Stipend $1200, Mileage $1000 M-5 Transportation Coordinator M-19 Treasurer/Collector W-5 Tree Climber W-9 Tree Surgeon M-14 Tree Warden W-9 Vehicle Body Repair& Painter W-1 Watchman 74 Welder W-8 Welder Layout W-9 Welder/Maintenance Worker W-7 Wire Inspector M-1Q Workers Comp Agent/Employee Health Nurse M-9, Workers Comp Asst./Head Clerk M-4 Working Supervisor — Building Maintenance M-W Working Supervisor — Custodial M-10 Working Supervisor— Park W-10 Working Supervisor — Public Works W-10 Working Supervisor — Tree W-10 Young Adult Librarian L-8 Youth Coordinator M-13 Zamboni Machine Operator/Learner& Utility Worker V-3 Zamboni Machine Operator H-4 SCHEDULE B — PAY PLAN GRADE STEP I STEP 2 STEP 3 M-17A 38148 39572 41051 ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel By-Law of the Town by striking Section 5 thereof and adopting in place thereof the amendments presented to the October 21, 1986 Special Town Meeting. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Finance Committee Personnel Board ARTICLE 2. 10/28/86 Voted: that the Town amend the Personnel By-Law of the Town by striking Section 5 thereof and adopting in its place the proposed Section 5 as presented to the Special Town Meeting on October 28, 1986. Section 5. There shall be a Personnel Board consisting of five members appointed by the Moderator. In making his/her appointments, the Moderator shall take into consideration the personal qualifications of those citizens who will best meet the responsibility of the Personnel Board to administer this Personnel By-Law in the best interest of the employees and the taxpayers. All members of the Personnel Board shall be residents of the Town and shall serve without compensation. Each member of the Personnel Board appointed by the Moderator shall serve for a term of three (3) years beginning on the June 1st date following the expiration of the previous term. Each such member shall hold office until his/her successor is appointed in the manner provided above. The term of service for two members shall expire on May 31st of the even year; the term of service for two members shall expire on May 31st of the odd year; and the term of service for one member shall expire on May 31st of the even year following the above odd year. Any member while serving on the Personnel Board shall not at the same time be a Town employee, Town Meeting member, elected official of the Town, or member of any standing board, committee, or commission of the Town. If any member shall resign or otherwise vacate his/her office (whether by ceasing to be a resident of the Town or by his/her candidacy and/or election as Town Meeting member, Town official, or by accepting other voluntary or paid Town Position), his/her successor shall be appointed forthwith in the same manner as was the member so resigning or vacating. Such successor shall serve until the expiration of the term of the member so resigning or vacating. 75 i The Personnel Board shall organize annually, as soon after June 1st or as soon as possible after the close of the Annual Warrant, whichever comes later, at the call of either the then Chairperson or the Town Modera- tor, and shall elect a Chairperson and a Clerk from among its members. The Chairperson and Clerk shall each hold office until his/her respective successor has been elected. In the event of a vacancy in the office of the Chairperson or Clerk prior to the organization meeting, the Personnel Board shall elect a successor Chairperson or successor Clerk from among its members, such successor to serve until the next organizational meeting of the Personnel Board and until his/her successor has been elected. The Personnel Board shall hold meetings at least once a month at such time as it may determine unless there is no current business before it. Additional meetings may be held at such times as the Personnel Board may determine. ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Senate Bill 1911 exempting the Offices of Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures of the Town of Framingham from the Civil Service Law and providing for the appointment of the Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures by the Selectmen of said Town. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen I ARTICLE 3. 10/28/86 Voted: that the Town accept the provisions of Chapter 126 of the Acts of 1986 i (Senate Bill 1911), exempting the Offices of Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures of the Town of Framingham from the Civil Service Law and providing for the appointment of the Sealers and Deputy Sealers of Weights and Measures by the Selectmen. ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the Legislature for a special act authorizing the Town of Framingham to appoint as assessors individuals who may not be citizens of the Town as of their appointment, but who will become citizens of the Town within one year of i' the date of appointment. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen i I' ARTICLE 4. 10/28/86 Voted: that the Board of Selectmen be authorized to petition the Legislature for a special act authorizing the Town of Framingham to appoint as assessors individuals who may not be citizens of the Town. r t' ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-Laws of the Town, Town Meetings, by deleting in the first sentence of Paragraph IV thereof the phrase "published in said Town" and substituting therefor the following phrase "of general circulation in said Town" so that the first sentence as amended will read: I "Notice of every Town Meeting shall be given by publication of a copy of the warrant in one issue of a newspaper of general circulation in said Town." Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. i SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen ARTICLE 5. 10/28/86 Voted: that the By-Laws of the Town, Town Meetings, be amended by deleting in the first sentence of Paragraph IV thereof the phrase "published in said Town" and substituting therefor the following phrase "of general circulation in said Town" so that the first sentence as amended will read: "Notice of every Town Meeting shall be given by publication of a copy of the warrant in one issue of a newspaper of general circulation in said Town." i Approved by the Attorney General on January 13, 1987. Published on January 20th and 27th, 1987. I 76 i ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-Laws of the Town, Town Meetings, by deleting in the first sentence of Paragraph V thereof the phrase "published in the Town" and substituting therefor the phrase "of general circulation in said Town" so that the first sentence as amended will read: "Whenever a town meeting shall adjourn to a future date, the Town Clerk shall cause a notice of the time and place of adjournment to be published in one or more issues of a newspaper of general circula- tion in the Town." Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen ARTICLE 6. 10/28/86 Voted: that the By-Laws of the Town, Town Meetings, be amended by deleting in the first sentence of Paragraph V thereof the phrase "published in the Town" and substituting therefor the phrase "of general circulation in said Town" so that the first sentence as amended will read: "Whenever a town meeting shall adjourn to a future date, the Town Clerk shall cause a notice of the time and place of adjournment to be published in one or more issues of a newspaper of general circula- tion in the Town." Approved by the Attorney General on January 13, 1987 Published on January 20th and 27th, 1987. IARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept and expend funds in i accordance with the provisions of Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended, and regulations promulgated thereunder by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban iDevelopment. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen ARTICLE 7 10/28/86 Voted: to authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept and expend funds in accordance with the provisions of Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended, and regulations promulgated thereunder by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; and in accordance with the "Proposed Allocation of Additional Federal Fiscal Year 1986 (12th year) Funds approved by the Board of Selectmen on August 25, 1986. ARTICLE 7 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Funds As a result of the passage of the Urgent Supplemental Appropriations Bill in July, the Town will receive an additional $77,000 in Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Entitlement Funds during Fiscal Year 1987 (Federal Fiscal Year 1986). The Board of Selectmen and the Community Development Committee recommend that these funds be used to implement the activities described in the attached Proposed Amend- ment to the FY 1986 CDBG Program. These activities were selected following a planning process that included a public hearing on community development needs held on June 18, 1986; Community Develop- ment Committee recommendation to the Board of Selectmen on July 23, 1986; adoption by the Board of Selectmen on August 25, 1986; and publication of the proposed use of funds for citizen comment on Septem- ber 9, 1986. The proposed activities will compliment the program previously approved for implementation by the 1986 Annual Town Meeting. The activities funded under the CDBG program are intended to address the follow- ing objectives established for the Town's FY 1987 CDBG Program: 1. To arrest deterioration in the existing housing stock and to stabilize neighborhoods through ongoing financial and technical housing rehabilitation assistance to homeowners and renters. 2. To improve public infrastructure that will prolong the useful life of Town-owned facilities, contribute to 1 neighborhood and economic development, and aid in the elimination and prevention of blight. 77 i 3. To improve the quality of life for low and moderate income residents of the Town through the provision of public services, especially those services related to housing and transportation. 4. To improve the capacity of human service agencies to provide effective community-based services, by assisting in the creation of local service centers. i 5. To administer the CDBG program effectively and equitably and to ensure that all members of the commu- nity can participate in or benefit from program activities. Community Development Block Grant Program i Fiscal Year 1987 (Federal Fiscal Year 1986) —Twelfth Year PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO FFY 1986 PROGRAM i The Town will receive an additional $77,000 in CDBG funds to be added to its previously received Entitle- I ment Grant for Federal Fiscal Year 1986. All of these additional funds will be used for activities primarily benefiting low and moderate income persons as described below. In order to further advance the objectives of the Twelfth Year CDBG Program, the Town will use these additional funds for the following activities: +I 1.0 HOUSING REHABILITATION 1 Installation of Sprinkler System: Memorial School Housing$50,000 SPONSOR: Framingham Housing Authority I Funding for installation of a sprinkler system in the 66 units of congregate housing for the frail elderly to be located in the former Memorial School Building. Funds are necessary to install a system that will meet the life safety requirements of the Massachusetts General Laws, as interpreted and enforced by the Town's Department of Building Inspection and the Town Fire Department. 2.0 REHABILITATION ASSISTANCE/HANDICAPPED ACCESS Adaptive Equipment Rehabilitation Service$10,000 SPONSOR: Greater Framingham Center for Independent Living (GFCIL) and Greater Framingham Associ- ation for Disabled Citizens(GFA) I, Consultation, advice, and direct assistance to disabled persons to allow them independent access to their residences, and other privately or publicly owned facilities through external and internal structural modifications. i 3.0 PUBLIC SERVICES 3.1 Alcoholism Services/Sober Site $5,500 SPONSOR: South Middlesex Alcoholism Services Funding in addition to the initial 12th Year CDBG award ($12,500) to hire additional staff to expand the hours of operation of a Sober Site Drop-in Center to include weekends and weekday mornings. 3.2 Community Center SPONSOR: Alternatives Unlimited, Inc. $5,750 I Funding to permit the Agency's Irving Square facility, which offers mental health counseling, social and recreational activities for psychiatrically disabled and mentally retarded adults, to remain open for addi- tional eveing and/or weekend hours. 4.0 CONTINGENCIES $5,750 TOTAL ADDITIONAL FEDERAL FISCAL YEAR 1986 FUNDS: $77,000 78 i ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by purchase or gift a certain easement located near the intersection of Pearl Street and Proctor Street. If acquired, the easement shall be used for public parking purposes and shall be under the control and jurisdiction of the Board of Selectmen. The easement is bounded on the north by land now or formerly of Colonial Realty Trust, on the east by land now or formerly of Raymond C. Avery et al, Trustees, and on the south and west by land of the Town of Framingham; and contains Four Thousand Four Hundred Thirty-Nine (4,439) square feet, more or less. Said parcel is shown as "Lot No. 2A" on a Plan entitled "Town of Framingham — Plan of Land — Land Transfers — Proctor Street", scale I"=20', dated September 15, 1986, by Fred W. Ser- geant, Town Engineer. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen ARTICLE 8. 10/28/86 Voted: that the Town authorized the Board of Selectmen to acquire by purchase or gift a certain easement located near the intersection of Pearl Street and Proctor Street. If acquired, the easement shall be used for public parking purposes and shall be under the control and jurisdiction of the Board of Selectmen. The easement is bounded on the north by land now or formerly of Colonial Realty Trust, on the east by land now or formerly of Raymond C. Avery et al, Trustees, and on the south and west by land of the Town of Framingham; and contains Four Thousand Four Hundred Thirty-Nine (4,439) square Ifeet, more or less. Said parcel is shown as "Lot No. 2A" on a Plan entitled "Town of Framingham — Plan of Land — Land Transfers — Proctor Street", scale 1"=20', dated September 15, 1986, by Fred W. Ser- geant, Town Engineer. 123 voting in favor. 3 opposed. ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to transfer to Francis J. and Louise M. Rivers, Trustees of Colonial Realty Trust, a certain parcel of land located at the corner of Pearl and Proctor Street on such terms and conditions as the Board of Selectmen may deem advisable. Said parcel contains Three Thousand Five Hundred Ninety-Eight (3,598) square feet, more or less, and is bounded on the west by Pearl Street, on the north by Proctor Street, on the east by land now or formerly of Colonial Realty Trust, and on the south by other land of the Town of Framingham. Said parcel is shown as "Lot No. IA" on a Plan entitled "Town of Framingham — Plan of Land — Land Transfers — Proctor Street", scale 1"=20', dated September 15, 1986, by Fred W. Sergeant, Town Engineer. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen ARTICLE 9. 10/28/86 Voted: that the Town authorized the Board of Selectmen to transfer to Francis J. and Louise M. Rivers, Trustees of Colonial Realty Trust, a certain parcel of land located at the corner of Pearl Street and Proctor Street on such terms and conditions as the Board of Selectmen may deem advisable. Said parcel contains Three Thousand Five Hundred Ninety-Eight (3,598) square feet, more or less, and is bounded on the west by Pearl Street, on the north by Proctor Street, on the east by land now or formerly of Colonial Realty Trust, and on the south by other land of the Town of Framingham. Said parcel is shown as "Lot No. IA" on a Plan entitled "Town of Framingham — Plan of Land — Land Transfers — Proctor Street", scale 1"=20', dated September 15, 1986, by Fred W. Sergeant, Town Engineer. ' 115 voting in favor. 7 opposed. 79 I I ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to convey to Francis J. and Louise M. Rivers, Trustees of Colonial Realty Trust, a certain easement, located near the corner of Pearl Street and Proctor Street, for parking purposes. Said easement is bounded on the north and east by land now or formerly of Colonial Realty Trust, and on the east, south, west, and north by other land of the Town of I Framingham; and is shown as "Lot No. 113" on a Plan entitled "Town of Framingham — Plan of Land — Land Transfers — Proctor Street", scale 1"=20', dated September 15, 1986, by Fred W. Sergeant, Town Engineer. Said easement is to be conveyed on such terms and conditions as the Board of Selectmen may determine. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. i SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen ARTICLE 1. 10/28/86 Voted: that the Town authorized the Board of Selectmen to convey to Francis J. and Louise M. Rivers, Trustees of Colonial Realty Trust, a certain easement, located near the corner of Pearl Street and Proctor Street, for parking purposes. Said easement is bounded on the north and east by land now or formerly of Colonial Realty Trust, and on the east, south, west, and north by other land of the Town of Framingham; and is shown as "Lot No. 111" on a Plan entitled "Town of Framingham — Plan of Land — Land Transfers — Proctor Street", Scale 1"=20', dated September 15, 1986 by Fred W. Sergeant, Town Engineer. Said easement is to be conveyed on such terms and conditions as the Board of Selectmen may determine. 114 voting in favor. 8 opposed. ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain a certain parcel of land described herein, located near the intersection of Pearl Street and Proctor Street; a certain easement described herein, located near the intersection of Pearl Street and Proctor Street and adjacent to said parcel; and the rights to a certain other easement adjacent to said parcel and to said easement. If acquired, the land shall be used for public parking purposes and shall be under the control and jurisdiction of the Board of Selectmen. A. The parcel to be acquired is bounded and described as follows: p Beginning at a point one hundred seventy and sixty hundredths (170.60) feet, more or less, southerly I from the southerly location line of Proctor Street, at a point common to land of Francis J. and Louise M. Rivers, Trustees of Colonial Realty Trust, Franklin Development Corporation, and the Town of Framingham; thence runs along land now or formerly common to Francis J. and Louise M. Rivers, Trustees of Colonial Realty Trust, and the Town of Framingham, S69°-11'-00"W a distance of eighty I (80.00) feet to a point; thence turns and runs along land now or formerly common to Francis J. and Louise M. Rivers, Trustees of Colonial Realty Trust, and the Town of Framingham, N23°-18'-00"W a distance of seventy-five and ninety-nine hundredths (75.99) feet to a point; thence turns and runs S76°- �i 08'-00"E a distance of one hundred and thirty hundredths (100.30) feet across land now or formerly of I Francis J. and Louise M. Rivers, Trustees of Colonial Realty Trust, to a point now or formerly corn mon to Raymond C. Avery et al, Trustees, and Francis J. and Louise M. Rivers, Trustees of Colonial Realty Trust; thence turns and runs along land now or formerly common to Francis J. and Louise M. Rivers, Trustees of Colonial Realty Trust, and Raymond C. Avery et al, Trustees, S23°-18'-00"E a distance of eighteen and eighty-six hundredths (18.86) feet to the point and place of beginning. i Said parcel contains three thousand seven hundred ninety (3,790) square fett, more or less, and is shown as I parcel "2A" on a Plan entitled "Town of Framingham - Plan of Land - Land Transfers - Proctor Street - Prepared by the Town of Framingham Engineering Department - Scale I"=40', September 4, 1985 - Fred W. Sergeant, Town Engineer. i 80 i B. The first easement to be acquired is described as follows: Beginning at a point one hundred fifty-one and seventy-four hundredths (151.74) feet, more or less, southerly from the southerly location line of Proctor Street, at a point common to land of Francis J. and Louise M. Rivers, Trustees of Colonial Realty Trust, and Raymond C. Avery et al, Trustees; thence runs N76°-08'-00"W a distance of one hundred and thirty hundredths (100.30) feet across land now or formerly of Francis J. and Louise M. Rivers, Trustees of Colonial Realty Trust, to a point now or formerly common to Francis J. and Louise M. Rivers, Trustees of Colonial Realty Trust, and the Town of Framingham; thence turns and runs N23°-18'-00"W a distance of eighteen and eighty-two hundredths (18.82) feet along land now or formerly common to Francis J. and Louise M. Rivers, Trustees of Colonial Realty Trust, and the Town of Framingham, to a point now or formerly common to Francis J. and Louise M. Rivers, Trustees of Colonial Realty Trust, and the Town of Framingham; thence turns and runs S76°-08'-00"E a distance of fifteen and nine hundredths (15.09) feet across land now or formerly of Francis J. and Louise M. Rivers, Trustees of Colonial Realty Trust, to a point; thence turns and runs S20°-48'-08"E a distance of three and ninety-eight hundredths (3.98) feet across land now or formerly of Francis J. and Louise M. Rivers, Trustees of Colonial Realty Trust, to a point; thence turns and runs N69°-11'-52"E a distance of five and seventy-five hundredths (5.75) feet across land now or formerly of Francis J. and Louise M. Rivers, Trustees of Colonial Realty Trust, to a point; thence turns and runs S76°-08'-00"E a distance of seventy-eight and twenty-two hundredths (78.22) feet across land now or formerly of Francis J. and Louise M. Rivers, Trustees of Colonial Realty Trust, to a point now or formerly common to Francis J. and Louise M. Rivers, Trustees of Colonial Realty Trust, and Raymond C. Avery et al, Trustees; thence turns and runs S23°-18'-00"E a distance of ieighteen and eighty-two hundredths (18.82) feet along land now or formerly common to Francis J. and Louise M. Rivers, Trustees of Colonial Realty Trust, and Raymond C. Avery et al, Trustees, to a point and place of beginning. I Said easement contains one thousand five hundred four (1,504) square feet, more or less and is shown on a Plan entitled "Town of Framingham - Plan of Land - Land Transfers - Proctor Street - Prepared by the i Town of Framingham Engineering Department - Scale I"=40' - September 4, 1985 - Fred W. Sargeant, Town Engineer." C. The rights to the other easement to be acquired are described as follows: Beginning at a point on the southerly location line of Proctor Street, at a point common to land now or formerly of Francis J. and Louise M. Rivers, Trustees of Colonial Realty Trust, and the Town of Framingham; thence runs along land now or formerly common to Francis J. and Louise M. Rivers, Trustees of Colonial Realty Trust, and the Town of Framingham, S23°-18'-OOdpE a distance of one hundred sixteen (116.00) feet, more or less, to a point; thence turns and runs S74°-06'-53"W a distance of twenty-two (22.00) feet, more or less, to a point; thence turns and runs N20°-52'-14"W a distance of one hundred fourteen (114.00) feet, more or less, to a point on the southerly location line of Proctor Street; thence turns and runs N69°-11'-00"E along the southerly location line of Proctor Street a distance of seventeen (17.00) feet, more or less, to the point and place of beginning. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. I SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen ARTICLE 11. 10/28/86 Voted: this article was defeated. 1 81 ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell Clarence A. Banks, Edna B. Banks, and Robert J. Banks any interest the Town may have in a parcel of land located on Dunning Avenue and Chautauqua Avenue and shown as lots 76L and 77L, on Town of Framingham Assessors Plan Sheet 187, Block 8 containing approximately 6,377 square feet. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen ARTICLE 12. 11/5/86 Voted: that the Town authorized the Board of Selectmen to sell to Clarence A. Banks any interest and Town may have in a parcel of land located on Dunning Avenue and Chautauqua Avenue and shown as Lots 76L and 77L on the Town of Framingham Assessors Plan Sheet 187, Block 8 containing approximately 6,377 square feet for not less than one dollar and on such other terms and condi- tions as the Board of Selectmen may require. I ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell M. Elaine Russo and Michael A. Russo any interest the Town may have in a parcel of land located on Waverly Street and shown as lot 2, on Town of Framingham Assessors Plan Sheet 153, Block 59 containing approximately 5,525 square feet. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen 1 ARTICLE 13. 11/5/86 Voted: that this article be referred back to the Board of Selectmen. I 1 ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell Mark S. Shahood any interest the Town may have in a parcel of land located on Waverly Street and shown as lots 30, 31, and 32, on Town of Framingham Assessors Plan Sheet 150, Block 50 containing approximately 13,545 square feet to be used solely for residential open space. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen ARTICLE 14. 11/5/86 Voted: that the Town authorized the Board of Selectmen to sell to Mark S. Sha- hood any interest the Town may have in a parcel of land located on Waverly Street and shown as Lots 30, 31, and 32 on the Town of Framingham Assessors Plan Sheet 150, Block 50 containing approximately 13,545 square feet to be used only for residential open space for not less than one dollar and on such other terms and conditions as the Board of Selectmen may require. RESOLUTION: Be it resolved that the Town Meeting affirms the agreement between the Board of Selectmen and the Finance Committee that the proceeds of the Hotel/Motel Tax be used to augment the Capital Improvement Plan. Voted: 11/5/86 Marc S. Alpert, Precinct 5 ,1 ,I 82 ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town of Framingham will vote to accept the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 64G, Section 3A, which authorizes the Town to impose a local room occupancy excise tax at a rate up to but not exceeding four percent of the total amount of rent for each occupancy. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen Finance Committee ARTICLE 15. 11/5/86 Voted: that the Town of Framingham accept the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 64G, Section 3A to authorize the Town to impose a local room occupancy excise tax at a rate of 4076 of the total amount of rent for each occupancy. ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for purchase of new or replacement vehicles and equipment; said sums to be expended under the direction of the responsible departments. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Finance Committee ARTICLE 16 1 11/5/86 Voted: that the sum of $432,765.00 be transferred from Free Cash to purchase the equipment specified: Town Owned Buildings: 3/4 ton pickup truck ($11,500.00) Park Maintenance Dept: 6 Passenger Crew Cab ($16,765.00) Dump Truck Public Works: (Fire 1 Sewer Cleaner&Truck (118,500.00) Replacement) 1 Trailer Mounted (286,000.00) Compressor, 121/2 yd. Articulated Bucket (trade-in value only). Loader, and two (2) pickup trucks 1 -3 yd. Front End Loader, 1 Street Sweeper, 1 Rubbish Packer, 3 - 35,000 G.V.W. Dump trucks, 2 - 3/4 Ton pickup trucks said sum to be expended under the direction of the Purchasing Agent, and the departments named. 83 ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will raise and appropriate or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for capital improvements and related engineering services for roads, drainage systems, the water system, the sewer system, the incinerator and the construction of or improvements to Town buildings; said sums to be expended under the direction of the responsible departments. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Finance Committee ARTICLE 17 (A). 11/5/86 Voted: that the sum of$209,000.00 be transferred from Free Cash for improve- ments to the Town water system, including laying or relaying water mains of less than sixteen (16) inches and engineering services related thereto, said sum to be expended under the direction of the Board of Public Works. (B) Voted: that the sum of $84,000.00 be transferred from Free Cash for replacement of a sewer main and engineering services related thereto, said sum to be expended under the direction of the Board of Public Works. (C) Voted: that the sum of $100,000.00 be transferred from Free Cash for engineering services on the Con- cord Street Bridge for the purpose of reconstruction, said sum to be expended under the direction of the Board of Public Works. (D) Voted: that the sum of$1,000,000.00 be appropriated for the Farm Pond Sewer Interceptor Project to be 1 used with funds available or to become available from a grant from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts; and to meet said appropriation, the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to issue from time to time bonds or notes in the amount of $1,000,000.00 pursuant to the provisions of Mass. General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7 (1). Said sum to be expended under the direc- tion of the Board of Public Works. Unanimous vote. j RESOLUTION Whereas a serious deficiency of off-street parking spaces exists in downtown Framingham; and Whereas the construction of the downtown parking garage is a necessary first step toward alleviating this shortage; and I' Whereas the practice of granting special permits to exempt downtown businesses from the off-street parking -Law continues to aggravate parking congestion in the central business requirements of the Zoning By district; Y Therefore, be it resolved that it is the sense of Town meeting that the Board of Selectmen should not grant such special permits where the special permit is for new construction or to exempt a substantial alteration from more than 10 required parking spaces, until the downtown parking garage is completed and in operation. Voted: 10/28/86 Linda Panzera, Precinct 3 RESOLUTION I That the Board of Public Works show "a cost-recovery" plan to be agreed upon by the Town of Fra- mingham and Ashland when and if this Town connects to this sewer line called The Farm Pond Relief or Interceptor sewer. That this plan include cost recovery for all monies expended to date by the Town directly and all that the Town will be held responsible for in the total project. Voted: 11/5/86 Harvey Chafitz, Precinct 11 i 84 RESOLUTION II That the Town of Framingham Department of Public Works cease allowing sewer connections into any line leading to the Farm Pond Line until such time the Farm Pond Relief Sewer Project has been completed and accepted by the Town and that the Building Official cease issuing Building Permits to any projects requiring sewer entrance to any of these affected lines and that notification of this resolution be sent to the State DEQE and MWRA. Voted: 11/5/86 Harvey Chafitz, Precinct 11 ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to hear and act on reports and recommendations of the Select- men and other Offices and Committees of the town and to raise and appropriate money by transfer from available funds or otherwise provide sums of money for the support of Town Departments. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen Finance Committee ARTICLE 18. 10/28/86 Voted: that the sum of $1,569,340.00 be transferred from Free Cash to the accounts, and to the Departments specified: A. Data Processing — Special Function/Central Services $14,700.00 B. Selectmen — Special Function/Law & Damages 35,000.00 C. Treasurer— Administration 67,150.00 D. Fire Department — Salaries and Wages 13,973.00 E. School Department Budget — Salaries and Wages 1,239,617.00 F. Public Works Administration — Special Function/Dioxin Testing 150,000.00 ' G. Public Works Sewer — M & O 38,900.00 H. Park Maintenance Dept. — Special Function/Cemetery Maintenance 10,000.00 said sums to be expended under the direction of the above named departments; and further voted that the sum of $20,000.00 be transferred from the Fleet Insurance Account to the Property Insurance Account, said sum to be expended under the direction of the Purchasing Agent, and that the sum of $8,000.00 be trans- ferred from the Cemeteries Salary Budget to Park Maintenance Special Function/Cemetery Maintenance, said sum to be expended under the direction of Director of Parks and Recreation. RESOLUTION I That the Town Meeting as the Zoning Authority of the Town of Framingham agrees with the jointly held and jointly made decision by the Board of Public Works, Planning Board, and Selectmen that the growing use of private roads as substitutes for the required roads built to Framingham standards is not in the best interest of the town. The Town Meeting urges all boards involved in such decisions stand firm with this conclusion and refuse requests for private roads. Voted: November 5, 1986 Virginia Marino, Precinct 14 RESOLUTION II That the Framingham Town Meeting as the Zoning Authority of the Town of Framingham go on record as disapproving the portion of the subdivision control law that allows new roads on accepted subdivision plans the same status as older accepted roads and therefore turns new subdivisions into a collection of approval - not - required lots. The Town Meeting urges that the standing committee on Planning and Zoning work with the Town Counsel to prepare an article for the Annual Town Meeting which would eliminate the ability to allow this form of management or "non-management of subdivisions" that the Planning Board be urged to refrain from allowing this way of management by using language in the covenant agreements between the Town Developers which will close this loophole until the Town Meeting can attend to officially closing it. Voted: November 5, 1986 s 85 I RESOLUTION III That the Town of Framingham require the developers of any building project to complete any Federal or State permitting process before submitting their plans to the Town. That written proof of the completion of plans. That any plan submitted first and found to be needing permitting process be submitted with the Federal or State permits should be given automatice extension of time until the permitting process is ' completed. Voted: November 5, 1986 ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of moneyfor preparation of a comprehensive plan for the Town; said sum to be expended under the direction of the Board of Selectmen. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Board of Selectmen Planning Board ARTICLE 19. 11/5/86 Voted: that the sum of $100,000.00 be transferred from Free Cash for the prepara- tion of a Comprehensive Plan for the Town, said sum to be expended under the direction of the Board of Selectmen. ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for the resurfacing of basketball court at Longs Field; said sums to be spent under the direction of the Park Commissioner. f Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Park Commissioners ARTICLE 20. 11/5/86 Voted: that the sum of $8,220.00 be transferred from Free Cash for the resurfacing of the basketball court at Long Field, said sum to be expended under the direction of the Park Commissioners. r ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds or otherwise provide sums of money for the support of various School Department Collective Bargaining Agreements for Fiscal Year 1987. ' Pass any vote or ke a y action elative th reto. SPONSOR: School Committee ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of M.G.L., Chapter 148, Section 26H as enacted under Chapter 265 of the acts of 1986 adopted July 16, 1986 which requires automatice sprinklers in boarding houses. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Fire Chief ARTICLE 22. 11/5/86 Voted: that the Town accept the provisions of M.G.L. Chapter 148, Section 26H as enacted under Chapter 265 of the Acts of 1986 adopted July 16, 1986 which requires automatic sprinklers in boarding houses. 86 ARTICLE 23 To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to discontinue as a public way and abandon as a public way, or as an easement for highway purposes, a section of Beech Street, bounded and described as follows: Beginning at a point on the easterly side of Lincoln Street thence N 53°-0° E three hundred twenty (320) feet i by land of Framingham Union Hospital, Inc., to a bound at land of said Hospital; thence southeasterly forty (40) feet; thence southwesterly three hundred twenty (320) feet, the last course being parallel to and forty (40) feet distance from the first described course; thence northwesterly along Lincoln Street to the point of beginning. The above-described parcel is now fully shown on a Plan entitled "Location of Beech Street Extension iFramingham, Mass. by J.J. Valkenburgh, C.E. Scale 1 inch = 30 feet, May 1905." The above-described area being the section of Beech Street taken pursuant to Article 10 approved by the Framingham Town Meeting on May 8, 1905. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Celia Herendeen, et al ARTICLE 23. 11/5/86 Voted: that this article be referred back to the sponsor with the concurrence of the ' sponsor. ARTICLE 24 To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to convey or abandon to Framingham Union Hospital, Inc. any and all right, title and interest and/or easement the Town may have in the follow- ing described parcel of land and to reserve for the benefit of the Town and others such easements as the Town may require: Said parcel is bounded and described as follows: Beginning at a point on the easterly side of Lincoln Street thence N 53°-0° E three hundred twenty (320) feet by land of Framingham Union Hospital, Inc., to a bound at land of said Hospital; thence southeasterly forty (40) feet; thence southwesterly three hundred twenty (320) feet, the last course being parallel to and forty (40) feet distance from the first described course; thence northwesterly along Lincoln Street to the point of beginning. The above-described parcel is now fully shown on a Plan entitled "Location of Beech Street Extension Framingham, Mass. by J.J. Valkenburgh, C.E. Scale 1 inch = 30 feet, May 1905." The above-described area being the section of Beech Street taken pursuant to Article 10 approved by the Framingham Town Meeting on May 8, 1905. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Celia Herendeen, et al ARTICLE 24. 11/5/86 Voted: that this article be referred back to the sponsor with the concurrence of the sponsor. 87 ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Laws of the Town by changing the Zoning Classification of the property described on the attached sheets, from Manufacturing to Residential Use, R-1. CLARK'S HILL — Lot 1 : Beginning at a stone bound at the southerly side line of Arthur Street (Public), and the easterly side line of Bishop Street (Public); thence South 64°-57'-40" East 894.20 feet by the southerly side line of Arthur Street to a point; thence South 24°-47'-55" West 150.00 feet by land now or formerly of A. & ; M. O'Neill to a point; thence South 64°-57'-40" East 100.00 feet by land now or formerly of A. & M. O'Neill and now or formerly of M. & M. Surro to a point; thence North 24'-47'-55" East 150.00 feet by land or formerly of M. & M. Surro to a point; thence South 640-571-40" East 157.15 feet by the southerly side line of Arthur Street to a concrete bound; thence South 24°-47'-55" West 1,036.83 feet by land now or formerly of Arthur Realty Trust to a stone bound; thence North 640-55'-55" West 315.22 feet by land now or formerly of Dennison Mfg. Co. to a point; thence North 25°-02'-20" East 300.00 feet by land now or formerly of Dennison Mfg. Co. to a point; thence North 64'-57'-40" West 526.04 feet by land now or formerly of Dennison Mfg. Co. to a point; thence South 25°-02'-20" West 93.81 feet by land now or formerly Dennison Mfg. Co. to a point; thence North 650-12'-30" West 225.00 feet by land now or formerly Dennison Mfg. Co. to a point; thence South 690-47'-30" West 120.00 feet by land now or formerly of Dennison Mfg. Co. to a point on the easterly side line of Bishop Street; thence North 24°-47'-30" East 916.67 feet by the easterly side line of Bishop Street to the point of beginning. All as shown as Lot I on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Framingham, MA., Property of: Dennison Mfg. Co., Certificate of Title No. 62950." Scale: 1" =80', Dated December 17, 1985 by Guerriere and Halnon Inc., containing 22.06± Acres. CLARK'S HILL — Lot 2 Beginning at a stone bound at the northerly sideline of Everit Avenue (Private), and the easterly side line of Bishop Street (Public); thence North 24o-47 -30 East 120.00 feet by the easterly side line of 1 Bishop Street to a point; thence North 69'-47'-30" East 120.00 feet by land now or formerly of Denni- son Mfg. Co. to a point; thence South 65'-12'-30" East 225.00 feet by land now or formerly of I Dennison Mfg. Co. to a point; thence North 25°-02'-20" East 93.81 feet by land now or formerly of Dennison Mfg. Co. to a point, thence South 64'-57'-40" East 526.04 feet by land now or formerly of Dennison Mfg. Co. to a point; thence South 25°-02'-20" West 300.00 feet by land now or formerly of I' Dennison Mfg. Co. to a point; thence North 64°-57'-40" West 91.01 feet by land now or formerly of Dennison Mfg. Co. to a point; thence continuing North 64'-57'-40" West 744.00 feet along the north- erly side line of Everit Avenue (Private), to the point of beginning. f 4 All as shown as Lot 2 on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Framingham, MA., Property of Dennison Mfg. Co., Certificate of Title No. 62950." Scale: V'=80', Dated: December 17, 1985, by Guerriere and Halnon Inc., containing 5.00± Acres. i Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Barbara Ford, et al ARTICLE 25. 10/30/86 Voted: that the Town amend the Zoning By-Laws of the Town by changing the Zoning Classification of the Property (Clark's Hill-Lot 1) described in the Town Warrant from Manufactur- ing to Residential Use, R 1. Unanimous vote. 10/30/86 Voted: that the Town amend the Zoning By-Laws of the Town by changing the Zoning Classifica- tion of the Property (Clark's Hill-Lot 2) described in the Town Warrant from Manufacturing to Residential Use, R 1. 90 voting in favor. 2 opposed. Boston, Mass January 13, 1987 ` 88 The foregoing amendments to the zoning by-laws under Article 25 of the warrant for the Framingham Special Town Meeting held on October 21, 28, 29 and November 5, 1986 is hereby approved. Francis X. Bellotti Attorney General Published on January 20th and 271h, 1987. ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Framingham by changing from a single family residence district to an office and professional district, that parcel of land situated off the easterly side of Edgell Road being more particularly bounded and described as follows: Beginning at the southwesterly corner thereof at a point common to land of the Town of Framingham and land of Crane, thence running N 11 15' 00" E by said Town of Framingham land 140.00 feet to a point at land of the Plymouth Church in Framingham; thence turning and running S 76 31' 40" E by said church land 139.00 feet to a corner; thence turning and running S 17 15' 00" W by said church land 149.763 feet to said Crane land; thence turning and running N 72 30' 00" W by said Crane land 138.699 feet said Town and Framingham land and the point of beginning. The building on said parcel is known and numbered 87 Edgell Road. The parcel is a portion of Lot 10 in Block 1 as shown on Town of Framingham Assessors' Map 351. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: K. Gene Geschickter, et al ARTICLE 26. 10/30/86 Voted: that this article be indefinitely postponed. ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Framingham in the following manner: (1) Amend Section I.E. DEFINITIONS by inserting the following term and definition in Section I.E.1., following the definition of "Open Space, Usable": Outdoor Recreational Facility: Parks, picnic areas, playfields and playgrounds; outdoor swimming pools and tennis courts; golf courses and country clubs on parcels of at least 50 acres; boat launching ramps; riding trails; and paths or trails for cycling, hiking, jogging, skiing, etc. Specifically excluded are firing ranges and miniature golf courses. (2) Delete existing Section I11.1. OPEN SPACE DISTRICTS, and substitute therefor a new Section III.I OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION DISTRICT as follows: IIL1.1 Purpose The purpose of this section is to encourage, preserve and protect land for use for recreational purposes and other uses as enumerated herein; and to conserve natural conditions, open space, wildlife and vege- tation for the general welfare of the public. II1.1.2 Permitted Uses No building or structure shall be used or arranged or designed to be used in any part, and no change shall be made in the use of land or premises except for one or more of the following purposes: a. Agricultural production, livestock, or animal husbandry; forestry, horticulture, floriculture, and related activities. b. Wildlife reserve, nature area, or similar conservation use. 89 c. Outdoor recreational facility, as defined in Section I.E.I. d. The following uses require a Special Permit from the Zoning Board of Appeals: (1) Greenhouse or other building for the raising and distribution of agricultural products or plants. (2) Indoor non-profit recreational facilities such as swimming pool, tennis court, skating rink, or children's camp or center. (3) Amend Section IV.G.2., Table of Dimensional Regulations, by adding the following provisions for Open Space and Recreation districts: LM mUlmrm u1nimm BWIM4 Mulm�me mMr SCae 0�some DINId Pftdpl DMS. Arm IF~. FIM I SIN M of gross floor "WW LM CewrMS aM FArm er Use (sq. ft.) (ft.) (ft) (ft.) area of bldg. (storieslft.) (%of iot area) RsW open Spare One-farrity detached 43.560 100 30 or 30 3/40 15 and Recreation dwelling Me Golf course or 50 Acres 200 100 100 100 3/40 5 country dub Any other 5 Acres 200 100 100 100 3/40 10 principal use l 1 )f (4) Amend Section V.D. BOARD OF APPEALS by inserting the following provision in paragraph 4., fol- lowing subparagraph a.: V b. A variance authorizing a use or activity not permitted in a Single Residence district shall be prohibited in an Open Space and Recreation district. 1! Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Harvey Chafitz, et al ARTICLE 27. 10/30/86 Voted: that the Town amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Framingham as set forth under Article 27 in the Warrant for the Special Town Meeting of October 21, 1986, with the following additional amendments: B. In paragraph (3) of Article 27, amend the Table of Dimensional Regulations by deleting the words "One- Family detached dwelling" and all dimensional regulations on the same line. C. Delete paragraph (4) of Article 27 and insert in its place the following: (4) Amend Section V.D. Board of Appeals, Paragraph 4, subparagraph a., by chaning the words "single residence and general residence districts" to read "single residence, general residence, and open space and recreation districts." 107 voting in favor. 10 opposed. Boston, Mass. January 13, 1987 i - i 90 The foregoing amendments to the zoning by-laws adopted under Article 27 of the warrant for the Fra- mingham Special Town Meeting held on October 21, 28, 29 and November 5, 1986 is hereby approved. Francis X. Bellotti Attorney General Published on January 20th and 27th, 1987 ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Framingham by changing the following described area from a SINGLE RESIDENCE R-4 DISTRICT TO AN OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION DISTRICT: (See "Exhibit A" attached hereto and incorporated herein by reference containing a description of the land.) ARTICLE 28. 10/30/86 Voted: that the Town amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Framingham by chaning the area known as the Framingham Country Club and described in the Town Warrant from Single Residence R-4 District to an Open Space and Recreation District and further voted that Exhibit A as described in the Town Warrant for the October 21, 1986 Town Meeting be amended as follows: By deleting the following paragraphs from Exhibit A: EXHIBIT A Several parcels of land with the buildings thereon, bounded and described as follows: PARCEL ONE: Said parcel is subject to flowage rights and conditions contained in a deed from Peter Parker to the City of Boston, dated November 2, 1875, and recorded with Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds in Book 134, Page 161 and shown on plan recorded with said Deeds in Plan Book 29, Plan 14. There is conveyed with the granted premises the right to use as now laid the water pipe line running from Gates Street to the granted premises, the approximate location of which is shown on Plan 155 of 1953, recorded with Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds in Book 8028, Page 453, together with the right to enter upon said Lot B on said plan over a twenty (20) foot strip, the center line of which is the pipe line as now laid, in order to repair, maintain and replace said pipe line. Subject also to an easement to H.A. Fafard & Sons Construction, Inc. recorded with said Deeds in Book 11984, Page 340. For title see deed from Ernest E. Brooks and Viola B. Brooks to the Framingham Country Club dated August 31, 1955, and recorded with the Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds in Book 8554, Page 564. PARCEL TWO: Meaning and intending to convey and hereby conveying all the premises conveyed to this mortgagor by deed of William E. Temple, dated January 27, 1902, and recorded with the Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds in Book 2943, Page 585, except the premises conveyed by this mortgagor to the Framingham Motor Inn, Inc., which deed is recorded in the Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds in Book 8913, Page 027, and the premises conveyed by this mortgagor to Anthony J. Liberatore et ux by a deed recorded in said Registry of Deeds in Book 8603, Page 571, and with the exception of Lots 1-6 as shown on a plan entitled "Compiled Plan of Land in Framingham, Mass. owned by: Framingham Country Club, Inc., scale 1"=60', September 17, 1970, Compiled by MacCarthy Engineering Service, Inc., Natick & Marlborough, Mass." which plan is recorded with said Deeds as Plan 336 of 1971 in Book 11984, Page End. PARCEL THREE: Meaning and intending to convey and hereby conveying the premises described in a deed from Maria Gnecco, dated September 21, 1951 and recorded with the Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds in Book 7802, Page 529, with the exception of a portion of Lot 1 as shown on said plan entitled "Compiled Plan of Land in Framingham, Mass. owned by: Framingham Country Club, Inc., Scale: 1"=60'pr, Septem- ber 17, 1970, Compiled by McCarthy Engineering Services, Inc., Natick and Marlborough, Mass." which plan is recorded with said Deeds as Plan Number 336 of 1971 in Book 11984, Page End. 91 PARCEL FOUR: Meaning and intending to convey and hereby conveying the premises described in a deed from Charles Ferrill dated January 23, 1953, and recorded with Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds in Book 8026, Page 5. The premises are conveyed subject to an easement to the Edison Electric Illuminating Company of Boston dated July 29, 1918 and recorded with said Deeds in Book 4221, Page 25. PARCEL FIVE: Meaning and intending to convey and hereby conveying the premises described in a deed from Charles K. Murphy et ux dated June 1, 1953 and recorded with said Deeds in Book 8083, Page 11. PARCEL SIX: Meaning and intending to convey and hereby conveying the premises conveyed to this mortgagor by deed of Harold E. Jones, dated January 20, 1953, and recorded with Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds in Book 8023, Page 202, with the exception of Lots 7-14 as shown on plan entitled "Compiled Plan of Land in Framingham, Mass., owned by Framingham Country Club, Inc., Scale: 1"=60', September 21, 1970, Com- piled by MacCarthy Engineering Service, Inc., Natick & Marlborough, Mass." which plan is recorded with said Deeds as Plan Number 337 of 1971 in Book 11984, Page End. PARCEL SEVEN: ortgagor by deed dated October 21, 1964, and recorded in said Being the same premises conveyed to m Deeds, Book 10676, Page 271. PARCEL EIGHT: reby conveying the premises conveyed to this mortgage by deed of Meaning and intending to convey and he Primo Silva dated April 22, 1953, and recorded with the Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds in Book 8062, Page 377, with the exception of about 0.47 acres taken by the Massachusetts Turnpike Authority which taking is recorded in said Deeds in Book 8913, Page 203, and shown on Plan Number 1068 (5 of 10) of 1955, Book 8486, Page 248. Together with a right of way to pass and re-pass at all times of the year between these premises and the highway known as Gates Street through the adjacent lot formerly known as Bemis Pasture, as set forth in a deed from Daniel Stone to William Buckminster dated October 6, 1834, and recorded with said Deeds in Book 338, Page 376. PARCEL NINE: Meaning and intending to convey and hereby conveying the premises described in a deed from Uranus Colaianni to this mortgage by deed dated April 15, 1953, and recorded with Middlesex South District Regis- try of Deeds in Book 8061, Page 189, with the exception of Parcel Ten hereinafter described and with the exception of 9.95 acres taken by the said Massachusetts Turnpike Authority which taking is recorded with said Deeds in Book 8913, Page 203 and shown on Plan Number 1068 (5 and 6 of 10) of 1955 recorded in !i Book 8486, Page 248. PARCEL TEN: Meaning and intending to convey and hereby conveying the portion of the premises conveyed to the said mortgagor by deed of Uranus Colaianni by deed dated April 15, 1953, and recorded with the Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds in Book 8061, Page 189. PARCEL ELEVEN: ed by deed of Louise Stone to Meaning and intending to convey and hereby conveying the premises conve Y mortgage dated March 18, 1953, and recorded with Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds in Book 8045, Page 480. Book 8045, Page 480. ,I 92 PARCEL TWELVE: Said Parcel 4B is subject to a Boston Edison Company easement which passed through the most Westerly portion of the granted premises which easement is shown on said plan and which easement is recorded in the Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds. Meaning and intending to convey and hereby conveying the same premises conveyed to the said mortgagor by deed of Haddon S. Owen et ux, dated January 31, 1956, and recorded in said Deeds, Book 8670, Page 439; as shown on a plan entitled, "Plan of Land in Framingham, Mass., property of Haddon J. Owen et ux, Scale: I"=100', January 11, 1956, Schofield Brothers Reg. Civil Engineers, 48 Park Street, Framingham, Massachusetts," which plan is recorded in said Deeds, Book 8676, Page End, as plan number 287 of 1956. PARCEL FOURTEEN: (A) The conveyance is made subject to a right of way or easement granted to the Boston Edison Company to erect and maintain poles and wires over, on and upon a certain portion of the granted premises, and as is more particularly described in the instrument granting said easement which is recorded with said Deeds in Book 4226, Page 583. Being the same premises described in a deed from Archie D. Crowell to this mortgagor dated January 4, 1968 and recorded with said Deeds in Book 11453, Page 171. PARCEL FOURTEEN: (B) Being the same premises conveyed to mortgagor by Archie D. Crowell by deed dated January 4, 1968 and recorded with said Deeds in Book 11453, Page 171. There is excepted from the above parcels conveyed so much as was conveyed by Archie D. Crowell to the Framingham Country Club by deed dated October 21, 1964, and recorded with said Deeds in Book 10676, Page 271. 1 Said parcels are conveyed subject to sewer easements as described in two instruments executed by the Fra- mingham Country Club to Ralph A. Gogliormella et al dated November 20, 1972 and April 26, 1973 and recorded with said Deeds in Book 12335, Page 684 and Book 12422, Page 130 respectively. Said parcels are conveyed subject to easements to the Town of Framingham for a water storage tank and water pipes, as recited in an instrument dated March 17, 1975 recorded with said Deeds in Book 12839, Page 218. PARCEL FIFTEEN: For title, see Deed into the Framingham Country Club, Inc. recorded with Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds in Book 8670, Page 430. t The aforesaid land is shown on Framingham Assessors' Plan Sheet 454 as Lots 18 and 19 in Block.4; on Plan Sheet 456 as Lots 2, 2E, 3, 4 and a portion of Lot 9 in Block 5; and on Plan Sheet 457 as a portion of Lot 7 in Block 5. s 108 voting in favor. 10 opposed. Boston, Mass. January 13, 1987 The foregoing amendments to the zoning by-laws adopted under Article 28 of the warrant for the Fra- mingham Special Town Meeting held October 21, 28, 29 and November 5, 1986 is hereby approved. Francis X. Bellotti Attorney General Published on January 20th and 27th, 1987. 93 ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Laws of the Town of Framingham by changing the following described area from SINGLE RESIDENCE R-4 DISTRICT to an OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION DISTRICT: (An area or parcel known as MACOMBER PROPERTY at the corner of Salem End Road and Singletary Lane and described as Exhibit B). PARCEL ONE: The parcel of land bounded on the north by Salem End Road, on the east by Singletary Lane and on the south and west by Massachusetts Water Resources Authority Reservoir No. 1. PARCEL TWO: The parcel of land bounded on the west by Badger Road, on the north by Salem End Road, on the east of Massachusetts Water Resources Authority Reservoir No. 1 and on the south by land owned by the Town of Framingham. Both parcels as shown on the Town of Framingham Assessors' Plan Sheet #447 Block 2, as lots 6, 7 and 8 as Parcel 1 and lots 3A and 5 as Parcel 2. Pass any vote or take any relative thereto. SPONSOR: Elinor Berenson, et al ARTICLE 29. 10/30/86 Voted: this article was defeated. ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town of Framingham will vote to amend the By-Laws of the Town of Fra- mingham by chaning the following described area from R-1 to R-4 SINGLE RESIDENCE DISTRICT j (Sons of Mary property so-called on Salem End Road) 33.68 Acres Legal description attached hereto. A certain parcel of land with the buildings thereon situated in the Town of Framingham, County of Middle- sex and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, being shown on a plan by MacCarthy Engineering Service, Inc., dated April 9, 1952, to be recorded herewith, and bounded and described as follows: Southerly by Salem End Road by three lines measuring together six hundred forty-seven and 09/ 100(647.09) feet; Southwesterly by the junction of said Salem End Road and Gates Street, one hundred sixty-five and 75/100(165.75) feet; Southwesterly again by said Gates Street by three lines measuring together eleven hundred thirty-seven and 85/100(1137.85) feet; Westerly by said Gates Street, sixty and 32/100 (60.32) feet; Westerly again by land of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts by three lines measuring together, four hundred thirty-five and 22/100(435.22) feet; Northerly and Northeasterly by Worcester Road by three lines measuring together seven hundred twenty-one and 13/ 100(721.13) feet; h Southeasterly by land now or formerly of the Salem End Trust, three hundred (300) feet; Northeasterly, Northerly and Northwesterly by land now or formerly of said Salem End Trust, by three lines measuring together fifteen hundred seventy-two and 02/100 (1572.02) feet; i Northeasterly Massachusetts by two lines measuring together four and Easterly by land of the Commonwealth of hundred eighty-five and 06/100 (485.06) feet; N M 94 Southwesterly by land of said Commonwealth of Massachusetts, one hundred ninety-five and 38/100 (195.38) feet; Southeasterly by said land of said Commonwealth of Massachusetts, five hundred seventy-five and 28/ 100(575.28) feet; Easterly again by land of said Commonwealth of Massachusetts, ninety-nine and 27/100 (99.27) i feet; and Easterly again by land of said Commonwealth of Massachusetts by four lines measuring together three hundred nine and 80/100 (309.80) feet. Containing 33.66 acres of land according to said plan. Including any rights of way as shown on said plan on the Easterly side thereof. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Arlene Steinberg, et al ARTICLE 30. 11/5/86 Voted: that the Town amend the Zoning By-Laws of the Town of Framingham by changing the area described in the warrant for the Special Town Meeting from R-1 to R-4 SINGLE RESI- DENCE DISTRICT. 89 voting in favor. 6 opposed. Boston, Mass. January 13, 1987 The foregoing amendments to the zoning by-laws adopted under Article 30 of the Warrant for the Fra- mingham Special Town Meeting held October 21, 28 and 29 and November 5, 1986 is hereby approved. 4 Francis X. Bellotti Attorney General Published on January 20th and 27th, 1987. ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map, as amended, by changing from an R-1 zoning, 8,000 square feet, to R-4 zoning, 40,000 square feet, the land in two parcels, on Salem End Road in the vicinity of Temple Street, formerly known as the Paull Property and currently deeded to William A. Depietri and Peter Venuto, Trustees of Rosewood IX Realty Trust, and described as Exhibits B and C. EXHIBIT B Land with the buildings thereon, situated on Salem End Road in the Town of Framingham, Middlesex County, Massachusetts being that parcel marked `Area = 4.73± Acres' as shown on a plan entitled, "Plan of Land in Framingham, Mass., Property of Thomas Paull et ux dated January 3, 1966 by Schofield Broth- ers, Registered Land Surveyors" recorded with the Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds in Book 12423, Page 259, more particularly bounded and described as follows: Northwesterly by the Southeasterly line of Salem End Road, as shown on said plan, on two courses, measuring respectively forty and 43/100 (40.43') feet and four hundred twenty-six and 14/100 (426.14') feet; Northeasterly by land now or formerly of Victor J. and Freda Masciarelli, J. Alan Hodder, George H. and Margaret G. Burrows, peter L. and Rose Mary Locchi, Salvo E. and Helen J. Pancini and Frank S. and Mary L. Walker, as shown on said plan, on two courses, measuring respectively three hundred one and 37/100 (301.37') feet and four hundred eleven and 79/100 (411.79') feet; Southwesterly by land of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Metropolitan District Commission, as shown on said plan, on two courses measuring respectively two hundred eighty-eight and 52/100 (288.52') feet and one hundred forty-seven and 63/100 (147.63') feet; and Southwesterly by that parcel marked `Area = 1.40 Acres ±', as shown on said plan, three hundred sixty-three and 30/100 (363.30') feet. 95 Said premises are conveyed with the benefit of all rights and privileges referred to in the deed by Edward C. Center et ux to Joseph W. Kelley dated September 23, 1909 recorded with said Deeds in Book 3474, Page 72, and subject to any existing restrictions and easements of record so far as the same are now in force and applicable. Said premises are conveyed subject to real estate taxes assessed as of January 1, 1986, for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1986, which the grantee herein by their acceptance hereof, assumes and agrees to pay. Said premises are the same conveyed to the grantors herein by deed of Thomas Paull and Dorothy F. Paull, dated December 26, 1985, recorded with said Deeds at Book 16667, Page 590. EXHIBIT C The land in Framingham, with the buildings thereon, situated on the southeasterly side of Salem End Road and being shown as a Lot Area = 1.40± Acres on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Framingham, Mass. Property of Thomas Paull et ux, Scale I"=50', January 3, 1966, Schofield Brothers Registered Land Sur- veyors, 48 Park Street, Framingham, Mass." which plan is recorded with said Deeds at Book 12412, Page 259, and according to said plan bounded and described as follows: Northwesterly by Salem End Road in two courses of one hundred ninety-seven and 92/100 (197.92') feet and one hundred thirty-seven and 92/100 (137.92') feet; Southerly by land of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Metropolitan District Commission three hundred ninety-four and 42/100(394.42') feet; Northeasterly by that parcel marked `Area = 4.73± Acres' as shown on said three hundred sixty-three and 30/100 (363.30') feet. Said premises are conveyed subject to real estate taxes assessed January 1, 1986, for the fiscal year commenc- ing July 1, 1986, which the grantee, herein by its acceptance hereof, assumes and agrees to pay. Said premises are the same described in a deed from Thomas Paull and Dorothy F. Paull to myself and Dorothy F. Paull as Trustee of Paull Realty Trust as aforesaid, dated April 11, 1973, recorded with said Deeds at Book 12412, Page 259. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Jonathan Hacker, et al i ARTICLE 31. 11/5/86 Voted: that this article be indefinitely postponed. ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map, as amended, by changing from an R-1 zoning, 8,000 square feet, to R-3 zoning, 20,000 square feet, the land in the vicinity of Temple Street and Salem End Road, more particularly described as bordered westerly by Temple Street for ±274 feet and southerly by the Mullen and Nanatovich properties for ± 156 feet and northerly by a bound with the shopping center property for 401 feet and easterly by the Levine and Garbarino properties for ±239 feet and containing approximately 2.46 acres. The said property is as shown on the Town of Framingham Assessors' Plan, sheet 380, blocks one, two and three. The property is presently assessed to Nantovich and k previously occupied by Framingham Landscape, Inc. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Thomas Leddy, et al ARTICLE 32. 11/5/86 Voted: that the Town amend the zoning by-law and zoning map, as amended, by changing from an R-1 zoning, 800 square feet, to R-3 zoning, 20,000 square feet the land in the vicinity of Temple Street and Salem End Road. The said property is a shown on the Town of Framingham Assessors' Plan, sheet 380, blocks one, two, and three. The dimensions and abutters are as described in the Special Town Meeting Warrant under Article 32, the property is presently assessed to Warrant under Article 32, the property is presently assessed to Nanatovich and previously occupied by Framingham Landscape, Inc. 96 s 75 voting in favor. 22 opposed. Boston, Mass. January 13, 1987 The foregoing amendments to the zoning by-laws adopted under Article 32 of the Warrant for the Fra- mingham Special Town Meeting held October 21, 28, 29 and November 5, 1986 is hereby approved. Francis X. Bellotti Attorney General Published on January 20th and 27th, 1987. ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to amend Zoning By-Law of the Town of Framingham, Section IV.G . . . . Dimensional Regulations, as follows: In Section IV G2, Table of Dimensional Regulations, make the following changes in the column titled "FLOOR AREA RATIO": (1) On the line titled "Business (B)", delete "0.5" and substitute therefor .32 (2) On the line titled "Light Manufacturing (M-1)", delete .5 one-story — .8 two or more" and substi- tute therefor .32 (3) On the line titled "General Manufacturing (M)", delete .5 one-story — .8 two or more" and I substitute therefor .32 Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. SPONSOR: Susan P. Bernstein, et al ARTICLE 33. 11/5/86 Voted: to amend the main motion by striking out the motion in its entirety and substituting in its place the following: That the Town amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Framingham, Section IV.G. DIMEN- SIONAL REGULATIONS, by inserting the following new Section IV.G.7.(d): (d) Interim FAR Limitation in Business, Light Manufacturing and General Manufacturing Districts Notwithstanding any provision of this Zoning By-Law to the contrary, the Floor Area Ratio (FAR) shall not exceed 0.32 in the Business (B), Light Manufacturing (M-1) and General Manufacturing (M) districts until October 21, 1988. 93 voting in favor. 9 opposed. Approved by the Attorney General on January 13, 1987. Published on January 20th and 27th, 1987. 11/5/86 Voted: that this warrant be dissolved at 11:15 p.m. as the business of this meeting was completed. A true record: Michael J. Ward, Town Clerk ATTENDANCE RECORD 1986 October 21, 1986 adjourned to April 28, 1986 due to motion that was voted. 107 town meeting members present October 28, 1986 133 Town Meeting Members present. October 29, 1986 Adjourned to April 30, 1986 October 30, 1986 124 Town Meeting Members present. November 5, 1986 118 Town Meeting Members present. 97 1 N i �,��i � I _ _ ..n� ...... . �. ., .. . .. .. - � I _ � � � - i .f �i - � - � ,I f S _ _ �. I