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HomeMy WebLinkAbout2018 Annual City Report.pdfCity of Framingham FY’18 Annual Report Dr. Yvonne M. Spicer, Mayor September 21, 2018 2 September 21, 2018 The Honorable City Council City of Framingham 150 Concord Street Framingham MA, 01702 Dear Councilors and Residents of Framingham, January 1, 2018 was an historic day in Framingham, as we officially transitioned from being a Town to becom- ing a City. That change was much more profound than changing logos or titles. It was a fundamental shift in how we organize our people and our resources. The FY’18 Year-End Report provides an overview of the activities and progress we have made in the past fiscal year during our period of transition. In its pages you will see the impressive progress we’ve made, and enjoy glimpses of what the future holds for us. You may also learn quite a lot about our City, as I did. Some fun facts from this past year that might be of interest to you: • This past year the City of Framingham consumed 5.67 million gallons of water per day, the lowest amount in five years. Through careful maintenance and education we have reduced our overall water consumption by one million gallons in just three years! • The Sanitation Department collected 5,400 tons of recyclables, and the DPW maintained all 5,170 street- lights. • The Fire Department responded to 16,703 incidents, 11,944 of which were emergencies; while the Public Health Department served 1,735 patients for non-flu immunizations in FY’18, a 281% increase from FY’17. • More than 14,700 permits were administered, and citywide taxable value was approved by the Department of Revenue at over $9 Billion, a robust growth of 6.9% over FY’17. • 525,000 items were borrowed from the library. Our community continues to benefit from the hard-working men and women who have dedicated their time and talent in our schools, protecting our safety, fortifying our infrastructure, beautifying our neighborhoods, improv- ing our quality of life, and administering the daily operations of the City we all care so much about. On behalf of the entire workforce, I invite you to stay informed about news, activities and emergency informa- tion by visiting www.framinghamma.gov and signing up for Notify Me, our email notification system, or by call- ing City Hall at (508) 532-5411. It is my distinct pleasure to present to you the FY’18 Year-End Report. Very truly yours, Yvonne M. Spicer, Mayor 3 In Memoriam Chris Walsh State Representative, 6th Middlesex District May 20, 1951 - May 2, 2018 Stephanie Mercandetti Framingham Planning Board September 12, 1975 - January 14, 2018 Barry M. Bograd Framingham Parks Commission March 10, 1940 - January 30, 2018 ~ 4 XXX 5 Table of Contents Office of the Mayor................................................................................................6 Police Department................................................................................................8 Fire Department...................................................................................................12 Public Works Division........................................................................................17 School Department.............................................................................................30 Framingham Public Library................................................................................42 Administration and Finance Division...............................................................46 Division of Public Health....................................................................................56 Facilities Management........................................................................................60 Human Resources Division...............................................................................62 Inspectional Services Division..........................................................................65 Planning and Community Development Division............................................68 Parks and Recreation Division..........................................................................87 Council on Aging................................................................................................92 City Solicitor........................................................................................................93 Revenue and Expenditure Reports.................................................................108 Appendix I: General Fund Revenue Report: Estimated to Actual Appendix II: Schools Department Financial Report Appendix III: City Departments Financial Report 6 Office of the Mayor Dr. Yvonne M. Spicer OFFICE OF THE MAYOR Phone (508) 532-5401 Mayor Memorial Building, Room 121 Fax (508) 532-5409 Thatcher W. Kezer III 150 Concord Street mayor@framinghamma.gov Chief Operating Officer Framingham, MA 01702 www.framinghamma.gov In the transition from a Town form of government to a City form, the Office of the Mayor takes on the functions that were previously the responsibility of the five-member Board of Selectmen and the responsibilities of the Town Manager. Upon entering office on January 1, 2018, in addition to taking on the incredible task of managing the on-going day-to-day operations of the now City, we had to manage the many transition requirements imposed by the new Charter to transition from a town to a city. This included creating a newly constituted Licensing Commis- sion, reappointing nearly every board and commission member, hiring new staff for the office, and establish- ing new processes to work with the City Council. I have been so impressed with the level of tireless work and dedication that so many of the professional staff, board and commission members, City Councilors and School Committee members have done to get our new City off to a successful start. I made a commitment to leading our community with integrity and transparency to move the City of Fram- ingham forward. I am pleased to report that we are making strides to refine our goals to be results-driven, to maximize community engagement, and to be fiscally responsible. I set out to focus on five points of light as we moved forward together on this new adventure. 1. A smooth transition to city form of government has been my first goal, and we are off to a good start, albeit with some challenges in the process. Guided by the Charter and the Transition Team recommendations, we are fill- ing key positions, boards and commissions, and establishing processes for effective and transparent government. 2. Excellence in education and in our schools has been another priority area. Under the guidance of our superintendent, we are undertaking several core initiatives at the Framingham Public Schools to ensure excel- lence in the education of our children. As an ex-officio member of the School Committee, I work closely with Superintendent Robert Tremblay and share his vision for our schools. The superintendent and the Framingham Public Schools Leadership Team drafted a multi-year strategic plan for improved outcomes for student achieve- ment over a three-year span. The School Committee voted unanimously to approve the plan, which begins a long-term strategy to make transformational change in support of student learning with measurable outcomes. 3. Invigorating our economy through planned growth and balanced development has been a priority as your Mayor. Our Panning and Economic Development Department started to plan and implement core initia- tives to anchor our downtown development. The initiatives include housing and business development that is consistent with transit-oriented development. One such project – 75 Concord Street – broke ground and is currently underway. 7 4. Preservation of assents, resources, and quality of life is another area where we have made progress. As your Mayor, providing public safety services we are proud of, keeping Framingham accessible, focusing on health and wellness, and renewing our commitment to the arts, community engagement, preserving open spaces in our northwest quadrant, and quality of life are always on my mind. 5. Investing in our people – our culturally diverse, linguistically-rich community; our seniors and veterans; our women and families – remains a top priority. We are supporting and enhancing the independence of our older adults. With a grant from the MetroWest Health Foundation, our Public Health Department is collaborating with the Callahan Center to transform the City of Framingham into an age- and dementia- friendly community. The City of Framingham will continue to be a place where older adults will have access to age-friendly community programs and be more inclusive and supportive of people living with dementia. As one of our first initiatives, in collaboration with our Department of Veterans Services, we hosted a Flag Day Parade on June 10, 2018. Flag Day commemorates the adoption of the United States flag on June 14, 1777, by resolution of the Second Continental Congress. Flag Day was officially established by President Woodrow Wilson on May 30, 1916: “I therefore suggest and request that throughout the nation and if possible in every community the fourteenth day of June be observed as Flag Day with special patriotic exercises.” We have only just begun this transition with much more work to be done. However, all of us are excited about the great potential to move Framingham forward as a model community, and to face the challenges we have with the capacity and capability to work to solve them. We have hired a Chief Operating Officer with the ex- perience and background to help guide our efforts as a City, a Mayor’s staff dedicated to serving the public, engaged with our legislative delegation for more resources for Framingham, and soon we will hire an employee dedicated to reaching out to the community to engage, listen, and inform. It has been a pleasure to serve as the first Mayor of Framingham these first six months as a City. I have high expectations that we will gain speed in our efforts to move Framingham forward. Respectfully Submitted, Dr. Yvonne M. Spicer, Mayor 8 XXX 1 William H. Welch Way | 508-872-1212 | sdt@framinghamma.gov A MESSAGE FROM ACTING CHIEF TRASK It is my pleasure to present the first annual report for the City of Framingham Police Department 2018. It was an exciting year as we transitioned into a city and saw many changes. Chief Kenneth Ferguson retired after 34 years of dedicated service to Framingham, and I was sworn in as Acting Chief on April 27, 2018. The Department also saw a change in the command staff as Deputy Chief Ron Brandolini was promoted to Executive Officer, and Lt. Victor Pereira and Lt. Lester Baker were both promoted to Deputy Chief. The Department will also welcome 12 new recruit officers this winter upon their completion of the police academy and field training. The Department continues to focus on evidence based crime preven- tion and reduction, training and community engagement. This spring we deployed several walking beats downtown to work with merchants and residents, and the feedback has been overwhelmingly positive. The Department has also been working with the Superintendent of Schools and has developed a plan to increase the presence of School Resource Officers (SRO’s) in the district to ensure the schools are a safe environ- ment and conducive to learning. This spring we also conducted our second gun buyback program, and it was a tremendous success once again as we took 150 guns off the street including 5 assault rifles. The City also brought back the Flag Day parade, and the Police Depart- ment proudly marched for the first time in 20 years. In addition to our downtown and school efforts, our community engage- ment efforts include interactive community meetings, Rape Aggression Defense (RAD), and citizen police academies, which provide community groups with an invaluable opportunity to learn about their police depart- ment and city. The Department has also increased its presence on social media with an active Facebook following and Twitter page, as well as the City’s See Click Fix app which enables us to be more responsive to citizen requests and concerns. The Police Department continues to follow the guidance of the President’s Taskforce on 21st Century Policing and strives to enhance our partnerships with community stakeholders and those who we are sworn to protect. It is our goal to be responsive to the needs of our residents and treat those to whom we come in contact with the utmost respect. It is an honor serving this great city. Respectfully, Steven D. Trask Acting Police Chief Police Department Police Personnel Resources Chief 1 Deputy Chief 3 Lieutenants 10 Sergeants 15 Assistant to Chief 1 Patrol Officers 102 Dispatchers 8 Civilian Staff 6.5 Mechanic 1 Parking Control 2 Animal Control 2.5 Crossing Guards 14 9 Emergency Management Framingham Emergency Management Agency (FrEMA) directs all emergency management operations in the City of Framingham. Emergency management is the preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery of both naturally occurring events like blizzards, ice storms, hurricanes, flooding and earthquakes, as well as any man- made disasters such as chemical spills, fires, transportation events, and acts of terrorism. FrEMA has worked extensively under its current structure to create planning groups, exercise response activities, secure funding from grants and other state and federal sources, and expand participation in this municipal function. FrEMA, in concert with Framingham Department of Public Works and the Northeast Homeland Security Regional Advi- sory Council, also operates an emergency equipment cache located at Framingham DPW. This cache is one of only three in Massachusetts and will be used to dispense equipment and supplies during emergencies. FrEMA, in conjunction with state and federal authorities, prepares, administers and implements Framingham’s Compre- hensive Emergency Management Plan (CEMP) as well as the federal mandated NIMSCAST. In 2010 Fram- ingham also joined five other communities (Ashland, Natick, Holliston, Hopkinton, and Sherborn) to form the Metrowest Regional Emergency Planning Committee. This planning committee engaged in a tabletop exercise in the fall of 2017 and is working toward a full-scale exercise for the fall of 2018. The Director of FrEMA is Acting Police Chief Steve Trask. The assistant emergency management directors are Assistant Fire Chief Mike Dutcher, DPW Asst. Highway Director Kate Ronconi, and Framingham Police Lt. Blaise Tersoni. Revenue The Framingham Police Department generates monies through the issuance of licenses and permits, admin- istration fees and fines from parking and traffic citations. This revenue is not appropriated to the police budget – it goes to the City’s general fund. Auxiliary Police The 19 dedicated officers of the Framingham Auxiliary Police completed another outstanding year of service to the community. For the past 76 years, the Auxiliary Police have been an active and vital component of the Police Department. Under the guidance of Auxiliary Captain Marc Spigel, the Auxiliary Police have a well- defined training program in which officers attend an academy for reserve police officers and are trained in first responder first aid and CPR/AED. Auxiliary Officers keep their skills and certification current with annual field and in-service training. The result is a professional Auxiliary Police Organization that stands ready and able to assist this department. During the year, Auxiliary Officers volunteer countless hours of their time to help make Framingham a better place to live and work. You can see some of their volunteer efforts in action at community events such as Con- certs on the Green, charitable road races, and child safety programs. As part of the Framingham Emergency Management Agency, Auxiliary Police Officers provide assistance at the Emergency Operations Center and emergency shelters as needed, and are trained in the National Incident Management System. Jail Diversion Program Advocates’ Jail Diversion Program (JDP) clinicians were physically embedded in the Framingham Police Department for over 80 hours a week between the hours of 7:30 am to 11:30 pm. During this year, these JDP clinicians provided support, resources, and services to over 1,087 individuals experiencing a psychiatric crisis or substance use disorder that members of the Framingham Police Department came into contact with. 10 XXX During this year, a further 138 individuals were diverted away from the Framingham Emergency Department by JDP clinicians who were on scene and available to provide the assessment and re- sources needed. The Framingham JDP continues to be held up as a best practice/gold standard in policing/behavioral health partner- ships, and it has been successfully replicated in several other communities across the Commonwealth and beyond. Framingham CARES The Framingham Compassionate Addiction Recovery Education Service (CARES) initiative continued to oper- ate during this year. The primary goal of Framingham CARES is to reduce the number and frequency of opioid overdose deaths in the Framingham community. This initiative has been developed to respond to individuals as soon as possible, post-opioid overdose/Narcan administration, and to connect them to specific and immedi- ately available treatment resources, including Advocates’ recovery coaches. Lessening the shame and stigma associated with substance use has been identified as a key tactic in identifying those in need of assistance. ANIMAL CONTROL DEPARTMENT 50 Western Avenue 508-532-5870 Fax 508-620-4872 Animal.Control@framinghamma.gov Staff and Responsibilities The Framingham Animal Control Department is staffed by two full-time and one part-time certified animal control officers. The Massachusetts Department of Agriculture, Division of Animal Health approves the appoint- ment of the municipal animal inspectors. Framingham animal control officers are responsible for all aspects of the Animal Control Department as the Department does not employ administrative or kennel staff. Animal control officers also: • Respond to all off-shift emergencies; • Provide care for the animals held by the department 365 days a year. • Prepare reports and participate in hearings and appear in court as needed; • Enforce both state laws and town by-laws; • Respond to calls regarding domestic animals, livestock and wildlife; • Work collaboratively with many outside agencies such as the Massachusetts Department of Fish and Wild- life, Tufts Wildlife Center, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Police, Massachusetts Department of Agriculture, Division of Animal Health, the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, and the Animal Rescue League of Boston; • Issue and enforce quarantines; • Work both in the field and in the office, managing calls for service, complaints and inquiries. 244 low level offenders were diverted from arrest to community based programs Katherine J. MacKenzie, Director of Animal Control, MA Municipal Animal Inspector, 25 years of service 11 Data During 2017, animal control officers fielded and responded to more than 5,525 calls. This number does not include calls for service that were made via email. More than 1,042 calls regarding wildlife were addressed by the animal control officers. Most often, wildlife calls are concerning possible rabid, injured or nuisance animals. This year they include sev- eral black bear sightings. The Department fielded more than 1,177 canine and 226 feline calls. Ap- proximately 3,080 calls addressed by the animal control officers involved such matters as kennel inspections, animal quarantines, animal bites, hearing requests, administrative calls, police assists, board of health as- sists, fire department assists, and livestock inspections. Rabies A primary duty of the animal inspector has recently become rabies control in the domestic animal population. In accordance with state law, all domestic mammals that bite a human or another domestic mam- mal must be quarantined for a period of ten days to determine the risk of rabies transmission. Domestic mammals that come in contact with or are otherwise exposed to the rabies virus must first be assessed to determine severity of risk. Depending on the vaccination status of the domestic mammal involved, it will be either quarantined or destroyed. The animal inspector must ensure that all animals, wild or domestic, which must be tested for rabies, are captured and euthanized. The head must be removed, and the specimen must be properly packaged and submitted to the State Rabies Lab for testing. Pets that may have been exposed to rabies through wounds of unknown origin or contact with a rabid animal are also quarantined. Livestock Municipal animal inspectors are also responsible for livestock inspections and may be called to assist with domestic animal disease quarantines in the event of an outbreak. Livestock inspections are a census of the domestic animal population of the City, ensure that all of the animals appear to be in good health and free from disease, observe animal housing, and ensure ample food and water are supplied. The annual livestock cen- sus, required by the Massachusetts Department of Agriculture, Division of Animal Health, is taken by the sworn animal inspectors of this department. There are more than 54 different locations that keep livestock and fowl within the City of Framingham. Livestock Inspections: 349 chickens 19 goats 2 turkeys 10 geese and ducks 14 sheep 48 horses 3 ponies 1 donkey 24 alpaca 4 llama 1 beef steer 10 game birds 12 Fire Department Mission Statement The Framingham Fire Department is a group of dedicated professionals committed to assist and protect the citizens of Framingham. In addition to firefighting and public safety services, the Department provides efficient emergency medical care and advanced technical rescue services to the community. Through collaboration and education, our mission is to prevent possible disastrous incidents from occurring and to minimize damage to life, property, and the environment. The Department employs the highly effective National Incident Command System in emergency operations. Planning for “all hazards” and “unified” command are two core principles. The Department’s highly skilled members provide emergency services and technical expertise for medical emergencies, hazardous material incidents, environmental emergencies, structural collapses, industrial accidents, specialized rope rescue, and water rescue and recovery incidents. Personnel The Framingham Fire Department experienced personnel changes in FY’18 caused by the retirement/resigna- tion/transfer of ten (10) employees, three (3) promotions, four (4) new hires and two (2) military deployment. Resignations FFOP Derek Cicciu Firefighter Michael Espinosa Firefighter Daniel O’Connor Transfers (DPW) Wayne Bolduc, Fire Alarm Division Dean Corbin, Fire Alarm Division Retirements: (years of service) Deputy Chief Mark Leporati (33) Captain William V. Norton (33) Firefighter Pablo Aponte, Jr. (30) Firefighter William Clover (32) Firefighter John Ford (32) 13 Military Deployments Firefighter Jerry Bosworth Firefighter Stephen Warren New Hires Fabricio Andrade James Foster Michael Travis Ryan McKinnon Promotions Captain K. Ryan Sullivan Lieutenant Joel Sexton Lieutenant Edward Rokes Total Alarms The Framingham Fire Department provides Fire, Rescue and Emergency Medical Services to those who live, work and travel through the community. FY’18 was our busiest year ever. We responded to 11,944 emergencies out of a total of 16,703 incidents. The remainder includes inspections, investigations and code enforcement activity. Safety is always the top priority. The FFD responded to 65 structure fires with ap- proximately $1,300,000 in property losses. FFD also responded to 445 cooking fires, 22 vehicle fires, and 130 outside fires which include brush, grass and mulch fires. Fires were the most serious of incidents, but the majority of all responses was medical and rescue emergencies. The first significant fire loss as a City occurred on January 2, 2018, in the Lord Chesterfield apartment building at 10 Greenview Street. Arriving fire companies were faced with fire and smoke coming from a fully-involved top-floor unit. Nevertheless, the fire was quickly extinguished and contained to the unit of origin. No civilians or firefighters were injured. FY2018FY2017FY2016 11,94411,52011,046 Total Emergency Calls 14 Partnerships The operation of the Fire Department is diverse and complex. We do more than simply respond to fires, res- cues and medical emergencies. Because some of the incidents we encounter are larger or more technical than the resources readily available to the Department, we work collaboratively with various departments and agen- cies both in and outside of the city. Some of these regional partnerships include: • MetroWest Medical Center • Massachusetts Hazardous Materials Response Team • Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) • Massachusetts Bay Community College • Massachusetts Fire District 14 • Regional Emergency Planning Committee (REPC) All Fire Prevention Division officials have some level of responsibility with the schools. The SAFE grant is a major resource in providing public education in collaboration with the Superintendent’s Office. The Fire Preven- tion Division and the Department look forward to continually improving this successful and cooperative venture. A major goal of the Framingham Fire Department is emphasis on community risk reduction and prevention by con- ducting life safety education programs in the community. Seniors are identified to be at risk and remain a primary focus. The Callahan Senior Center and Framingham Housing are two major resources in assisting with elder safety. Collaborative relationships with our neighboring communities and supporting agencies allow for shared re- sources and mutual aid assistance, ultimately improving public safety with minimal expense. Grants, Outside Funding, and Awards FFD was successful in obtaining some outside funding through grant awards from the Federal Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program, the Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety, and the Massachusetts De- partment of Fire Safety and will continue to seek additional outside revenue sources and grants. Some of the grants we secured this year include: • SAFE-Student Awareness of Fire Education - $6,707 • Senior Safe Grant - $3,009 • Private Donations - $25,500 15 FFD also received a major Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) grant. The grant totaled $175,182.00 and enabled the Department to purchase forty-eight (48) state of the art portable radios. In 2018, FFD received the Employer Support for the Guard and Reserve (ESGR) award for supporting the De- partment’s active military personnel. Framingham Fire has a long-standing tradition of supporting our soldiers and their families. FIRE PREVENTION DIVISION The Division of Fire Prevention is managed by a Fire Marshal, who supervises an Assistant Fire Marshal and two Fire Inspectors. This group attends professional training with the State Fire Marshal’s Office. Professional memberships and ongoing education with the Fire Prevention Association of Massachusetts (FPAM), the Inter- national Association of Arson Investigators (IAAI), and the Massachusetts Department of Fire Services (DFS) assists with maintaining consistent, professional standards. The Division’s major areas of responsibility include fire code violation investigations, public safety education, construction plan review, fire code permitting, and fire cause determination. Other responsibilities include rep- resentation on the Traffic and Roadway Safety Committee, the Technical Review Permitting Team, the Code Enforcement Task Force and the Interdepartmental Community Support Team. The Division also collaborates with all of the departments in the City - from the schools to public works. The Assistant Fire Marshal assists with the Division’s responsibilities and fills in with the Marshal’s absence. The Assistant Fire Marshal works closely with the Building Department in permitting approvals. He schedules acceptance testing with fire protection contractors, as well as conducting meetings with general contractors, engineers and property owners for proposed projects and also for addressing any problems that arise during construction and final inspection. The Fire Inspectors are responsible for reviewing fire permits and conducting the subsequent required inspec- tions. Acceptance tests are a major area of responsibility in which Fire Inspectors witness the proper operation of fire and life safety systems prior to a new tenant or owner occupying a residential or commercial space. The inspectors are the “boots on the street,” engaging with the community to promote and enforce safety interpreta- tions and fire protection issues. 16 In addition to hundreds of occupancy inspections, a summary of permit activity in FY’18 includes: • 1,261 residential smoke detector permits • 1,799 fire alarm system permits • 783 sprinkler system permits • 223 oil burner permits • 135 flammable liquid storage permits • 105 propane storage permits • 63 welding permits TRAINING AND EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES DIVISION The Training Division is managed by a Deputy Chief and assisted by a Lieutenant assigned as the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Officer. The Deputy Chief and EMS Officer are also safety officers for the Department. Reviewing accidents and injuries to provide insight and potential solutions is part of their responsibility in pro- moting safety. The EMS Officer acts as the liaison to local agencies, regional hospitals, state agencies, and the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT). Our motto is “Every day is a training day.” Federal and State mandates dictate much of the myriad required training. Solid basic training is the primary objective and foundation for all training. Since training is perfor- mance-based, firefighters must demonstrate skill competence. Personal protective gear, specialized tools and equipment, and technological advances continue to place a strong demand on the Division as well. American Medical Response (AMR) is Framingham’s contracted EMS provider. The Division manages EMS and AMR. In FY’18, a fourth ambulance called “A4” was put into service - stationed in the Water Street fire station. Adding A4 has reduced response times and taken some of the workload of the other three ambulances during peak times. A4 is on duty Monday through Friday, 8:30 am through 4:30 pm. A compliment to the Department is the fact that Framingham is a desired system to work in as an EMT. Amongst our peers, we are considered a professional, highly skilled public service organization that is looked upon as a resource and model for others to follow. We are proud to hold that reputation and assure it will continue. On behalf of the Framingham Fire Department, thank you to the governing officials, businesses, and citizens for your assistance and support. 17 Peter A. Sellers, Executive Director - 508-532-5600 150 Concord Street, Room 213 Framingham, MA 01702 DPWprojects@framinghamma.gov ENGINEERING AND TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT The Engineering and Transportation Department is responsible for the planning, design and construction of capital roadway and utility infrastructure projects; maintaining compliance with various state and federal pro- grams such as National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Phase II Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) permit; managing the City’s Street and Trench Opening Permit programs; reviewing de- velopment and redevelopment plans to ensure roadway and utility changes conform to the City’s construction standards; and inspecting modifications and expansions to the roadway, water, sewer and stormwater infra- structure. The Department also provides technical expertise to the operational departments of Public Works; other City departments; various boards, committees and commissions; maintains an extensive Geographical Information System (GIS); and is the custodian of a large collection of historical paper plans and documents. Design Projects Multiple transportation and utility design projects were advanced or completed in FY’18. Transportation design work included the Union Avenue corridor and the Edgell Road at Central Street intersection, which are both be- ing advanced as federal and state funded Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) projects. Other projects include the Beaver Street bridge, which was funded through a Small Bridge grant; the intersection of Edgell, Edmands, and Water Streets; Fountain Street; Salem End Road bridge, North Concord Roadway; the intersec- tion of Concord, Central, and Water Streets; Dudley Road Multi-path Phase II, which is being funded through a Complete Streets grant; and the Downtown Common. Further, the design of transportation and utility improve- ments to Marble Street was completed by the developer’s engineer for the 266 Waverly Street housing project; the construction of these improvements will be paid through a MassWorks grant, and the project will be man- aged by the Department. Design work advanced for the following utility projects: sewer improvements downstream of the Technology Park; the Saxonville Levee Stormwater Pump Station; water, sewer and drain improvements along Union Avenue from Walnut Street to Proctor Street; replacement of the Lanewood Avenue sewer siphon; realignment of the Woodland sewer pump station force main; and water and sewer improvements along Worcester Road Public Works Division Paul G. Barden, Deputy Director of Public Works 508-532-6053 Diane Conner, Assistant Director of Administration & Support 508-532-5611 William R. Sedewitz, Chief Engineer 508-532-6012 Thomas Coyne, Director of Administration & Finance 508-532-5620 Fred J. Davies, Director of Fleet, Facilities & Communications 508-532-6073 Blake Lukis, Director of Water & Wastewater 508-532-6052 Wayne Bolduc, Director of Lighting & Signals 508-532-5934 Daniel S. Nau, Director of Highway & Solid Waste 508-532-6032 18 from Concord Street to the Natick town line. Further, the engineer for the development project located at 175 Millwood Street designed a replacement for the Blackberry Lane Sewer Pump Station; the construction of this project will occur in FY’19 as a City-managed project but will be paid for by the developer. Transportation Construction Projects Transportation construction projects in FY’18 included: repairs to a retaining wall along Main Street near Moulton Park Road, improvements to the Downtown Common, and Phase I of the Dudley Road multi-path. The Department worked closely with the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT) on the rehabilitation of the Mount Wayte Railroad Bridge and the replacement of the Winter Street Railroad Bridge. The multi-year Downtown Improvements project reached substantial completion in FY’18 and involved traffic improvements, pedestrian and bicycle improvements, and streetscape upgrades to the Downtown area. Utility Construction Projects Utility construction projects in FY’18 included: water, sewer and drainage improvements along Union Avenue between Main Street and Walnut Street; water and sewer work on Elmfield and Griffin Roads; water main replacements on Speen Street and Cochituate Road: rehabilitation of the Goodnow Lane water pump station; construction of a 1.75 million gallon water tank on Indian Head Heights; sewer and drain improvements on Fountain Street; and the start of the replacement of four neighborhood sewer pump stations – Eastleigh, Han- cock, Shawmut and Little Farms. 19 Grants In conjunction with the Community & Economic Development (C&ED) Department, a $396,115 Complete Streets grant was secured for the second phase of a multi-use path along Dudley Road. Phase II will connect to the section completed in 2017 and extend the path from Fountain Street to Union Avenue. Department staff completed the design in-house, and construction began in spring of 2018. The Department assisted C&ED with the Municipal Vulnerability Preparedness (MVP) grant program resulting in a $44,500 award to the City to begin the process of planning for climate change resiliency and implementing priority projects. The Department received a $185,000 grant from the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) to improve water quality at Farm Pond. The Department worked cooperatively with the Department of Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Affairs to design and install a rain garden adjacent to the new skate park at Farm Pond Park. The design was completed in-house and used native plants from the New England Wildflow- er Society at Garden in the Woods. The Department received a grant from the Massachusetts Department of Ecological Restoration for $155,000 as part of their Culvert Replacement Municipal Assistance Grant Program. The grant provided funding to conduct field data collection, engineering, design, and permitting for a culvert replacement at Colonial Drive on Hop Brook. Replacing the culvert is the first step of a multi-phase project to improve ecological function, fish and wildlife connectivity, and storm resiliency while reducing flood impacts in the Hemenway neighborhood. The Department is managing a Hazard Mitigation Grant award of over $710,000 from FEMA to upgrade three culverts between A Street and Concord Street for flood mitigation. The Department also managed a Five Star and Urban Waters Restoration Program grant award from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to provide an edu- cation program to engage the local community in appreciating, enhancing, and preserving Beaver Dam Brook. Preparedness, Permitting, and Support The Department has increased efforts to prepare for the new EPA NPDES MS4 Permit, which became effec- tive on July 1, 2018. The permit is detailed and includes numerous new requirements with a focus on regu- lating the water quality of the City’s drainage system, including the discharges of over 600 outfalls into local waterbodies. In preparation for the permit, the City updated mapping of the drainage system and reviewed existing bylaws and regulations for compliance with the new requirements. The Department developed City-specific technical specifications for water main bypass, disinfection, and test- ing work; prepared a standard operating procedure for the handling of asbestos cement pipe; and implemented a cloud-based construction document management system to increase efficiency in the sharing of submittals, shop drawings, pay requisitions, daily and weekly reports, and other construction information. The Department continued to be actively involved in the Central Massachusetts Regional Stormwater Coalition (CMRSWC), a group of communities working to more effectively manage municipal stormwater and to meet the require- ments of the MS4 Permit in an efficient and cost-effective manner. The Department also continued to take an active role in the Massachusetts Statewide Municipal Stormwater Coalition. In partnership with these coalitions, the Department supported a $200,000 MS4 Municipal Assistance grant from the MassDEP, which resulted in a statewide “Think Blue Massachusetts” public education campaign to improve awareness of stormwater and to encourage ways to prevent water pollution. Also in partnership with these coalitions, the Department sponsored Worcester Polytechnic Institute student proj- ects that developed education tools to assist elementary teachers in meeting the new Massachusetts Science Standards. The Department conducted an annual inspection of the Saxonville Flood Damage Reduction System (a.k.a. Saxonville Levee) with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), prepared semi-annual reports, and man- aged capital improvements identified by the USACE to maintain the system’s efficiency. 20 The Department supported the Traffic & Roadway Safety Committee (TRSC) until December 2017 by providing technical advice, processing requests and agendas, and working with petitioners. The Department continued to provide City GIS support including: integrating 2017 aerial photography from a City-wide flyover into GIS for internal and public use, transferring asset management data to a cloud-based system with mobile data tools, and updating the work order system for mobile device use. The Department continued to advance the street acceptance program to identify unaccepted roads that were constructed consistent with the subdivision standards and were intended for eventual public acceptance. Un- der the new City structure, the Department provided an overview of the street acceptance program and meth- odology for future prioritization to the City Council. Finally, in 2017 the Department conducted 1,597 total inspections primarily of private work within the right- of-way or involving public infrastructure. These inspections ranged from single family residence water/sewer connections to large scale projects such as private utility gas main installations or private developments. The permitting work included 501 Street Opening Permits, 284 Trench Opening Permits, 39 Public Way Access Permits, and review of 313 plan submissions. The survey staff conducted 73 large survey projects and 49 side- line surveys. HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT The Highway Department is responsible for the maintenance and repair of the City’s roadways, sidewalks, stormwater utilities, and public shade trees. Pavement Management Program Roadway projects consist of the replacement or upgrade of roadways and appurtenances for adherence to cur- rent regulatory guidelines and directives, as well as new pavement markings, street signs, sidewalks, granite and bituminous curbing, ADA compliant wheelchair ramps, and curb-cut control measures. In FY’18 the program resulted in: road rehabilitation on over seven centerline miles of roadway; maintenance and replacement of defective guardrails; emergency repairs; preventive maintenance; and the filling of approxi- mately 11,500 potholes. The Department continued to integrate and manage the use of specialized contracted equipment with in-house resources. The continuation of the Annual Roadway Program has led to greater cost control, quality control, and accountability while performing repair work on defective roadways. Snow and Ice Management Program The Snow and Ice Program is one of the most critical public safety functions undertaken by the Department. Management of this operation requires the integration of City forces with contracted equipment, and respond- ing to a large number of uncontrollable factors to successfully mitigate the impact to those traveling City road- ways. The Department is responsible for providing safe roadways and sidewalks both during and after snow, ice, and other weather related events. This effort involves the plowing, anti-icing, and de-icing treatment, and snow removal of 255 centerline miles of public roadway, 45 municipal parking facilities, 84 miles of sidewalks and public pathways, 215 crosswalks, 190 cul-de-sacs, 11 school paths, 31 school crossing-guard stations, and all student drop-off areas. The Department also distributes and fills 50 sand barrels located on hills throughout Framingham for community use. 21 The Department integrated Geographic Information System (GIS) with an Incident Command Structure to manage each event. In addition, the Department installed global positioning system (GPS) units into plowing equipment. The purpose of this strategic effort is to provide a high level of accountability, while applying the appropriate amount of resources to each weather event. In order to be fiscally responsible, the Department has developed a strategy to focus on main roads with greater speeds and higher traffic volumes while utilizing a measured response on secondary roads, making them all safe and passable. All City spreader trucks are equipped with a computerized distribution system operating according to ground speed to ensure the uniform distribution of de-icing materials. Stormwater Management Program The stormwater system consists of more than 200 miles of surface and subsurface drainage systems, over 10,000 catch basin and manhole structures, and more than 900 drainage outfalls. Construction projects com- pleted by the Department and contracted personnel in FY’18 include the installation of over 600 linear feet of new drain line installation and/or repairs, and the repair or adjustment of 855 drainage structures. The De- partment continues the practice of monthly inspections as part of a proactive drainage structure maintenance program. During FY’18, 21,117 linear feet of drainpipe was cleaned and 6,000 linear feet was televised. With the addition of a stormwater vactor truck to the Department’s fleet, in-house stormwater crews have assumed responsibility for cleaning drain lines, rather than a private contractor. Additionally, headwalls and the trash gates under the Second Street Bridge and Taralli Terrance Bridge are cleared of debris monthly as well as prior to any significant rain event. The removal of sand and debris from the City’s catch basins and manholes remains an operational prior- ity each year. In an effort to minimize the amount of sand entering and further diminishing the capacity of the system, the Department has continued strict control practices for the use of de-icing materials during the winter months. Additionally, a robust, City-wide street and sidewalk cleaning program, performed each spring, aims to maximize sand and debris removal. Overnight sweeping of the streets and sidewalks in the Downtown Business District minimizes the entry of materials into the system and provides a cleaner environment. Parking is restricted during overnight hours to allow for the sweeping of over seven miles of roadway each night. Additionally, in 2017, the Board of Select- men approved an Urban Sweeping Program to restrict parking once a month in order to clean the streets more effectively in four Downtown residential areas totaling just under 30 miles. Approximately 500 “No Parking” signs were installed, including specially made trilingual signs in English, Spanish, and Portuguese. Additionally, residential notifications were distributed in the area. Deficiencies in the stormwater system throughout the City are a major cause of unscheduled overtime and emergency repair costs incurred by the City. To maintain compliance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Systems Phase II Stormwater Permit, a vigorous, yearlong effort is made to clean all of the catch basins utilizing both Department personnel and contracted services to remove silt, sand, and debris annually. Storm drain cleaning consistently results in a significant list of neces- sary repairs as the inspection process progresses. Once the catch basins are cleaned, approximately 1,000 tons of catch basin debris is hauled to an accepted facility utilizing City equipment and personnel. Beaver Dam Brook and Hop Brook continue to be significant operational challenges as even a modest rain event can cause the brooks to surcharge at the many culvert headwalls in both South Framingham and the Gregory Road and McAdams areas of North Framingham. For this reason, in FY’18 the Department installed automated monitoring sensors alerting staff of high water levels. The Department is responsible for the maintenance, inspection and operation of the City’s Saxonville Flood Levee System, consisting of 2,500 feet of earth dikes, 1,340 feet of concrete floodwalls, 1,000 feet of channel realignment, a pumping station, interior drainage, and a vehicular floodgate. 22 Traffic Systems Management Program The Department manages the maintenance, fabrication, and placement of the City’s regulatory, advisory and street signage; steel-beam safety guardrails; installation of new and annual maintenance of existing pavement markings; and the work zone safety program for Department operations. Other responsibilities include the advance planning of roadway traffic management during infrastructure improvements; posting street-by-street “no parking” signage to efficiently advance street sweeping and snow removal operations; installing and/or replacing hundreds of regula- tory and advisory signs either by direction of the Traffic Roadway Safety Committee, the Traffic Commission, or as required through routine maintenance practices; responding to police, fire and other safety roadway related issues requiring emergency traffic management; and assistance for scheduled events such as the Boston Marathon. The Department also managed the annual contract and painting of 85 miles of yellow centerline, 54 miles of white edge line, over 726 crosswalks, 792 stop bars, and over 600 arrows and symbols throughout the City. Tree Warden & Forestry Management Program Framingham was named a ‘Tree City USA’ again in 2018 for the 28th consecutive year. The Department is respon- sible for promoting, preserving, and enhancing the shade tree environment in the City through the application of best management practices and public education campaigns. Additionally, the Department is responsible for managing the maintenance of the City’s estimated 10,000 public shade trees, and for the development of a Public Shade Tree Program for the community. The Department plans an annual Arbor Day celebration, and several private contractors donate their time and resources to this successful event. This year the event was held in conjunction with the Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Affairs Department and Keefe Technical School on the Keefe Tech campus. Statutory requirements to maintain minimum clearance over the 225 centerline mile roadway network is a primary and recurring function of the Department. This year’s pruning program has been delayed in its spring start due to the special curbside collection of storm debris. Additionally, the City works with Eversource to ensure that their line-pruning practices are appropriately managed. The City’s shade trees, while provid- ing a great public amenity to the community, require routine maintenance to avoid becoming a public liability. The Department performs monthly surveys to determine hazardous and diseased trees and takes corrective action to minimize damage; responds during severe weather events; and provides cleanup and removal of storm debris. The Tree Warden conducts frequent hazardous tree assessments, prescribes treatment, oversees removals, and participates in public hearings on issues related to trees within the right of way. The Department routinely responds to residents’ inquiries and requests for tree related services. During FY’18, personnel performed seven preventative hazard tree removals and planted 95 trees. Due to the March Nor’easters, the Depart- ment performed an extremely high number of emergency tree removals (184) and responded to an additional 744 hangers and tree limbs in the road during the initial response to those storms. Another 199 hangers were removed in the weeks that followed to clear roadways of tree-related hazards. The Department performed a City-wide collection of storm debris in May 2018 to facilitate cleanup of private residential property. The City collected, processed and disposed of approximately 60,000 cubic yards of debris during the 4-week collection. 23 Vegetation Management Program The Department oversees the City’s vegetation management program that is permitted annually by the Mas- sachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources Pesticide Bureau. This program allows the Department to apply best management practices for the control of curbside vegetation that otherwise would grow uncontrol- lably and require the commitment of substantial and sustained labor to eradicate unwanted growth. Addition- ally, a landscape crew maintains approximately 80 locations by mowing, mulching, weeding and watering on a consistent basis. SANITATION DEPARTMENT The Department is responsible for managing the City’s solid waste; overseeing the curbside solid waste and recycling programs; operating containerized collections at condominiums and municipal facilities, the Recycling Drop-Off Center (RDC) on Mount Wayte Avenue, and the Yard Waste Drop-Off on Dudley Road. In FY’18, the Department fielded requests from residents to exchange their recycling carts to a larger size, totaling 835 exchanges, drop-offs, or other issues resolved. There were 4,062 Recycling Center permits sold, providing access to the RDC. In addition to the hazardous and difficult to manage waste collected at the RDC, the center collected 251 tons of recyclables. Through fees collected for services and the marketing of the recy- clables and through the sale of RDC permits, $285,302.44 was generated for the City’s FY18 General Fund. The Department managed the collection of refuse and recycling from over 17,000 stops, including the tipping of over 36,000 recycling and refuse carts per week. A total of approximately 5,400 tons of recyclables were collected. The Sanitation Department continues to provide weekly curbside collection of recyclable materials, a service added for residents when the Department eliminated the need for a contractor to perform the collection. This allows for greater control and accountability over the operation. 24 The Department continues to research and develop new techniques in managing waste that cuts costs, im- proves efficiency, and further develops the City’s recycling programs. Some approaches include: • Initiated more frequent inspections for compliance with curbside and condominium trash and recycling regu- lations, and educational outreach to increase residents’ awareness of contamination issues. • Obtained grant funding and continuing to work with Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection to obtain future sustainability grants. • Educational outreach to the City’s elementary schools to teach students how to recycle and to inform them of the City’s program. Continued residential outreach through City events. • Completed Phase 1 and 2 of the formal closure procedures with the Massachusetts Department of Environ- mental Protection to bring the Dudley Road Yard Waste Drop-Off Facility into compliance. • Trained and cross-trained employees on the usage of automated recycling trucks to promote redundancy within the Department. Drivers have also undergone one-on-one Safe Driver training with a specialized consultant. • Facilitated curbside collection of textile recycling through a contractor at no cost to the City. • Continued the sale of compost to homeowners and landscapers at reduced rates, helping to reduce disposal costs, raise additional revenues for the City, and create a full circle recycling loop. Other Departments, at no additional cost, use the compost, providing them with a significant financial savings. The Department has provided these materials for various City projects such as at the Recycling Drop-Off Center itself, as a soil amendment in athletics fields, landscaping at City-owned buildings, and various roadway projects throughout Framingham. Additional special events and programs were offered to residents at no cost to them, including: • Household Hazardous Waste Day, which drew over 350 vehicles in the spring, and close to 200 vehicles in the fall. • Earth Day Celebration and Green-Up Day. • Shred Fest (secure confidential document shredding). • Electronics Recycling Day. A total of 772 vehicles were counted for these events. WATER DEPARTMENT The Water Department is responsible for protecting public health, safety, and the environment by the distribution of a public potable water supply and the provision of fire suppres- sion service to Framingham’s residential and commercial users. The Department provides for the maintenance of and repairs to the water distribution infrastructure. In 2018, the Water Department was the recipient of the Water System Compliance Award from the Massachusetts Depart- ment of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) for the second year in a row. The Department reports on water on a calendar year basis and for 2017, an average daily water demand of 5.67 million gallons per day was purchased from the MWRA. This is the Water Distribution Infrastructure265 miles of water mains18,000 service connections6 storage tanks store 8.8 mill gallons4 pump stations provide water3 booster pump stations provide pressure2,180 hydrants6,117 valves2,667 backflow preventers20,617 meters 25 lowest average daily demand that Framingham has seen in recent history; a majority of which can likely be at- tributed to the wet summer season that we had as compared to the drought in 2016. However, the Department has placed a significant emphasis on reducing water losses by identifying and repairing leaks in the distribu- tion system by performing an annual leak detection survey of the entire distribution network of pipes and hydrants. In 2018, the leak detection program found, and subse- quently repaired, 13 leaks with a total po- tential water loss of 80,000 gallons per day. Through this effort, and in conjunction with the extensive infrastructure improvement projects completed, the City has reduced its average daily demand by almost 1 mil- lion gallons per day in just three years. The first six months of 2018 have shown a small uptick in average daily water usage, which can be attributed to the significant number of water system failures during the extreme cold weather this winter. In January alone, the Department responded to 30 water failures, 19 of which occurred within a seven-day period. The water lost through these 30 failures totals approximately eight million gallons. The Department has also continued the practice of identifying and implementing capital improvement projects of limited scope from design through construction, utilizing in-house engineering and operations staff. This practice not only provides the City with a significant cost savings over contracting for these services, but is used as a tool for continually training employees. This year, approximately 2,000 feet of water infrastructure and associated appurtenances were replaced using this approach on Beaver Court, Summer Street, Hastings Street, Pitt Road, and at the Barbieri School. In addition to construction activities, over 176 excavations were required for repair of water system issues throughout the year. To ensure proper hydrant operation, 16 hydrants were repaired and 19 hydrants were replaced. Further, the Department responded to 1,012 first response calls for customers in need of immediate assistance. To ensure the protection of the City’s water infrastructure during contractor excavations, the De- partment belongs to Dig Safe and is required to mark out all water and wastewater infrastructure in locations where excavations will occur. In 2017, Department staff responded to 3,635 DigSafe requests. By March 2018, the contracted work to replace meters aged greater than 15 years was completed. At the beginning of this project in the Spring of 2015, over 33% of meters in Framingham were aged greater than 15 years; had this work not been conducted the quantity would be over 47% today. Thanks to this program, the percentage of meters in Framingham aged greater than 15 years has been reduced to below 7%. The total number of meters installed by the contractor was 7,329. Along with the contractor’s efforts in 2018, Department staff have completed 1,950 meter installations and performed over 4,600 backflow device tests. The Department performs approximately 936 bacteriological tests on a regular interval throughout the year to ensure the quality and protection of the City’s drinking water. The City maintained continuous compliance throughout the year with the Environmental Protection Agency’s standards related to bacteria testing (Total Co- liform Rule). Furthermore, the Department collects drinking water samples from 15 homes annually, which are subsequently analyzed for their lead and copper content. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has set the action level for lead in drinking water at 15 parts per billion and copper at 1.3 parts per million, the level that triggers corrective actions to be undertaken by the water supplier. The results of the sampling program have once again successfully demonstrated the City’s compliance with these water quality standards. Average Daily Demand (Million Gallons per Day) 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 6.50 6.47 6.44 6.12 5.67 26 WASTEWATER DEPARTMENT The Wastewater Department is responsible for the collection and transportation of wastewater to the Massa- chusetts Water Resources Authority’s (MWRA) collection and treatment facilities in a manner that is regulatory compliant, economical, and safe to support the public health and sanitation of the City’s nearly 70,000 resi- dents. The Department provides for the maintenance of, and repair to, the wastewater collection infrastructure that con- sists of 226 miles of gravity mains, 18 miles of force (pressure) mains, 43 pump stations, 6,600 manholes, and over 40 miles of cross-country sewer-line easements. Wastewater is conveyed from Framingham to the MWRA, which is charged with the transport and treatment of wastewater from its forty-three member communities. In 2018, the average daily collection of wastewater was 7.19 million gallons per day. The highest month av- erage day flow occurred in April with 10.43 million gallons per day. This increase in flow to the wastewater collection system is typical during periods of significant rainfall or snowmelt; infiltration and inflow from sources, such as leaking mains and service connections; roof and area drains; and sump pump discharges. Capital improvement programs were substantially under-funded for decades, and, consequently, critical infra- structure experienced ever-increasing incidents of failure. Throughout the 20th century, the infrastructure was extended to include service to an area of increasing development; however, the funding for maintenance and repair did not keep pace with the capital needs of these aging and expanding assets. As a consequence, the Department was historically engaged solely in performing unscheduled maintenance and was unable to devote resources to perform critical preventative maintenance and capital improvement to the system. This issue was underscored by the issuance of an Administrative Consent Order (ACO) and Notice of Noncompliance by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) in 2007. The ACO requires Framingham to undertake major sewer construction and rehabilitation projects over several years with the primary focus of addressing system capacity deficiencies and alleviating reoccurring sanitary sewer overflows, a violation of state and federal law. The last specifically identified project from the ACO was completed on schedule before the end of 2013. The ACO included several other requirements including in- creased staffing levels, major equipment purchases, implementation of a Supervisory Control and Data Acqui- sition (SCADA) system to remotely monitor and control pumping stations, and strict reporting requirements. At the end of 2017, all municipalities were required to submit to the MassDEP an Infiltration and Inflow Plan. Due to the present ACO, Framingham can expect to receive stringent scrutiny of this plan. The Department is awaiting MassDEP’s review of the Inflow Removal Plan that will likely result in additional enforcement action to identify and remove extraneous flow sources such as from roof and area drains and sump pumps that are illegally connected to the wastewater system. The Department also faces the continuing challenges of managing a second ACO originally issued by the MWRA in 2003. The MWRA Settlement Agreement limits the level of hydrogen sulfide that Framingham is authorized to discharge to the MWRA system through operational efforts. Hydrogen sulfide generation causes nuisance odor, corrosion, and deterioration problems in sewers, which when left unchecked, can lead to catastrophic system failures. Measures taken to mitigate the generation of sulfide include chemical dosing at several wastewater pumping stations and points in the collection system; ongoing collection system cleaning and inspection; daily pump station maintenance and inspection, and enforcement of grease interceptor require- ments at food establishments. A major cause of sulfide generation in wastewater is excessive detention times associated with the large number of pumping stations and miles of associated sewer force main piping. The City’s completion of wastewater system capital improvements to comply with the ACO over the last decade have eliminated seven problematic pump stations and their associated force mains to significantly reduce hydrogen sulfide generation throughout the system. The MWRA requires the Department to routinely sample and test for sulfide at several collection system locations, and in 2017, the results of all of the hydrogen sulfide sampling were below the required limit and demonstrated compliance with the Settlement Agreement. 27 Similar to the Water Department’s efforts, the Wastewater Department has also embraced the practice of iden- tifying and performing capital projects of limited scope --from design through construction -- utilizing in house staff. This year, approximately 1,200 feet of wastewater infrastructure and associated manholes were replaced using this approach on Waushakum Boulevard and Guild Road. In addition, Department staff rehabilitated 200 manholes and performed a complete upgrade to the Oakcrest Wastewater Pumping Station, including the installation of new pumps, new motors, and electrical and control systems. In addition to construction activities, over 122 excavations were required for repair of wastewater system is- sues throughout the year. Department staff responded to 1,500 first response calls for customers in need of im- mediate assistance. To ensure the protection of the City’s wastewater infrastructure during contractor excava- tions, the Department belongs to Dig Safe and is required to mark out all water and wastewater infrastructure in locations where excavations will occur. In 2018, Department staff responded to 3,635 DigSafe requests. The Department also completed closed-circuit TV (CCTV) video inspection of over 27 miles of sewer main. The conditions were documented using a remotely controlled camera unit that traveled through the pipe and by us- ing a standardized reporting format for future reference. These inspections have revealed areas of the system that have structural failures or less severe defects that require repair, replacement, or continued monitoring. FLEET, FACILITIES AND COMMUNICATIONS DEPARTMENT The Fleet, Facilities and Communications Department provides critical support services for vehicle and equip- ment maintenance to the Department of Public Works and other City departments. The Department is respon- sible for the development and implementation of professional fleet management standards and practices; the design and procurement of all Public Works vehicles and equipment; and for providing standardized mainte- nance management practices for all Public Works facilities. The Department is also charged with the technical management of the telecommunications network that provides a critical service component to the Department’s Emergency Management Response Plan. The Department continues to provide logistical support to the DPW through the provision of fully operational equipment, facilities and telecommunications that together, ensure the effective and efficient delivery of essen- tial services to the residents of the community. The Department also continues to be one of three major equip- ment and materials cache sites for the Northeast Homeland Security Regional Advisory Council (NERAC). Fleet Management When purchasing items the Department uses several contracts to get the best pricing available. The Depart- ment takes advantage of multiple state contracts including the National Joint Powers Alliance (NJPA) and the U.S. Communities Government Purchasing Alliance. In FY’18, the Department researched, designed, and prepared specifications for the procurement of the following specialized equipment: two 11,000 gross vehicle weight (GVW) cab and chassis trucks with service bodies and plows, and one specialized Vactor truck that is designed, along with its regular duties, to assist the Fire Department in trench rescues. The Department also developed a service body vehicle to assist in asbestos material collection for City construction projects. Technician training sessions continued both in-house and off-site, which included Massachusetts State Inspec- tion Training, First Aid and CPR Training, Haldex Brake Training, ATA Diesel After Treatment, Elgin Pelican Sweeper Training, Comp U Spread Sander Control Training, and Ford training. The Department implemented a bar code inventory tracking system to help maintain the inventory system. This year was the 11th winter season that utilized a temporary site set up by the Fleet Services Technicians on the north side of the City during snow and ice events. This site continues to work well in providing the techni- cians a closer proximity to make repairs while reducing a vehicle’s time out of service that would occur if return- ing to the Western Avenue facility on the south side of the City. 28 The Department wrote 3,960 repair orders, performed 581 scheduled preventative maintenance services, com- pleted 179 Commonwealth of Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles Enhanced Emissions State Inspec- tions, and managed the acquisition and distribution of more than 298,888 gallons of gasoline and diesel fuel. Facility Maintenance The Department continued monthly inspections of the fuel system and the annual calibration of the fuel pumps that must be completed at the Western Avenue fuel site as per the Department of Environmental Protection’s (MassDEP) new mandates. The oil/water separators at Western Avenue and the Mount Wayte Recycling Facil- ity continue to be inspected quarterly and pumped out in compliance with MassDEP regulations; the separators are pumped annually, at minimum, or sooner if needed. The Department continues to perform full load tests on the emergency/standby generators at both the Henry Street and Western Avenue facilities. This is done quarterly to ensure proper operation, along with a semi-annual maintenance program. The annual fire sprinkler inspection was also performed at the Mount Wayte Recycling and the Western Avenue Facilities. In-house craftsman talent has proven to be an invaluable asset to the Department. This was evident when the Department needed a major reconstruction of the equipment wash bay. This included welding, fabrication, electrical, plumbing and carpentry work. The Department set up security systems at the Arthur Street gate location and the Goodnow Lane Pump Station. The Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure Plan (SPCCP) is reviewed annually to ensure accuracy. This plan outlines the Department’s response to any type of uncontrolled release of hazardous materials and also includes the City’s pumping stations and the Mount Wayte Recycling Facility. Fleet Services continues to do monthly inspections at the Watson Place Flood Station and performs repairs as necessary. LIGHTING AND SIGNALS DEPARTMENT The Lighting and Signals Department was established in 2017, creating a department that previously had similar and overlapping disciplines into one cohesive unit. This department is responsible for the operation and maintenance of the Fire Department and Public Works communication systems; the municipal fire alarm system; City-owned traffic, pedestrian and school zone signals; street lighting; the public safety network; the wireless mesh network; and DPW technology services. Municipal Fire Alarm The Department maintains 106 miles of fire alarm/communication cable and 941 fire alarm boxes strategically located throughout Framingham; of the 941 boxes, 589 are master boxes that protect individual properties, and 352 are street boxes. During FY’18 approximately 5,085 feet of fire alarm cable was installed for new master/ street boxes and to replace deteriorated cable. Verizon poles are utilized to carry fire alarm cabling throughout the City. Staff transferred fire alarm cable from existing Verizon poles to newly installed ones at 28 locations. Traffic Signals Fifty intersections are controlled by traffic signal, while three intersections are controlled by flashing signals. Additionally, there are thirty-six mid-block crossing pedestrian solar signals, and two 30 MPH S curve signals. Staff responded to a total of 160 calls to intersections for signals not working properly, signal heads turned, signals burnt out, damaged from motor vehicle accidents, repairs, preventive maintenance, or investigations. 29 School Zone Signals There are 26 school zone signals. The Department received and responded to 56 calls for signals not working properly, timing adjustments, signals burnt out, repairs, and preventive maintenance. Street Lighting There are a total of 5,170 street lights throughout Framingham. Staff responded to 112 calls for street lights not working, or malfunctioning. Public Safety Wireless Network The Department is responsible for operations and maintenance of the City’s wireless mesh network which is made up of 620 radio nodes. Additionally, there are 24 intersection cameras throughout Framingham, which operate on the network and require a level of maintenance and occasional repair. The Department worked jointly with the Framingham Fire Department’s Fire Prevention Unit to review fire alarm plans submitted to their Department. In addition, the Department attended meetings with contractors for new interior fire alarm and master box installations. Both departments worked together to perform interior system acceptance testing in new and existing buildings. ADMINISTRATION & FINANCE The Administration & Finance Department provides for the consolidation of all administrative, financial, and human resources functions within the Department of Public Works (DPW). The Department strives to enhance the efficiency and accuracy of those functions within the Department through the use of professional practices. The Department’s core mission is to provide service and technical support to the major Departments within DPW: Highway and Sanitation, Water and Wastewater, Engineering, and Fleet, as well as providing information to other City departments. The DPW assumed oversight of the City’s Lights and Signal Department on July 1st: merging two staff from the Fire Department with DPW electricians and software and hardware technicians to create a central point for maintenance of fire alarms, street lighting, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA), and other systems. Administration & Finance staff worked with the Fire Department on the financial aspects of this transition, including budget, and the shift of Master Box billing to those customers whose fire alarm system connects directly to the City’s Fire Dispatch Center. The Department was able to use existing systems to automate the process; billing 449 customers $89,800. This organizational change also transferred billing for all street lighting and traffic signals to Public Works. The Department is working with Eversource to consolidate these 90 bills into a more efficient payment process while maintaining sufficient documentation to justify the expense. Department staff manage Water and Sewer utility billings for the City, and provide service to customers via telephone, mail, email, and in-person. Most Framingham residential customers are billed quarterly for water and sewer usage, while commercial, industrial, and high volume customers are billed monthly. The Department issued 73,432 bills in FY’18. Currently 277 customers are enrolled in the City’s online bill payment program. Department staff also administer the Discount and Utility Abatement Policies including the Agricultural Properties Discount. Department staff coordinated new staff hiring; managed payroll and personnel activities for approximately 170 DPW employees; processed thousands of vendor invoices; managed operating, enterprise, grant, and revolv- ing fund budgets; processed walk-in scheduling requests for sanitation pick-ups; recorded fuel inventory activ- ity and generated internal invoices for City departments drawing fuel from DPW’s Western Avenue fuel pumps; processed over $100,000 in revenue deposits; and coordinated state and federal reimbursements. 30 In FY’18, the district developed a three-year strategic plan, emboldening the mission of Framingham Pub- lic Schools to be a system that understands and values our diversity, to educate each student to learn and live productively as a critically-thinking, responsible citizen in a multicultural, democratic society by providing academically challenging instructional programs taught by a highly qualified and diverse staff and supported by comprehensive services in partnership with our entire community. During the previous fiscal year, a comprehensive multi-year strategic plan was developed which, in turn, in- formed the development of individual School Improvement Plans. District and school improvement efforts are now supported by a zero based budget in an effort to identify cost centers instead of continuing to fund school spending through bottom-line increases year-over-year. The capital and operating budget, crafted in a new, thoughtful, detail-oriented way, was built by a large stakeholder group as well as collaboration from each department and building leadership team, and was a major undertaking. Restructuring the senior-level leadership team in the Framingham Public Schools was among the district priorities in FY’18. Positions were more clearly defined and appropriate authority was given to leaders to en- sure consistency of practice across all district schools and to promote increased accountability around student performance outcomes at all grade levels. The overall restructure of the senior leadership team resulted in a higher-performing, better aligned, and more cost-effective leadership model and came at a reduced overall cost, saving $90,000 in the proposed FY’19 budget that is now in effect. With an extraordinary focus on improving teaching and learning in the Framingham Public Schools, among the priority goals was to develop a shared understanding of high quality instruction, including content and instructional strategies, by all staff and executed in all classrooms and instructional settings. To meet that goal, we concentrated on the Curriculum Plan to address immediate needs, developed scope and sequence and/ or curriculum maps for identified subject areas and grade levels, including middle school science, and devel- oped a seven-year curriculum plan and review cycle. We revised the Scope and Sequence and Unit Maps as identified in the plan and publicized it through the district digital platform, Canvas, accessible by all staff. We experienced an increase use of Sheltered English Immersion (SEI) strategies and language level differentia- tion in mainstream classrooms. All schedules, district-wide, were developed to allow for common planning time for teachers to share best practices among grade levels, providing teachers more time to collaborate than ever before. In FY’18, the Office of Teaching and Learning made a concerted effort to provide equitable access to high quality instruction for all students. The district made it a priority to review current practices and resources to identify areas of strength, gaps, and next steps to optimize student outcomes. The district made the following improvements: The Directors of Elementary and Secondary Education met regularly with principals, individually and in teams, to discuss student, staff and leadership needs. They provided ongoing support in the alignment of school- based goals to district goals, using data as the foundation of all work. As part of this process, the district reviewed class size at the high school and each of the middle schools to ensure equity; discussed scheduling practices at each school to streamline decision-making and the scheduling process across the district. Along these same lines, district leadership worked collaboratively with school principals to begin to create a con- sistent middle school schedule to be implemented at all schools beginning with the 2019-2020 academic year. Additionally, district leadership met with elementary principals to discuss the intricacies of the elementary schedule. The district provided intensive training to our highest risk schools’ instructional leadership teams (ILTs) related to evidence-based turnaround practices. This training included School Works turnaround site visits (including analysis of multiple data points) and prioritization of goals. This resulted in the develop- ment of goals in school improvement plans for Tier II and Tier III schools around shared leadership and re- sponsibility. The district also provided training through School Works for all Tier II and Tier III administrators as well as district administrators on the use of the Classroom Visit Tool (CVT) that will be used on district walk- throughs. All those in attendance were tasked with obtaining certification in the use of the CVT. School Department 31 In coordination with the District and School Assistance Center (DSAC) and the Center for Collaborative Education (CCE), the district provided staff of Woodrow Wilson, Brophy and McCarthy Elementary Schools with training and coaching in effective protocols for Professional Learning Communities (PLCs), co-planning meetings, and team meetings. The partnership with DSAC also allowed for unpacking of state standards and protocols and structures for collaborative lesson planning in an effort to provide equitable access to high quality instruction. The district reviewed all online curriculum licenses currently in use (assessments, instructional software, learning platforms, etc), including effectiveness, utilization rates and alignment to district curriculum. Where appropriate and necessary, the district piloted new software to better meet the needs of our students. For example, the district rolled out the use of the iReady diagnostic assessment at the elementary level and offered the option of the instructional component for schools that were prepared to implement this intervention. We collected data on its ease of use, alignment with Massachusetts frameworks, and accuracy in predicting MCAS performance. We identified appropriate software, eliminated programs that were less effective or not used with fidelity, and streamlined our plans to purchase licenses for all schools and/or grade-specific teachers to provide equity of access. We communicated our expectation that all staff use these resources consistently. The district became an active participant in the Metrowest STEM Education Network (MSEN), providing opportunities for Framingham Public Schools to improve instruction and collaborate with outside partners. Furthermore, the Framingham Public Schools became a collaborating partner with MSEN in the STEM Eco- system, a community of partner organizations across the nation dedicated to advancing STEM education for all students, particularly those from underrepresented populations. The Office of Teaching and Learning established a seven-year curriculum review cycle. During the 2018 fiscal year, the district completed a thorough curriculum revision for middle school science to align with the Massachusetts Science, Technology, and Engineering Curriculum Frameworks. In addition, the district updated the elementary scope and sequence for Reading, Writing, Phonics, Science and Math to reflect shifts in cur- riculum and standards. Finally, the district conducted a review of its Gifted and Talented department to ensure equity of instructional offerings across all schools. For the 2019 fiscal year, the district will be reviewing and updating curriculum in the following areas: • 6-8 Mathematics • 6-8 Technology Education • 6-12 History and Social Studies • K-12 World Language To support teachers in the implementation of new curriculum and to more consistently apply focused instruc- tional strategies, the district created school-based leadership roles. These roles include a STEAM coach to support project-based learning across the district and stipended department head positions at the middle schools for Social Studies and Science. Additionally, Math coaches at the elementary school level were in- creased from part time to full time. FINE AND PERFORMING ARTS DEPARTMENT Equity in programming and curriculum offerings was the focus for the Fine and Performing Arts Department. Along with discipline specific awards and recognition, the K-12 department worked closely to integrate social emotional learning strategies into every arts lesson. Through targeted professional development and peer coaching we began the journey to recognize the work we already do in this area and build on that foundation. Our elementary school arts teachers reach every child K-5 so that impact cannot be overstated. Our focus was: and justice for all as we began the difficult work of beginning to recognize our own bias in the classroom. https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1uJGqjY-9ouvIc6nb-atVDnxt1-kV4BHY6cOKvZ9ocbg/edit#slide=id.p 32 XXX Music • Continued to expand the grade five band program: 80% of our grade five students are now taking band les- sons. We presented a band concert at the Holiday Tree Lighting, and concerts were held at all elementary schools with their partner Middle School (Curriculum and Instruction); • Brought back our grade five string program which was cut ten years ago. A pilot program at Barbieri gave 45 students the opportunity to start lessons on violin, viola and cello. (Curriculum and Instruction); • The Framingham High School (FHS) Marching Band performed in the parade at Disney World (Family and Community Engagement); • The FHS Percussion Ensemble placed first in the state (Curriculum and Instruction); • Three FHS students participated in the District Music Festival and the All State Festival (Curriculum and Instruction); • 22 students from Cameron, Walsh, and FHS participated in the Central Mass Honors Band (Family and Community Engagement); • Middle School vocal groups competed at the Great East Festival. Fuller earned a Gold Medal and Walsh earned a silver medal. 33 Visual Art • 13 Gold Keys, Silver Keys and Honorable Mentions in the Globe Scholastic Art Show (Curriculum and Instruction); • One FHS student was selected for Art All State Honors (Community Engagement) • Arts teachers and students K-12 prepared artwork to send to students in Parkland, Florida to show our sup- port. (Community Engagement) Flowers for Parkland • K-12 Visual Arts Show at the Framingham Public Library for the month of March. Over 700 pieces of student art and 500 hundred visitors to our opening reception.(Community Engagement) Theatre Arts • Fully vetted curriculum across all three middle schools (Curriculum and Instruction); • All three middle schools presented plays in the Massachusetts Educational Theatre Guild One- Act Festival in March, receiving silver medals along with several awards recognizing outstanding acting and design (Cur- riculum and Instruction); • Each Middle School presented a musical. Cameron- Elf Jr, Walsh- Addams Family and Fuller- Seussical Jr. In an attempt to reach out to the broader community both Cameron and Fuller included students in grades K-5 in their casts (Community Engagement); • Framingham High School entered several competitions. Students were recognized for playwriting by METG, Trinity Rep, and Boston University. • The Framingham High School Drama Company presented Mary Poppins and Chicago to sold out audiences (Community Engagement); • For the 14th year the Framingham High School Drama Company was ranked as one of the top 14 theatre programs in the state with its production of She Kills Monsters. 34 XXX BILINGUAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT A major focus of our department this past year was on aligning our department goals to the FPS District Stra- tegic Plan: Expand opportunities for Bilingualism and Biliteracy and Improve Communication with Stakeholders and Families. In FY’18, we: • Implemented the Two-Way Portuguese Bilingual Program in Kindergarten and Grade One at Potter Road. Meetings were held in the winter, spring and summer of 2017-2018 with families, community members, staff and current Dual-Language/Two-Way Program parents; • Supported professional development for teachers, staff, and families on Dual Language philosophy and methodology at Potter Road; • Partnered with Multistate Association for Bilingual Education to provide professional development on bilin- gual dual language program shifts at Brophy and Wilson; • Strengthened and supported the Two-Way Spanish Program by developing a 3-strand pathway towards biliteracy in Spanish, which includes greater opportunities for internships, independent studies, and by taking Advanced Placement (AP) Spanish Language in grades 10 and/or 11 and dual enrollment at Framingham State University and MassBay Community College; • Supported the Cultural Exchange Spanish Visiting Teacher Program. Framingham Public Schools hired eleven teachers from Spain to work across program levels and schools; • Implemented the Seal of Biliteracy (SEAL): Over 344 students in grades 5, 8 and 12 were awarded SEAL certificates with over 70 students receiving gold and platinum SEALS at Framingham High School; https://www. metrowestdailynews.com/news/20180905/framingham-increases-language-opportunities-for-ell-students • Planned bi-monthly welcome meetings for new families to our schools and community; • Partnered with Framingham State University on a grant that provides a free Master’s degree in Teaching English as a Second Language for Framingham Public Schools educators; • Coordinated the summer preschool for ELs summer of 2017 and summer 2018. Over 44 incoming preschool students participate in this Title III-funded program. 35 • Analyzed data on percentage of students in grades K-12 over a five-year period who met and/or exceeded their target student growth percentile on the state standardized test for English Learners in listening, speak- ing, reading, and writing English. Data is not available for 2017 and 2018 as DESE is revising English Language Proficiency benchmarks, as a result of the LOOK ACT of 2017 SPECIAL EDUCATION DEPARTMENT The special education department is continually assessing our specialized programs and looking to expand our in-district opportunities. A substantially separate classroom for students with multiple disabilities has been thriv- ing at Barbieri Elementary Schools for many years. Once they graduated from Barbieri, students were placed in private, approved special education schools, quite a distance from Framingham and at a high cost. After two years of planning, a middle school classroom for students with multiple disabilities started at Cameron for SY17-18. Below is a picture of the ribbon cutting ceremony from October 23, 2017. We will be starting the planning for a high school classroom at FHS for SY’20-21. 36 XXX COMMUNITY RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT The Office of Community Resource Development (CRD) manages all out-of-school time programming for the district and community partnerships. As a department we served over 1,000 students in the past year, through elementary, secondary, vacation weeks, and summer programs. Elementary Out-of-School-Time (OST) Our Elementary Out-of-School-Time (OST) program is called Explorers and operates at King, Woodrow Wilson and Brophy Elementary Schools. For FY’18, we ran Vacation Week programs which were open to grades K-5 throughout the district. We opened programming during Rosh Ha- shanah and held a two-day sports and team-building camp. For Sum- mer Scene, we partnered with the Department of Fine and Performing Arts to run a theatre-based summer program in which students performed Once on this Island Jr. We also offered an academic intervention program and Club Exitos (dual immersion) for Barbieri students, and another year of Camp Invention which is a free, federally funded, STEM program. 37 Secondary Out-of-School-Time (OST) At the middle school level, our model is comprised of student enrichment clubs along with academic support, service learning, and mentorship. In 2018 we served a total 850 students. Walsh Discoverers Program fin- ished the first year of a three year partnership with DESE’s 21st Century Community Learning Centers (CCLC) funding program and served over 500 students through after school clubs, intramurals, and summer program- ming. Fuller Aviators Program served more than 150 students through after school and summer program- ming, partnering with FSU, MassBay, Access TV, and FSU’s McAuliffe Center. Cameron’s C-Camp served more than 200 students through their robust intramurals program, after school clubs and principal clubs. CRD welcomed Resiliency for Life to the CRD family by providing administrative and programming support, and we are developing a strategic plan for FY19. As a department, we also launched new initiatives like the Family Fun Day event in May 2018, designed to bring families together with community partners to provide workshops for families including understanding mental health, STEAM at home, financing for college, and more. Through a partnership with Avidia Bank we offered Money Matters classes for our students at King Elementary, which culminated in a Financial Summit for all families with activities and prizes. In FY’19, we will continue our community partnerships with Avidia Bank, Wellesley College, FSU McAuliffe Challenger Center, Wayside Youth and Family Support Network, and we will expand our offerings by bring in additional partners such as Big Brother Big Sister. OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY The Office of Technology oversees and supports technology among1,600 district staff members and 9,000 students and many of the community and after-school programs across 17 sites. We provide a wide breadth of support for technical issues, security and networking, data and analytics, state reporting, digital curriculum sup- port, and professional development. Over the past year, we continued to enhance our infrastructure including core networking, security and wireless access. Additionally, the district has increased the number of student learning devices in every school and has enhanced teacher digital tool kits. As responsibilities of our team continue to expand across all areas of the district, one of our primary goals of FY’18 was to improve efficiencies to provide faster response time to technology needs. Automation and Workflow Through the standardization of systems and the development of workflows, the Office of Technology has auto- mated network user account management to align with Human Resources to speed up onboarding/offboarding 38 XXX of district staff. Student user management is aligned with the registration process through the Parent Informa- tion Center (PIC). In most cases user accounts are created with 24 hours of information entered into systems. System Monitoring To quicken response time to district outages, we enhanced our system monitoring capacity to provide 24x7 monitoring of all critical technology resources. This provides our team with im- mediate feedback on failed systems and outages and allows us to reduce systems downtimes. Our system uptime for 2017-18 across all systems was 99.947 uptime. The Office of Technology administered nearly 8,000 support tickets in 2017-18. The district has invested in Chromebooks as the primary stu- dent learning device. In 2017-2018 the distribution of chrome- books across schools increased to ensure that schools had available devices for students across all schools. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELLNESS The Department of Health and Wellness is comprised of nurs- es, social workers, school counselors, and psychologists. The department promotes FPS’s academic mission by supporting the social, emotional, cognitive, and physical growth and devel- opment of its diverse student population and the greater school community. The Department of Health and Wellness is committed to sup- porting all aspects of our students’ health and wellbeing. Encouraging our students’ physical, social, emotional and behavioral growth through the creation of supportive learning environments is essential to their school and life success. Ef- forts last year focused on promoting a strong climate and culture, engaging instruction for academic and social emotional learning, offering proactive student-specific support, and developing strategic partnerships. Grant Funded Collaborations Framingham Public Schools benefited from collaborations with, and support from, a variety of community and state stakeholders in support of student health, wellness, and academic success. These include: Systems for Student Success Action Planning Initiative: funded by the Massachusetts Department of Elemen- tary and Secondary Education (DESE), this grant supported the planning and implementation of programs focused on school climate and social emotional learning district-wide. Promoting Adolescent Health and School Success: funded by DESE and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), this grant concluded a five-year program to create safe and supportive learning environments with a focus on strengthening support for LGBTQ. Chrombooks Ratio BAR 539 0.8:1 BRO 400 0.88:1 CAM 674 1.15:1 DUN 408 0.89:1 FHS 1135 0.5:1 FUL 738 1.33:1 HEM 489 0.86:1 JUN 19 0.07:1 KNG 232 0.71:1 MCC 434 0.82:1 POT 418 0.78:1 STA 292 0.83:1 WAL 885 1.19:1 WIL 383 0.75:1 39 Nourishing Teachers, Strengthening Classrooms Project: funded through Open Spirit, this grant supported teaching mindfulness strategies to at-risk students and building capacity of teachers to use mindfulness tech- niques in the classroom. MA Department of Public Health Essential School Health Services (ESHS): funded school health infrastructure with personnel, professional development opportunities, equipment, and technology. School-based Health Center: the Edward M. Kennedy Health Center satellite site at Framingham High School provided comprehensive medical services to enrolled students, including immunizations, physicals, sports physicals, and treatment of illnesses. Department Health and Social Emotional and Behavioral (SEB) Initiatives DSAC Social Emotional Behavioral (SEB) Plan The overarching goal of the district’s SEB initiative is to drive a systemic approach to improving SEB outcomes throughout the district. We aim to elevate the district’s understanding of the positive impacts of SEB, and its significance in creating the conditions that enable all students to thrive in an academic setting. We feel that a greater emphasis on prioritizing SEB as a core district and school improvement strategy will ultimately lead to not only improved social-emotional learning outcomes, but will serve as the conduit to greater academic achievement for our students. A team of FPS educators convened during the 2017-2018 school year with the goal of producing an action plan for improving the SEB supports throughout the district. Through the support of the MA Department of Elemen- tary and Secondary Education (DESE) funded Systems for Student Success (SfSS) grant and Massachusetts District and School Assistance Center (DSAC), our team engaged in a data and root cause analysis to identify the challenges that are impeding enhanced SEB outcomes and systems of support. Through this process, a comprehensive three-year SEB plan was developed in alignment with the district’s Strategic Plan. District Data Collection Panorama Education is a leader in the field of education data collection and analysis. For the second year, Panorama Education conducted district-wide family and staff (grades Pre-K-12) and student (grades 3-12) sur- veys designed to measure perceptions of school climate, culture and social emotional development. Specific measures included: • Student/Family Engagement: How involved are students/families with their schools? • School Climate: How do you see the overall social and learning climate of the school? • Teacher/Student and Family Relationships: How strong is the social connection between teachers and stu- dents within and beyond school? There were a total of 1,077 staff member, 1,467 parent/guardian, and 4,939 student responses. The results of the surveys provide valuable information about our schools and help inform both school-based and district- wide initiatives to support the social and emotional health of our community. Professional Development We continued efforts to build the capacity of classroom teachers to create a positive classroom climate and build the capacity of staff administrators to support teachers in that work. Responsive Classroom is an evi- dence-based approach to education that focuses on the strong relationship between academic success and 40 XXX social-emotional learning (SEL). The Responsive Classroom approach empowers educators to create safe, joyful, and engaging learning communities where all students have a sense of belonging and feel significant. Specifically, educators were taught the following Responsive Classroom practices: • Begin and end the day positively with morning meeting and closing circle; • Establish a calm, orderly, safe, and engaging environment for learning with a proactive approach to discipline; • Develop teacher language that promotes respectful, kind, and positive classroom communities; • Respond to misbehavior with clear, consistent expectations and logical consequences; • Teach students how to complete academic tasks, interact with classmates, and maintain routines with interactive modeling; • Create a developmentally appropriate learning environment. During the 2017-2018 school year a total of 115 teachers, support staff and administrators across five elemen- tary schools participated in four-day comprehensive Responsive Classroom Training for Elementary Educators. Behavioral & Mental Health Supports The Social Emotional Mental Health (SEMH) Team was founded in March 2018 to meet the district’s goal of promoting academic achievement and social and emotional growth for all students. The SEMH Team is staffed by a clinical psychologist and a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) with expertise in child clinical psychology, applied behavior analysis, special education, program development and management, and staff training. The SEMH Team employs a consultation model to support administrators, teachers, support staff, and other adults with: • Case consultation for high needs students; • Training and professional development for staff regarding behavior & mental health; • System support with developing and maintaining effective intervention teams and structures. Positive Behavior Intervention and Supports (PBIS) PBIS is the behavior framework that FPS has chosen to address a range of social, emotional, and behavioral needs of students in grades Pre-K through Grade 8. PBIS is a research proven framework that aligns with the multi-tiered system of support that is being implemented in schools for both academic and non-academic sup- ports. The PBIS approach was selected because it uses proactive strategies to teach clearly defined behavior- al expectations, and it provides targeted support for students in need of more social, emotional, or behavioral support through a data driven identification process. Each school is individualizing the features of PBIS to meet their needs. There is an established set of core values in each school that have been explicitly taught, an acknowledgement system to promote expected be- haviors, a clear process to follow when students are not demonstrating expected behavior, and a database to log all disciplinary infractions. Last year, a strong tier 1 was established in each building, with several schools moving forward with tier 2 training for more targeted interventions, such as social skills groups, behavior plans, and mentoring programs. The program is making an impact, as our data shows positive results in the reduc- tion of office referrals and suspensions, especially in schools that have had established PBIS programming for three or more years and where PBIS has become imbedded in the culture of the school. A 0.5 FTE PBIS Coordinator was added last year to oversee the district implementation of PBIS. This position will be increased to a 1.0 FTE for the 2018-2019 school year. 41 OFFICE OF HUMAN RESOURCES The Office of Human Resources posted 470 positions during FY’18. There were 9,011 applications received and screened by screening committees who ultimately were involved in the hiring process. On average, five in- dividuals were interviewed for each of the 470 open positions. There were 352 terminations and 504 new hires onboarded. The office began implementing an online onboarding process, which came into effect in FY’19. There were 112 employees who participated in health benefit packages and 74 employees who made changes to their benefit packages during the open enrollment period. The Director created a hiring manual and a policy and procedures manual which had not existed prior. The Director met with building principals and directors on a monthly basis to provide guidance on the supervision and evaluation process in order to meet mandated deadlines. The Framingham Public Schools appreciates the support of the School Committee, Board of Selectmen, Town Meeting, and the taxpayers of Framingham who make a high quality and increasingly equitable and acces- sible education possible in our great community. We understand that the annual school budget constitutes the largest percentage of the city’s operating budget, and we are pleased to have this opportunity to share how impactful that spending commitment has been as it directly benefits the children in our community. Thank you. 42 XXX 49Lexington St. (Main) | 508-532-5570 library.public@framinghamma.gov Expansion of innovative programming at the Christa McAuliffe Branch Library, renovations to the Main Library, advancements in technology, securing of grants, and continued changes in organizational structure, highlight- ed a very successful 2017 at the Framingham Public Library. Main Library Improvements Improvements continued in the aftermath of the 2015-16 fire that shuttered the Main Library for nine months. The storage closet in the Costin Room was transformed into a technology room for the installation of new A/V equipment. This space, with the generous assistance of the Facilities Department, was slightly enlarged, a new ceiling was installed, and the space was freshly painted. New storage cabinets were constructed at the en- trance to the Costin Room to accommodate program supplies, etc. Trim, doors, and casings throughout the building received a fresh coat of paint that has been favorably com- mented upon by our patrons. The accomplishment of this long overdue project was also made possible by staff from Facilities Management. We are most grateful for the large allotment of time and supplies devoted to this project. Technology The second phase of Radio Frequency identification (RFID) equipment was installed at the Main Library. Se- curity gates were installed on the main floor, while self-checkout stations were placed in the Children’s Room. RFID technology offers the promise of greater efficiencies in our operations that will result in the re-deployment of staff toward new service models such as a proposed Bookmobile. There will be more news about this initia- tive in FY’19. Personnel Changes Technical Services assistant Supervisor Kathy Marscher retired after twenty-three years of service to the Library. Kathy will be fondly remembered for the outstanding work she did to maintain our existing collections and her support of emerging collections. Kathy will also be remembered for being the “right hand” person to the Library’s Technology Supervisor during a period of tremendous growth in this area of library operations. Reference Librarian Laraine Worby also retired, after sixteen years of service to the Library. Laraine was noted for her indefatigable pursuit of any refer- ence question a patron presented to her. No matter the complexity of the question, or the time involved to locate an answer or resource, Laraine would not be stopped until the patron had all that they were seeking. Circulation Department staff members Sande Marchetti and Mary Murphy retired after twenty-seven and ten years of service to the Library respectively. In addition to serving the public at the Circulation Desk, both had special duties and Framingham Public Library 43 both performed those duties excep- tionally well. Sande worked closely with the Friends of the Library to keep our important book donation operation running efficiently. With thousands of books donated to the Library annually, Sande had to be organized, diligent, and collaborative. Sande was all of these things and more. Mary Murphy took an interest in the movie collection. Coupled with a strong desire to expand her responsibilities, Mary became the primary selector for this important collection. Working closely with her colleagues, and always listening to our patrons, Mary built a collection that maintained the high standards that the Library has long been noted for. We wish all of these outstanding col- leagues the very best with the next chapters in their lives. Re-think, Re-purpose, Re-deploy With personnel changes in FY’18 came further opportunity to assess how we utilize the Library’s most valu- able and valued resource – staff. We made significant adjustments in staffing levels and assignments to ad- dress growth in usage at the branch library, in addition to addressing changes in technology and expansion of programming. The implementation of the “re-think, re-purpose, re-deploy” process resulted in the development of several key positions this past year. We strengthened our technology support staff, re-organized the Tech- nical Services Department, and deployed more staff to meet demand for services at the Branch. All of these moves have contributed to make the Library more efficient, flexible and responsive to our patrons. Additionally, a new Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) was negotiated that addressed external and internal inequities in compensation. More importantly, the new CBA created additional advancement paths for staff. We are most appreciative of the efforts and support we received from Dolores Hamilton, Director of Human Resources for the Town of Framingham, in this endeavor. We are equally appreciative of the Finance Division for their support of the CBA. Unique Programs and Services In FY’18 the Library continued its long tradition of addressing the unique needs of a diverse community with specialized services. The Library’s Homework Center continued to offer free tutoring and homework to all Framingham students, elementary through high school. This afterschool program has assisted hundreds of student with school assignments while reinforcing the Library’s role as an essential resource in their educa- tional pursuits. The Literacy Unlimited program provides a solid, comprehensive program for training and supporting volunteers to teach basic reading, writing and math skills to adult learners, including those for whom English is a foreign language. Dedicated to increasing public awareness of the need to eliminate illiteracy in our community, and expanding the availability of educational programs that accomplish this, the program is based on the belief that literacy strengthens our society and promotes equality among its members. The Library further responded to an identified community need by securing a two-year $15,000 grant from the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners to establish a “Citizenship Corner” at the Main Library. This unique collection of materials, instructional services, and technology has assisted over twenty Framingham residents become citizens of the United States. The Literacy Unlimited program is fully integrated with this new service, guaranteeing that this investment will fulfill its mission for years to come. 44 XXX Reaching out to the Community The Library collaborated with many organizations responding to community needs and provided a wide va- riety of educational and enriching programs. This year, 13,105 people attended 329 Library sponsored adult programs at the Main Library. Highlights included the expansion of community participation in our two lifelong learning programs titled “Adventures in Learning,” that are presented in collaboration with Framingham State University. This is the only program of its kind in the nation that joins together the resources of a public univer- sity and a public library to specifically serve senior citizens. Our Lifelong Learning Lecture Series once again presented 20 lectures by scholars from the FSU as well as other colleges and universities in the area. Lectures on a variety of topics were given on Thursday evenings at the Main Library, and attendance once again in- creased dramatically over the previous year. The daytime classes for seniors, held on Tuesdays in March and October were so popular that we, once again, had to limit registration. More than 200 seniors participated in each of the October and March programs. Support for this project was provided in part through the generosity of its membership. Framingham City Hall and the Callahan Senior Center collaborated in the success of this program. Grants and Donations The Library successfully pursued several grant opportunities in 2017 that would enhance existing programs and bring new programs to Framingham. A $15,000 grant from the Massachusetts Board of Library Com- missioners enabled us to expand our citizenship initiatives. The Adventures in Learning Program received a $2,000 grant from the Joseph L. & Ray L. Freund Foundation to underwrite the lecture series component of this unique life-long learning program. Whole Foods continued their support of the Library with a $1,000 grant supporting our “Around the World” film series. Other contributors to the Library in 2017 included: BJ’s Whole- sale, Cumberland Farms, Hammond Residential, Metrowest Credit Union, Morton J. Shuman Law Offices, Piz- zeria Uno’s, Roche Bros., Stop & Shop, Trader Joe’s and Wegman’s. The Library also received a very gener- ous $10,000 donation to support programming from a Framingham resident who wished to remain anonymous. All of these grants and donations allow the Library to enhance and expand services that the community values. We are most grateful to our generous grantors and donors for their support. Programming The Library’s programming was once again diverse and attracted large and enthusiastic audiences. Our goal continues to be to provide a variety of cultural and informational programs that educate, entertain and enrich audiences. Our Friday Night Film Series regularly attracts large and enthusiastic crowds. Our Sunday Concert Series and Summer Concert Series provide a variety of classical and popular music with emerging artists that often attracts capacity crowds. The “Brown Bag Learning Series” is an informal lunchtime program featuring speak- ers from local businesses and organizations. The Library also added several new Book Clubs to our existing offerings in response to both patron and staff interests. New programming at the McAuliffe Branch Library ramped up this year. Hun- dreds of patrons attended outdoor summer concerts held in collaboration with the Amazing Things Art Center of Framingham. The new Friday Night Film series was equally popular as were special lectures, book discussions, etc. As envisioned when the new library was being designed, the Community Meeting Room has become an invaluable resource for residents wishing to gather on the north side of the City. 45 We appreciate the efforts of our local media, newspapers, email lists and online media in helping us publicize our programs to the community. We thank the many volunteers who have assisted Library staff in making these programs possible and especially to the Friends of the Framingham Library, Inc. who financially support our efforts. We also ap- preciate the financial support from local businesses, and the Framingham Cultural Coun- cil that have helped defray the costs of bringing innovative programming to our patrons. FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY The Friends of the Framingham Library Association, Inc. continued their long tradition of dedicated work on behalf of the Library. The Friends, through their monthly book sales, raised thousands of dollars to support col- lections, programs, and special projects. There are numerous and rewarding volunteer opportunities that will fit just about anyone’s schedule. Please consider joining this essential organization! Library Trustee News In April 2017, incumbents Arthur Finstein, Elizabeth Roy, and Jo-Anne Thompson were re-elected to serve as Trustees for three-year terms. Steven Malchman was elected to a three-year term. In May 2017, the Trustees elected the following officers: Eric Doherty, Chair; Elizabeth Roy, Vice-Chair; Maria Barry, Secretary; and Arthur Finstein, Treasurer. The other Trustees are: Bob Dodd, Elizabeth Fideler, Jan Har- rington, Nancy Coville-Wallace, Ruth Winett and William Wray. Long serving Library Trustee Sam Klaidman did not seek re-election to the Board of Trustees. Sam will be remembered for his dedication and the business acumen that he brought to the Board. Sam will also be noted for the tremendous skills he demonstrated as Chair of the Board’s Standing Building Committee. In this capac- ity, Sam guided the development and construction of the new Lexington Street entrance at the Main Library, which brought the building into full compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Sam’s most significant and lasting contribution to Framingham and its public library is, of course, the realization of the new Christa McAuliffe Branch Library. Sam provided the leadership and team building skills that were essential throughout the course of the project, the result being a library that will serve Framingham residents for generations. We all join in thanking Sam Klaidman for his service to the community and for a job well done. We appreciated Town Meeting’s recognition of the importance of our libraries to citizens of all ages. We also appreciated the ongoing support of the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, Assistant Town Manager, Chief Financial Officer, Town Counsel, the collegiality and support of other Town Departments. We also appreciated the support of the Finance Committee, the Standing Committee on Education, Capital Budgets, Disability, Ways and Means and other committees. Now that we are a City, we are excited about our partnership with Mayor Spicer and support from the City Council. Respectfully submitted, For the Board of Library Trustees Mark J. Contois, Director of Libraries 46 XXX The Administration and Finance Division is comprised of five departments: Accounting, Assessing, Purchas- ing, Technology Services, and the Treasurer/Collector; all overseen by the CFO’s Office. The Technology Services Department was combined with the Town’s Finance Division by the City Charter, which created the Administration and Finance Division. The transition to a City and the implementation of the City Charter changed the Town Finance Division to the City Administration and Finance Division. The Chief Financial Officer position remained the Division Head, with an amended title to include Director of Administration and Finance. The organization chart below illustrates the new structure. OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER The transition to a City has given the CFO’s Office an opportunity to change budget formats, providing more data and explanation of service components and operating costs. Assistant CFO Jennifer Pratt and Financial Analyst Margaret Ottaviani were instrumental in reformatting/streamlining the financial information to be clear and concise. Quarterly reporting formats have been created for all departments, including a school-specific report. These reports have been used to communicate the quarterly financial position of the City to the Mayor, Division and Department managers, the City Council Finance Subcommittee, and the School Department. Year-end versions of these reports are included at the end of these Division administrative reports. The Administration and Finance Division successfully closed out FY18 with another successive surplus. Re- serves were supplemented, significantly in the case of the Capital Stabilization Fund; over $5 million was added in anticipation of the cost of two major projects: Fuller Middle School and City Hall. Both the general Stabilization Fund and OPEB Trust Fund were supplemented; all three funded from Free Cash. Financial reporting and public access to Framingham financial data has been a focus for FY’18. The Financial Transparency Center on the Framingham.gov website is more dynamic that ever before, with the FY’18 budget loaded on our ClearGov page. During FY’18, an additional budget display was added that breaks down the bud- get as we voted it locally, versus the standard state Department of Revenue categories. The new account organi- zation now matches all the financial reports that are housed on the “Budget Central” page on the City website. In December 2017, a successful bond sale was conducted with a very favorable interest rate and an excellent credit report. While we still have challenges related to our ability to manage and afford the maintenance and repair of facilities and infrastructure, our approach to addressing financing and investment of our capital and operating budgets has enhanced our access to the municipal bond market. The last Town Long Range Financial Forecast was submitted to Town Meeting at the Fall Special Town Meet- ing in October of 2017. This forecast led to the decisions made for the FY’19 operating and capital budgets. Chief Financial Officer Director of Admin & Finance Mary Ellen Kelley Assessing Department Chief Assessor William Naser Accounting Department City Accountant Richard Howarth Asst. Chief Financial Officer Chief Procurement Officer Jennifer Pratt Treasurer/Collector Department City Treasurer/Collector Carolyn Lyons Technology Services Division Technology Director Carly P Melo Citywide Payroll Department (School & Municipal) Procurement Department Media Services Administration and Finance Division 47 The Departments that make up the Administration and Finance Division are often overlooked as they do not perform very public functions. However, the financial stewardship performed by the Departments described below allows the City to thrive. As operational partners to all the front line, direct citizen service departments, it is our goal to enable those departments to focus in their work knowing they are well supported financially and technologically. Collectively, the Department Heads in the Administration and Finance Division have more than 100 years of professional experience in their respective fields. ASSESSING DEPARTMENT The Assessing Department is directed by the Chief Assessor. Assisted by the Board of Assessors, the Commercial Assessor and a staff of four professional Field Assessors, two Customer Service Representatives and an Office Manager, the Depart- ment evaluates residential and commercial real estate and commercial personal property to determine full and fair cash value. All valuation work is done in accordance with state law and regulation and in compliance with, and under review of, the Massachusetts Department of Revenue. In 2018, the Assessing Department participated in the state’s TARP program, complet- ing its work on an accelerated schedule and committing to an early tax rate hearing conducted by the Board of Selectmen in mid-November. Citywide taxable value was approved by the Department of Revenue at over $9 Billion, a robust growth of 6.9% over FY’17. New property val- ue for FY’18 was over $132 million; generating $3.2 million in additional tax revenue. The majority of that growth was residential, pushing the residential value to 77% of total value from 76% the previous year. All types of residential property increased in value, with condominiums leading the way and single-family homes second. As depicted in the graph, single-family homes at $5.2 billion in value is 75% of the total resi- dential value; the total value of all the other residential types combined represents the remaining 25%. Property Parcels inspected: 3,536 Building Permits reviewed: 2,440 Customers at Counter:2,600 Tax Exemptions and deferrals:301 Vehicle Excise abatements: 1,868 Residential77% Commercial 17% Industrial3% Personal Property3% FY2018 PROPERTY VALUES $5,206,444,500, 75% $538,226,360 $400,435,700 $662,987,300 Residential Property Values Single Family homes Condominiums Mobile/Multi Homes 2/3 Family Homes Apartments Residential Vacant Land Multi-use Primarily Residential 48 XXX ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT The Accounting Department is led by the City Accountant. The City Accountant is respon- sible for ensuring all expenditures of the City conform to the requirements of Massachusetts General Laws, City Council ordinances and Grantors, and do not exceed City Council ordinances or grant authorizations. The De- partment also accounts for all financial trans- actions of the City– receipts, expenditures and payroll – in conformance with generally accept- ed accounting principles and the Uniform Mu- nicipal Accounting System promulgated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts’ Department of Revenue. It then makes this accounting information available to (1) the City’s municipal program managers to facilitate their manage- ment of program budgets, (2) independent auditors who must opine on the financial con- dition of the City, (3) state and federal agen- cies for use in generating financial information for program and policy development, (4) credit rating agencies for their use in assessing the City’s fiscal stability and creditworthiness, and (5) residents. Prior to the implementation of the City Char- ter, the Director was referred to as the Town Accountant and had many of the same re- sponsibilities. One substantial change is the direction of the comprehensive annual audit. The oversight of this function has been trans- ferred to the City Council. However, the City Accountant will still coordinate the audit func- tion with the audit firm contracted by the City Council to conduct that audit. All departmental financial activity, including the School Department, is channeled through the Accounting Department for review and/ or approval and for posting to the numerous ledgers. The Department prepares financial statements for all City funds, tax filings, and reports. In FY’18, the Department processed over 12,500 purchase orders and certified funds availability for over 380 contracts; set up 58 grants and processed 38 amendments; processed over 900 employee reimburse- ments; added over 900 vendors; and re- Accounting Department Staff Richard Howarth City Accountant Nancy Lomas Assistant City Accountant Dawn Divito Payroll Administrator Mark Bingle Payroll Coordinator Faith Greenberg Payroll Coordinator Shirley Tibbert Accounts Payable Specialist Kelly Lanefski Administrative Assistant 3 Stephanie Galli Administrative Assistant 3 Lauren DiGiandomenico Payroll Specialist (PT) Acconting Transactions - FY18 Count Budget Transfers 375 Cash Receipts batches - posted & proofed 8,054 Checks Printed 18,199 Contracts - Funds reviewed/certified 381 Grants - set up 58 Grants amendments/changes 38 Invoice batches - proofed & posted 3,576 Invoices - proofed & posted 47,279 Misc Journal Entries 240 Purchases orders closed/amended 1,879 Employee Reimbursement - City 500 Employee Reimbursement - School 400 Requisition activity - approvals/rejections 12,142 Vendors - changes 922 Vendors - new 893 Total transactions, All Types 94,936 49 viewed over 47,000 invoices and issued over 18,000 accounts payable checks. In addition, 593 new employees were added and 636 employees were terminated (includes school and municipal departments). Many of the pay- ments processed to vendors are substantial. The policies and procedures developed and enforced by the Accounting Department reduc- es the risk of incorrect payment; safeguarding taxpayer funds. PROCUREMENT DEPARTMENT The Procurement Department is directed by the Assistant CFO/Chief Procurement Officer (CPO), who is a certified Massachusetts Certi- fied Public Purchasing Official (MCPPO). All City purchases are vetted through the Depart- ment to determine the requirements for compliance with MGL Chapter 30B (services and supplies) or Chapter 149 (construction). The office is staffed with a Procurement Administrator and a part time administrative as- sistant. The CPO signs every contract and approves every contract award, quote, and requisition over $1,000. The Procurement Department advises on goods and service purchases, using national, regional and local purchasing collaboratives, state contracts and local bids. The Department conducts bids for all City depart- ments, including Schools. Building construction project bids include separate bids for trade subcontractors and general contractors. In FY’18, 363 contracts were awarded with a total value of more than $35 million. Top Ten Vendors Paid in FY18 US Bank $70,883,603 Group Insurance Commission $37,031,719 Framingham Retirement System $14,632,870 Keefe Technical School $9,283,324 Newport Construction Corp.$6,508,170 Accept Education Collaborative $6,317,871 Durham School Services LP $5,444,842 Lupachino & Salvatore, Inc.$4,042,777 Mass Clean Water Trust $3,992,079 RJV Construction Corporation $3,985,680 50 XXX TECHNOLOGY DIVISION The Technology Services Division is committed to providing the highest level of service possible while being fiscally responsible. Goals focus on maintaining a stable, up-to-date network, and end-user environment that enables and enhances user productivity. Additionally, we look to leverage technology wherever possible to streamline and automate processes. APPLICATION SERVICES Heidi R. Bryce, Manager Application Services is responsible for the ongoing support of the City’s financial management system, Munis, for both School and City employees with over 310 active users; and Granicus Legislative Management, which manages agendas and minutes for all City Boards, Councils, and Committees, and are visible to the public via the web portal with more than 90 active meeting groups represented. MUNIS • Facilitated transfer of Fire Master Box billing responsibilities to DPW Administration; • Ongoing project to streamline accounting processes surrounding accounts payable procedures; • Initiated major software upgrade (to be completed Fall 2018). Legislative Management • Provided ongoing technical support; • Updated meeting portal documents as needed; • Created templates for new City meeting groups (City Council, eight City Council subcommittees, Recreation- al Marijuana Task Force, Short Term Property Rental Task Force). Technology Services Staffing Carly Premo Melo, Director Jennifer Nall, Administrative Assistant Alan D. Holt, Assistant Director/Development Stephen Bedard, Helpdesk Technician James V. Schiavone, Assistant Director/Support Heidi Bryce, Applications Manager Charles J. Duross, Public Safety Systems Administrator Anthony Sylva, Programmer/Analyst Nichol Figueiredo, Public Information Officer/Webmaster Robert Becker, Network Technician Michael Tusino, IV, Records Access Officer Kim Saucier, Fiscal Manager 51 TECHNOLOGY SERVICES Alan Holt, Asst. Director/Development Anthony Sylva, Programmer/Analyst Technology Services implements and maintains the Citywide permitting and inspection system, Accela Auto- mation. Permits and Licenses • Over 14,700 Permits have been created during the year, along with over 6,300 renewals of cyclical permits and certificates using the City’s enterprise permitting system Accela Automation. The system is used by the Building, Fire, Planning, Board of Health, Conservation, Zoning, Police, City Council and Public Works De- partments; • Building Services permits have been added to Accela for services like the rental of Nevins Hall, Cushing Chapel, Downtown Common and the Town Common; • These will also be the first permits turned into Laserfiche forms, which can be filled out online and then re- corded in Accela automatically; • Currently 245 different types of permits, licenses, and case types are tracked in the system. The records are maintained by 12 different departments. The system interfaces with the City’s GIS, Assessor records, state licensing authorities, the City’s document management system, and DigSafe; • The Zoning Board Department has also been added to Accela so their work can now be tracked within Ac- cela and create a more fast and fluid workflow with other departments. Other Projects and Activities • Laserfiche Forms streamlines internal processes and removes excessive paperwork by creating forms to help both Fire and Police automate form processing and then report and analyze the data based on those forms through reporting services. Forms have been created for a variety of internal processes such as the checking of police vehicle to note repair needs for their fleet; and the police camera form, which provides a way for community members to contact police to allow them to use personal cameras for police work. • Accela will integrate with forms allowing citizens to apply for permits online, and Accela will generate the permits. PUBLIC SAFETY Charles Duross, Public Safety Systems Administrator Public Safety is responsible for supporting key information technology applications and related technologies utilized by the Police and Fire Departments and for ensuring critical public safety systems function efficiently and effectively on a 24/7 basis. Scanning Over 90,000 documents scanned into central repository in FY18; over 500,000 documents now housed there 52 XXX FY’18 Accomplishments • The server virtualization project is in process. When complete, the new virtual environment will provide for improved disaster recovery and redundancy; • The implementation of Microsoft SharePoint applications for the City continued during 2017 and 2018; • The rollout of new police cruiser computers was completed. The new devices enhance officer safety and improve performance by using new technology and faster network connectivity. Replacement devices were received from the manufacturer to resolve hardware problems. These will be deployed at the beginning of FY’19. • The police department remodeled their dispatch center in the final weeks of FY’18. The state’s 911 Depart- ment provided a mobile public safety answering point (PSAP) to house 911 operations for the police depart- ment. Technology services coordinated the move of the City’s technology assets to the vehicle and back to the remodeled dispatch center. NETWORK SERVICES James V. Schiavone, Asst. Director/Support Robert Becker, Network Technician Network Services is responsible for the ongoing support of the City’s fiber network, servers and desktop de- vices. Messaging, security, WIFI also fall under Network Services. Network • Installed the remaining hardware that was purchased from the Cisco lease, including the deployment of ac- cess point to the smaller water and sewerage station; • Installed and tested the remaining software components from the Cisco lease, including emergency respond- er, which is Cisco 911 software that allows us to break buildings down by floor or location. We are still final- izing the Jabber deployment (desktop messaging and video calling software); • Upgraded both the public WIFI and City’s internet connection to increase capacity; • Supported the addition of traffic signals onto the network; • Added the Taralli police substation on to the network. Fiber Additions Installed fiber optic cable at the following locations: • Dudley Rd. continuing on Fountain ending at the Taralli substation. • Off Edgell Road running down Central Street ending at the Indian head water tank • New York Ave. from the sewer station to support the traffic signals at New York Ave. & California Ave. 53 Projects • Hardware and software installation to support the Police and Fire server upgrades. This included storage solutions along with Cisco UCS server for the virtual environment; • Assisted in the cloud migration of DPW Vueworks application; • Began preparations for the Verizon upgrade of their copper lines. Proposed a capital project for FY’19 for a radio network upgrade to support the Verizon upgrade; • Started using Meraki MDM (Mobile Device Management) software on iPads and will expand to be used on Windows mobile devices; • Barracuda appliances upgrades: upgraded our web and email security gateways along with our mail ar- chiving and backup appliances; • Began the process of redesigning and migrating the City’s disaster recovery site. Network Statistics During normal business hours we maintained an industry accepted 5 9’s of availability (99.999%). Due to the Cisco lease and the massive upgrade that we undertook, there was some downtime encountered outside normal business hours. USER SERVICES Stephen Bedard, Helpdesk Technician User Services is responsible for technology support services to City Departments, including Help Desk support, set-up and training, email, Internet, hardware and software support, inventory mainte- nance, and policy and licensed software audits. User Services is also responsible for PC, printer, and software upgrades and mainte- nance; and equipment and presentation assistance to City adminis- tration; departmental staff, boards, and committees. We are currently deploying Windows 10 on desktops and laptops, using Microsoft Office 2016 on all devices. Jennifer Nall, Administrative Assistant Jenn is a valuable asset in managing the day-to-day operations of the Technology Services department. Her duties include attendance tracking, payroll, processing departmental bills, and overall office management. Additionally Jenn processes the Citywide telephone bills for both VOIP and traditional phone lines. Jenn is also responsible for the management of the onboarding process of new equipment ordered by all City departments. Kimberly Saucier, Fiscal Manager Kim joined our team in September 2017 and is responsible for managing the department’s finances. This includes preparation of the annual operating and capital budgets, generating budgetary transfers and adjust- ments, tracking expenses, and producing budgetary reports. She also tracks software expiration dates and is responsible for managing contract renewals. Kim frequently corresponds with vendors for various reasons such as quote requests, invoice matters, and purchase order processing. Inbound E-mail: Blocked: 1,543,218 Allowed/Tagged: 490,110 Allowed: 1,546,104 Outbound E-mail Sent: 443,560 Encrypted: 1,466 FY18 User Services Supported 453 PCs 264 Laptops 642 Users (81 New) 1912 Help Desk Calls 124 NEW PCS installed 31 New Laptops/Tablets 54 XXX Nichol Figueiredo, Public Information Officer/Webmaster Michael A. Tusino IV, Records Access Officer The Public Information Officer/Webmaster works directly with the Mayor and the Technology Services Depart- ment on all strategic communication initiatives for the City, including collaboration with key Division Heads and community stakeholders. On January 1, 2017 An Act to Improve Public Records became law, which required municipalities to appoint a Records Access Officer (RAO). Nichol was appointed RAO until a full time RAO position was created to man- age the new Public Records Law and the dramatic increase in Public Records Requests; Michael A. Tusino IV was hired for this new role in September 2017. The RAO coordinates responses to requests for access to pub- lic records, assists individuals seeking public records in identifying the records requested, assists the custodian of the records in preserving public records, and prepares guidelines that enable requestors to make informed decisions. In 2017 the City responded to 2,242 public records requests. None of these accomplishments would be possible without this amazing staff. Their dedication, technical ex- pertise and commitment to working as a team are exceptional. We continue to be committed to implementing and supporting new technology which allows Framingham to remain on the forefront of technology. TREASURER/COLLECTOR DEPARTMENT The Treasurer/Collector Department is responsible for the management of the City’s funds, including the investing of all City funds; issuing payroll and accounts payable checks; tracking and reconciling City receipts that are collected through all municipal departments; and working closely with the CFO, City Accountant, banks, state agencies, and all municipal departments to identify, secure and make funds available. The Treasurer’s Office also handles the biannual bond/ban borrowing, and the collection of all of our Tax Title accounts. The Department reconciles all 72 City bank ac- counts and investment accounts, which at any given time have a monthly balance of $145,000,000 for which the Trea- surer ensures the City is receiving the maximum yield. On the collection side, we are responsible for working with our vendors on the yearly mailing of 82,962 real estate bills, 4,850 personal property bills, 58,779 excise tax bills and the collection of 73,432 water/sewer bills. The majority of payments are administered either through our lockbox service or by tax services. Our new Website Stats Site Visits: 589,300 Page Views: 1.2 million Unique Visits: 858,000 Actions by returning visitors: 778,000 Searches: 46,000 FaceBook 3,857 likes | 3,954 followers Twitter: Instagram: 3,861 followers 604 followers FY18 REVENUE COLLECTED REAL ESTATE: 99.7% WATER/SEWER: 97% EXCISE/PARKING: 95.8% 55 online payment company, City Hall Systems, accepts real estate, personal property, excise, water, school re- ceipts, MLC and dog licenses payments in a user-friendly method. We will be adding more departments to the online system as the year goes on. The amount of accounts going into tax title has been steady over the past few years. In FY’17 there were 107 accounts, in FY’16 there were 120 accounts, in FY’15 there were 150 accounts. The Treasurer/Colector Department staff are well trained and are cross-trained to better ensure timely delivery of services to our residents, especially during peak periods of activity. Mary Ellen Kelley, CFO/Director of Administration and Finance: mek@framinghamma.gov – (508) 532-5425 Jennifer Pratt, Asst. CFO/Chief Procurement Officer: jap@framinghamma.gov – (508) 532-5425 Richard G. Howarth, Jr., City Accountant: rgh@framinghamma.gov – (508) 532-5413 William G. Naser, Chief Assessor: wgn@framinghamma.gov – (508) 532-5415 Carolyn R. Lyons, Treasurer/Collector: crl@framinghamma.gov – (508) 532-5430 Carly P. Melo, Director, Technology: cp@framinghamma.gov – (508) 532-5829 56 XXX The vision of the Framingham Division of Public Health (the Division) is to equitably protect and promote the health of the diverse populations that live, learn, work, and play in the City of Framingham. We seek to support and enhance health through strong leadership, high quality services, culturally competent health education, and collaboration with diverse local and regional partners. Leadership & Governance Under the leadership of the Director of Public Health, the Division is comprised of four main service areas: Environmental Health, Community Health, Public Health Nursing & Emergency Preparedness, and Administra- tion. In FY’18 the Division hosted 11 municipally funded positions, 1.5 grant funded positions, and one inde- pendent contractor. Highlights of the Division’s FY’18 activities are included in this report. The Board of Health (BOH) is a five-member appointed body that provides policy direction to the Division. In FY’18, BOH members included Laura T. Housman, MPH, MBA (Chairwoman), Michael R. Hugo, JD (Vice Chairman), Tammy C. Harris, MD, MPH (Secretary), David W. Moore, MD (Member), and Judith Wester, RN, BSN, MSN (Member). Environmental Health The Environmental Health section of the Division regulates and protects many aspects of environmental health for the City of Framingham. Much of our regulatory actions are mandated by state and local laws and regula- tions. Our team of Public Health Inspectors, led by the Environmental Health Manager, carried out the opera- tions of this section of the Division. Permits & Inspections In FY’18, our team conducted over 1,500 inspections and over 75 plan reviews for new and/or renovated establish- ments. We inspected and permitted restaurants, farmer’s markets, food trucks, recreational camps, septic systems, tanning salons, tattoo parlors, swimming pools and beaches. We also offered lead paint testing, promoted smoke-free housing, conducted pre-rental housing inspections, enforced tobacco regulations, and coordinated mosquito control ef- forts. Our inspectors responded to complaints related to housing, trash, rodents, hoarding, and food-borne illness. Hoarding In FY’18 our Community Intervention Specialist offered case management, referrals, and support to Framingham resi- dents with hoarding disorder. She managed 46 individual cases, connected 38 residents to additional programs and services, provided specialized training to 145 Framingham firefighters, and facilitated two peer support groups for clients suffering from hoarding disorder. We secured a grant from MassHousing to cover the cost of home clean-outs for severe hoarding cases. In FY’18 this was a shared position with Veterans Services. FY18 Inspections 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 Number of Inspections Camps Septic Animal Hoarding Pools Nuisance Housing Food Division of Public Health 57 Environmental Justice and Major Contaminated Sites Portions of South Framingham meet the definition of Environmental Justice Areas. In this district, we work closely with Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection to advocate for the appropriate and timely remediation of three main contaminated sites – the Mary Dennison Park, General Chemical Corporation prop- erties on Leland Street, and the EverSource property on Irving Street. In FY’18, the Division contracted with Bois Consulting to provide technical support in this area. Community Health Guided by our vision, the Division has started to invest more energy on improving the health outcomes of our residents through community health programs. In FY’18, we focused on four main programmatic areas: the on- going opioid crisis and other substance use issues, adolescent mental health, healthy aging, and the regional MetroWest Moves program. This section of the Division is guided by the Assistant Director of Public Health. Substance Use Prevention and Intervention Under a multi-year grant from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, our Community Health Coordinator continued to lead a regional coalition with a wide variety of members who are all commit- ted to preventing substance abuse and reducing overdoses. In FY’18, we received additional grant funds from the MetroWest Health Foun- dation to create the MetroWest Health Department Nalaxone Pro- gram. Through this grant, we increased access and education about Nalaxone (Narcan) in health departments in Framingham, Natick, Ashland and Hudson. In addition, we have provided a series of com- munity trainings about addiction, sponsored positive youth develop- ment workshops, and partnered with the Boston University School of Medicine to develop recommendations for pediatricians related to opioid prescriptions. We were active partici- pants in the Middlesex County District Attorney’s Community Justice Project, and served on the expert panel for Mayor Spicer’s Community Conversation on the Opioid Crisis. Adolescent Metal Health In the last quarter of FY’18, we formed a collaborative working group with the Framingham Public Schools to look into addressing the issues related to mental health among our adolescents. This working group included leadership representatives from a number of mental health services providers, youth serving organizations, School Committee members, and local foundations. We looked at available data and will continue to prioritize this issue in FY’19. Healthy Aging In January 2018 the Division received a grant from the MetroWest Health Foundation to better understand and implement strategies to become an age and dementia friendly city. We hired a full-time program coordinator for this new initiative, and worked with a community-based coalition to conduct a baseline healthy aging assess- ment and learn more about dementia. We will analyze the results of this assessment and identify action steps in FY’19. 58 XXX MetroWest Moves We continued our collaboration in the regional MetroWest Moves program, an initiative that is coordinated by the Hudson Health Department. In FY’18, we worked with project partners to complete a community food as- sessment. We plan to use the results of this assessment to better coordinate efforts that address food insecu- rity in Framingham. Public Health Nursing & Emergency Preparedness In FY’18 the Division continued to provide a plethora of public health nursing services in order to comply with state law and the needs of our diverse population. Major activities included communicable disease control, im- munization/clinic services, and emergency preparedness. Our Public Health Nurse also collaborated with col- leagues and community organizations to provided health screenings and education, conduct food borne illness investigations, and oversee the medication and sharps kiosks. Communicable Disease Control There were 983 cases of reportable diseases in FY’18, a 9% increase from FY17. Compared with FY’17, FY’18 saw a reduction in Lyme disease cases (99 compared with 146) and Zika virus (12 compared with 34). This may be the result of increased public awareness and changes in physician protocol for testing and treat- ing the diseases. In contrast, the number of Hepatitis C infection cases increased significantly in FY’18 (163 cases, compared to 113 cases for FY’17). Working with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, we determined that the increase was mostly likely related to an increase in intravenous drug use. Nursing Clinic and Immunizations In FY’18 we administered over 2,500 doses of flu vaccine over a series of flu clinics. We also provided a large number of non-flu vaccinations through our daily nursing clinic, including; shingles, tetanus, pneumonia, HPV, Hepatitis A, MCV and others. Many immunizations were provided to children without a primary care physician so that they could enroll in school. Overall, we served 1,735 patients for non-flu immunizations in FY’18, a 281% increase from FY’17. 59 Emergency Preparedness In FY’18, our Public Health Nurse supervised the Division’s emergency preparedness planning and response func- tions. This included managing our Medical Reserve Corps (MRC), a group of nearly 250 volunteers who have been trained to respond to emergencies in the community. We conducted trainings and drills, coordinating deployments for shelter operations, managed the Division’s CDC Emergency Preparedness grant, and served as the emergency health alert responder. In FY’18, the Framingham MRC was deployed to 17 major events in Framingham, ranging from the Boston Marathon, to flu clinics, to health services for homeless Veterans. Administrative Services Our administrative staff provided high quality office support to our staff, and friendly customer service to resi- dents and the business community. They handled incoming complaints, inquiries, and requests, as well as the issuance of permits for the Division. Our administrative staff also coordinated the patient flow for our daily nursing clinic. They completed essential tasks including payroll, accounting and purchasing for the Division. The section of the Division was staffed by our Office Manager and the Administrative Assistant. In closing, I would like to express my sincere gratitude and deep appreciation to our Board of Health, MRC vol- unteers, and each member of the staff for their dedication and hard work in FY’18. Our achievements are the direct result of their commitment to public health in the City of Framingham. 60 Facilities Management Memorial Building, Rm 133│508-532-5485 │facilities@framinghamma.gov The Department of Facilities Management is responsible for the general maintenance, repairs, renovations, and day-to-day operations for multiple public facilities and parking lots owned by the Town of Framingham. The department oversees and maintains 19 City Owned Buildings, the Waverly Street and Hollis Court commuter parking lots, Pearl Street Ga- rage, both Centre & Downtown Commons, and parking meters located throughout the downtown area. The Department consists of 13 fulltime employees, with an operating budget of $2.5 million. The Department of Facilities Management and the Capital Building Projects Department have continued to work as a co- hesive unit in all current and fu- ture building projects. Due to our in-house trades staff, we have been able to provide a more efficient and effective approach to the everyday maintenance is- sues that occur. This year Framingham has made some monumental chang- es as we shift from a town to a city. With this most recent change in government, the Department prepared and assisted throughout the whole planning process for our first-ever Inauguration and the swearing-in of our new Mayor, City Council and School Committee members. This historic event was a tremendous success due to involvement and hard work that was contributed by the Department as well as that of other municipal offices and the Inauguration Committee. The Department continues to serve our 24/7 public safety buildings, which include the police headquarters and five fire stations. For the second year in a row, we applied for and received a 911 Incentives Grant for the police department. The grant funding was used to renovate the dispatch office with new counsels and flooring. I would like to thank all City of Framingham officials and departments that we have worked with over the course of this past year. We appreciate the assistance and guidance you have provided to the Department of Facilities Management. We continue to strive to make efficiency improvements through the facilities we manage and will continue to focus on the reduction of our carbon footprint. Finally, I would like to thank my staff for their continued dedication and hard work. The Department has worked extremely hard to maintain and keep up with the additional demands with our existing resources. Their individual and combined efforts have helped create the quality of service for the Department of Facilities Management. Capital Building Projects Department In FY’18, the Capital Building Projects Department has continued to manage the construction of the Loring Arena renovation. This project has completed the first phase and allowed the rink to operate during construc- tion. The front addition and the newly renovated rear locker rooms will address longstanding code issues of ADA compliance and proper gender separation. This project is scheduled to complete in September 2018. Cultural Historical (5) Cushing Chapel Old Edgell Library Academy Building Village Hall Athenaeum Hall Municipal Use (4) Memorial Building Main Library Callahan Senior Ctr McAuliffe Branch Library Public Safety (7) Police Headquarters Animal Control Kennel Fire Stations (5) Special Use (2) Danforth Building Pearl Street Garage 61 While continuing our commitment to reduce our carbon footprint, the City of Framingham has applied for the 2018 Green Communities Competitive Grant. This grant funding will be applied towards the replacement of the original boiler at the fire headquarters, and the mechanical infrastructure and energy management upgrades at Fire Station 5. These projects, along with additional energy conservation measures such as LED conver- sions throughout our facilities, will continue our commitment as a Green Community. The Capital Building Projects Department continues to work in a joint ef- fort with the Facilities Management Department with 20-year long-range plans. The Department has successfully completed and moved the con- struction planning and plan implementation into the next phase of two major City projects. The Department has awarded the contracts for both the Village Hall Handicapped Access Improvements and Replacement of Fire Station 2 on Watson Place. The construction completion of the Village Hall is anticipated for January 2019. The Fire Station 2 construction is on an accelerated schedule due to its present condition, and construction is anticipated to be complete in May 2019. Another project that was funded in FY’18 was the ADA Pearl Street Accessible Entrance Project at the Main Library. The Department is preparing an RFQ for the design in the later summer followed by the bidding and procurement of the construction once the design has been completed. In closing, the Capital Building Projects Department will continue its me- thodical approach and preparation for all future projects. 62 Human Resources Division Telephone: 508-532-5490 Fax: 508-532-5497 The Human Resources Division consists of the Human Resources Department and the Veterans Services Department. HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT The Department of Human Resources has multiple responsibilities related to future, current, and past em- ployees. The Department is responsible for overseeing the recruitment, hiring, and onboarding process of new employees for all City positions, in accordance with state and federal laws and established City policies and procedures. In addition, the Department maintains the City’s job analysis and compensation plans; drafts, revises and interprets the City’s personnel policies and procedures; plays a key role in negotiating and inter- preting all collective bargaining agreements; fosters harmonious, engaged, productive labor and employee relations; performs cost and staffing analysis; assists in employee development and training; maintains and analyzes employee benefit packages; and oversees employee appreciation programs. Additionally, the Department administers the City, school, and retiree benefits and Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) leaves of absence; unemployment insurance programs for schools employees on unpaid FMLA, and City and school workers’ compensation. Employment Judy Caron is a Human Resources Generalist/Analyst. She man- ages the employment and recruitment process, including advertis- ing, reviewing employment applications, interviewing candidates, and facilitating and conducting pre-employment background checks. In FY’18 Judy hired 129 full and part time employees, including 59 temporary/ seasonal employees. She conducted 104 CORI/SORI background checks on employment candidates. She coordinates the Department of Transportation Commercial Driv- ers’ License random drug and alcohol testing program. In 2017, there were 76 random drug/alcohol tests. Judy administers the City Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) policy and ensures legal compliance with the federal FMLA law. In FY’18, Judy managed 24 FMLA leaves. She is also involved with employee counseling and conducted 16 exit interviews in FY’18. Benefits Robin Tusino is the HR Benefits Manager. She is responsible for administering all employee benefits including health, dental, life and disability insurance programs for the City, the schools, and retirees. Robin also conducts educational in-service seminars to all off-site departments during open enrollment to share benefit news and information. She counsels all employees (school and City) who are retiring to ensure a smooth transition of benefits from an active employee to a retiree. In addition, she counsels retirees who are turning 65 on the Medicare and supplemental insurance process and ensures that all necessary forms are completed. From January FY18 Municipal Employment # Full & PT Hires 129 Background checks 104 Drug/Alcohol Tests 76 FMLA Leaves 24 Exit Interviews 16 Benefit Processing Enrollments 232 Terminations 186 Life Insurance Claims 13 COBRA Notifications 121 63 1, 2018 through June 30, 2018, Robin counseled municipal retirees and teachers. She processes and audits pay- ments of all insurance related accounts and of claims for death and disability. Robin works closely with all active former and retired City and school employees. Max Bastos is the Benefits Assistant. He assists with day-to-day benefit administration including orientation, enrollment and disenrollment of employee benefits, and resolution of insurance issues. He is also responsible for the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act or COBRA for City and school employees. In 2018, the Benefits staff processed 121 COBRA notifications to City and school employees. HR Benefits is also responsible for new employee orientations, conducting open enrollment, orchestrating the health and wellness fair, and processing life insurance claims. In 2018, HR Benefits enrolled 232 employees, processed 186 terminations, and processed 13 life insurance claims. There were 55 community vendors who participated in the health and wellness fair, the largest turnout thus far. Workers’ Compensation & Safety Richard Lamb is a Human Resources Generalist and specializes in workers’ compensation. He oversees safety and workers’ compensation programs for City and School Department employees, including reviewing accidents, coordinating medical claims, lost work time, light duty, and return to work programs. Richard also runs the Safety Committee for both the City and the School Department. One goal of the Human Resources Department is to create a culture of safety for all City employees, including school employees, starting with new employee orientation. We have added safety training to each City employee’s first day, and 20 employees attended safety orientation in 2018. In 2018 there were 36 employees trained in safe driving, workzone safety and basic first aid from the Department of Public Works. Additionally, Richard developed and issued a safety manual for DPW employees. The School Department conducts continuous quarterly safety training for custo- dial staff. Administration and Social Media Renan Pinheiro is the Financial Coordinator. Renan assists with budget preparation; tracking accounts; and coordinating pay- ment of all department bills including health insurance, workers’ compensation, unemployment, and other departmental bills. He is also responsible for the Department’s accounts receivables, directly billing employees, retirees, and surviving spouses for their portion of the health insurance benefits premiums. In FY’18 Renan sent out 1,402 bills and collected $176,274.90 in mon- ies owed. Renan is also in charge of the Department’s webpage and social media. He is multi-lingual and helps with translation services. Susan Embree is the Division’s Administrative Assistant. She provides excellent customer service, greeting each visitor to the department, making them feel welcome, and assisting them in any way possible, whether it’s finding directions, walking someone to the right department, or helping them fill out a job application. She provides administrative support to the Department, orders supplies, and coordinates monthly meetings with benefit vendors. She also plans and coordinates special projects such as employee training and development programs, employee appreciation events, the annual tree lighting, and other special events. Public records re- quests dominated FY’18, and through Susan’s continued training she became an expert for the Department as the Public Records Access Officer (RAO). She worked closely with the state and is well versed in the laws, and she is very familiar with the City software, FoiaDirect. Susan processed 48 public record requests in FY’18. FY18 Administrative Workload Public Record Requests 48 Medical Premium Bills 1,042 Medical Premium Revenue $176,275 64 VETERANS SERVICES DEPARTMENT 508-532-5515 508-532-5497 (fax) Veterans@framinghamma.gov The Mission of the Department is to aid, assist, advise, and advocate for Veterans and their dependents regarding their rights to benefits and services. The Veterans Benefits and Services Department handled number of unique cases in FY’18. We assisted a Framingham native’s mother who lost her daughter while she was serving on active duty in the United States Air Force. The Department partnered with the Framingham Public Health Department’s social worker to provide bereavement counseling and introduced her to the Gold Star Family President. We assisted in the ordering of a memorial bench that was installed in Cushing Park. The Veterans Agent visited various senior service facilities in Framingham to increase awareness of our state Chapter 115 program and to discuss how to file for compensation with the federal Veterans Administration. The Department shipped boxes of Halloween candy that were collected at a local dentist office overseas to our Troops. We made a visit to the Stapleton Elementary School where the 2nd graders sang patriotic songs and presented a check to our office that we donated to the Prison Pups Benevolent Association. The Department held our annual Sock Hop during the Framingham Concert on the Common series, collecting socks for homeless Veterans. Memorial Day Ceremonies featured the presentation of the Massachusetts Medal of Liberty to four Gold Star families from the City of Framingham whose relatives were killed in action during WWI and WWII. In preparation for Memorial Day, 4,700 flags were placed on the graves of Veterans in Framingham’s seven cemeteries. Special thanks to all of enthusiastic volunteers. Brigadier General Leonid Kondratiuk, was the Guest Speaker at Veterans Day. The Veterans’ Agent co-Chaired the Flag Day Parade Committee with Kelly Hegarty from the Public Health Department, our Veterans social services partner. This was the first Flag Day Parade in the new City of Fram- ingham; a return of the Flag Day Parade after a 10-year hiatus. 65 508-532-5500 508-532-5768 (fax) Building.Dept@framinghamma.gov The second half of FY’18, which also commemorates the beginning of our City form of government, has been very busy due to a robust economy and a plethora of new apartment complexes planned throughout the city. The focus of the Department continues to be the pursuit of the highest quality of public service by responding to concerns as they arise, to follow up on previous concerns, to maintain a record of property activities re- viewed by inspectors and investigators, and to be responsive to consumer protection. The mission of the Building Department is to provide knowledge and service regarding local, state, and federal codes and standards in a manner that supports our commitment to the safety of our public and to the integrity of the department. We willingly participate in programs of continuing education to keep our staff informed of the latest technology and requirements within the building trades industry, as well as customer service and com- puter literacy. Due to some retirements and an open position, the Department was able to re-organize positions to increase efficiency and cost effectiveness. These changes in staff will reflect a $60,000 savings in the FY’19 budget. It has been a pleasure working with Mayor Yvonne Spicer and her administration as well as our City Council. I am looking forward to further building relationships and working together in our new city form of government. Inspectional Services Division Staff:Michael A. Tusino, Director James Murphy, Local Inspector Fred Bray, Deputy Commissioner Mark Shahood, Plumbing-Gas Inspector Ed Hicks, Electrical Inspector Vacant, Plans Examiner Heidi Bryce, Applications Manager Suellen Seta, Code Enforcement James DeMeo, Assist. Sign Officer Paul L.M. Kelley, Code Enforcement Michael McCarthy, Code Enforcement Stephen DeMarco, Local Inspector Vincent Sarnosky, Local Inspector Joanne Panarelli, Code Enforcement Michelle Fletcher, Administrative Assistant Rebecca Nau, Administrative Assistant Mark Dempsey, Access Compliance Insp. FY’19 Operating Budget: $1,117,922 Calendar 2018 Fees Collected: $2,677,591 66 BUILDING PERMITS SUMMARY 7/1/2017 to 6/30/2018 Permit Type Permits Estimated Cost Fee Antenna 25 $879,500 $13,218 Com Addition 2 $4,580,400 $68,706 Com Change Occ 1 $0 $100 Com Demo 11 $731,702 $11,059 Com Electric 653 $0 $309,953 Com Fire Alarm 5 $121,000 $550 Com Garage 1 $100,000 $0 Com Gas 251 $0 $26,908 Com New 3+ Family 1 $1,773,000 $26,595 Com New Const 5 $80,942,200 $472,503 Com Plumbing 527 $0 $80,887 Com Reno 440 $36,220,197 $481,070 Com Roofing 37 $2,959,880 $44,666 Com Shed 1 $0 $0 Com Sheet Metal 53 $1,617,848 $23,930 Com Solar 7 $1,172,711 $17,591 Com Sprinkler System 14 $143,800 $2,610 Com Temp Structure 25 $56,043 $2,650 Com Tenant Fit-Up 15 $2,436,610 $37,137 Inground Pool 1 $35,000 $525 NA 12 $421,622 $6,624 Total Commercial 2087 $134,191,513 $1,627,282 Res Above Ground Pool 3 $1,200 $150 Res Accessory 4 $12,000 $300 Res Addition 28 $2,683,517 $40,253 Res Deck 33 $383,637 $5,886 Res Demo 24 $175,200 $2,727 Res Electric 1196 $0 $180,989 67 Permit Type Permits Estimated Cost Fee Res Garage 4 $187,110 $2,807 Res Gas 870 $0 $74,772 Res Inground Pool 7 $239,200 $3,588 Res New Single Family 46 $8,984,990 $144,067 Res New Two Family 28 $3,249,600 $71,263 Res Plumbing 769 $0 $56,429 Res Relocate 2 $21,435 $339 Res Reno 977 $17,182,982 $262,600 Res Roofing 332 $3,118,553 $47,251 Res Shed 67 $0 $3,223 Res Sheet Metal 160 $3,563,204 $54,495 Res Solar 208 $5,655,551 $84,652 Res Temp Structure 21 $57,165 $1,478 Res Wood Stove 12 $0 $1,019 Total Residential 4791 $45,515,344 $1,038,287 Awning 4 $0 $204 Banner 20 $0 $1000 Directional 5 $0 $250 Multiple Businesses 1 $0 $90 Other Sign 6 $0 $200 Panel Change 31 $0 $1,700 Realty 2 $0 $100 Standing 60 $0 $2624 Wall 89 $0 $4954 Window 19 $0 $900 Total Sign 237 $0 $12,022 Total 7115 $179,706,857 $2,677,591 Certificates of Occupancy 141 68 150 Concord Street, Room B-2 508-532-5455 Framingham, MA 01702 www.ChooseFramingham.com The Community and Economic Development Division (CED) undertakes a wide variety of projects focused on protecting and enhancing the quality of life for Framingham’s residents. The projects are multi-dimensional, ranging from promoting homeownership and strengthening the City’s tax base, to providing policy analyses and pursuing mission-related grants. The Division also promotes the City as a desirable place in which to live, shop, work, and invest. The Division consists of three departments: Planning, Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA), and Community Devel- opment (CD). While each department concentrates on different functions, each coordinates closely with other departments and divisions, boards, committees, and the public. The new city charter, approved by Framingham voters in 2017, calls for the CED division to merge with the Planning Board and the Conservation Commission. Since January 2018, when the charter took effect, the CED Division has been working to integrate the staff and functions into a new, reorganized Planning and Com- munity Development (PCD) Division. While formally still separate, the staff have been in close collaboration and working towards a formal reorganization proposal later in 2018. This report includes information from all PCD activities, reflecting another step toward full integration. PLANNING DEPARTMENT Memorial Building, Room B-2 (508)532-5455 | Planning@framinghamma.gov www.framinghamma.gov/1666/Planning The Planning Department concentrates on sound planning to promote economic development and to sup- port our residential neighborhoods. Planners manage a variety of projects and provide policy analyses for the Mayor and City Council. The Department pursues and manages mission-supporting grants while also provid- ing staff support to City committees. The Planning Department coordinates closely with staff from the Planning Board, the Department of Public Works (DPW), and Parks & Recreation (P&R) on all relevant planning issues. The Department supports the implementation of key plans including the Land Use Master Plan, updated by the Planning Board in 2014; the Housing Plan (updated in 2014); the Open Space and Recreation Plan; the Strategic Economic Development Plan (EDIC 2015); the Southeast Framingham Brownfields Study (2016); the Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan (2017), and the Historic Preservation Plan (2017). Economic Development The Department is committed to encouraging appropriate economic development, to grow the tax base, and to contribute to the fiscal health of the City. The Department promotes the development of major parcels for (re) development throughout City. Staff engage with businesses with expiring leases, monitor property available for sale and lease, and respond to questions from individuals and businesses interested in locating in Fram- ingham. Staff participate in interdepartmental teams that review development proposals to facilitate the project through the various review processes. Staff also serve as a “front door” to City resources, connecting property owners, existing businesses, and prospective businesses with other municipal departments. Planning and Community Development Division 69 FY’18 Budget and Initiatives The Planning Department’s revised FY’18 budget was $417,160, including funding for historic preservation initiatives. 2018 Planning Department initiatives included: • Downtown Transit Oriented Development - implementation. Building on 2015 Central Business District zoning amendments and the creation of an Urban Center Housing district in 2017, Framingham built a pipe- line of six downtown projects reflecting a potential for 877 new housing units within a 10-minute walk to the MBTA Commuter Rail station. Taken together, this series of projects, when built, will provide a foundation for a Downtown transformation. • Golden Triangle Planning Project. Working with the Town of Natick, the Planning team began this com- prehensive planning effort in spring, 2017. The purposes of this long-range project include creating a shared future development vision for the area and identifying options to improve access to Exit 13 of the Mass Pike. In FY’18, the Planning team advanced the project to a final draft report, leveraging the CoUrbanize online platform to gain 800 project comments through 5,900 unique web site visits, and conducted a joint communi- ty meeting with Natick staff. The Planning team will advance the plan through resident outreach and Planning Board review in fall, 2018. • Comprehensive Economic Development Plan, Phase 1. In FY’18, the Planning team collaborated with the Planning Board to procure consulting services and, in January launched an effort to set a Citywide direction for future economic development. Work to date has included extensive consultant management, business leader engagement, “open house” sessions, an online survey yielding input from nearly 800 residents, exten- sive economic research, and engagement with City political leaders. The Planning Department co-leads the project and anticipates a final report in fall, 2018. • Opportunity Zone designation. In May, 2018 the federal government recognized two Framingham census tracts for eligibility under this new program. The designation offers the option for projects to attract invest- ment from new opportunity funds offering federal tax advantages to investors. Leaders from Framing-ham and Wood Partners break ground on Alta Union House, a 196-unit Downtown TOD project, in April 2018. 70 • Housing Community Choice designation. The Planning team led an application effort, resulting in the May 2018 designation of Framingham as one of 67 Housing Choice communities. The designation recognizes our commitment to supporting housing development and provides access to a capital grant program. The Plan- ning team led an application to the program’s first grant funding round in early FY’19. • Nobscot Task Force. CED established the Nobscot Task Force to coordinate decision-making and actions leading to infrastructure improvements, new investments, and enhanced quality of life in the Nobscot neigh- borhood commercial center. The task force includes City staff, City Councilors, the Planning Board, and Framingham Library trustees. In FY’18, the task force met several times to work on four issues: • Disposition of the Nobscot Chapel • Edgell Road/Water Street intersection improvements • Updated Zoning & Design Guidelines • Shopping center redevelopment CED, with the support of task force members, drafted and issued an RFP to attract proposals to move, protect, and activate the Nobscot Chapel. RFP results are now pending. • Historic Preservation Awards program. In May, the Planning team coordinated an awards ceremony dedicat- ed to the memory of Gerald Couto, AIA and Massachusetts Representative Chris Walsh, two staunch archi- tecture and historic preservation advocates. The Historical Commission created the Couto/Walsh Award, to recognize an architect making significant contributions to historic preservation. Downtown Revitalization Building on planning efforts dating to 2009, the Planning Department coordinates and supports several efforts to promote revitalization and Transit Oriented Development (TOD). The Planning Department continued to work with other departments on permitting and other Downtown business issues. Downtown Framingham, Inc. (DFI) CED supports Downtown Framingham, Inc. (DFI), a non-profit organization focused on the revitalization of our downtown. DFI provided assistance to 120 local businesses that affect 30,635 residents. Fourteen of the busi- nesses were new, while 10 had newly relocated to Framingham. In addition, DFI highlighted downtown business- es and increased the customer base in the area, most notably through its numerous activities, including holiday Lt. Governor Karyn Polito joins COO Thatcher Kezer III, CED Director Arthur Robert, and EOHED Undersec-retary Janelle Chan to mark the state designating Framingham as a Housing Choice Community, in May 2018. 71 events, beer crawls, yoga on the common, and other activities. Learn more about DFI on Facebook Twitter and their website: www.downtownframingham.org. During FY’18, the Community Development Department provided DFI with $58,000 in grant funding through the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program. Department staff participate in public Board of Directors meetings and meet regularly with Courtney Thraen, DFI’s Executive Director, to ensure coordination with CED efforts and policies. Since January 2018 DFI has continued to work proactively with the Framingham Business Coalition, surveying downtown businesses on key issues, including cannabis dispensary locations and the City’s sign bylaw. DFI continues to host events – 25 between January and June 2018 – and is targeting 50 events for this calendar year, including its continued tradition of hosting activities and events related to the Boston Marathon. This year, DFI also increased its place making efforts. The group commissioned a new mural at 199 Concord Street, pro- viding a vibrant new Downtown gateway, and partnered with the EDIC to create a pilot project to activate Me- morial Plaza with tables and chairs, beginning in July 2018. DFI also began the “Lokerville Lookouts” program, which engages the Lokerville neighborhood to find ways to better connect the neighborhood with downtown businesses and services. Technical Review Team (TRT) The Planning team continues to support a multi-departmental approach to ensuring timely and efficient project permitting. The team, including representatives of all permitting parties (Planning Board, Inspectional Services, etc.) meets with project proponents to identify permitting requirements, identify issues, and track timely resolu- tion. This collaborative approach promotes appropriate economic development by boosting the predictability and timeliness of the City’s permitting efforts. In FY’18, the TRT held 20 meetings and reviewed 29 projects. Brownfields Framingham has a considerable number of brownfields sites, defined as “properties containing - or potentially containing - hazardous substances, pollutants or contaminants that complicate the property’s refinancing for expansion or redevelopment”. Brownfields are a blighting influence on their surroundings and are typically underutilized. These properties have the potential to generate new property taxes, once hazards are abated or it is established that that they are no longer contaminated. Since 2008, the Department secured and administered four EPA grants totaling $1,100,000 to identify, abate, and eventually redevelop brownfields. In 10 years, 18 Phase I Assessments, eight Phase II Assessments, four cleanup plans, and 14 Preliminary Environmental Studies have been conducted under these grants. Several properties have been converted into valuable community assets, such as the Cochituate Rail Trail, Pratt Street Community Garden, and the Christa McAuliffe Branch Library. Major grant activities – including property owner outreach – are set to begin in fall 2018. This grant runs from September 2017 to September 2020. Cultural District Designation The Department is supporting an effort to establish a state-recognized “Cultural District” around the Centre Common. Once led by the late Rep. Chris Walsh, a state-recognized district will highlight cultural resources clustered in the area, including the History Center, Danforth Museum, FSU, and the historic architecture of the buildings. In 2018, the Planning Department continued active participation in this effort. 72 Multiple Hazard Mitigation Planning The Planning team staffs the Multiple Hazard Mitigation Plan (MHMP) Working Group, consisting of represen- tatives of various City divisions, as well as citizens. The group is responsible for overseeing the updates and implementation of the City’s MHMP. The Federal Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 requires regular MHMP up- dates. MHMP implementation is ongoing. In April 2018, the state awarded the Department a $44,500 grant award under the Municipal Vulnerability Preparedness (MVP) program. The Department will use the grant to hire an MVP Provider, a consultant who will assist in the creation of a climate change assessment. This assessment will help Framingham best prepare for local impacts of global climate change. The work will lead to the state designating Framingham as an MVP Community, providing access to additional resources. Open Space The Planning Department staffs the Open Space & Recreation Implementation Working Group (OSRIWG), which is charged with implementing the 2013 Open Space and Recreation Plan (OSRP). The OSRIWG – with staff from other City Divisions and Departments – meets regularly to discuss opportunities to advance the Open Space Priority List. In 2018, two notable successes include: • Wayside Forest. In FY’18, the Planning team won a $217,000 LAND grant, supporting conservation restric- tions and protecting 52 acres of prime open space. The innovative arrangement leveraged Sudbury Valley Trustees fundraising, leading to that organization’s purchase of the property. • Nyanza Grant – 936 Central Street. In June, the Planning team completed the purchase and conservation restriction process on this property. The team continued to work toward conservation restrictions on Auburn Street properties, pending owner donations. Bicycle and Pedestrian Planning CED recognizes a need for a comprehensive approach to supporting bicycle and pedestrian access throughout the City. Planning Department staff led an interdepartmental team, including DPW and Planning Board staff, to establish the City’s first Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan, in June 2017. The plan guides City investment in alterna- tive transportation infrastructure. Completion of Phase II of the Dudley Road multi-use path is expected in early FY’19. When complete, the path will offer bikers and pedestrians with connections linking our Downtown to Farm Pond Park and easy access to Bowditch Field. Bruce Freeman Rail Trail (BFRT) The Department manages the planning process to develop the Framingham portion of the proposed 35-mile rail trail that will ultimately extend from Lowell to Framingham. The Department, at the direction of Mayor Spicer, began preparations for renewing discussion with CSX, intended to lead to purchasing the property. CED expects discussion with CSX to begin later in 2018. Aqueducts Planning Department staff continue to review and develop opportunities for opening aqueducts for public use. In February, the MWRA issued a permit to the City and ATAC enabling public uses on the Sudbury Aqueduct on the City’s south side. 73 Subsidized Housing Inventory (SHI) CED monitors the City’s status on the Commonwealth’s Subsidized Housing Inventory to ensure the state ac- curately and fully accounts for Framingham’s subsidized housing. The City’s share of its housing stock des- ignated as affordable remains in excess of 10%. This limits the applicability of Chapter 40B Comprehensive Permits (subsidized housing development that is not subject to municipal Zoning Codes). The State SHI lists Framingham with 27,443 housing units with 2,871 or 10.5% affordable. Grants & Access to Funding CED tracks and aggressively pursues grant opportunities that support Framingham’s economic development and enhances our high quality of life. In 2018, CED secured several grants, including: • $1.1MM MassWorks grant, for improvements to Marble Street, boosting vehicular and pedestrian safety on a road bordering the 270-unit multifamily project at 266 Waverly Street. • $396,115 MassDOT Complete Streets grant, for Phase II for the Dudley Road Multi-Use Path. • $217,600 EOEEA LAND grant, for Wayside Forest protection. • $44,500 EOEEA Municipal Vulnerability Preparedness Program grant, for conducting a climate change assessment. • $16,000 DCR Urban Forestry grant, for creating a South Framingham Urban Forest Inventory and Manage- ment Plan. • MassDevelopment Commonwealth Places grant, for developing a design converting a City-owned tract from a parking lot to a neighborhood pocket park. Provide Support to City Committees The Department provides staff support to several City committees, including the EDIC, the Framingham His- torical Commission, and the Framingham Historic District Commission. Link to Municipal, Regional, and State Organizations The CED Director and Department staff represent the City through a host of associations, working groups and committees including but not limited to the following: • MetroWest Chamber of Commerce • Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) • MetroWest Regional Collaborative • Framingham Community Partnership • 495/MetroWest Partnership • Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) • Code Enforcement Task Force • Brownfields Coalition of the Northeast The Department also maintains strong contacts with many state entities, including the Massachusetts Office of Business Development (MOBD), MassDevelopment, and the Department of Housing & Community Develop- ment (DHCD). 74 Economic Development Industrial Corporation (EDIC) The EDIC is charged with creating a proactive capacity to execute activities supporting the Economic Develop- ment Strategic Plan. Based in part on the Economic Development Self-Assessment Tool (EDSAT) it sponsored in 2012, the EDIC received funding for a number of activities. EDIC members who served in FY’18 included: Mike Gatlin, Chair, Government Member Scott Wadland, Vice Chair, Real Estate Dan Rao, Manufacturing Member Rick Gallitto, At Large Rick Donovan, Industrial Member Maureen Dunne, At Large Chris DiBenedetto, Finance Member EDIC Budget Since FY16, the Framingham government funded the EDIC through a Special Purpose Account, providing flex- ibility in executing its marketing plan. As of June 30, 2018, the status of each account is as follows: Fiscal Year Budget Expended Available* FY’16 $120,000 $111,243 $4,057 FY’17 $121,500 $108,448 $5,450 FY’18 $127,500 $65,789 $45,163 *FY’18 Additional Committed = $19,906 for contractual services salaries and wages for part-time contract staff hired in May. The City Council did not provide EDIC FY’19 funding. The EDIC designated the bulk of the funding to hire a consultant to continue implementation of the Commu- nications Plan created in 2016. The EDIC engaged O’Neill and Associates to continue the work they began in 2015, including publishing a monthly newsletter, hosting business events, and increasing the City’s social media presence among the region’s businesses, developers, and influencers. EDIC Activities During FY’18, the EDIC continued to support City membership in the Metrowest Chamber, the 495/Metrow- est Partnership, MassEcon, and NAIOP, providing Framingham with access to regional and statewide de- velopment networks. EDIC funds have also been used to acquire business data subscriptions (CoStar and Hoover’s) to support site selection inquiries, as well as software and training for CED staff. EDIC Marketing The EDIC leads efforts to market Framingham’s assets and businesses, to encourage companies and individuals to invest, create jobs, work, and live in the City. Planning team staff execute the promotion program, with the support of O’Neil & Associates, a marketing and public relations firm. Marketing channels, through which the EDIC shares information and positive stories about business success and quality of life to a growing target audience, include: 75 • The EDIC’s marketing web site - www.chooseframingham.com. In FY’18, there were 8,980 visits with 13,431 unique page views. • Traditional media engagement. In FY’18, Planning staff worked with our consulting team to support 15 one-on-one discussions with reporters, and seven stories and op-eds. • Monthly email newsletter. The newsletter reached over 1,300 (in April 2018) regional business and de- velopment leaders, an 18% year over year increase. The newsletter shared 54 positive stories highlighting Framingham’s business location strengths. • Twitter account - @Choosefram. Attracted 1,700+ followers as of April 2018, a 23% year over year in- crease. • Facebook page. Attracted over 500 followers as of April 2018, a 20% year over year increase. • “Social media tours”. Planning staff experimented with three “tours,” including a takeover of the “Only in Boston” (OIB) snapchat feed. This pilot provided an opportunity to share background on Framingham at- tractions directly with OIB’s thousands of primarily young and urban Boston followers. The Framingham OIB takeover engaged over 4,000 people. • Promotional events. These staff-intensive activities highlight Framingham’s strengths while helping build relationships with business leaders and influencers. The EDIC, with Planning team support, conducted three events, reaching over 200 business and community leaders, including: • Life Sciences event – September 2017. This event brought together 80 business, government, and aca- demic leaders into a panel discussion on how to raise awareness of – and support the growth of – the emerging life sciences sector in Framingham. The event raised awareness of Framingham opportunities and conditions for conducting a highly successful, Framingham-focused life sciences bus tour in June 2018. It also sparked interest in creating a more formal Metrowest Life Sciences network, which staff helped launch in spring 2018. • Business networking event - April 2018. The event provided Mayor Spicer an opportunity to get acquaint- ed with 75 leaders from small and large businesses, hear of the City’s strengths and challenges, highlight EDIC efforts, and to share her vision for Framingham’s development. • Life Sciences bus tour – June 2018. This event brought 50 global life sciences leaders, attending the BIO convention, to Framingham and Natick. The event included an industry panel discussion, introductions to Senate President Karen Spilka and Travis McCready, CEO of the Mass Life Sciences Center, site visits at Alira Health and Sanofi Genzyme, and informal networking at the Springdale room – all highlighting locating and growing in Framingham and the Metrowest region. CED Director Art Robert organized this event, in col- laboration with Gabrielle Brambilla, Alira Health’s CEO, Paul Joseph, CEO of the Metrowest Chamber, and Gary Kaufman, CEO of Natick’s ABI-Labs. CED Director Art Robert with Framingham & Natick Life Sciences executives participating in the Metrowest Life Sciences Bus Tour. Photo courtesy of Alira Health 76 Industry Engagement, New Project Milestones & Investments • CED company meetings. Through April 2018, CED Director Art Robert completed 57 meetings with busi- ness owners, property owners, and investors considering Framingham for new business activity. This figure is up 30% over the twelve-month period ending in April 2017. • Alta Union House. In April, Wood Partners broke ground on a $60MM, 196-unit mixed-use project at 55-75 Concord Street. • Modera Framingham. In April, Mill Creek Residential Trust began demolition for a $70M, 270-unit multifam- ily project at 266 Waverly Street • Avidia Bank. In September 2017, this Hudson- headquartered regional bank opened a Route 30 branch. This ~$3MM, new construction facility reflected extensive Planning team engagement on permitting over several years – and the CED Director’s personal visit with the bank’s CEO and leadership team. • King Street Properties. In March 2018, King Street Properties closed on the $9.3MM purchase of 33 New York Avenue. The well-regarded, Cambridge-based life sciences space developer secured Planning Board permits to convert the 90,000 SF, former Metrowest Daily News building, to a multi-tenant life sciences facil- ity. King Street announced its first tenant, Replimune, in August 2018. • KANO. In February 2018, this London-based, VC-backed, early stage company entered into an agreement to lease ~ 3K SF office in the Saxonville Mills. Growing out of the FSU Entrepreneurship Innovation Center, the Department coordinated a site selection tour, highlighting available office options. The commitment cre- ates KANO’s North America sales and marketing office and will ultimately support 12 new jobs. • Kephera Diagnostics. In May, this life sciences startup entered into a ~5K SF lease agreement at 1 Grant Street to complete R&D around new tools to detect infectious diseases. CED Director Art Robert coordinated permitting discussions with DPW and Inspectional Services, completed a financing meeting with SMOC Fi- nancial Services, and generated a range of location options, all setting conditions for a Framingham location decision. ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS Memorial Building, Room B2 (508)532-5456 zba@framinghamma.gov www.framinghamma.gov/zba The Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA) is the Permit Granting Authority and the Special Permit Granting Author- ity for projects that do not meet the requirements of the City’s Zoning Bylaw. The ZBA’s function is to, through a public hearing process, approve or deny requests for appeals, variances, and special permits; and issue findings, determining whether required criteria, as stated in the Zoning Bylaw, have been met. The ZBA also administers the Comprehensive Permit process for affordable housing as set forth under M.G.L. Chapter 40B. The Board meets on the second Tuesday every month at 7:00 pm in the Blumer Room. ZBA staff post meeting agendas and case files on the Public Meeting Portal (www.framinghamma.gov/meetings). 77 The ZBA is a three-member board now appointed by the Mayor. In the first half of 2018, members were previ- ously appointed by the Board of Selectmen, and include: Philip R. Ottaviani, Jr., Chair Susan S. Craighead, Vice-Chair Stephen E. Meltzer, Clerk Edward “Ted” Cosgrove, Associate Joseph Norton, Associate John “Rick” McKenna, Associate ZBA staff assist applicants with the ZBA process, facilitating applications and fielding general zoning questions from the public. They also draft the Board’s decisions and advise the Board on procedure and other informa- tion, in addition to managing the Board’s finances. Staff were: Sam Scoppettone, Administrator Alaa Abusalah, Administrative Assistant The City Solicitor advised the Board as required. Total filing fees in FY’18 amounted to $21,850. These funds go directly into the General Fund. FY18 Budget and Activity The ZBA’s revised FY’18 budget was $109,077. In 2018, the ZBA conducted 53 public hearings. A summary of the Board’s activity for this period is contained below: Petition Type Decisions*New Petitions Variances 33 31 Use Variances 5 3 Sign Variances 13 7 Findings (Sec. 6)12 11 Special Permit 16 17 Appeals 4 4 Sign Appeals 1 1 *Decisions include those for cases filed prior to the reporting period and exclude those decided after the report- ing period. Variance and special permit requests typically include those for relief from dimensional requirements for: construction of, and additions to, single-family homes; placement of garages and sheds on residential proper- ties; construction of two-family residences and automotive and restaurant uses; and changes of use for local businesses. Three Associate Members voted on sign appeal applications, with a fourth Alternate Member. Ted Cosgrove chaired the sign cases. 78 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT Memorial Building, Room B-3 (508) 532-5457 nsaj@framinghamma.gov www.framinghamma.gov/418/Community-Development The Community Development Department (CD) manages the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) and Home Investment Partnership Act (HOME) grants allocated to the City by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Funds subsidize projects, programs, and services primarily benefitting low- and moderate-income persons earning 80% or less of area median income. Program and service categories are: downtown improvements, public services, public facilities improvements, code enforcement and housing rehabilitation. Two full-time and one part-time positions staff CD. FY18 CDBG & HOME Budgets Budget Spent Percent Utilized* Home $185,024.00 $175,440.59 94% CDGB $528,973.80 $425,617.53 80% *These are federal entitlement funds and unexpended funds can carry over. Previous years’ funds, as well as a small amount of Program Income ($26,292 for FY18), are often utilized for program activities in a following fiscal year. FY’18 Accomplishments To-Date • Major housing rehabilitation plans finalized for 73-75 Hollis Street. HOME and private sources will finance the upgrades to this single-room occupancy, SMOC-owned facility in the downtown. • Celebration of National Community Development Week (CD Week). In April, the CD team created a weeklong series of events highlighting the program’s impact in the community. Major events included a re- source fair in the City Hall rotunda, and a tour of Butterworth Park to view the many past and current projects funded by the CDBG program. • Revision of CD’s citizen participation practices to reflect Framingham’s shift to a city form of govern- ment. Changes incorporating the mayor, city council and the community development committee were imple- mented in the lead-up to CDBG fund acceptance • Continuance of CD’s membership on the Regional McKinney-Vento Committee. The Framingham Public Schools convenes this group every other month to assess the needs and to assist in the provision of services to the area’s homeless student population. • Focus on discussing and promoting the health of older adults. The CD team pursued this through shar- ing and identifying challenges, best practices, and strategies around improving their health and well-being as a member of the Age-Friendly Coalition. • Marking the Fair Housing Act’s 50th anniversary. Activities included a mayoral proclamation for National Fair Housing Month, and April 26 as Fair Housing Day, as well as a presentation by a HUD equal opportunity specialist on the history and accomplishments achieved to date due to the law’s passage. 79 CDBG-Funded Initiatives Housing Rehabilitation Assistance Program (HRAP) The HRAP program provides comprehensive and emergency repairs to homes of income-eligible homeowners. For 2018, the Department is on track to complete projects at three homes. The program expended $70,990 on housing rehabilitation projects. Code Enforcement & Neighborhood Improvement CDBG funds assisted the Inspectional Services Department in assessing for code violations in South Framing- ham. There were approximately 144 units cited for code violations in 2018. The program resolved 378 of 448 violations, with $67,000 expended. Public Facilities Improvements CDBG funds supported public facility improvements at Butterworth Park and the Edward M. Kennedy Com- munity Health Center (EMKCHC). The Butterworth Park project entailed the installation of a shade structure. CDBG funds also paid for parking lot restriping and landscaping upgrades at EMKCHC. The program invested $40,409 into these public facilities improvements. Economic Development & Façade/ Sign Improvement Program CD contracts with DFI to provide technical assistance to downtown businesses, as well as manage the Sign & Façade program. Program funds help merchants develop signs that maximize business identification and branding, while improving the appearance of the downtown commercial district. Two businesses benefited from the program in 2018 with new sign installations. Two façade projects are in the pipeline for completion later in the year. The program invested $3,296 on subsidies to assist two businesses. Supporting Community Non-Profits Assisting Framingham Residents In 2018, ten public service agencies serving primarily low- and moderate-income residents received CDBG funds. The pressing needs addressed by the agencies included food insecurity, after-school and enrichment programs for area children and young adults, as well as ESL, citizenship course delivery, and literacy services to new immigrants and low-literacy adults. The program invested $79,902 into grant programs serving approxi- mately 1,100 beneficiaries. HOME Program Framingham is a member of the WestMetro HOME Consortium with 13 other member municipalities comprised of Newton (lead community), Belmont, Brookline, Concord, Framingham, Lexington, Natick, Needham, Sud- bury, Waltham, Watertown, and Wayland. The communities do not qualify to meet the $500,000 threshold to receive HOME funds directly. Thus, they band together as contiguously located governments to participate in the HOME Investment Partnerships Program (HOME) program. Working collaboratively, they create affordable housing, provide rental support and issue down payment assistance to their residents. 80 Subsidized Housing Support CD concluded transactions on a rehabilitation project to occur at a SMOC owned single-room occupancy facility, at 73-75 Hollis Street. The work supported by HOME and private funds highlights non-luxury housing improvements complementing new, transit-oriented developments in the downtown. Through a formally record- ed affordable housing restriction, the project adds 55 units of affordable housing in Framingham. The program committed $424,000 in HOME funds to support this project. The city also completed the Tribune Apartments, a 53-unit apartment complex for low-income seniors and persons with disabilities. The development, entirely subsidized by Section 8 vouchers, is located in downtown Framingham. Its completion was a major accomplishment for the City. Subsidies among the $16 million fi- nancing the project included sources as MassHousing, DHCD, MHIC, CEDAC, FHLB and more. The program committed $179,023 to Phase 1, and $160,485 for Phase 2, supporting additional rehabilitation work on the property. Framingham uses a portion of its HOME funds for a Tenant-Based Rental Assistance (TBRA) pro- gram that solely pays for security deposits and first or last month’s rent. The program successfully assisted 30 low- and moderate-income households secure stable housing. The program committed $38,866, to assist 31 renters through TBRA. Outreach to attract more applicants to the down payment assistance program resulted in one client assisted. The program assisted a first-time homebuyer with the purchase of a new home. Barriers that emerged for cli- ents who did not qualify are the underwriting review, which requires that no more than 33/38 front to back end ratio. Many clients could not meet this threshold due to the high price of homes, though they qualified for the assistance based on income. The underwriting largely found that their housing expenses were too high for the homes they were attempting to purchase. The program expended $3,410 to assist one homeowner with clos- ing costs. FRAMINGHAM PLANNING BOARD 150 Concord Street, Room 205 Amanda Loomis, Planning Board Administrator ALoomis@Framinghamma.gov http://www.framinghamma.gov/69/Planning-Board The Framingham Planning Board (FPB) serves as a partner for municipal land use policy and planning efforts. Such efforts include responsibility for the development, maintenance, and implementation of the Master Land Use Plan; development of zoning and the recodification of the Framingham Zoning By-Law; maintenance of the Rules and Regulations Governing the Subdivision of Land in Framingham; review, permitting, and con- formance of development projects; and collaboration with various municipal departments. The FPB continues to improve efficiencies around the Plan-Build-Grow model, project review and permitting, public outreach and engagement. The FPB was comprised of Christine A. Long, Chair (2020) Lewis Colten, Vice-Chair (2019) Victor A. Ortiz, Clerk (2019) Thomas Mahoney (2018) Stephanie Mercandetti (2018) Numbers shown between 2010-2017, are calculated for the entire calendar year, post transition from a Town to a City – numbers shall be shown for the Fiscal Year (FY) 81 On January 1, 2018, Framingham began its transition from a town form of government to a city form of govern- ment. Current members of the FPB continue to serve out their elected terms. As elected FPB positions expire, the Mayor will appoint replacements, subject to City Council confirmation. Numbers shown between 2010-2017, are calculated for the entire calendar year, post transition from a Town to a City – numbers shall be shown for the Fiscal Year (FY) On January 14, 2018, the Planning Board lost their valued member, Stephanie Mercandetti. Ms. Mercandetti’s untimely passing left the FPB with only four members as Tom Mahoney retired from the board. Two new mem- bers will begin their service in FY19. The FPB Office consists of three employees who support the Planning Board and collaborate with other de- partments on initiatives. Through much of FY’18, the FPB Office was comprised of Amanda L. Loomis, Plan- ning Board Administrator and Nathaniel A. Eames, Associate Planner. The Community Outreach Coordinator is currently vacant. FY’18 Budget and Initiatives The Board’s revised FY18 budget was $237,062. During FY18, the FPB granted 29 decisions for applications (Site Plan Review, Special Permits, Subdivisions, Public Way Access Permits, and Modifications to Scenic Roadways). The FPB has received 76 applications and held 37 meetings. Zoning By-Law Amendments In FY’18, no amendments to the Zoning By-law were voted, but work continued on several key initiatives. Pro- posed amendments include: • Transfer of Development Rights (TDR) amendments to Section I.E and V.O of the Framingham Zoning By- Law; • Corporate Mixed-use (CMU) Zoning District By-Law and Zoning Map Amendment; • Active Adult Housing By-Law (Section V.I) and associated definitions (Section I.E) Section V.I Active Adult Housing By-Law amending definitions found in Section I.E associated with Section V.I. and amending the bylaw to coordinate the language around Active Adult and Inclusionary Zoning; Numbers shown between 2010-2017, are calculated for the entire calendar year, post transition from a Town to a City – numbers shall be shown for the Fiscal Year (FY) 82 • Marijuana Establishment Regulations – regulations that will add a new footnote to Section II.B.5.D regarding Marijuana Retailers, add a new footnote to Section II.B.6.A. regarding Marijuana Independent Testing Labo- ratory, add a new footnote to Section II.B.6.C regarding Marijuana Cultivators and Marijuana Product Manu- facturer, amend Site Plan Review to include All Marijuana Retailers as a new Section VI.F.2.a.6), and further amend Section VI.G.1. by adding new language regarding Marijuana Retail Establishments; • The FPB worked in collaboration with the Town Bylaw review committee to review and update the Framing- ham Zoning Bylaw to be consistent with the City Charter. Land Use - Nobscot • In spring 2018, a collaborative effort with the Division of Community and Economic Development and the Planning Board offered “office hours” in the McAuliffe Library. This made it possible for residents, landown- ers, and other stakeholders in the Nobscot community to express concerns, ask questions, and offer ideas about the future redevelopment of the area. A total of 13 sessions, attracted over 90 people, from March 9, 2018 to April 27, 2018. • A Nobscot Community Survey was conducted to collect meaningful comments, opinions, thoughts, and data from a targeted audience of those who identify with the Nobscot community. The goal of the survey was to establish baseline data from which to make informed decisions regarding possible land use, regulation, and zoning changes to the area. The survey was open from April 6, 2018 to May 30, 2018 and received 779 responses. The survey posed nine questions that ranged from general demographics to opinions about the strengths and weakness of Nobscot as it is currently developed. The survey provides in-depth perspective and direction as to alternatives for future next steps and needed action for the Nobscot area. Master Plan Implementation The FPB continues to monitor implementation of the Master Plan. Ongoing initiatives stemming from that effort include plans for the Golden Triangle, Nobscot, South Framingham, and the Economic Development Plan. Public Information The FPB continues to improve its public outreach efforts through the City’s website and FPB Facebook page. The FPB staff ensures that all projects archived and currently under review are available to the public on the FPB webpage. Sudbury River through Saxonville within Nuisance Aquatic Vegetation Management Program target area on June 25, 2018. Photograph courtesy of Mr. Ron Chick. 83 CONSERVATION AND OPEN SPACE DIVISION Memorial Building, Room 213 Robert McArthur, Conservation Administrator (508)532-5450 RDM@Framinghamma.gov https://www.framinghamma.gov/Conservation The Conservation and Open Space Division (COSD) of the Department of Planning and Community Devel- opment in support of the Conservation Commission is responsible for implementing local, state, and federal wetland laws, managing over 400 acres of conservation land, and engaging the public in conservation efforts. COSD is responsible for reviewing all proposed and on-going municipal, private, commercial, and industrial projects to determine if they fall under the jurisdiction of local, state, and federal wetland laws. Conservation staff conducts site inspections, attends pertinent meetings, and represents the Commission in legal matters. Staff advises and provides technical expertise to the Conservation Commission to assist with the protection of the environment as well as interdepartmental reviews for other City departments. Other duties include man- aging conservation land owned by the City, overseeing the Framingham Stewardship Program, directing the Nuisance Aquatic Vegetation Management Program, and providing education and outreach to residents. Wetlands Protection Achievements (January to June 2018) Table 1: FY 2018 Conservation Division Wetlands Protection Act Permit Applications Processed Permit Type Quantity Processed Inter-departmental Reviews of applications (Building Permits, Planning Board Permits, and Zoning Board of Appeals Permits) 98 Notice of Intent 45 Abbreviated Notice of Resource Area Delineation 1 Request for Determination of Applicability 16 Emergency Certification 2 Minor Plan Change 9 Permit Extensions 4 Amended Order of Conditions 2 Certificate of Compliance 37 Notice of Violation 8 Enforcement Order 2 Administrative Approval 43 The Commission and its supporting staff held 26 public meetings and performed 209 site visits and inspections in support of permitting shown in Table 1. 84 Management Achievements In 2018, the Conservation Division continued its five- year program to manage nuisance aquatic vegetation in the impounded section of the Sudbury River. In the month of June, the Division’s lake management con- tractor completed two treatments of the river using the herbicide Clearcast and achieved approximately 70 percent control of invasive water chestnut (Trapa natans) at the surface. The COSD continues to administer the Lakes and Ponds Nuisance Aquatic Vegetation Program, which manages nuisance and/or invasive aquatic vegetation in Farm, Waushakum, Learned, Gleason, Norton, and Mohawk Ponds. In May, staff initiated the first chemical treatment of nuisance aquatic vegetation in Wausha- kum Pond since 2015, following successful collabora- tion with the Natural Heritage and Endangered Spe- cies Program. Open Space Achievements The COSD cooperatively worked with the CED team in an ongoing effort to secure Conservation Restrictions for properties located on Central Street, Auburn Street, and Wayside Inn. The Conservation Restrictions acquired by the City for 936 Central Street and Wayside For- est (0 Wayside Inn Road and 0 Dartmouth Drive) were accepted and held by the Conservation Commission. Conservation Land Management The COSD land management program continued the highly successful land management program. The seasonal crew continued the ongoing efforts to curb the spread of invasive species and maintain the passive recreational opportunities across 400 acres of conservation land. COSD also provided work opportunities and experiences to local high school students participating in the Partnerships for a Skilled Workforce (PSW) Youth Careers program. Educational and Outreach Achievements COSD Staff participated in key educational outreach events: Transition Framingham’s Earth Day, the SuAsCo Wild and Scenic River Stewardship Council’s RiverFest, Framingham State University’s Science on State Street science fair, and Transition Framingham’s Green Framingham United 2.0. Conservation Staff also conducted a walk with the Sudbury Valley Trustees in a fundraising and awareness event, met with local cub scouts for educational programming, and visited local preschools to celebrate Earth Day. Staff worked with Transition Framingham in a collaborative effort to produce educational media focused on local organizations and sustainability. Seasonal crew members Jack Duross and Christian Celestian install signage at the newly acquired Conservation Restriction at Wayside Forest. 85 HISTORICAL COMMISSION AND HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION Jennifer Doherty, Historic Preservation Planner Memorial Building, Room B2 (508) 532-5455 jbd@framinghamma.gov www.framinghamma.gov/HistoricPreservation FY18 Budget The FY18 budget devoted $40,000 to support the work of the Historical Commission (HC) and the Historic District Commission (HDC). Historical Commission Current HC Members include: Chair: Fred Wallace Vice Chair: Paul Silva Clerk: Susan Kennedy Jane Whiting Thomas Schuetz Lewis Colten Consultant Jennifer Doherty continues to serve as HC staff undertaking various historic preservation initiatives and managing all administrative duties. The HC continued work with preservation consultants Claire W. Dempsey and Zachary Viollette to document properties in Saxonville under the Massachusetts Historic Commission (MHC) Survey and Planning Grant awarded in 2017. They support efforts by the HDC to establish a local historic district in this Saxonville. Another successful Preservation Awards Program was held during Preservation Month (May 2018). This year’s ceremony was dedicated to the memory of Gerald Couto, AIA, who passed away in June 2017 and Massachu- setts Representative Chris Walsh who passed away in May 2018. Both worked for many years to raise aware- ness of architecture and preservation issues in Framingham and served on the Commission for many years. The HC has created an award called the Couto/Walsh Award intended for an architect who makes significant contributions to historic preservation. A total of 19 requests for demolition were reviewed under the City’s Demolition delay bylaw, covering all build- ings greater than 75 years old. Only one demolition delay actions was taken. A one-year delay was enacted for the building at 613 Pleasant Street. Also, the house sign marker program was continued this year and the HC worked with McAuliffe Charter student, Elana Gelfand, to commemorate the history of the Indian Head Heights Road area and address concerns that the name was derogatory. 86 Historic District Commission Current HDC members include: The Historic District Commission held 11 meetings and one site visit in FY’18. In conjunction with the HC, the Commission hired Historic Preservation Consultant Jennifer B. Doherty to un- dertake several projects, as well as to handle administrative duties of the Commission. The Historic District Commission reviews building alteration requests in five separate historic districts. In FY18, the Commission held three hearings. In 2018, work continued on the establishment of a local historic district in Saxonville. The HDC partnered with the Historical Commission to work with Historic Preservation Consultants Claire W. Dempsey and Zachary Vio- lette to continue their work under the Massachusetts Historic Commission (MHC) Survey & Planning Grant to formally survey the balance of the structures within the proposed Saxonville Historic District. They have submit- ted 81 MHC Form B forms for review and acceptance by the MHC Staff. The HDC also held one informational neighborhood meeting on February 27, 2018 to help residents understand the project process and goals. HDC/ HC staff also participated in the Saxonville Mills Open Studios in April 2018 to provide information about the project to the public at that event. Members Steven Greeley, Acting Chair; District Resident Member Sue Bernstein; Realtor Member Henry Field; Attorney Helen Lemoine; History Center Member Julie Ferrari, A.S.L.A.; At Large Jim Kubat, A.I.A.; At Large Alternates: Ted Grenham; Amy Finstein, Ph.D; Andrew Mackin; Ken Nowell 87 Parks and Recreation Division PARKS AND RECREATION COMMISSION Joan Rastani served as Chairwoman with members Dave Gudejko, Kathy Hauck, Joe Kaufman, and Phil Reitz. The Division is diligently moving forward with the Phase II assessment of the soil at the Mary Dennison Park. As part of the risk assessment, it was recommended that additional soil testing be done on several properties abutting the Park. In addition, Weston & Sampson performed a peer review of the process and created a park conceptual design incorporating remediation options. A Community Day to present the most recent conceptual park design was scheduled in May at Mary Dennison Park, but due to inclement weather was moved indoors. Many great ideas were discussed that may be integrated into the final design. Additional meetings will be scheduled later in the year. A grand opening of the new Skatepark was held on June 21, 2018, which coincided with National Skate Park Day. Numerous residents both young and old enjoyed the event. Skaters featuring Anthony Shelter and the “All I Need” Skate Team entertained the crowd. For the 4th year, the Department hosted the Metrofest Festival at Bowditch. The event was held in June, and for the first time there was no admission charge. This event continues to grow in popularity with something for every- one, including events for children, music, a beer and wine tasting tent, 20 food trucks and over 100 vendors. Bose Day was also held at Bowditch Field. Over 200 volunteers worked to cleanup sites around the City result- ing in numerous savings for the City. Phase II of the Dudley Road Multi-Use Recreation Path (Bicycle & Pedestrian) at Farm Pond opened. The ten-foot wide asphalt paved pathway extends along the eastern edge of Dudley Road on the Farm Pond parcel from Dr. Harvey Cushing Way along Mt. Wayte Avenue to Union Avenue, providing safe access to key ameni- ties all the way to Bowditch Field. Other projects included the resurfacing of the Bowditch Track, new backstops at Furber Park, and improve- ments to the Walsh complex, Anna Murphy Park, and the entrance of Butterworth Park. We would like to thank the Mayor and City Council, departments and volunteers for supporting our services. We would also like to thank the hundreds of user organizations and volunteers for their continued support. RECREATION DEPARTMENT The Recreation Department provides programs geared toward a varied population, including adults, youth, 55+ adults, preschool children, and those with special needs. Services are provided through a combination of user fees and public tax dollars. During the past year, we formally registered over 21,000 participants in over 311 different program categories. In January, the vacant Activities Supervisor position was filled internally by Elaine (Intze) Prue who had been serving the Department as Recreation Super- visor for over ten years. Also in January, after an extensive search, a new Recreation Supervisor was hired. David Sequeira has a strong recreation back- ground and experience in the field. We look forward to new programs and offerings for the community. 88 Events and Activities For the 8th year, we managed the ever-popular “Friday Night Concerts on the Green.” The eight- week schedule included Bruce Katz, Eleven, Amy Gallatin & Stillwaters, 4 Ever Fab, The Brazilian Project featuring Marlene Roasario, and Back Pages. The weather prevented Un- finished Business and Little Red and the Riders from per- forming, but they will be scheduled for next summer. We are grateful to the many sponsors who made this event possible, especially the Auxiliary Police for being there every week, and DPW for providing security lighting. Due to the resurfacing of the Bowditch Track, our sig- nature summer track meets were relocated to Fram- ingham State University. We are grateful to FSU for allowing us to continue the program with little disruption. Jacks Abby Brewing held its first Social Tennis League at Butterworth Courts. The program was so successful that we plan to offer a summer and fall league next year. The Department sponsored many special events this year with the assistance of Friends of Framingham Recreation. Highlights includ- ed the EGGciting Egg Hunt, Pumpkins in the Park, the 911 Remem- brance Ceremony, Santa’s lil’ Sports, and Family Fun and Movie Night featuring ‘Moana’ at Bowditch Field. Our Division participated on the Flag Day Parade Committee and marched with pride in the return of the Flag Day Parade after a 15- year hiatus. In June, we were excited to assist with the Skatepark Grand Open- ing. This unique amenity will open up a whole new program track, as we plan to offer lessons and other special events in the future. Waushakum Pond was chemically treated with Aquathol for weed control for the first time in years by Solitude Lake Management. Although this was done before the beach season, there were no swimming restrictions advised. Hopefully, this will help with the invasive weeds that have taken over our swimming area. We would like to thank the Mayor and City Council, City staff, and numerous community volunteers for their commitment and dedication. Without their continued support, we would not be successful in offering quality programs to the residents of Framingham. We welcome input from residents and we value both your feedback and involvement in our programs. 89 PARKS MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT The Parks Maintenance Department provides safe and well-maintained facilities for over 15,000 scheduled events each year for our many user groups. Our commitment to provide well-maintained facilities combines a well-planned maintenance program with a field use scheduling program. This proactive approach enables us to manage our facilities to prevent overuse while offering greater public access to our facilities. Our maintenance program continues to promote the high quality establishment of natural turf to our high use areas. Our program continues to use a balanced system of aeration, fertilization, seeding, mowing, with proper irrigation in the most cost effective manner. We continue to monitor our soil conditions and provide the neces- sary nutrient applications as needed. This maintenance work continues to benefit all of our high use turf areas. The continued demand to provide additional practice and game field facilities is still a ma- jor issue. The demand is constant and there are few alternatives to turn to. The overuse of facilities and the resultant decline in turf qual- ity is still a major problem and concern for us. The strategy of field rotation and limiting use has worked in the past, but once again we are being challenged by not having enough space for all our groups. We are still seeing a growing increase in participation of some of the seasonal sports as well as some non- traditional seasonal sports, i.e. fall lacrosse and spring soccer. We have had to look at ways to change how and where some of the non-traditional user groups that are being scheduled can go. There is a definite need to look at some long-range plans for future field space. Until this happens, we will continue to be asked to provide more use on areas that are already seeing heavy use. As we have noted in the past, this overuse accelerates the need to shutdown fields for costly renovations. Our Maintenance Department continues to provide support to the athletic programs of three high schools, Framingham High, Marian High and Keefe Vocational High School. Other schools that rely on our department for a portion of their athletic program needs are Framingham State University and MassBay Community Col- lege. In addition to school athletics, the Department provides scheduling and facilities for hundreds of other user groups from the Framingham community. We continue to use a site based management program at the Bowditch facility to offer extended use of the facility during non-traditional times. This has provided our users with better access and use of the complex facilities. Our working relationship with Keefe Technical School continues to benefit the Department. Our use of their labs has provided a beneficial relationship for the City. This collaboration also provides access to cost effective, professionally supervised, electrical, carpentry, plumbing, and metal fabrication, while affording students the benefit of practical “real world” learning experiences in a commercial setting. FY18 Supply Purchases Supplies Used Athletic Field Marking Lime (Pounds)8,400 Athletic Field Marking Paint (Gallons)99 Fertilizer (Pounds)24,000 Grass Seed (Ponds)516,000 Ballfield Clay (Yards)56 Loam (Yards)204 Playground Safety Chips (Yards)206 Bark Mulch (Yards)80 90 Through our Capital Budget program we were able to purchase one new vehicle, a pre fab toilet facility for Cushing Park, and provide funding for the retaining wall and backstop project at Furber Park. Our tree maintenance program continues the tree removal program, with a concentration on hazardous trees and trees with obvious structural defects. With the increased funding we are keeping up with the work de- mand. The Citywide beautification program continues to be highly successful. We have had great collaboration with benefactors willing to make donations to upgrade and beautify roadside areas with the ability to advertise their donations. We continue to give support and resources to other City departments including the School Department, Building Services, Library, Public Works and Conservation. We would like to thank all of the City departments for their cooperation throughout the year. It would be very difficult for us to achieve the success we have without their help. We would also like to thank all our volunteers and volunteer groups for their help on projects this past year. Their support was tremendous. Cemeteries The Cemetery Commission consists of a three-member board appointed by the Board of Selectmen. The three cemeteries under their jurisdiction are the Edwards Cemetery, Main Street Cemetery, and Old South Burial Grounds. Leone’s Landscaping has a one-year grounds maintenance contract. We are happy with the service they have been providing. Due to the limited supply of sites, the moratorium on the general sale of new lots is still in effect. The fee schedule for cemetery associated activities remained the same in FY’18. The Parks Maintenance staff contin- ues to perform grave openings and internment of cremations at the cemeteries. This year there were two buri- als and one cremation. We continue to receive requests for historical records associated with the cemeteries and are able to use an electronic database to promptly respond to the majority of inquiries. With capital improvement funding, restoration of the gates was completed at the Old South Cemetery. We have identified the need to continue tree pruning and removals at the cemeteries and are requesting these funds in our FY’19 budget. 91 Loring Arena The men’s hockey team for Framingham State University, Framingham High School boys and girls hockey teams, Ashland High School and Holliston High School were in full swing in FY’18. Framingham, Ashland and Holliston boys hockey teams all made it to the playoffs with Holliston going the deepest. Construction on the Arena continued throughout the entire operating season. Weekly status meetings were held each Tuesday to ensure communication and progress was at a maximum. Attendees at the weekly meet- ings included James Snyder - Parks Director, Thomas Begin - Parks Deputy Director, Richard Weston – Arena Director, James Paolini, Bill McManus, Christopher McGinty and Alan Miller. In March 2018, Framingham Youth Hockey hosted the State championship games for District 8. The last day of the operating season was April14, 2018. The Arena was not kept open this year since the ice surface was not needed for lifts to access certain height restrictions during construction. The office space and skate shop were moved from the temporary trailers to another temporary location at the Parks and Recreation M&O building next to the Arena. The office will remain at the M&O facility until the per- manent office is completed. Rink staff have continued cleaning, maintaining, and painting the building as well as assist in the everyday needs of the contractors during construction. The Administrative Assistant continues to fulfill the daily requirements of the Arena office in addition to creating next year’s schedule and contracts for ice rental. A grand opening is being planned for fall 2018. 92 Council on Aging The Raymond J. Callahan Center is a multi-purpose center offering programs, activities, and services to promote healthy aging for people 55 and older and for the people who care for them. The Council on Aging Board assess- es the needs of older adults in the community and advises on programs and services to meet those needs. • More than 2,140 individuals participated 43,226 times in activities and programs, with more than 17,000 of those involved in exercise sessions. • 63 attendees are younger than 60. • There were 1,147 attendances at 97 evening sessions. • More than 29% of the participants are male. • The Social Services staff connected with 1,578 people, providing 5,701 contacts that included referrals for home care, housing, or transportation; for securing various benefit programs; and for supportive counseling. • More than 564 pieces of durable medical equipment were loaned out free of charge to 464 people. • The Framingham Cultural Council and the Friends of Callahan funded 23 free cultural programs with 830 attendances. There were an additional 15 free cultural programs with 745 attendances, thanks to generous funding by the Friends of Callahan and other donors. Volunteerism More than 440 volunteers donated more than 15,810 hours, which equates to 8.5 FTE. More than 994 seniors received assistance from the SHINE program regarding health insurance plans. New events and happenings in 2018 • Collaborated with Framingham Fire Department to provide six Fire and Falls Prevention trainings to 30 people, and home visits to 28 seniors. • Congresswoman Katherine Clark held the first Senior Resource Fair at the Callahan Center with 43 attendees. • Partnered with Framingham State University to provide Senior Health Fair on their campus. • Collaborated with Department of Public Health to begin process of designating Framingham as an Age- Friendly & Dementia Friendly City. Arranged for the translation of Healthy Aging Survey into several languag- es to reach a broader segment of the population. • Entered into an agreement with the MetroWest Regional Transit Authority to provide van service for $2 per one-way ride to Framingham destinations for residents 55 and older or disabled, starting in fall 2018. 93 City Solicitor Introduction & Overview Petrini & Associates, P.C. (“P&A”) is pleased to provide the 2017/2018 Annual Report of the Office of the City Solicitor. P&A operates the Office of the City Solicitor in accordance with Article II, Section 5 of the General Bylaws and Article III.3.e of the Framingham Charter. Christopher J. Petrini was appointed City Solicitor by Mayor Yvonne Spicer in February 2018, and previously served as Town Counsel. P&A represents the City in litigation and appears on behalf of the City before all courts and administrative agencies of the Commonwealth. In addition, P&A serves as a liaison and a resource to various special counsel and insurance counsel representing the City in a variety of legal matters. P&A also attends meetings of boards, committees and commissions of the City as necessary. P&A drafts legal documents for City officials, boards and commissions upon request, and reviews legal con- tracts, deeds and agreements to which the City is a party. P&A provides advice and opinions to the Mayor, City Council, and various boards, committees, commissions, division heads and department heads in accordance with the City bylaws and the City’s Policy on Access to Town Counsel and Confidentiality of Attorney-Client Communications. Over the past several years, the Petrini & Associates has handled the City’s significant volume of litigation with efficiency, focus and positive results. Included in Section II of this report is a comprehensive list describing the status of cases that were active between January 1, 2017 and July 11, 2018, as required by Article II, Section 5.8 of the General Bylaws. Included in Section III of this report is a Budgetary Overview section that summa- rizes the revenue, mitigation and avoided expenses that P&A helped achieve for the Town/City in 2017/2018. Status of Framingham Cases In accordance with Art. II, Sections 1.5 & 5.8 of the General Bylaws, below is a list of the Framingham cases that were active between January 1, 2017-July 11, 2018. Included are the case name, type of case, and a brief description of the case with the 2017 activities and 2018 activities through July 11, 2018 summarized in the last column. This section is divided into two parts. Part A summarizes cases that are handled by this office, Part B summarizes cases handled by special counsel or insurance counsel, and Part C summarizes School Depart- ment cases of which we are aware. (P&A does not serve as full counsel to the School Department but rather assists with specific matters upon request.) 94 A. Office Of City Solicitor Cases MATTER TYPE 2017/2018 STATUS/DISPOSITION 39 Grant Prop- erty Holdings, LLC v. Framingham Plan- ning Board, et al. Zoning An appeal of the Planning Board’s issuance of a decision dated June 14, 2018 granting Howard One Grant, LLC’s ap- plications for Site Plan Approval and a Special Permit for use of the property at 1 Grant Street. The City Solicitor and Plan- ning Board are in the process of reviewing the complaint and preparing any necessary filing. 58 Exchange Realty v. Zoning Board of Appeals, et al. Zoning This is an appeal of the Zoning Board of Appeals’ issuance of a variance to Colbea Enterprises, LLC for a canopy within the front setback at 601 Old Connecticut Path. The Plaintiff has 30 days to appeal the Court’s judgment. Butler v. Framingham Public Records This matter concerns a suit under the Public Records Law challenging the Town’s redaction of attorney-client privileged portions of a workplace investigation report stemming from complaints of harassment against the Plaintiff. The Town denies any violation of the Public Records Law, and after reviewing the redacted portion of the report in camera, the Supervisor of Public Records concurred that the Town properly withheld that portion of the report. A hearing on the parties’ motions was held in July 2018 and a decision from the Court is expected soon. Colbea Enterprises, LLC v. Framingham Zoning Board of Ap- peals Colbea Enterprises, LLC and Kobeissi Re- alty Corp. v. Framing- ham Zoning Board of Appeals Certiorari/Sign Bylaw In these related Land Court actions, Colbea Enterprises, LLC and Kobeissi Realty Corp. challenge the Sign Board’s deci- sions to deny Colbea’s and Kobeissi’s applications for varianc- es under the Sign Bylaw to include lighting on signage at their underlying gas station property. The Court issued an order dated August 7, 2017 allowing Colbea and Kobeissi to present previously unsubmitted permits that Colbea and Kobeissi con- tended they had received from the City to authorize them to in- stall the proposed signage lighting. Upon consideration of the new documents, the Board reversed its decision and issued decisions dated May 15, 2018 granting Colbea’s/Kobeissi’s applications for variances. On June 28, 2018, the parties filed a joint status report noting the Board’s decisions and advising that Colbea/Kobeissi intend to withdraw these cases upon the lapse of the 60-day appeal period following the Board’s May 29, 2018 filing of its decisions with the City Clerk, or on or after July 28, 2018. Framingham Police Officers Union & Town of Framingham (MUP-17-5757) Labor This matter concerns an unfair labor practice charge alleging that the Town violated Chapter 150E by not allowing FPOU unit members to work out-of-town details. The Town denies the charge because there was no past practice. The parties reached a tentative agreement to resolve this matter which is currently before the City Council for its review and approval. 95 Framingham Police Officers Union & Town of Framingham (AAA No. 01-17- 0000-4033) & Town of Framingham v. Framingham Police Officers Union (Mid- dlesex Superior Court and Appeals Court) Labor This matter concerns a demand for arbitration over the De- cember 2016 reassignment of police officer Matthew Gutwill from a special assignment with the Drug Enforcement Admin- istration to the Patrol Division. The City believes that the reas- signment of personnel is a management prerogative that is non-arbitrable and accordingly filed an action in Superior Court in March 2017 seeking to enjoin the arbitration from going for- ward. The Court denied the Town’s motion and the Town filed an appeal. The parties submitted briefs and oral argument before the Appeals Court occurred in March 2018. On July 10, 2018, the Appeals Court issued a ruling in the City’s favor, re- versing the Superior Court’s ruling. The FPOU has 20 days to seek further appellate review with the Supreme Judicial Court. Framingham Police Officers Union JLMC Petition Labor This matter concerns a joint petition filed in March 2017 by the Town and the Union with the Joint Labor Management Com- mittee regarding the negotiation of a successor agreement between the Town and the union. The previous agreement expired June 30, 2016. The parties attempted to mediate over several dates in 2017 and 2018 without success. An interest arbitration is expected to go forward in late summer/early fall 2019. Additional mediation is expected to be scheduled after the FPSOA JLMC Award is issued. Framingham Police Officers Union & City of Framingham (MUP-18-6704) Labor This matter concerns an allegation of unfair labor practices where the Union alleges that the City has retaliated against Of- ficer Matthew Gutwill for filing and litigating a grievance and for engaging in concerted activity through his Union by declining to appoint him to various positions since he was disciplined in December 2016. The City denies the allegations. The parties are in the process of scheduling an investigative conference. Jordan’s Furniture v. Planning Board, et al. Zoning This matter involves an appeal by Jordan’s Furniture of the ZBA’s decision granting Soniya Hotel, LLC’s request for site plan review and special permits in connection with a proposed development project at 130 Worcester Road. The complaint also named as a defendant Soniya Hotel, which as the permit grantee is the real party in interest. In accordance with G.L. c. 40A, the ZBA filed a notice of appearance in lieu of an answer on February 28, 2018, and will defend the Board’s issuance of the underlying zoning relief in this matter. 96 Lewis v. Zoning Board of Appeals Zoning This matter involves an appeal by a property owner challeng- ing the Zoning Board of Appeals’ September 13, 2016 decision affirming the determination of the Building Commissioner that the plaintiff’s property is illegally operating as a lodging house. The ZBA propounded interrogatories and a request for pro- duction of documents upon the Plaintiff and, after determining that the Plaintiff’s responses were lacking, moved for an order compelling further discovery. The Land Court issued in order on September 8, 2017 requiring that the Plaintiff supplement its discovery responses, and currently the ZBA is working with the Plaintiff on further production of electronic discovery and other discovery issues. Lynch v. Teti, et al.Subdivision Control Law This case involves an appeal by an abutter of the Planning Board’s Definitive Subdivision Plan approval of the Kendall Corner Subdivision, located at 0, 92, 110 Kendall Avenue and 9999 (RR) Kendall Lane. The parties commenced settlement discussions in the months following the Plaintiff’s filing of the complaint, and the Court has issued 60-day nisi dismissal orders to allow the parties to continue such discussions, including an order dated May 31, 2018 that provides that the case shall be dismissed in the absence of the parties’ filing of an agreement for judgment or stipulation of dismissal no later than July 12, 2018. Manelis/Rubin v. Framingham Administrative Ap- peal These consolidated matters concern appeals under G.L. c. 30A, s. 14 by Richard Manelis and David Rubin stemming from the Town’s denial of their parking ticket appeals in Au- gust 2017. The City filed the record of proceedings in January 2018 and the parties cross-moved for judgment on the plead- ings. A hearing on the motions is scheduled to take place in September 2018. Roy v. Capital Group Properties, LLC Zoning This case is an abutters’ appeal of the Planning Board’s June 19, 2018 decision allowing special permits and site plan ap- proval with conditions for a 129-unit development project at 175 Millwood Street and 818 Grove Street, the current locus of the Millwood Farms Golf Course. The complaint also names as a defendant Capital Group Properties, LLC, which as the permit grantee is the real party in interest. The Plaintiffs filed the complaint on July 11, 2018. The City Solicitor and the Board are in the process of reviewing the complaint and pre- paring any necessary filing. 97 SB General Contract- ing v. Town of Fram- ingham I SB General Contract- ing v. Town of Fram- ingham II Construction These two lawsuits involved the Town and SB General Con- tracting, Inc. (“SB”), the general contractor for the New York Avenue Utility Corridor Project (“Project”), a Town public works project that was performed primarily in 2010. The Project con- sisted of work on two streets, New York Avenue and California Avenue, and principally involved replacing existing sewer force mains with new larger diameter force mains. In March of 2011, SB filed a suit against the Town in Norfolk Superior Court, claiming the Town breached the Project agreement by failing to pay SB for certain work performed on the Project. SB alleged $341,021 in damages plus interest, which the Town disputed. The parties attempted to resolve the matter through voluntary mediation, but were unable to reach agreement primarily due to the assertion against the Town in April and May of 2012 of third party claims by two private property owners and the Com- monwealth of Massachusetts alleging that Asbestos Contain- ing Materials (ACM) from the Project site were improperly disposed in a residential area in Milford, Massachusetts during the summer of 2010, with estimated clean-up costs in excess of $750,000. The property owners also claimed unspecified property damages, emotional distress and other damages. The Town filed suit against SB in July 2012 in Middlesex Supe- rior Court seeking defense and indemnification and other relief pertaining to the asbestos dumping issue. The Town subse- quently moved for summary judgment and obtained a favor- able court ruling that SB had a duty to defend the Town under the applicable defense and indemnity clause agreed to by SB in the contract documents. The Town and SB, along with other potentially responsible parties, also engaged in pre-suit negotiations as required by G.L. c. 21E, § 4A related to the Milford asbestos dumping site. Following mediation in August 2013, the parties agreed on a cost sharing arrangement for the remediation of the Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) soil pile that included an exchange of releases between the parties. The Town’s contributed $175,000 towards the total settlement of $975,000, consist- ing of $100,000 in construction costs paid to SB and $75,000 towards the cleanup. This settlement was approved by the Special Town Meeting on October 16, 2013. continued on to next page 98 The Commonwealth threatened to commence suit and seek civil fines of up to $25,000 per day against the Town and the other parties for various statutory violations pertaining to the improper soil disposal. Negotiations with the Attorney Gen- eral’s Office to resolve the alleged statutory violations without litigation were completed in late 2016, and a consent judg- ment was entered by the Court on March 8, 2017. A mod- est ($35,000) monetary penalty imposed on the Town would become void provided the Town commits no violations of the applicable statutes during the three-year period from March 9, 2017-March 8, 2020. As part of the Consent Judgment, the Town also agreed to various injunctive relief relative to over- sight, recordkeeping and training to avoid a similar event from occurring in the future. Issues arose with the Town’s compliance with the Consent Judgment due to several incidents between September 2016 and August 2017, one involving DPW operations staff and others involving the contractor and engineer on a DPW capi- tal project. The Town and the Commonwealth negotiated an amendment to the Consent Judgment requiring, among other things, the payment to the Commonwealth of $17,500 (half of the suspended penalty referenced above) and the develop- ment of standard operating procedures (SOPs) for asbestos handling by DPW personnel and contractors on DPW projects. The amendment was approved by the Court in January 2018. The payment was made to the Commonwealth in January 2018, and draft SOPs initially were submitted to the Common- wealth in December 2017. The draft SOPs are currently being discussed and revised with the Commonwealth. Tortcon Builders, Inc. v. Zoning Board of Appeals Zoning/Land Use This is a case appealing the ZBA’s denial of Tortcon Builders, Inc.’s application for a variance from frontage requirements to build a single-family home at property located at 32 Sewall Street. The City served discovery requests upon Tortcon in April 2018 and is awaiting Tortcon’s responses. We anticipate that discovery, and potential motion practice, will occur in 2018 and into early 2019. Town of Framingham v. Seven Forty-Nine, LLC Environmental This case concerns claims under G.L. c. 21E for response costs incurred by the Town due to environmental contamina- tion encountered below the public right-of-way during a DPW project, which the Town alleges originated from the property located at 749 Worcester Road, which is owned by the defen- dant, Seven Forty-Nine, LLC. The parties engaged in pre-suit mediation in 2016 but were unable to resolve the case. The Town filed suit in the Middlesex Superior Court and the parties are in the process of conducting discovery. 99 MATTER TYPE ACTIVE CASES SUCCESSFULLY CLOSED IN FY’18 Burke v. Zoning Board of Appeals, et al. Zoning This is an appeal of the Zoning Board of Appeals’ issuance of a variance to Sirlei Evangelista. This matter is now closed. Butler v. Town of Framingham Declaratory/Injunc- tive Action sought declaratory and injunctive relief to enjoin the Town from “analyzing commercial and industrial values and their subsequent assessments pursuant to ‘income and ex- penses.” This matter is now closed. Butler v. Framingham Board of Selectmen Declaratory/ Injunc- tive This action sought to challenge Article 36 of the 2016 Annual Town Meeting, which limited Town Meeting’s consideration of personnel matters. This matter is now closed. Butler v. Brendon Properties Northside, LLC et al Zoning This case challenged the ZBA’s March 8, 2016 issuance of a special permit for the planned development of an assisted liv- ing facility at 518 Pleasant Street. The plaintiff alleged viola- tions of the state Conflict of Interest Law, G.L. c. 268A, §§2 and 23. This matter is now closed. Centore v. Piso and Zoning Board of Ap- peals, et al. Zoning This case was an appeal of the Zoning Board of Appeals’ issu- ance of a variance to John Piso. This matter is now closed. Circle Assets, LLC v. Zoning Board of Ap- peals. Zoning This matter involves the Plaintiff’s appeal of the Zoning Board of Appeals’ denials of applications for a variance and special permit to build two houses at 0 Franklin Street. This matter is now closed. Citimortgage v. Town of Framingham and Matterazzo Real Estate This was a Land Court Action for reformation of a deed brought by Citimortgage against the record owners and mort- gagors, Eugene Matterazzo, Jr. and Nancy Matterazzo. This matter is now closed. City of Framingham v. Delmar Martins Zoning This matter was an action filed in Housing Court to enforce the Zoning Bylaw to enjoin the Defendant from operating a land- scaping business at residential property at 33 Cherry Road. This matter is now closed. City of Framingham v. Jose Varela Nuisance Bylaw This matter was an action filed in the Housing Court to enforce alleged Nuisance Bylaw violations at the Defendant’s property at 14 Pratt Street. This matter is now closed. Evangelos v. Fram- ingham Fire Depart- ment Civil Service This matter concerned an appeal by Mr. Evangelos regarding his bypass for appointment as a firefighter. This matter is now closed. Framingham Police Officers Union & Town of Framingham (MUP-17-5758) Labor This matter concerned an unfair labor practice charge alleg- ing that the Town violated Chapter 150E by declining to pay certain FPOU members for “specialist pay.” This matter is now closed. 100 Framingham Police Officers Union & Town of Framingham (MUP-17-5930) Labor This matter concerned an unfair labor practice charge alleg- ing that the Town violated Chapter 150E by failing to provide notice or an opportunity to bargain before informing the FPOU that Framingham Police Officers, would not be permitted to use time off on Monday, April 17, 2017. This matter is now closed. Framingham Police Superior Officers Association JLMC Petition Labor This matter concerned a joint petition filed in March 2016 by the Town and the Union with the Joint Labor Management Committee regarding the negotiation of a successor agree- ment between the Town and the union. This matter is now closed. Framingham-Franklin LLC v. Zoning Board of Appeals Zoning This is an action pursuant to G.L. c. 40A, §17, appealing a decision of the Framingham Zoning Board of Appeals. This matter is now closed. Framingham-Franklin LLC v. Zoning Board of Appeals Certiorari This case involves an action challenging the Zoning Board of Appeals’ November 2015 decision denying the plaintiffs’ ap- peal of a notice of violation under the Sign Bylaw and accom- panying order requiring the removal of two dilapidated free- standing signs at the Mt. Wayte Plaza owned by the plaintiff. This matter is now closed. Gutwill v. Framing- ham Police Depart- ment Civil Service This matter concerned a disciplinary appeal by Officer Mat- thew Gutwill. A local appointing authority hearing was held in May and June 2017, and in September 2017 the hearing officer found that the Town had established just cause for the discipline. This matter is now closed. Huntington Proper- ties, LLC v. Conser- vation Commission Wetlands/ Certiorari This case involves an appeal of a Conservation Commission order denying a notice of intent to construct a single-family home and site improvements at 13 Pelham Ave. This matter is now closed. Jackson v. Framing- ham et al Employment/ Labor This matter concerned a claim of discrimination by a bus driver employed by Durham School Services, the busing contrac- tor for the Framingham Public Schools. This matter is now closed. Manelis v. Framing- ham Board of Select- men Administrative Ap- peal This Superior Court case concerned an appeal under G.L. c. 30A, s. 14 by Richard Manelis stemming from the Town’s denial of a parking ticket appeal in January 2017. This matter is now closed. Moreas v. and Zoning Board of Appeals, et al. Zoning This case involved an appeal of the ZBA’s decision to issue two variances to Defendant, Richard Aronovitz for his building at One Nicholas Road. This matter is now closed. Stuart Pologe v. Bay- stone Development, LLC Zoning This case involved an abutters appeal of variances allow- ing residential development and a restaurant at 480 Franklin Street, the site of the Mt. Wayte Plaza. This matter is now closed. 101 City of Framingham Bowditch Building Roof Repairs/ Protes- tor: S.I. Services, Inc. Bid Protest This matter concerned alleged violations of the public bidding laws by a bidder rejected for City construction project. This matter is now closed. Trustees of Century Estates Condomini- um Trust v. Morrison, et al. Condominium Lien This matter was a case for alleged unpaid common area condominium expenses. The plaintiff named the Town as a defendant/party-in-interest insofar as the property was in tax title. This matter is now closed. Trustees of Century Estates Condomini- um Trust v. Morrison, et al. Condominium Lien This matter was another case for alleged unpaid common area condominium expenses. This matter is now closed. B. Special Counsel/Insurance Defense Counsel Cases Below is a list of significant cases that presently are being handled by special counsel or insurance defense counsel. MATTER TYPE STATUS Bower v. Town of Framingham Tort This matter concerned a property damage claim from an alleged defect in a Town sewer main. The plaintiffs alleged damages to their home caused by the Town’s neg- ligent maintenance of the sewer line. The matter settled in May 2018 and is now closed. Fromberg v. Framingham Police Department Civil Rights This case concerned claims of violations of civil rights by an indi- vidual stemming from an alleged incident with the police in Octo- ber 2015. The Town, defended by insurance counsel assigned by Travelers, moved to dismiss the complaint. The motion was granted by the Court and judgment was entered on October 31, 2017, which the Plaintiff did not appeal. This matter is now closed. 102 Gutwill v. Town of Framingham et al Employment/ Civil Rights This federal lawsuit involves claims of whistleblower retaliation and vio- lations of Section 1983 against the Town and former Police Chief Fer- guson by FPD officer Matthew Gut- will, who alleges he was removed from his assignment as a DEA Task Force Officer in retaliation for filing a complaint regarding an- other officer. The Town denies the plaintiff’s allegations. The Town’s insurer, Travelers, has assigned the case to the law firm of Pierce, Davis and Perritano to defend the Town and Chief Ferguson in this matter. Discovery is ongoing. O’Loughlin v. Framingham et al Civil Rights This case concerned a claim for wrongful conviction and viola- tions of Section 1983 brought by the plaintiff against the Town and several retired and former mem- bers of the Framingham Police Department. The plaintiff alleged that he was arrested and ultimately convicted for a rape that occurred in April 1982, and for which he served approximately 3 years and 9 months in prison. He appealed his criminal conviction in or about 1983 and his criminal convic- tion was affirmed by the Appeals Court. Years later, another person who had been arrested for similar crimes around the same time re- portedly told police he was “99%” sure he had committed the 1982 crime, not Mr. O’Loughlin. Based on this investigation, the District At- torney did not oppose a motion for a new trial filed by Mr. O’Loughlin’s counsel, and dismissed the charg- es after the motion was allowed. This civil rights lawsuit followed. Continued onto next page 103 Mr. O’Loughlin contended that the Town defendants failed to disclose evidence that would have exoner- ated him. The Town denied these allegations. The Town’s defense in this matter was assumed by Trav- elers Insurance Company, based on evidence of a 1982 liability policy that Town Counsel located in the Town’s records. Travelers defended the case under a res- ervation of rights, but ultimately after direct settlement negotiations agreed to settle the case and make a settlement payment on behalf of the Town and the individual defen- dants. A stipulation of dismissal for the Town and the individual Town defendants was entered by the Court on January 9, 2018. After the Town was dismissed, the case was tried (only the Commonwealth remained as a defendant) and a jury awarded $5 million in dam- ages against the Commonwealth. For the City, this matter is now closed. In re: Larry Rogers and Mae En- carnado Rogers Bankruptcy This case involved the City’s filing of a motion with the Bankruptcy Court requesting advance permis- sion to allow the City to proceed with a Framingham District Court case against Larry Rogers con- cerning alleged Nuisance Bylaw violations. The City sought such an order to clarify that it could pro- ceed notwithstanding the automat- ic stay of certain legal proceedings that applies upon the commence- ment of a Bankruptcy Court case such as that filed by Mr. and Mrs. Rogers. After allowing the parties to engage in discovery and motion practice concerning the Debtors’ allegations, the Court dismissed the Debtors’ claims in orders is- sued in March and April of 2018, and thereafter formally closed this case. This matter is now closed. 104 Slattery v. Town of Framingham et al Employment/ Civil Rights This federal lawsuit involves claims of whistleblower retaliation and violations of 42 U.S.C. section 1983 against the Town, former Police Chief Ferguson, and then- Deputy Police Chief Trask by Kevin Slattery, a former Framingham Deputy Police Chief who retired in April 2017. Slattery contends that plaintiff alleges that he was retali- ated against for various complaints he allegedly made while serving as a Deputy Police Chief. The Town denies the allegations. The Town’s insurer, Travelers, has assigned the law firm of Pierce, Davis and Perritano to represent the Town and Mr. Simoneau is this matter. Discovery is ongoing. Stuart v. Town of Framingham et al Employment/ Civil Rights This federal lawsuit involves claims of whistleblower retaliation and violations of 42 U.S.C. section 1983 against the Town and As- sistant to the Chief of Police Brian Simoneau by Vincent Stuart, a former Framingham police officer who was terminated in Febru- ary of 2017 for wrongful conduct. The plaintiff alleges that he was retaliated against for making a complaint regarding Mr. Simoneau to the Chief of Police. The Town denies the allegations. The Town’s insurer, Travelers, has assigned the law firm of Pierce, Davis and Perritano to represent the Town and Mr. Simoneau is this matter. Discovery is ongoing. Viana v. Framingham Tort This matter concerns a personal injury claim alleging a slip and fall on City property. Travelers has assigned defense counsel Michael Ashe to represent the Town. The matter remains pending. 105 C. School Department Cases (Of Which City Solicitor Is Aware) Below is a summary of cases of which P&A is aware involving the Framingham School Department. P&A does not represent the School Department and provides these summaries for informational purposes based on infor- mation known to us. These cases are being handled by insurance counsel, or Boston-based Morgan Brown & Joy, labor counsel to the School Department. MATTER TYPE STATUS Camargo v. Durham School Ser- vices et al Discrimination This case concerns a claim of discrimination based on national origin by a bus driver employee of the School Department’s contrac- tor that provides transportation ser- vices, who has also alleged claims against the School Department’s Director of Transportation. The School Committee denies wrong- doing and has tendered defense of this matter to Durham School Ser- vices based on the indemnification provision of the Town’s contract and is being defended by counsel assigned by Durham’s insurer (at Durham’s expense). We under- stand this matter remains pending at MCAD. Cuddy v. Framingham Public Schools Discrimination This case concerned a claim of discrimination by a School Depart- ment employee. This matter was defended by insurance counsel as- signed by AIG, the Town’s School Board insurer. Mediation occurred in April 2016 and we understand a settlement was reached. DeOliveira v. Framingham Public Schools Discrimination This case concerned a claim by a former School Department em- ployee of age discrimination. This matter was defended by insurance defense counsel assigned by AIG. We understand a settlement was reached. Haak v. Framingham Public Schools Discrimination This case concerned a claim of discrimination by a School Depart- ment employee. This matter was defended by insurance counsel assigned by AIG. We understand a mediation occurred in April 2016 and the matter was settled. 106 Smith v. Framingham Public Schools Discrimination This case concerns a racial dis- crimination claim by a former School Department employee. The matter was initially filed at MCAD in August 2014 but was re- moved and a complaint was filed in Hampshire Superior Court in May 2016. The School Department is being defended in this matter by School Labor Counsel, Morgan, Brown & Joy. We understand the matter remains pending. Saviatto v. Framingham Public Schools et al Discrimination This matter concerned a claim by a former School Department employee who alleges she was wrongfully terminated and discrimi- nated against based on her na- tional origin and race. The School Department was defended in this matter by School Labor Counsel, Morgan, Brown & Joy. This matter settled, and the case was dis- missed in June 2018. This matter is now closed. Viti v. Framingham Public Schools Discrimination This matter concerns claims of gender discrimination and retalia- tion by a School Department em- ployee alleging she was wrongfully terminated from her position as a volleyball coach based on her gen- der. This matter is being defended by insurance counsel assigned by AIG. We understand the matter remains pending at MCAD. Budgetary Overview As in past years, I would like to conclude this report with a brief discussion of budgeting and legal expenses. In 2017-2018 this office continued its positive track record of procuring new revenue for the General Fund or helping to avoid the imposition of additional costs to the City. The services provided by the Office of the City Solicitor have resulted in monetary benefits to the City that has resulted in direct revenue, mitigation and avoided expenses approximately double Framingham’s FY’18 appropriation of $735,000. Below is a chart summarizing the revenue, mitigation and avoided expenses achieved in FY’18 by the efforts of the Office of City Solicitor working with other departments, boards or commissions, or through the substantial assistance of the City Solicitor. 107 A. FY 2018 Revenue, Mitigation and Avoided Expenses Matter:Description: Payments Received from Ashland for sewage trans- port in FY 2018 $1,026,715.07 (Revenue) Payments received in FY 2018 for sewage transport under the February 13, 2004 Decision issued by the Department of Telecommunications and Energy, and pursuant to the January 1, 2007 IMA between Ash- land and Framingham. This represents more than a 180-fold increase over what Framingham received from 1964-2003 ($5500 per year). Through FY 2018 the Town has received more than $11 million dollars in payments from Ashland. Pelham Apartments and Framingham Housing Au- thority Trash Collection $300,000 (Avoided Expense) By a favorable summary judgment ruling achieved in the Pelham litigation, the Town ceased trash collec- tion at the 550 units at the Pelham Apartments in ap- proximately 2004, which results in avoided expenses estimated at more than $100,000 per year. For the same reason, the Town ceased trash collection at approximately 1,000 units owned by the Framingham Housing Authority, thus realizing savings of approxi- mately an additional estimated $200,000 per year. Calvao, et al. v. Town of Framingham $175,000 (Avoided Expense) As a result of the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit’s March 17, 2010 decision affirm- ing the District Court’s decision allowing the Town’s Motion for Summary Judgment with respect to the Town’s establishment of a 24-day work period under 29 U.S.C. 207(k), the Town has avoided liability for approximately $1,500,000 in damages. Addition- ally, Framingham has avoided the need to pay FLSA overtime to officers who work more than 40 hours per week, thus saving approximately $175,000 per year. O’Loughlin v. Framingham Estimated $1,200,000 (Avoided Expense) = $1,200,000.00 After extensive research in archived Town files, Town Counsel was able to locate a responsive insurance policy from 1982. Based on this policy and subse- quent negotiations with the insurer, we were able to obtain reimbursement for the Town of legal fees paid to special counsel of over $36,000 in FY 2015 and legal defense and expert costs through the remainder of the Town’s involvement in the case, which settled in late 2017, estimated to be over $300,000. The $900,000 settlement payment subsequently made by Travelers on behalf of the Town and the individual Town defendants was also covered by the carrier for the 1982 policy, thus avoiding over $1.2 million in expenses to the taxpayers. TOTAL FY 2018: $2,701,715.07 108 Revenue and Expenditure Reports The reports that follow are two separate quarterly expenditure reports and two revenue reports through the end of FY’18: School Department and City (which is everything other than School Department). The School Department Quarterly School Budget Report is organized by the School “responsibility centers” or RCs. This report is organized to provide the School Department with an easy-to-read report that will assist the Administration in completing the School End-of-the-Year report for the Massachusetts Department of Elemen- tary and Secondary Education (DESE). Three notes related to these reports: (1) The revenue amounts listed includes $1,000,000 of free cash, re- corded in the “Other Financing Sources” Revenue account which funds the Special Education Reserve. That reserve account is not included in the expenditure reports. (2) Included in the available balance of the City Expenditure Report is the tax overlay account of $2,163,617. The overlay amount must be subtracted from the available balance, as the account is a reserve for tax abatements filed in FY’18 and will be carried over into future years. The available balance, or “turn back,” in the General Fund is $3,327,553. (3) The School Depart- ment available balance is actually zero ($0). The $42,945 listed on the reports as available has an expenditure in the Food Services Department. The Food Services Department does not usually expend General Funds; this year General Funds were used to close out any negative balances in student accounts as voted by the School Committee. Revenue Account Description Original Revenue Estimate Adjustments to Est. Revenue Revised Revenue Estimate Actual Revenue Revenue Balance % Collected Total Property Taxes 189,775,131 -1,321,218 188,453,913 187,348,177 -1,105,736 99.4 Total State Aid 55,722,863 0 55,722,863 55,678,358 -44,505 99.9 Local Receipt Revenue Motor vehicle excise 8,520,000 0 8,520,000 8,586,690 66,690 100.8 Other excise 213,800 0 213,800 221,324 7,524 103.5 Penalty & Interest on taxes 867,340 0 867,340 1,379,891 512,551 159.1 Pay in lieu of Tax (PILOT)727,912 0 727,912 677,441 -50,471 93.1 Charges for Service 257,151 0 257,151 290,742 33,591 113.1 Other charges for service 156,659 0 156,659 141,202 -15,457 90.1 Fees 581,421 0 581,421 737,933 156,512 126.9 Rentals 158,778 0 158,778 163,748 4,970 103.1 School Revenue 800,000 0 800,000 762,500 -37,500 95.3 Library Revenue 31,355 0 31,355 36,089 4,734 115.1 Dept Rev - Recreation 463,095 0 463,095 431,337 -31,758 93.1 Other departmental 237,447 0 237,447 131,628 -105,819 55.4 Licenses and permits 3,502,645 0 3,502,645 3,764,466 261,821 107.5 Fines and forfeitures 447,075 0 447,075 372,501 -74,574 83.3 Investment income 182,528 0 182,528 321,433 138,905 176.1 Misc recurring 190,510 0 190,510 314,074 123,564 164.9 Misc non-recurring 401,290 389,172 790,462 811,844 21,383 102.7 State Revenue 806,680 -373,581 433,099 446,415 13,316 103.1 Other Financing Sources 0 0 0 30,358 30,358 100.0 Federal Revenue 206,032 0 206,032 329,079 123,047 159.7 Meals Tax 1,411,255 0 1,411,255 1,511,223 99,968 107.1 Rooms Tax 1,490,725 0 1,490,725 1,546,947 56,222 103.8 Medicare Reimbursmnt 1,700,000 0 1,700,000 2,005,528 305,528 118.0 Total Local Receipts 23,353,698 15,591 23,369,289 25,014,392 1,645,103 107.0 Other Financing Sources 11,644,732 1,000,000 12,644,732 12,224,578 -420,154 96.7 Indirect Costs (Enterprise Fund)3,194,770 0 3,194,770 3,194,770 0 100.0 Grand Total - FY18 Revenue 283,691,194 -305,627 283,385,567 283,460,276 74,709 100.0 FY2018 General Fund Revenue Report: Estimated to Actual FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET ADMINISTRATION 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 960 -Superintendent Description FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 FY 2018 Actual Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 %Spent Salary 404,805 445,285 114,913 94,385 115,100 125,671 450,068 (4,783)101.1Differentials8,500 8,500 1,620 1,046 1,414 4,080 4,420 48.0Total Personnel 413,305 453,785 114,913 96,005 116,745 127,Q85 454,148 (363)100.1__ __ __Rentals &Lease 30,750 30,750 __1,104 2,000 4,151 21,913 29,169 1,581 94.9 Professional &Technical Services 8,500 8,500 2,000 2,000 6,500 23.5 Communication 7,500 7,500 4,666 1,081 2,965 8,713 (1,213)116.2 Other Purchased Services 500 500 1,080 1,080 (580)216.0 Supplies 3,000 3,000 482 731 1,226 636 3,075 (75)102.5Vehicle Supplies 12,000 12,000 905 2,816 1,633 10,694 16,048 (4,048)133.7 Professional Development 16,187 16,187 15,300 2,645 17,945 (1,758)110.9 Additional Equipment 1,756 674 31 2,462 (2,462) Total Operating 78,437 78,437 19,547 15,533 ........8,123......37;288 80,491..(2,054)102.6 Total Superintendent 491,742 532,222 134,460 111,538 124,268 164,373 534,639 (2,417)100.5 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET ADMINISTRATION 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 961 -Assistant Superintendent Description FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 FY 2018 Actual Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 %Spent Salary 359,750 340,650 90,437 83,712 82,221 93,452 349,822 (9,172)102.7 Differentials 500 113 150 54 317 183 63.4 Personnel _.....359,750 "`341;150 90,437 83,824 82,371 .93,506 ..... 350,139 _.. (8;989)-102.fi Rentals &Lease 12,750 12,750 18,000 15,001 33,001 (20,251)258.8 Communication 1,500 1,500 500 500 1,000 33.3 Supplies 4,500 4,500 282 222 262 358 1,125 3,376 25.0 Vehicle Supplies 2,750 2,750 905 1,516 180 180 2,781 (31)101.1 Professional Development 14,027 14,027 900 5,439 6,339 7,688 45.2 Additional Equipment 4,000 4,000 8,500 8,500 (4,500)212.5 39,527 39,527 2;087 7,678 2f:,942'1 ,539 52,245 02,718)132.2 Total Assistant Superintendent 399,277 380,677 92,524 91,502 109,313 109,045 402,384 (21,707)105.7 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET ADMINISTRATION 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 970 -Business Administration Dept Description FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 FY 2018 Actual Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 %Spent Salary 607,172 625,172 153,409 154,136 152,683 164,202 624,430 742 99.9 Differentials 8,000 8,000 8,000 Total Personnel 615,172 633,172 953,409 154,136.152,683 164,202 624,430 8,742 98.6 Rentals &Lease 1,000 1,000 191 191 383 765 235 76.5 Professional &Technical Services 361,000 361,000 118,715 63,744 120,841 59,665 362,965 (1,965)100.5 Communication 1,500 1,500 1,295 110 1,405 95 93.7 Other Purchased Services 1,198 246 1,444 (1,444) Supplies 6,500 6,500 498 981 681 857 3,016 3,484 46.4 Vehicle Supplies 3,000 3,000 3,000 Professional Development 500 500 650 650 (150)130.0 Total Operating.....373,500........373,500.....119,404 67,868 ....121.824 61,150 370,245 3,255 99.1 Total Business Administration Dept 988,672 1,006,672 272,812 222,004 274,506 225,352 994,675 11,997 98.8 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 ADMINISTRATION 965 -Human Resources Department FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Description Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb Balance %Spent Salary 431,000 510,848 111,778 106,290 126,367 176,722 521,157 (10,309)102.0 Differentials 1,636,500 1,679,126 111,252 465,374 382,135 609,407 1,568,168 110,958 93.4 Other Personnel Services 132,000 144,513 20,647 6,325 3,538 92,172 122,682 21,831 84.9 Personnel 2,999;50Q 2.,334,487 243,677 577,989 512,040 878,301 2.,212.,007..122,480 94.8 Rentals &Lease 600 600 191 191 383 765 (165)127.5 Professional &Technical Services 24,500 24,500 4,881 5,821 7,985 5,703 24,389 43 68 99.7 Communication 4,000 5,000 2,159 443 1,084 3,147 6,833 (1,833)136.7 Supplies 4,500 4,500 947 564 674 1,570 3,755 745 83.4 Vehicle Supplies 1,500 1,500 1,417 1,648 4,266 7,331 (5,831)488.7 Professional Development 3,000 3,000 1,150 985 2,135 865 71.2 Additional Equipment 82,662 82,662 65,329 23,674 89,003 (6,341)107.7 120,762 121,762 74;656-31,920 :11,582 16!054 134,211 43 (12,492)1'[0.3 °fo Total Human Resources Department 2,320,262 2,456,249 318,333 609,909 523,622 894,355 2,346,218 43 109,988 95.5 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET ADMINISTRATION 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 968 -Grants Development Description FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 FY 2018 Actual Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 %Spent Salary 80,027 90,027 21,700 20,950 24,275 22,988 89,913 -114 99.9Total Personnel 80,027 90,027.21,700 20,950 24,275 22,988..89,913.... -114 ....99.9 Communication ---_-__--- --- Supplies 300 300 --432 334 767 -(46~255.6 Vehicle Supplies 3U0 300 ----- -300 -Additional Equipment 400 400 --199 -199 -201 49.8 Total Operating 1,000 1,000 --631 334 966 -34 96.6 Total Grants Development 81,027 91,027 21,700 20,950 24,906 23,323 90,879 -148 99.8 ADMINISTRATION 979 -Media Services-School Description FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 FY 2018 FY 2018 Balance %Spent Professional &Technical Services - - - - - - - - - - Total Media Services-School - - - - - - - - - - Total ADMINISTRATION 4,280,980 4,466,847 839,829 1,055,903 1,056,616 1,416,447 4,368,795 43 98,009 97.8 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS 9/19/2018 FISCAL YEAR 2018 4:49:01 PM QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET Through Period 13 EDUCATION 967 -Educational Operations FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Description Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb Balance %Spent Salary 436,799 377,096 147,070 116,517 133,218 154,231 551,036 (173,940)146.1 Personnel 436,799 377.096 147,070 :..116,517..133,218..154,231 551,036 (173,940)146.1 Communication 2,000 2,000 1,685 1,685 315 84.2 Supplies 4,000 4,000 712 1,003 1,492 690 3,897 103 97.4 Vehicle Supplies 7,662 7,662 108 313 425 845 6,817 11.0 Professional Development 1,200 1,200 666 158 824 376 68.7 Total Operating 14,862 14,862 2,396 1,111 2,471 1,273 7,251 7,611 48.8 Total Educational Operations 451,661 391,958 149,467 117,627 135,689 155,504 558,287 (166,329)142.4 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET EDUCATION 963 -Curriculum Services FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Description Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Salary 355,058 275,058 34,656 Differentials 182,500 182,500 17,568 Total Personnel __._...537,558 457,558 52,224 Rentals &Lease 600 600 191 Professional &Technical Services 500 500 - Communication 3,200 3,200 48 Supplies 218,774 618,774 249 Vehicle Supplies 16,800 16,800 - Professional Development 104,100 104,100 14,778 Additional Equipment 212,469 212,469 133,835 Total Qperating 556,1#43 956,443 149,101 Total Curriculum Services 1,094,001 1,414,001 201,325 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb Balance %Spent 16,828 17,463 20,369 89,316 -185,742 32.5 13,973 50,757 33,599 115,896 -66,604 63.5 30,801 _ 68,220 _. 53,967 '-_,...:_.__205,213 - -252,345 .........139.0 44.$% '' -260 383 834 (234) ---- -500 - ---48 -3,152 1.5 115,216 27,546 479,798 622,809 -(4,035)100.7 7,058 283 222 7,563 -9,237 45.0 26,379 22,708 17,775 81,640 -22,460 78.4 69,374 19,800 -223,009 -(10,540)105.0 21$,027 7Q,~97'49$,17$'' 935,903 _20,540 `97.9 248,829 138,817 552,145 1,141,116 -272,885 80.7 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS 9/19/2018 FISCAL YEAR 2018 4:49:01 PM QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET Through Period 13 EDUCATION 962 -Bilingual Education FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Description Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb Balance %Spent Salary 625,388 614,712 111,993 181,744 180,182 194,047 667,966 (53,254)108.7 Differentials 55,000 59,000 4,453 20,621 17,703 31,678 74,454 (15,454)126.2 Personnel 680,388 673,712 116,447 202,364 197,884....225,725 742,420 (68,708)110.2__ Rentals &Lease 191 191 383 765 (765) Professional &Technical Services 2,000 2,000 1,248 1,120 390 879 3,637 (1,637)181.8 Communication 168 142 310 (310) Supplies 12,500 12,500 4,286 32,733 1,943 2,517 41,479 (28,979)331.8 Technical Supplies 445 445 615 922 1,537 (1,092)345.3 Vehicle Supplies 9,000 9,000 1,510 7,175 215 3,765 12,664 (3,664)140.7 Professional Development 18,600 18,600 2,939 360 8,250 11,549 7,051 62.1 Textbooks 60,000 60,000 937 5,067 3,660 9,664 50,336 16.1 Additional Equipment 1,500 1,500 2,675 4,354 2,643 9,672 (8,172)644.8 Total Operating 904,045...104,045.........14,400 51,899 2,739.22,237 91,275 12,770 87.7 Total Bilingual Education 784,433 777,757 130,847 254,263 200,624 247,962 833,696 (55,939)107.2 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET EDUCATION 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 989 -Adult ESL FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Description Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb Balance %Spent Salary 108,915 108,915 26,103 26,257 28,226 29,079 109,665 (750)100.7 Differentials 1,000 1,000 1,000 Tofal Personnel.......109,915 109,915 26,103 26,257 28,226 29,079 19,665 250 99.8 TOtal Adult ESL 109,915 109,915 26,103 26,257 28,226 29,079 109,665 250 99.8 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET EDUCATION 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 997 -Fine Arts Dept Description FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 FY 2018 Actual Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 %Spent Salary 153,794 209,017 40,929 49,938 53,763 64,024 208,654 363 99.8 Differentials 154,300 154,300 87,131 27,013 32,775 146,918 7,382 95.2 Total Personnel 308,094 363,317 40,929 137,068 8Q776 96,799 355,572 7,745 97.9 Repairs &Maintenance 8,800 8,800 831 793 1,980 3,604 5,196 41.0 Professional &Technical Services 8,500 8,500 3,813 1,634 5,513 10,960 (2,460)128.9 Communication 2,100 2,100 1,119 571 400 1,622 3,711 (1,611)176.7 Supplies 12,571 12,571 480 5,910 2,049 2,349 10,788 1,783 85.8 Vehicle Supplies 2,000 2,000 366 730 1,097 903 54.8 Professional Development 1,300 1,300 210 975 1,185 115 91.2 Additional Equipment 1,000 1,000 1,516 791 209 2,516 (1,516)251.6 Total Operating 36,271 36,271 1,98 13,007 5,878 _:13,378.33,86 2.,411 93.4 Total Fine Arts Dept 344,365 399,588 42,527 150,075 86,653 110,176 389,433 10,155 97.5 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET EDUCATION 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 994 -Gifted &Talented FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Description Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb Balance %Spent Salary 36,453 36,453 7,332 10,057 10,736 12,879 41,004 (4,551)112.5 Differentials 14,300 14,300 3,398 3,378 5,108 11,884 2,416 83.1 Personnel 50,753 50,753.7,332 13 455 .....14,193'17 987 52,888 (2,135)104.2 Professional &Technical Services 216 216 6,143 183 6,326 (6,110)2928.7 Communication 618 618 500 500 118 81.0 Supplies 5,727 5,727 36 3,198 974 408 4,616 1,111 80.6 Vehicle Supplies 1,030 1,030 300 300 730 29.1 Professional Development 1,648 1,648 344 825 1,169 479 70.9 Additional Equipment 6,180 6,180 641 641 5,539 10.4 Operating 15,419 15,419 :536 4,183 7,117 1,716 'f.3,553 1;867 87.9 Total Gifted &Talented 66,172 66,172 7,868 17,638 21,230 19,704 66,440 (268)100.4 Total EDUCATION 2,850,547 3,159,391 558,136 814,691 611,240 1,114,569 3,098,636 60,755 98.1 SPED 980 -Special Education Department Description Salary Differentials Total Personnel Rentals &Lease Professional &Technical Services Communication Supplies Vehicle Supplies Transportation Te~books Additional Equipment Total Operating Total Special Education Department FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Adopted Revised Q1 Actuai 1,003,616 1,268,112 206,560 500,000 500,000 431,488 1,503,616 :__1,545 1,768,112 .1,545 638,048 191 103,706 103,706 73,288 20,600 20,600 - 66,486 106,486 29,281 24,720 24,720 831 3,772,040 4,343,333 626,454 --153 18,0?.5 18,025 9,972 4,OQ7,122 4,618,415 740,171 5,510,738 6,386,527 1,378,219 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual 312,183 350,297 491,103 28,029 20,413 37,092 34Q212 370,714....... 528,196__- 191 383 69,385 43,005 16,659 10,640 - 299 55,442 9,601 3,663 6,718 2,445 4,564 1,042,359 1,041,555 1,231,130 15 - - 3,646 2,680 - 1,188,204 1,099,478 . '1,256,697... 1,528,416 1,470,187 1,784, 893 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Actual Encumb Balance %Spent 1,360,143 - (92,031)107.3 517,022 - (17,022)103.4 1,877,166 (109,054)106.2 °lo ....,765 _ _ 780._ 49.5...% 202,337 - (98,631)195.1 10,939 - 9,661 53.1 97,987 - 8,499 92.0 14,557 - 10,163 58.9 3,941,498 - 401,835 90.7 167 - (167)- 16,299 - 1,726 90.4 4,284,550 __ _ 333,865 _92.8 6,161,715 - 224,812 96.5 SPED 982 -SPED Services Description FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb Balance %Spent Differentials 148,000 148,000 11,500 43,633 36,078 49,232 140,443 7,557 94.9 Personnel 148,00£1 148,000 11;5Q0 43;633 36,078 49,232 140,443 ._7,557"94.9 %` '. Rentals &Lease 515,000 515,000 39,286 29,465 __68,751 446,250 13.3 Professional &Technical Services 659,200 619,200 21,948 158,223 108,297 291,336 579,804 39,396 93.6 Other Purchased Services 77,250 77,250 3,664 53,130 56,794 20,456 73.5 Operating 1,251,45Q 1,211,450 61,234 187,688 111,961 344,466 705,348 506,102 58.2 °/n' Total SPED Services 1,399,450 1,359,450 72,734 231,320 148,039 393,699 845,791 513,659 62.2 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS 9/19/2018 FISCAL YEAR 2018 4:49:01 PM QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET Through Period 13 SPED 991 -Psychology Services FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Description Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb Balance %Spent Professional &Technical Services 500 500 2,829 2,829 (2,329)565.8 Supplies 12 12 (12) Technical Supplies 22,869 22,869 5,878 11,141 3,395 20,414 2,455 89.3 Vehicle Supplies 4,350 4,350 194 1,592 384 2,169 2,181 49.9 Professional Development 5,669 5,669 1,500 1,605 3,105 2,564 54.8 Additional Equipment 2,100 2,100 2,100 Total Operating 35,488..35-,488 5,878 11,335 6,499 4,818 28.530 6,958 80.4 Total Psychology Services 35,468 35,488 5,878 11,335 6,499 4,818 28,530 6,958 80.4 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET SPED 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 981 -Tuition-Out District Placement Description FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 FY 2018 Actual Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 %Spent Salary 50,000 50,000 6,220 4,504 8,054 15,074 33,852 16,148 67.7 Personnel...50,Q00 50,OOD'6,220 4,504 ___8,054 15,074 33,852 16.;14$:67.7 °lo Professional &Technical Services 25,750 25,750 900 2,038 1,802 4,741 21,009 18.4 Tuition 11,092,765 12,099,765 1,097,727 3,616,944 3,009,282 5,786,048 13,510,000 (1,410,235)111.7 Operating 11,118,515 12,125,515 .1,097,727 3,617,844 3;091,320 5,787,850.:13,51.4,741 (1,389,226)...111.5 Total Tuition-Out District Placement 11,168,515 12,175,515 1,103,946 3,622,348 3,019,374 5,802,925 13,548,593 (1,373,078)111.3 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET SPED 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 983 -Occupational Education FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Description Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb Balance %Spent Transportation 77,744 77,744 8,659 25,977 34,636 17,318 86,589 (8,845)111.4 Tuition 165,791 165,791 155,043 8,364 10,692 174,099 (8,308)105.0 7ofal Operating 243,535 243,535 8,659 ........181,020 ....43,000......28,010 260,688 (17,153)107.0 Total Occupational Education 243,535 243,535 8,659 181,020 43,000 28,010 260,688 (17,153)107.0 Total SPED 18,357,726 20,200,515 2,569,435 5,574,439 4,687,099 8,014,344 20,845,317 (644,802)103.2 TRANSPORTATION 973 -Transportation Department Description FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET FY 2018 FY 2018 Adopted Revised 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb Balance %Spent Salary 372,438 372,438 88,969 90,086 96,164 105,532 380,750 - (8,312)102.2 Differentials 51,700 51,700 5,308 2,385 1,724 2,485 11,902 - 39,798 23.0 Total Personnel 424,'t38 ''424,138 94,276 92,471 97,888'1Q8,017 392,653 __......- 31,486 ".92.6 °lo''_Repairs &Maintenance _1,500 ......1,500 _ .. ..._....._.. 1,500 _ Rentals &Lease 36,355 36,355 11,863 5,996 11,863 6,058 35,780 - 575 98.4Other Purchased Services -----596 596 - (596)- Supplies 1,500 1,500 397 -31 71 499 - 1,001 33.3 Vehicle Supplies 2,500 2,500 248 273 2,267 268 3,056 - (556)122.2 Professional Development 1,900 1,900 450 ---450 - 1,450 23.7 Transportation 5,507,968 5,507,968 5,983 1,563,460 1,217,254 2,741,379 5,528,075 - (20,107)100.4 Additional Equipment 7,515 7,515 10,860 ---10,860 - (3,345)144.5 Total Ope~atirrg 5,559,238 5,559,238 29,800 ~ 1,569,729 1,231,415 2,748,372 '` 5,b79,316 _ (20,078)10.4 Total Transportation Department 5,983,376 5,983,376 124,076 1,662,200 1,329,303 2,856,389 5,971,968 - 11,408 99.8 Total TRANSPORTATION 5,983,376 5,983,376 124,076 1,662,200 1,329,303 2,856,389 5,971,968 - 11,408 99.8 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET TECHNOLOGY SERVICES 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 974 -Technology Department FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Description Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb Balance %Spent Salary 920,516 1,039,983 231,396 250,953 270,683 282,834 1,035,866 4,117 99.6 Differentials 45,650 45,650 8,482 300 14,010 18,684 41,475 4,175 90.9 Total Personnel __966,166 ._1,085,633 239,878'___251,253 284,693 301,518 1,077,341 8,292 99.2 Repairs &Maintenance 12,000 12,000 1,295 1,113 1,844 4,193 8,445 3,555 70.4 Rentals &Lease 5,000 5,000 5,000 Professional &Technical Services 235,000 235,000 3,694 108,618 38,256 22,357 172,926 62,074 73.6 Supplies 3,000 3,000 232 1,552 1,553 2,103 5,440 (2,440)181.3 Vehicle Supplies 2,500 2,500 603 1,563 1,400 3,566 (1,066)142.6 Professional Development 7,600 7,600 100 100 7,500 1.3 Additional Equipment 249,600 249,600 52,502 143,031 88,446 14,814 298,793 (49,193)119.7 Total Operating 514,700 514,.700 57,723 254,917 131,763 44,867.489,270 25,430 ........95.1 Total Technology Department 1,480,866 1,600,333 297,601 506,170 416,455 346,385 1,566,611 33,722 97.9 Total TECHNOLOGY SERVICES 1,480,866 1,600,333 297,601 506,170 416,455 346,385 1,566,611 33,722 97.9 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET BUILDINGS 8~ GROUNDS 971 -Building &Grounds Department FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Description Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Actual Encumb Balance %Spent Salary 1,407,766 1,351,766 317,754 336,814 321,502 371,475 1,347,546 - 4,220 99.7Differentials151,900 187,900 120,525 23,438 32,335 179,965 356,262 - (168,362)189.6 °/oOther Personnel Services 80,000 80,000 11,093 18,731 20,047 28,937 78,809 - 1,191 98.5 °/aTo#at Personnel '..1,639,666 1,619,666 449,372 378984 :475,777 373,884 580,377 1,782,617 - _ (162,951)_ 110.1 °!o !,Energy 2,371,060.......2,374,924......255,988 626,603 807,392.2,165,761 ........3,864 205,299 91.4 Repairs &Maintenance 211,150 211,150 15,276 153,079 38,894 107,263 314,513 - (103,363)149.0 Rentals &Lease 221,510 221,510 36,894 62,904 35,696 38,426 173,920 - 47,590 78.5Professional &Technical Services 231,750 231,750 9,690 80,257 54,359 150,437 294,742 - (62,992)1272Communication119,532 119,532 21,135 28,079 31,440 36,930 117,583 - 1,949 98.4Other Purchased Services 97,850 97,850 --12,048 17,512 29,560 - 68,290 30.2 Supplies 272,950 272,950 113,187 35,625 21,670 93,461 263,943 - 9,007 96.7Vehicle Supplies 61,078 61,078 5,049 5,869 15,767 8,529 35,214 - 25,864 57.7Professional Development 3,399 3,399 275 2,500 --2,775 - 624 81.6Te~books 324,450 324,450 66,262 113,740 73,125 69,686 322,813 - 1,637 99.5Land/Building/Plant 157,500 157,500 89,789 90,312 5,420 28,595 214,116 - (56,616)135.9Additional Equipment 7,210 7,210 1,942 -1,474 125 3,541 - 3,669 49.1Total Operating.4,079,439...'.4;083,303 615,487 'f,048,143 `916,497`1,358,355-3,938,481 '3,864 140,958 96.5 °Lo ', Total Building &Grounds Department 5,719,105 5,702,969 1,064,859 1,427,126 1,290,381 1,938,732 5,721,098 3,864 (21,993) 100.4 Total BUILDINGS &GROUNDS 5,719,105 5,702,969 1,064,859 1,427,126 1,290,381 1,938,732 5,721,098 3,864 (21,993) 100.4 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS 9/19/2018 FISCAL YEAR 2018 4:49:01 PM QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET Through Period 13 GENERAL SCHOOL 966 -School Committee FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Description Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb Balance %Spent Salary 60,000 45,000 12,561 13,503 4,385 14,592 45,041 (41)100.1 Differentials 2,500 26,250 371 1,018 13,024 13,019 27,432 (1,182)104.5 Total Personnel 62,500 71,250 12,932 14,522 17,409 27,611 72,473 (1,223)101.7 Rentals &Lease __1,000 1,000 191 191 383 765 235 76.5 Professional &Technical Services 113,500 113,500 3,366 79,144 36,844 132,824 252,178 (138,678)222.2 Communication 1,725 1,725 1,783 1,783 (58)103.4 Supplies 2,000 2,000 542 184 250 976 1,024 48.8 Vehicle Supplies 7,600 7,600 2,229 175 140 2,544 5,056 33.5 Professional Development 65,200 65,200 6,801 14,380 105 21,286 43,914 32.6 Additional Equipment 1,000 1,000 950 950 50 95.0 Total Operating 192,025 192,025 10,900 95,752..38,344...........135,486 280,482 (88,457}146.1 Total School Committee 254,525 263,275 23,832 110,274 55,752 163,097 352,955 (89,680)134.1 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET GENERAL SCHOOL 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 975 -Copier 8~ Printers FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Description Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb Balance %Spent To#al Personnel ___.._... __ __ _ __ ___1,_ %' Rentals &Lease 535,600 560,025 182,419 128,421 144,173 105,011 560,025 - _.:., - 100.0 7'atal Operating 535,600.......560,025:182,419 128,42'1 144,173 1Q5,011 560,025 100.4 %o Total Copier &Printers 535,600 560,025 182,419 128,421 144,173 105,011 560,025 -- 100.0 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS 9/19/2018 FISCAL YEAR 2018 4:49:01 PM QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET Through Period 13 GENERAL SCHOOL 993 -Athletics Department FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Description Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb Balance %Spent Salary 222.461 222,461 54,899 52,771 59,206 85,078 251,953 (29,492)113.3 Differentials 380,000 380,000 1,818 195,224 66,258 126,417 389,717 (9,717)102.6 Personnel 602,461 602,461 56,717 247,995 125,464 211,495 641,670 (39,2Q9)__106.5 Rentals &Lease 24,055 24,055 (24,055) Professional &Technical Services 34,814 34,814 1,563 10,986 1,276 158,071 171,896 (137,082)493.8 Communication 412 412 412 Other Purchased Services 3,508 1,607 230 5,345 (5,345) Supplies 37,080 37,080 35,726 29,946 16,652 6,908 89,232 (52,152)240.6 Technical Supplies 3,476 3,476 3,476 Vehicle Supplies 2,884 2,884 894 846 218 1,958 926 67.9 Professional Development 18,540 18,540 13,010 1,065 1,940 1,597 17,612 928 95.0 Transportation 200,645 200,645 48,707 6,500 63,007 118,214 82,431 58.9 Additional Equipment 5,042 5,042 2,867 4,074 399 125 7,465 (2,423)148.1 Total Operating 302,893 302,893.56,674 97,279 27,843 253,980 435,776 (132,883)143.9 Total Athletics Department 905,354 905,354 113,391 345,274 153,307 465,475 1,077,447 (172,093)119.0 GENERAL SCHOOL 964 -Health Services Description FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb Balance %Spent Salary 249,420 272,165 56,153 67,747 83,031 68,073 275,005 (2,840)101.0 Differentials 47,500 47,500 1,400 12,100 12,875 24,300 50,675 (3,175)106.7 Tofal Personnel 296,920 319,665 -7,000 57,553 79,847 95,906 92,373 ,,325 680 ....(6,015)101.9 Repairs &Maintenance 7,000 6,860 6,860 140 98.0 Rentals &Lease 7,250 7,250 6,691 191 383 7,265 (15)1002 Professional &Technical Services 22,973 22,973 9,418 11,664 6,670 27,752 (4,779)120.8 Communication 650 650 39 16 176 231 419 35.5 Other Purchased Services 800 800 1,797 100 1,896 (1,096)237.0 Supplies 19,060 19,060 275 1,993 18,607 553 21,427 (2,367)112.4 Vehicle Supplies 10,600 10,600 638 445 1,108 2,192 55 8,353 212 Professional Development 3,000 3,000 39 39 2,961 1.3 Additional Equipment 2,150 2,150 2,150Tofal 73,483 73,483 13,864 13,862 31,046 8,890 67,662 55 5,766 92.2 Total Health Services 370,403 393,148 71,417 93,710 126,951 101,?64 393,342 55 (249)100.1 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS 9/19/2018 FISCAL YEAR 2018 4:49:01 PM QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET Through Period 13 GENERAL SCHOOL 986 -Community Resource FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Description Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb Balance %Spent Salary 162,822 162,822 38,857 38,270 42,156 153,316 272,598 (109,776)167.4 Differentials 126,000 175,224 4,213 41,086 47,948 105,199 198,447 (23,223)113.3 'Cotal Personnel 288,822 338,046 43;070 79,356 90,104 258,515 471,045 (132,999)139.3__Communication 1,000 1 .. ,000 250_250 750 .....25.0 Supplies 2,500 2,500 1,004 387 147 1,538 962 61.5 Vehicle Supplies 2,000 2,000 50 912 1,013 30 2,005 (5)100.3 Transportation 87,362 77,362 37,684 8,744 58,939 105,367 (28,005)136.2 Additional Equipment 4,500 4,500 280 5,605 (212)5,672 (1,172)126.1 Total Operating 97,362 87,362 329 45,454.'10,144 58,905 114,833 (27,471)131.4 Total Community Resource 386,184 425,408 43,399 124,810 100,248 317,420 585,878 (160,470)137.7 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET GENERAL SCHOOL 995 -Parent Information Center FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Description Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Salary 439,831 439 831 95,239 106,589 Differentials 5,000 10 046 - Tafal Personnel .444,831 449,877.......95;239 106,589_.:.. _R t I & _~800..:...........:.... 800........ 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb Balance %Spent 114,469 127,058 443,356 -(3,525)100.8 °/a 1,667 2,150 I 3,817 -6,229 38.0 ~ fi 1 ~~~ as ~nR 447173 _2 705 99 4 °!o en a s ease ---- Professional &Technical Services 1,200 1,200 82 165 307 205 Communication 3,950 3,950 1,306 2,341 814 - Other Purchased Services ---400 200 - Supplies 3,500 3,500 1,646 733 784 621 Vehicle Supplies 250 250 ---- Additional Equipment 72,676 63,732 40,556 -22,224 74 Total Operating 82,376 73,432 -43,590 3,639 24,329 9Q0 Total Parent Information Center 527,207 523,309 138,829 110,228 140,465 130,108 -- 800 - 760 - 440 63.3 4,461 - (511)112.9 600 - (600)- 3,784 - (284)108.1 -- 250 - °/a 62,854 - 878 98.6 72,459 - 973 98.7 °fo 519,631 - 3,678 99.3 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET GENERAL SCHOOL 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 999 -Undistributed School Costs FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Description Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb Balance %Spent Salary 942,315 - - - - - - - - - Total Personnel 942,315 oho Other Purchased Services. _ _ 150,000...._. _ _ _ _ __ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ __ - Operating _ 150,000 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ _ __ Total Undistributed School Costs 1,092,315 - - - - - - - - - GENERAL SCHOOL 992 -Physical Education Description FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb Balance %Spent Repairs &Maintenance - - - - - - - - - - Other Purchased Services - - - - - - - - - - Supplies - - - - - - - - - - Professional Development - - - - - - - - - - Operating Total Physical Education - - - - - - - - - - Total GENERAL SCHOOL 4,071,588 3,070,519 573,289 912,717 720,897 1,282,375 3,489,278 55 (418,814) 113.6 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 HIGH SCHOOLS 910 -Framingham High School FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Description Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual actual Encumb Balance Spent Salary 17,677,956 17,286,183 2,267,744 4,229,008 4,804,401 6,222,639 17,523,792 (237,609)101.4 Differentials 145,400 145,400 47,312 15,287 32,021 52,562 147,182 (1,782)1012 Total Personnel 17,823,356 17,431,583 2,315,055 4,244,296 4,836,422 6,275,201...17;670,974 __(239,391)101.4 Repairs &Maintenance 3,090 3,090 1,820 1,820 1,270 58.9 Rentals &Lease 10,094 10,094 824 911 911 911 3,557 6,537 35.2 Professional &Technical Services 19,055 19,055 553 5,422 473 7,378 13,825 5,230 72.6 Communication 11,330 11,330 9,709 108 9,817 1,513 86.6 Other Purchased Services 6,180 6,180 5,928 271 6,199 (19)100.3 Supplies 167,409 167,409 31,131 57,952 42,751 16,281 148,114 19,295 88.5 Technical Supplies 15,450 15,450 13,069 13,069 2,381 84.6 Vehicle Supplies 16,450 16,450 5,055 3,508 1,060 9,624 6,826 58.5 Professional Development 9,476 9,476 5,310 1,920 3,525 4,070 14,825 (5,349)156.4 Transportation 11,617 11,617 3,143 982 7,500 11,626 (9)100.1 Textbooks 67,774 67,774 17,403 7,399 16,258 2,846 43,906 23,868 64.8 Additional Equipment 5,150 5,150 28,071 1,577 933 1,401 31,981 (26,831)621.0 -89.9Total Operating 343,075 .............343,075 93,001 91,235...82,409.........41,717 308,362 34,713 Total Framingham High School 18,166,431 17,774,658 2,408,056 4,335,531 4,918,831 6,316,919 17,979,336 - (204,678) 101.2 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET HIGH SCHOOLS 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 911 -Alternative HS Thayer Campus FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Description Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb Balance %Spent Salary 804,562 810,062 91,237 184,477 214,685 296,285 786,685 23,377 97.1 Differentials 200 200 200 Total Personnel 804,762.......810,262 91,237 184,477 ...214,685...296,285........786,685 23,577 ........97.1__Rentals &Lease 137 137 137 137 __ 549 (549) Professional &Technical Services 70U 700 700 Communication 515 515 515 Supplies 8,333 8,333 837 3,037 1,199 5,072 3,261 60.9 Textbooks 1,781 587 2,368 (2,368) Total Operating 9,548 9,548 974 4,955 1,923 137 7,989 1,559 83.7 Total Alternative HS Thayer Campus 814,310 819,810 92,211 189,432 216,608 296,423 794,674 25,136 96.9 Total HIGH SCHOOLS 18,980,741 18,594,468 2,500,267 4,524,963 5,135,439 6,613,341 18,774,010 (179,542)101.0 MIDDLE SCHOOLS 920 -Cameron Middle School Description Salary Differentials Total Personnel ___Professional &Technical Services Communication Other Purchased Services Supplies Professional Development Additional Equipment Tnfal Clnaratinn _ __ Total Cameron Middle School FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET FY 2018 FY 2018 Adopted Revised 6,104,205 6,123,748 8,850 8,850 6,'(13,055 6,'i32,598 2,560 2,560 4,000 4,000 500 500 31, 076 31, 076 2,745 2,745 14,000 14,000 54,881 64;889 6,167,936 6,187,479 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual 786,047 1,434,191 1,675,840 256 1,611 1,616_... __786,303 1,435,SQ2 1,677,456 92 186. 94 341 - 328 - 220 69 3,826 7,334 10,077 84 239 140 11,355 6,142 1,802 15, 697 .14,121 12 , 511 802,001 1,449,923 1, 689, 967 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY Q4 Actual Actual En 2,239,756 6,135,834 1,947 5,431 2,241,703_._373 6,141,264 746 656 1,325 211 500 877 22,115 200 663 3,467 22,766 5,784 48,114 2,247,487 6,189,379 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 cumb Balance %Spent - (12,086) 1002 °/a - 3,419 61.4 (8,666) 100.1 __ 1,81.4 ....29.1 %_ - 2,675 33.1 - - 100.0 - 8,961 712 - 2,082 242 - (8,766) 162.6 - 6,.767 87.7 - (1,900) 100.0 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET MIDDLE SCHOOLS 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 921 -Fuller Middle School Description FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 FY 2018 Actual Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 %Spent Salary 6,022,750 5,944,746 770,775 1,485,186 1,641,057 2,153,248 6,050,266 -(105,520)101.8 Differentials 8,850 15,830 226 1,289 1,771 3,565 6,852 -8,978 43.3 Total Personnel _. .._...... _6,031 600 -1,311 5,960,576 771,002 1,486,475 1,642,828 2,156,814 6057119 -r...._...._..~(96543),_..._1.01 6 Rentals &Lease 1,311 292 264 _ _..... 264 264 _..... _ .. _1,084 -_227 _... 82.7 Professional &Technical Services 17,345 10,365 -183 183 1,263 1,630 -8,735 15.7 Communication 1,545 1,545 1,545 110 -180 1,835 -(290)118.8 Supplies 38,852 38,852 6,881 22,374 9,518 4,074 42,846 -(3,994)110.3 Vehicle Supplies 1,000 1,000 40 -125 690 855 -145 85.5 Professional Development 824 824 --295 -295 -529 35.8 Additional Equipment 4,220 4,220 72 692 3,416 -4,180 -40 99.0 Total Operating 65,09?58,'117 883fl 23,623 93,801 6,471 52,75 -5,392:90.7 °lo `'. Total Fuller Middle School 6,096,697 6,018,693 779,832 1,510,098 1,656,630 2,163,285 6,109,844 -(91,151)101.5 °/a MIDDLE SCHOOLS 922 -Walsh Middle School Description FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb Balance %Spent Salary 8,201,575 7,941,770 1,021,185 1,909,299 2,157,810 2,872,587 7,960,881 (19,111)100.2Differentials8,850 8,850 680 1,217 2,412 2,301 6,611 2,239 74.7 Total Personnel 8,210,425 7,950,620 1,021,866 1,910,516 2,160,222 2,874,888 7,967,492 (16,872)100.2 Rentals &Lease 1,370 1,370 305 601 __906 464 66.1 Professional &Technical Services 1,315 1,315 4,494 3,250 228 7,972 (6,657)606.2Communication3,090 3,090 611 611 2,480 19.8 Other Purchased Services 250 250 250 Supplies 42,334 42,334 3,017 7,620 9,895 2,733 23,265 19,069 55.0 Vehicle Supplies 299 299 (299)Professional Development 900 900 200 200 700 22.2 Additional Equipment 14,400 14,400 14,172 7,534 1,018 22,724 (8,324)157.8 Operating 63,659 63,659 17,189 19,953 14,662 4,172 55.977 7,682.87.9 Total Walsh Middle School 8,274,084 8,014,279 1,039,055 1,930,469 2,174,885 2,879,060 8,023,469 (9,190)100.1 Total MIDDLE SCHOOLS 20,538,717 20,220,451 2,620,887 4,890,490 5,521,482 7,289,832 20,322,691 (102,240)100.5 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET ELEMENTARY 8~ PRE-K SCHOOLS 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 930 -Barbieri Elementary School Description FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 FY 2018 Actual Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 %Spent Salary 6,495,296 6,415,646 732,605 1,461,295 1,638,381 2,123,127 5,955,408 -460,238 92.8 Differentials 7,350 7,350 1,738 676 1,896 969 5,278 -2,072 71.8 Total Personnel 6,502,646.6,422,996-734,343 'I,46t 9Z1 1,64 ,277 2,124,095 5,960,686..462,31Q 92.8 °lo Professional &Technical Services 1,700 1,700 -227 -1,800 2,028 -(328)119.3 Communication 450 450 -441 --441 -9 98.0 Other Purchased Services 1,500 1,500 -1,025 --1,025 -476 68.3 Supplies 72,939 70,669 10,379 44,659 6,894 97'1 62,903 -7,766 89.0 Technical Supplies 7,000 7,000 -1,150 -1,494 2,644 -4,356 37.8 Professional Development 4,500 4,500 59 610 75 3,039 3,783 -717 84.1 Additional Equipment 1,400 1,400 594 3,703 39 330 4,666 -(3,266)333.3 Total Operating 89,489 87,219 11,031 51,815 7,008 7,634 77,488 =9;731 < 88.8 °lo _.. Total Barbieri Elementary School 6,592,135 6,510,215 745,374 1,513,786 1,647,284 2,131,730 6,038,174 -472,041 92.7 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET ELEMENTARY 8~ PRE-K SCHOOLS 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 931 -Brophy Elementary School Description FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 FY 2018 Actual Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 %Spent Salary 4,367,035 4,473,270 517,351 1,059,396 1,196,862 1,550,205 4,323,813 -149,457 96.7 Differentials 7,350 7,350 312 712 1,743 2,600 5,366 -1,984 73.0 Total Personnel 4,374,385 4,480,620 5'[7,662 '1,060,108 1,198,604........1,552,805 4,329,179 ............. -.........151,441 ...96.6 Rentals &Lease _ _1..000.._ 1..,000 ____ _ - -__1.000 - Professional &Technical Services 3,400 3,400 102 154 154 1,558 1,967 -1,433 57.9 Communication 515 515 -98 --98 -417 19.0 Other Purchased Services 1,000 1,000 ----- -1,000 - Supplies 64,000 64,000 599 33,844 26,631 332 61,406 -2,594 95.9 Vehicle Supplies 1,300 1,300 ----- -1,300 - Professional Development 4,698 4,698 --340 -340 -4,358 7.2 Additional Equipment --709 9,657 --10,366 -(10,366)- Total Operating.75,913.75,913..1,410 43,752 27,724 1,890 74,177 -1,736 97.7 Total Brophy Elementary School 4,450,298 4,556,533 519,073 1,103,860 1,225,729 1,554,695 4,403,356 -153,177 96.6 °/a FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET ELEMEfdTARY 8~ PRE-K SCHOOLS 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 932 - Dunnpng Elementary School Description FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 FY 2018 Actual Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 %Spent Salary 4,698,148 4,646,058 531,907 1,151,166 1,255,475 1,621,192 4,559,740 -86,318 98.1 Differentials 7,350 7,350 131 317 1,529 2,333 4,309 -3,041 58.6 Total Personnel -4,705,498 4;653,408-532-;037 1,159,483 1,257;03 1;623,525 4,564,04 _89,3b9 98.1 %.:....._Repairs &Maintenance ----334 -334 -(334)a,. /o Rentals &Lease 515 515 ----- -515 - Professional &Technical Services 4,185 4,185 ---500 500 -3,685 11.9 °/o Communication 310 310 -49 --49 -261 15.8 Other Purchased Services --414 1,311 347 -2,073 -(2,073)- Supplies 48,159 48,159 20,003 5,882 2,872 1,261 30,019 -18,140 62.3 °/a Vehicle Supplies 1,075 1,075 ---220 220 -855 20.5 Professional Development 1,100 1,100 ----- -1,100 - Textbooks 1,600 1,600 ----- -1,600 - Additional Equipment 8,600 8,600 1,847 25,064 872 105 27,888 -(19,288)324.3 Total Operating 65,544 65,544 22,264 32,307 4,425 2,086:.:61,Q83 4,461 `93.2 °10 Total Dunning Elementary School 4,771,042 4,718,952 554,302 1,183,790 1,261,429 1,625,611 4,625,131 -93,821 98.0 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET ELEMENTARY 8~ PRE-K SCHOOLS 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 933 - Hemenway Elementary School Description FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 FY 2018 Actual Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 %Spent Salary 4,904,717 4,745,967 537,680 1,108,866 1,214,695 1,561,055 4,422,295 -323,672 93.2 °/o Differentials 7,350 7,350 -1,470 1,636 1,696 4,802 -2,548 65.3 Total Personnel 4,912,067 4,753,317 537,680 1,110,336 1,216,331 1,562,751 4,427,097 -326,220 93.1 Professional &Technical Services 300 300 ---812 812 -(512)270.8 Communication 1,100 1,100 700 158 --858 -242 78.0 Supplies 67,976 67,976 14,649 16,729 3,639 5,119 40,136 -27,840 59.0 Technical Supplies 1,200 1,200 ----- -1,200 - Vehicle Supplies 2,500 2,500 ----- -2,500 - Professional Development 550 550 ----- -550 - Additional Equipment 1,000 1,000 3,441 25,430 1,018 663 30,552 -(29,552)3055.2 °/o Total Operating 74,626 74,626.18,791 42,31.7 4,657 6,594 .72,358 -2,268 97.0 Total Hemenway Elementary School 4,986,693 4,827,943 556,471 1,152,652 1,220,988 1,569,345 4,499,456 -328,487 93.2 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS 9/19/2018 FISCAL YEAR 2018 4:49:01 PM QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET Through Period 13 ELEMENTARY 8~ PRE-K SCHOOLS 935 -King Elementary School FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Description Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb Balance %Spent Salary 2,124,029 2,104,071 276,066 571,253 648,819 815,570 2,311,709 -(207,638)109.9 Differentials 4,850 4,850 215 1,026 1,619 1,838 4,699 -151 96.9 Total Personnel 2,128,879 2,108,921 276,282 572;279 65D,438`817,408 2,316,407 -` (207;486)109.8 Professional &Technical Services 1,700 1,700 -_-_.156 2,143 2,300 -(600)135.3 Communication 200 200 ----- -200 - °/o Supplies 78,000 78,000 22,372 23,876 1,280 187 47,714 -30,286 612 Professional Development 2,550 2,550 -1,495 1,076 -2,571 -(21)100.8 Additional Equipment 3,531 3,531 2,446 13,908 14,076 -30,430 -(26,899)861.8 Total Operating _:85,981 85,981 24;818 39,279 16,5$8 2,330 83:,015..,, -2,967 96.5 °fo Total King Elementary School 2,214,860 2,194,902 301,099 611,558 667,026 819,738 2,399,422 -(204,520)109.3 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET ELEMENTARY 8~ PRE-K SCHOOLS 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 936 -McCarthy Elementary School Description FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 FY 2018 Actual Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 %Spent Salary 6,103,735 5,753,091 684,096 1,414,241 1,559,656 2,078,997 5,736,990 -16,101 99.7 Differentials 7,350 7,350 90 1,437 1,338 2,321 5,185 -2,165 70.5 Total Personnel 6,111,085 5,760,441 684,187 1,415,677 1,56Q,994 2,081,317 5,742,175 18,266 99.7__Professional &Technical Services 1,650 1,650 ---1,008 1,008 -642 61.1 Communication 523 523 245 ---245 -278 46.8 Supplies 68,015 68,015 25,758 18,842 7,452 8,108 60,161 -7,854 88.5 Technical Supplies 258 258 ----- -258 - Vehicle Supplies ------- --- Professional Development 1,200 1,200 ----- -1,200 - Land/Building/Plant 1,000 1,000 ----- -1,000 -Additional Equipment 5,400 5,400 4,458 1,018 640 1,018 7,134 -(1,734)132.1 Total Operating 78,046 78,046 30,462 19,860 ........8.092 10,134 68,548.9,498 87.8 Total McCarthy Elementary School 6,189,131 5,838,487 714,649 1,435,538 1,569,086 2,091,451 5,810,723 -27,764 99.5 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET ELEMENTARY &PRE-K SCHOOLS 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 937 -Potter Road Elementary School Description FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 FY 2018 Actual Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 Spent Salary 3,930,947 3,874,067 452,118 932,501 1,075,787 1,441,299 3,901,705 (27,638)100.7 Differentials 7,350 7,350 242 821 1,482 2,062 4,608 2,742 62.7 Personnel 3,938,297 3,881,417 452361 933,322 1,Q77,269 9,443,361 3,906,313 (24,896}X00.6 Rentals &Lease 492 492 327 327 165 66.5 Professional &Technical Services 1,100 1,100 528 528 572 48.0 Communication 550 550 519 519 31 94.4 Other Purchased Services 800 800 840 17 857 (57)107.1 Supplies 61,546 61,546 20,174 5,895 4,068 12,798 42,935 18,611 69.8 Technical Supplies 250 250 250 Vehicle Supplies 1,000 1,000 56 52 232 339 661 33.9 Professional Development 1,400 1,400 178 1,070 54 1,302 98 93.0 Additional Equipment 11,400 11,400 3,840 19,296 99 1,045 24,279 (12,879)213.0 Operating 78,538 78,538 25551 26,334 4,272'.:.14,929 71,087 7451 '90.510'` Total Potter Road Elements Schoolry 4 016 835 3,959,955 477,912 959,655 1,081,541 1,458,291 3,977,399 (17,444)100.4 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET ELEMENTARY 8~ PRE-K SCHOOLS 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 938 -Stapleton Elementary School Description FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 FY 2018 Actual Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 %Spent Salary 4,396,943 4,280,943 489,304 1,018,202 1,108,129 1,551,322 4,166,957 -113,986 97.3 Differentials 7,350 7,350 372 295 1,506 1,474 3,647 -3,703 49.6Total Personnel 4,404,293 4,288,293 489,677 1,418,497 1,109,635 1,552,795 4,1~Q,604 -117,689 97.3 Professional &Technical Services 1,100 1,100 -370 138 803 1,311 -(211)119.1 Communication 350 350 343 ---343 -7 98.0 Other Purchased Services 500 500 --661 633 1,294 -(794)258.8 Supplies 61,045 61,045 4,651 16,650 4,381 9,029 34,712 -26,333 56.9 Vehicle Supplies 600 600 ----- -600 - Professional Development 550 550 ----- -550 - Textbooks ---2,530 7,419 492 10,442 -(10,442)- Additional Equipment 2,500 2,500 1,878 11,483 225 66 13,652 -(11,152)546.1 °/o Total Operating 66,645 66,645 6,872 31,fl34 92,825 11,023 61,753 -4,892 92.7 Total Stapleton Elementary School 4,470,938 4,354,938 496,548 1,049,531 1,122,460 1,563,818 4,232,357 -122,581 97.2 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET ELEMENTARY 8~ PRE-K SCHOOLS 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 939 - W. Wilson Elementary School Description FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 FY 2018 Actual Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 °/o Spent Salary 5,560,795 5,184,340 612,651 1,216,491 1,360,176 1,806,426 4,995,743 -188,597 96.4 Differentials 8,350 8,350 260 462 1,760 2,096 4,578 -3,772 54.8 Tofal Personnel 5 569,14b 5,192,690 612;9'1'1 1,216,953_,.1,361;936 __1,808,522 x,000;,322: -" 1.92;368 96:3 °lo Professional &Technical Services 40,471 40,471 - . -1,650 977 2,627 -37,844 6.5 Communication ------- --- Supplies 52,600 52,600 27,110 10,224 4,598 256 42,188 -10,412 80.2 Technical Supplies 300 300 ----- -300 - Vehicle Supplies 1,400 1,400 ---16,155 16,155 -(14,755)1153.9 Professional Development 11,000 11,000 8,520 1,070 --9,590 -1,410 872 Additional Equipment --2,279 -72 (72)2,279 -(2,279)- Tofal Operating 105,771 105,771..37,909 11;294 6,320'17,315 72,838 -32933 68.9 °la Total W. Wilson Elementary School 5,674,916 5,298,461 650,820 1,228,247 1,368,256 1,825,837 5,073,160 -225,301 95.7 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET ELEMENTARY 8~ PRE-K SCHOOLS 9/19/2018 4:49:01 PM Through Period 13 945 -Preschool/BLOCKS FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Description Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb Balance %Spent Salary 2,432,627 2,154,087 245,583 561,131 570,432 774,056 2,151,202 -2,885 99.9Differentials2,350 2,350 ----- -2,350 -Total Personnel 2,434,977 2,156,437 245,583 561,131 57D,432 774,056 2,151,202 5,235 99.8 Total Preschool/BLOCKS 2,434,977 2,156,437 245,583 561,131 570,432 774,056 2,151,202 -5,235 99.8 Total ELEMENTARY &PRE-K SCHOOLS 45,801,825 44,416,823 5,261,831 10,799,748 11,734,230 15,414,572 43,210,381 -1,206,442 97.3 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS 9!19/2018 FISCAL YEAR 2018 4:49:01 PM QUARTERLY SCHOOL BUDGET Through Period 13 PERSONNEL 8~ OPERATING TOTALS FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 FY 2018 Adopted Revised Q1 Actual Q2 Actual Q3 Actual Q4 Actual Actual Encumb Balance %Spent Personnel 97,225,166 94,745,999 12,787,231 22,862,056 25,200,807 33,351,014 94,201,109 -544,890 99.4 Operating 30,840,305 32,669,693 3,622,980 9,306,390 7,302,334 12,935,972 33,167,677 3,962 (501,945)101.5 GRAND TOTAL 128,065,471 127,415,692 16,410,211 32,168,447 32,503,142 46,286,986 127,368,785 3,962 42,945 100.0 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised GENERAL GOVERNMENT DIVISION 122 - Mayor Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 681,293 109,631 123,385 177,989 270,289 - 681,301 8 100.0% 493,158 5110 Part-time Salaries 244 244 - - - - 250 6 97.5% - 5120 Overtime 9,544 704 3,024 2,300 3,516 - 10,680 1,136 89.4% 10,000 5130 Differential - - - - - - 2,350 2,350 - % 2,350 5140 Other Personnel Services 750 - - - 750 - 750 - 100.0% - 5150 Total Personnel 691,831 110,579 126,409 180,288 274,555 - 695,331 3,500 99.5% 505,508 Repairs & Maintenance 1,593 221 336 652 384 275 900 (968) 207.6% 400 5240 Rentals & Leases 238 - - 190 48 - 190 (48) 125.2% - 5270 Professional & Tech Services 71,913 13,809 13,902 25,726 18,476 799 75,159 2,446 96.7% 26,000 5300 Communications 5,676 1,214 1,696 1,523 1,243 - 10,984 5,308 51.7% 12,350 5340 Supplies 4,696 1,379 480 2,064 772 756 4,136 (1,316) 131.8% 2,500 5420 Technical Supplies 1,944 - 400 299 1,245 - 2,524 580 77.0% 1,600 5440 Vehicular Supplies 220 74 146 - - - 750 530 29.3% 750 5480 Meals/Special Functions 4,263 110 - 2,597 1,556 76 3,342 (997) 129.8% - 5490 Professional Development 47,254 19,139 12,563 6,832 8,720 460 52,117 4,403 91.6% 75,500 5710 Additional Equipment 46,041 - - 44,684 1,357 - 46,042 1 100.0% - 5850 Total Operating 183,839 35,946 29,522 84,568 33,802 2,367 196,144 9,939 94.9% 119,100 Total 122 - Mayor 875,669 146,525 155,931 264,856 308,357 2,367 891,475 13,439 98.5% 624,608 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised GENERAL GOVERNMENT DIVISION 111 - City Council Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Differential - - - - - - - - - % - 5140 Other Personnel Services 28,750 - - 14,375 14,375 - 28,750 - 100.0% - 5150 Total Personnel 28,750 - - 14,375 14,375 - 28,750 - 100.0% - Professional & Tech Services - - - - - - - - - % - 5300 Communications - - - - - - - - - % - 5340 Technical Supplies - - - - - - - - - % - 5440 Professional Development - - - - - - - - - % - 5710 Additional Equipment - - - - - - - - - % - 5850 Total Operating - - - - - - - - - % - Total 111 - City Council 28,750 - - 14,375 14,375 - 28,750 - 100.0% - CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised GENERAL GOVERNMENT DIVISION 161 - City Clerk Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 186,431 42,504 47,220 46,507 50,200 - 187,978 1,547 99.2% 185,958 5110 Overtime 714 - 787 (73) - - 1,110 396 64.3% 1,110 5130 Differential 500 - - - 500 - 500 - 100.0% 500 5140 Other Personnel Services 103,430 22,343 26,421 25,358 29,308 - 103,430 - 100.0% 101,430 5150 Total Personnel 291,075 64,848 74,428 71,791 80,008 - 293,018 1,943 99.3% 288,998 Repairs & Maintenance 407 - 298 - 109 - 973 566 41.8% 250 5240 Professional & Tech Services 7,294 988 4,584 1,537 184 - 7,500 206 97.3% 6,000 5300 Communications 3,853 477 324 2,636 416 - 4,595 742 83.8% 4,595 5340 Supplies 5,221 1,471 1,875 371 1,503 - 7,277 2,056 71.7% 5,000 5420 Technical Supplies 2,046 - 1,014 135 897 - 1,515 (531) 135.1% 800 5440 Professional Development 1,721 40 375 724 582 - 2,800 1,079 61.5% 2,800 5710 Total Operating 20,542 2,976 8,471 5,404 3,692 - 24,660 4,118 83.3% 19,445 Total 161 - City Clerk 311,618 67,824 82,899 77,195 83,700 - 317,678 6,060 98.1% 308,443 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised GENERAL GOVERNMENT DIVISION 151 - Legal Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Professional & Tech Services 735,000 148,406 173,685 173,156 267,853 - 735,000 - 100.0% 735,000 5300 Total Operating 735,000 148,406 173,685 173,156 267,853 - 735,000 - 100.0% 735,000 Total 151 - Legal 735,000 148,406 173,685 173,156 267,853 - 735,000 - 100.0% 735,000 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised GENERAL GOVERNMENT DIVISION 192 - Facilities Management Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 838,494 184,665 216,109 214,628 223,091 - 859,596 21,102 97.5% 940,576 5110 Overtime 45,479 8,597 12,513 14,684 9,685 - 50,398 4,919 90.2% 51,000 5130 Differential 19,266 1,649 11,258 1,716 4,642 - 19,279 13 99.9% 17,729 5140 Other Personnel Services 5,403 849 1,937 498 2,120 - 6,002 599 90.0% 5,400 5150 Total Personnel 908,641 195,760 241,816 231,527 239,538 - 935,275 26,634 97.2% 1,014,705 Energy 355,645 94,212 82,549 100,351 78,533 - 563,661 208,016 63.1% 720,812 5210 Repairs & Maintenance 266,392 39,996 41,732 73,496 111,168 15,342 423,056 141,322 66.6% 407,600 5240 Rentals & Leases 30,408 6,250 6,250 6,250 11,658 - 48,375 17,967 62.9% 43,000 5270 Professional & Tech Services 139,695 20,224 35,997 35,666 47,808 273 136,673 (3,295) 102.4% 122,860 5300 Communications 10,657 1,813 2,434 3,083 3,327 - 16,725 6,068 63.7% 17,525 5340 Supplies 194,748 19,787 29,359 30,979 114,623 - 199,718 4,970 97.5% 162,250 5420 Technical Supplies 7,877 425 1,995 3,041 2,417 - 9,417 1,540 83.6% 5,800 5440 Vehicular Supplies 9,420 1,667 2,341 2,450 2,963 - 22,000 12,580 42.8% 22,000 5480 Meals/Special Functions 357 - - 357 - - 800 443 44.7% 800 5490 Professional Development 2,015 7 1,379 471 158 - 8,650 6,635 23.3% 8,650 5710 Additional Equipment 38,302 8,511 6,482 16,213 7,097 - 38,303 1 100.0% - 5850 Total Operating 1,055,518 192,891 210,517 272,358 379,752 15,615 1,467,378 396,245 73.0% 1,511,297 Total 192 - Facilities Management 1,964,159 388,651 452,333 503,884 619,291 15,615 2,402,653 422,879 82.4% 2,526,002 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised GENERAL GOVERNMENT DIVISION 162 - Elections Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 54,114 12,253 13,529 13,605 14,727 - 54,381 267 99.5% 54,158 5110 Overtime 399 - 399 - - - 1,500 1,101 26.6% 1,500 5130 Differential 1,500 - - - 1,500 - 1,950 450 76.9% 1,950 5140 Total Personnel 56,012 12,253 13,928 13,605 16,227 - 57,831 1,819 96.9% 57,608 Repairs & Maintenance 9,640 1,343 3,797 - 4,500 - 9,900 260 97.4% 9,900 5240 Professional & Tech Services - - - - - - 8,000 8,000 - % 10,000 5300 Communications 5,864 1,677 1,665 1,271 1,251 - 7,400 1,536 79.2% 7,400 5340 Other Purchased Services 56,409 - 55,134 - 1,275 - 71,335 14,926 79.1% 80,550 5380 Supplies 34,275 8,544 15,581 5,288 4,862 - 39,000 4,725 87.9% 35,000 5420 Technical Supplies - - - - - - 1,000 1,000 - % 1,000 5440 Professional Development 104 6 44 36 18 - 300 196 34.6% 300 5710 Total Operating 106,293 11,570 76,222 6,596 11,905 - 136,935 30,643 77.6% 144,150 Total 162 - Elections 162,305 23,823 90,150 20,200 28,132 - 194,766 32,461 83.3% 201,758 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised FINANCE DIVISION 133 - Chief Financial Officer Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 330,654 75,088 81,667 81,513 92,387 - 330,655 1 100.0% 322,348 5110 Differential 450 - - - 450 - 450 - 100.0% 400 5140 Total Personnel 331,104 75,088 81,667 81,513 92,837 - 331,105 1 100.0% 322,748 Repairs & Maintenance 18,516 - 18,516 - - - 18,516 - 100.0% 17,725 5240 Professional & Tech Services 87,200 10,000 30,000 31,600 15,600 - 87,200 - 100.0% 79,000 5300 Communications 34 6 6 9 13 - 51 17 66.1% 1,820 5340 Supplies - - - - - - - - - % 1,500 5420 Professional Development 2,291 120 45 1,408 718 - 2,294 3 99.9% 5,500 5710 Total Operating 108,040 10,126 48,567 33,017 16,330 - 108,061 21 100.0% 105,545 Total 133 - Chief Financial Officer 439,145 85,214 130,234 114,529 109,167 - 439,166 21 100.0% 428,293 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised FINANCE DIVISION 135 - Accounting Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 530,207 122,011 123,411 135,488 149,297 - 531,452 1,245 99.8% 541,105 5110 Part-time Salaries 32,033 7,242 7,996 8,091 8,704 - 32,036 3 100.0% 32,736 5120 Overtime 1,564 801 648 1 113 - 1,575 11 99.3% - 5130 Differential 1,050 550 200 - 300 - 1,250 200 84.0% 1,250 5140 Total Personnel 564,854 130,604 132,256 143,580 158,414 - 566,313 1,459 99.7% 575,091 Professional & Tech Services 10,936 - 7,736 3,200 - - 10,936 - 100.0% - 5300 Communications 3,113 890 620 1,031 571 - 4,225 1,112 73.7% 4,525 5340 Supplies 2,903 516 1,420 221 746 - 3,650 747 79.5% 3,050 5420 Technical Supplies 677 264 237 176 - - 3,750 3,073 18.1% 4,050 5440 Professional Development 4,218 716 451 1,414 1,637 - 8,620 4,402 48.9% 8,620 5710 Total Operating 21,847 2,386 10,464 6,042 2,954 - 31,181 9,334 70.1% 20,245 Total 135 - Accounting 586,701 132,991 142,720 149,622 161,368 - 597,494 10,793 98.2% 595,336 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised FINANCE DIVISION 138 - Purchasing Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 72,860 16,309 18,063 17,844 20,644 - 72,863 3 100.0% 72,083 5110 Part-time Salaries 17,230 3,792 4,555 4,075 4,807 - 18,969 1,739 90.8% 19,499 5120 Differential 200 - - - 200 - 200 - 100.0% 200 5140 Total Personnel 90,289 20,101 22,618 21,919 25,651 - 92,032 1,743 98.1% 91,782 Rentals & Leases 77,486 25,102 16,046 17,256 19,082 865 80,700 2,349 97.1% 80,700 5270 Professional & Tech Services - - - - - - 1,000 1,000 - % 1,000 5300 Communications 1,912 392 678 403 440 88 2,525 525 79.2% 2,525 5340 Supplies 822 180 267 289 106 23 2,000 1,155 42.3% 2,000 5420 Technical Supplies 8,574 630 1,231 1,890 4,823 2,958 14,550 3,018 79.3% 14,550 5440 Professional Development 2,560 350 1,044 800 366 - 2,745 185 93.3% 3,050 5710 Total Operating 91,354 26,654 19,266 20,638 24,817 3,934 103,520 8,231 92.0% 103,825 Total 138 - Purchasing 181,643 46,754 41,884 42,556 50,469 3,934 195,552 9,974 94.9% 195,607 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised FINANCE DIVISION 141 - Assessing Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 529,196 109,598 127,664 138,908 153,025 - 545,462 16,266 97.0% 552,328 5110 Overtime 168 - - 168 - - 177 9 94.8% - 5130 Differential 6,300 1,100 1,100 2,000 2,100 - 12,600 6,300 50.0% 12,600 5140 Other Personnel Services - - - - - - 600 600 - % 600 5150 Total Personnel 535,664 110,698 128,764 141,076 155,125 - 558,839 23,175 95.9% 565,528 Repairs & Maintenance - - - - - - 115 115 - % 5,415 5240 Professional & Tech Services 93,350 18,783 22,204 15,239 37,125 - 93,750 400 99.6% 82,250 5300 Communications 3,981 528 1,613 1,348 492 - 4,739 758 84.0% 8,850 5340 Supplies 5,803 209 1,307 1,960 2,327 - 6,000 197 96.7% 3,000 5420 Technical Supplies 962 94 27 - 841 - 1,295 333 74.3% 2,250 5440 Professional Development 12,635 6,074 1,585 1,501 3,475 - 13,855 1,220 91.2% 14,200 5710 Additional Equipment 8,938 8,938 - - - - 9,000 62 99.3% 15,000 5850 Total Operating 125,669 34,625 26,735 20,048 44,261 - 128,754 3,085 97.6% 130,965 Total 141 - Assessing 661,333 145,324 155,499 161,124 199,386 - 687,593 26,260 96.2% 696,493 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised FINANCE DIVISION 145 - Treasurer / Collector Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 490,822 109,655 121,654 121,265 138,248 - 490,769 (53) 100.0% 481,130 5110 Overtime 667 54 278 223 112 - 2,000 1,333 33.4% 2,000 5130 Differential 900 - 450 - 450 - 900 - 100.0% 900 5140 Total Personnel 492,390 109,709 122,382 121,488 138,811 - 493,669 1,279 99.7% 484,030 Repairs & Maintenance 2,281 - - 1,303 978 - 2,300 19 99.2% 1,600 5240 Professional & Tech Services 22,527 225 8,671 5,799 7,832 1,300 43,455 19,628 54.8% 50,025 5300 Communications 73,215 4,040 13,616 29,633 25,927 - 78,030 4,815 93.8% 78,080 5340 Supplies 2,090 1,058 469 63 501 790 3,138 257 91.8% 2,638 5420 Technical Supplies 2,959 508 729 1,223 499 - 3,000 41 98.6% 3,000 5440 Professional Development 3,438 1,410 145 - 1,883 - 5,175 1,737 66.4% 5,175 5710 Additional Equipment 5,420 - - - 5,420 - 5,420 - 100.0% - 5850 Total Operating 111,931 7,240 23,630 38,021 43,039 2,090 140,518 26,497 81.1% 140,518 Total 145 - Treasurer / Collector 604,320 116,949 146,012 159,509 181,850 2,090 634,187 27,776 95.6% 624,548 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised FINANCE DIVISION 155 - Technology Services Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 886,340 183,971 229,600 226,779 245,989 - 891,605 5,265 99.4% 791,985 5110 Part-time Salaries - - - - - - - - - % 44,758 5120 Overtime 6,075 715 718 1,970 2,672 - 10,262 4,187 59.2% 8,500 5130 Differential 300 - - 300 - - 965 665 31.1% 4,850 5140 Total Personnel 892,715 184,686 230,319 229,049 248,661 - 902,832 10,117 98.9% 850,093 Repairs & Maintenance 931,396 664,584 25,943 127,239 113,630 - 932,985 1,589 99.8% 937,977 5240 Rentals & Leases 250,553 250,553 - - - - 250,553 - 100.0% 250,000 5270 Professional & Tech Services 97 - - - 97 - 98 1 99.0% - 5300 Communications 17,383 3,427 4,186 4,202 5,567 - 23,705 6,322 73.3% 26,596 5340 Supplies 3,877 1,374 1,165 259 1,079 - 3,878 1 100.0% 2,500 5420 Technical Supplies 12,568 1,395 1,969 3,346 5,859 - 15,761 3,193 79.7% 19,572 5440 Professional Development 52,965 6,465 6,058 4,343 36,099 - 57,897 4,932 91.5% 53,889 5710 Additional Equipment 122,328 5,686 18,206 35,510 62,926 - 128,112 5,784 95.5% 122,440 5850 Total Operating 1,391,167 933,484 57,527 174,899 225,256 - 1,412,989 21,822 98.5% 1,412,974 Total 155 - Technology Services 2,283,882 1,118,170 287,846 403,949 473,917 - 2,315,821 31,939 98.6% 2,263,067 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised FINANCE DIVISION 194 - Media Services Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 130,181 29,234 31,930 32,405 36,612 - 130,709 528 99.6% 129,216 5110 Part-time Salaries 15,665 3,680 4,379 3,439 4,167 - 20,123 4,458 77.8% 20,123 5120 Differential 250 - 250 - - - 500 250 50.0% 500 5140 Total Personnel 146,097 32,914 36,559 35,844 40,779 - 151,332 5,235 96.5% 149,839 Repairs & Maintenance 6,819 - 680 1,868 4,271 - 6,452 (367) 105.7% 16,500 5240 Professional & Tech Services 39,978 2,323 135 20,113 17,407 - 45,000 5,023 88.8% 35,000 5300 Communications 2,207 473 448 458 827 1,031 3,700 462 87.5% 3,700 5340 Supplies 8,150 - 1,367 854 5,928 33 8,250 67 99.2% 8,250 5420 Vehicular Supplies 18 - - - 18 - 250 232 7.2% 250 5480 Professional Development 7,998 - 989 48 6,961 - 12,048 4,050 66.4% 12,000 5710 Miscellaneous (Property/Liability Insurance - - - - - - 1,000 1,000 - % 1,000 5740 Additional Equipment 144,950 11,746 4,437 33,319 95,447 - 147,700 2,750 98.1% 147,700 5850 Total Operating 210,119 14,542 8,056 56,660 130,860 1,064 224,400 13,217 94.1% 224,400 Total 194 - Media Services 356,215 47,456 44,615 92,504 171,639 1,064 375,732 18,453 95.1% 374,239 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised HUMAN RESOURCES DIVISION 152 - Human Resources Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 475,526 108,680 119,314 119,197 128,333 - 475,527 1 100.0% 463,752 5110 Overtime 447 - - 447 - - 447 - 99.9% - 5130 Differential 400 200 - - 200 - 400 - 100.0% - 5140 Other Personnel Services 27,269 1,531 2,750 8,743 14,245 - 27,269 - 100.0% 10,000 5150 Total Personnel 503,641 110,411 122,064 128,387 142,778 - 503,643 2 100.0% 473,752 Repairs & Maintenance 319 - - - 319 - - (319) - % - 5240 Professional & Tech Services 39,271 5,016 5,240 12,025 16,990 4,685 72,803 28,847 60.4% 75,000 5300 Communications 3,164 410 392 1,194 1,169 500 12,000 8,336 30.5% 12,500 5340 Supplies 2,980 174 374 1,696 735 1,654 4,500 (135) 103.0% 4,000 5420 Meals/Special Functions 5,851 - 4,797 500 554 - 6,000 149 97.5% 6,000 5490 Professional Development 6,395 1,428 1,973 2,548 445 484 5,420 (1,459) 126.9% 5,420 5710 Additional Equipment 1,937 - - - 1,937 117 2,197 143 93.5% - 5850 Total Operating 59,918 7,028 12,776 17,964 22,150 7,441 102,920 35,561 65.4% 102,920 Total 152 - Human Resources 563,559 117,439 134,841 146,351 164,928 7,441 606,563 35,563 94.1% 576,672 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised HUMAN RESOURCES DIVISION 543 - Veterans Services Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 93,046 26,255 24,143 16,222 26,425 - 94,168 1,122 98.8% 115,691 5110 Differential - - - - - - - - - % - 5140 Total Personnel 93,046 26,255 24,143 16,222 26,425 - 94,168 1,122 98.8% 115,691 Professional & Tech Services 12,500 - 12,500 - - - 12,750 250 98.0% 250 5300 Communications 515 213 143 58 101 - 475 (40) 108.3% 475 5340 Supplies 240 - - - 240 - 550 311 43.5% 550 5420 Technical Supplies - - - - - - 200 200 - % 200 5440 Professional Development 262 199 - 63 - - 1,050 788 25.0% 1,050 5710 Unclassified/Veterans Benefits 407,644 92,147 96,953 89,422 129,122 - 451,275 43,631 90.3% 463,775 5770 Total Operating 421,160 92,559 109,596 89,542 129,463 - 466,300 45,140 90.3% 466,300 Total 543 - Veterans Services 514,205 118,814 133,739 105,764 155,888 - 560,468 46,263 91.7% 581,991 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised COMMUNITY & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DIVISION 172 - Community & Economic Development FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 366,114 81,623 91,342 93,102 100,047 - 367,513 1,399 99.6% 354,638 5110 Differential - - - - - - - - - % - 5140 Total Personnel 366,114 81,623 91,342 93,102 100,047 - 367,513 1,399 99.6% 354,638 Repairs & Maintenance - - - - - - - - - % 700 5240 Rentals & Leases 600 - - 100 500 - 600 - 100.0% - 5270 Professional & Tech Services 60,381 9,699 13,069 13,805 23,808 - 72,506 12,125 83.3% 161,300 5300 Communications 948 108 515 128 197 - 2,050 1,102 46.3% 2,030 5340 Supplies 3,110 309 438 804 1,559 - 3,114 4 99.9% 2,000 5420 Technical Supplies 699 - - - 699 - 815 116 85.8% 500 5440 Meals/Special Functions 1,400 189 336 - 875 - 2,614 1,214 53.6% 2,200 5490 Professional Development 5,879 1,466 2,509 478 1,426 - 7,375 1,496 79.7% 25,225 5710 Special Awards - - - - - - - - - % 15,000 5790 Total Operating 73,017 11,771 16,867 15,315 29,065 - 89,074 16,057 82.0% 208,955 Total 172 - Community & Economic Developme 439,132 93,394 108,209 108,417 129,112 - 456,587 17,455 96.2% 563,593 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised COMMUNITY & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DIVISION 173 - Zoning Board of Appeals FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 81,914 18,457 20,562 20,599 22,296 - 82,029 115 99.9% 81,581 5110 Overtime - - - - - - 2,300 2,300 - % 2,300 5130 Differential - - - - - - - - - % - 5140 Total Personnel 81,914 18,457 20,562 20,599 22,296 - 84,329 2,415 97.1% 83,881 Professional & Tech Services - - - - - - - - - % 100 5300 Communications 5,461 1,018 1,735 1,047 1,661 - 9,200 3,739 59.4% 9,200 5340 Supplies 1,198 412 225 100 462 - 1,200 2 99.8% 800 5420 Technical Supplies 182 17 - 165 - - 500 319 36.3% 500 5440 Professional Development 450 - - - 450 - 600 150 75.0% 500 5710 Additional Equipment 11,625 11,625 - - - - 12,755 1,130 91.1% 13,155 5850 Total Operating 18,915 13,071 1,960 1,311 2,573 - 24,255 5,340 78.0% 24,255 Total 173 - Zoning Board of Appeals 100,829 31,528 22,522 21,911 24,869 - 108,584 7,755 92.9% 108,136 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised COMMUNITY & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DIVISION 171 - Conservation FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 122,659 27,649 32,088 31,742 31,179 - 122,825 166 99.9% 122,206 5110 Part-time Salaries 52,502 42,255 - - 10,247 - 55,268 2,766 95.0% 59,028 5120 Overtime 7,359 2,124 2,359 878 1,999 - 7,360 1 100.0% 5,000 5130 Other Personnel Services - - - - - - - - - % - 5150 Total Personnel 182,520 72,028 34,447 32,620 43,425 - 185,453 2,933 98.4% 186,234 Repairs & Maintenance 29,563 2,250 1,932 - 25,381 13,219 43,110 328 99.2% 45,000 5240 Professional & Tech Services 190 - - 80 110 - 265 75 71.7% 250 5300 Communications 2,469 462 613 421 973 376 2,851 6 99.8% 2,050 5340 Supplies 3,110 426 645 17 2,021 192 3,400 98 97.1% 3,500 5420 Technical Supplies 79 - - 79 - - 80 1 98.6% 200 5440 Vehicular Supplies 5,013 1,099 248 524 3,142 - 5,155 142 97.3% 2,536 5480 Public Works Supplies 195 - - - 195 - 195 - 100.0% 500 5530 Professional Development 1,762 752 2 1,000 8 - 1,845 83 95.5% 2,865 5710 Additional Equipment 1,303 - 265 1,038 - - 1,400 97 93.1% - 5850 Total Operating 43,683 4,990 3,705 3,160 31,829 13,787 58,301 831 98.6% 56,901 Total 171 - Conservation 226,203 77,018 38,152 35,780 75,254 13,787 243,754 3,764 98.5% 243,135 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised COMMUNITY & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DIVISION 175 - Planning Board FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 179,208 48,565 49,199 39,171 42,273 - 181,774 2,566 98.6% 211,132 5110 Overtime - - - - - - 3,400 3,400 - % 3,400 5130 Differential - - - - - - - - - % - 5140 Total Personnel 179,208 48,565 49,199 39,171 42,273 - 185,174 5,966 96.8% 214,532 Repairs & Maintenance - - - - - - 320 320 - % 320 5240 Professional & Tech Services 21,178 - 1,555 6,941 12,961 2,000 28,900 5,722 80.2% 11,000 5300 Communications 3,043 705 635 848 855 263 4,950 1,644 66.8% 4,950 5340 Supplies 3,023 154 3 105 2,761 - 3,200 177 94.5% 1,100 5420 Meals/Special Functions 117 - - - 117 - - (117) - % - 5490 Professional Development 3,535 379 1,455 945 756 - 5,160 1,625 68.5% 5,160 5710 Total Operating 30,896 1,238 3,647 8,839 17,451 2,263 42,530 9,371 78.0% 22,530 Total 175 - Planning Board 210,104 49,803 52,846 48,011 59,724 2,263 227,704 15,337 93.3% 237,062 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised POLICE DIVISION 210 - Police Department Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 9,002,697 2,041,054 2,214,858 2,190,770 2,556,016 - 9,022,698 20,001 99.8% 9,606,948 5110 Part-time Salaries 154,806 13,177 40,435 37,345 63,849 - 154,808 2 100.0% 147,011 5120 Overtime 1,138,639 253,107 277,013 279,902 328,617 - 1,150,432 11,793 99.0% 720,000 5130 Differential 1,803,092 213,624 881,807 258,168 449,493 - 1,811,559 8,467 99.5% 2,280,252 5140 Other Personnel Services 57,010 20,366 26,674 5,042 10,378 1,985 58,705 (290) 100.5% 147,200 5150 Total Personnel 12,156,245 2,541,328 3,440,788 2,771,227 3,408,352 1,985 12,198,202 39,972 99.7% 12,901,411 Energy 1,135 151 392 98 493 697 1,815 (17) 100.9% 48,083 5210 Repairs & Maintenance 95,186 38,302 24,353 15,273 17,257 4,215 107,138 7,737 92.8% 93,582 5240 Rentals & Leases 245 - 195 50 - - 250 5 97.8% 5,500 5270 Professional & Tech Services 479,579 33,675 193,259 79,511 173,133 38,705 537,571 19,287 96.4% 318,000 5300 Communications 86,262 15,464 21,630 28,548 20,619 5,136 91,385 (12) 100.0% 58,525 5340 Supplies 94,514 13,706 18,469 17,850 44,490 20,050 115,471 907 99.2% 51,000 5420 Technical Supplies 124,698 11,137 1,285 12,829 99,448 70 124,743 (25) 100.0% 5,000 5440 Vehicular Supplies 229,483 21,790 39,577 37,734 130,382 6,432 302,277 66,362 78.0% 318,000 5480 Meals/Special Functions 2,572 241 372 1,118 841 988 3,540 (21) 100.6% 4,400 5490 Professional Development 130,528 22,637 36,036 18,150 53,704 2,677 138,871 5,666 95.9% 155,500 5710 Refunds/Reimbursements 5,112 - - - 5,112 - - (5,112) - % - 5780 Grant Close Out Old Accounts 4,411 - - - 4,411 - 4,415 4 99.9% - 5790 Additional Equipment 268,174 116,371 114,151 439 37,213 5,138 273,323 11 100.0% 244,000 5850 Total Operating 1,521,899 273,475 449,720 211,601 587,104 84,108 1,700,799 94,792 94.4% 1,301,590 Total 210 - Police Department 13,678,144 2,814,804 3,890,507 2,982,827 3,995,456 86,093 13,899,001 134,764 99.0% 14,203,001 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised POLICE DIVISION 291 - Framingham Emergency Management Agency FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Part-time Salaries - - - - - - 1,000 1,000 - % 1,000 5120 Other Personnel Services - - - - - - 3,000 3,000 - % 3,000 5150 Total Personnel - - - - - - 4,000 4,000 - % 4,000 Professional & Tech Services - - - - - - 9,000 9,000 - % 9,000 5300 Communications 3 1 1 1 1 - 5,300 5,297 0.1% 5,300 5340 Supplies - - - - - - 7,000 7,000 - % 7,000 5420 Technical Supplies 8,639 - - - 8,639 - - (8,639) - % - 5440 Meals/Special Functions 946 - - 392 554 - 1,000 54 94.6% 1,000 5490 Professional Development 4,930 - - 4,930 - - 3,600 (1,330) 136.9% 3,600 5710 Additional Equipment 38,830 22,539 - - 16,291 3,180 66,000 23,990 63.7% 66,000 5850 Total Operating 53,348 22,540 1 5,322 25,485 3,180 91,900 35,372 61.5% 91,900 Total 291 - Framingham Emergency Manageme 53,348 22,540 1 5,322 25,485 3,180 95,900 39,372 58.9% 95,900 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised POLICE DIVISION 292 - Animal Control Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 128,306 29,350 32,307 32,057 34,592 - 126,944 (1,362) 101.1% 126,944 5110 Part-time Salaries 18,318 4,173 4,549 4,580 5,016 - 21,612 3,294 84.8% 21,612 5120 Overtime - - - - - - 1,350 1,350 - % 1,350 5130 Differential 1,100 750 - - 350 - 650 (450) 169.2% 650 5140 Other Personnel Services - - - - - - 1,500 1,500 - % 1,500 5150 Total Personnel 147,725 34,273 36,856 36,637 39,958 - 152,056 4,331 97.2% 152,056 Energy 6,299 827 1,465 2,515 1,492 1,703 13,049 5,047 61.3% 13,049 5210 Repairs & Maintenance 1,140 285 190 380 285 60 3,500 2,300 34.3% 3,500 5240 Professional & Tech Services 1,790 486 874 429 - 949 5,000 2,262 54.8% 5,000 5300 Communications 257 45 68 63 81 - 1,400 1,143 18.4% 1,400 5340 Supplies 754 - 629 - 125 - 825 71 91.3% 825 5420 Vehicular Supplies 2,164 573 571 485 535 - 5,000 2,836 43.3% 5,000 5480 Professional Development 81 - - - 81 - 500 419 16.1% 500 5710 Total Operating 12,484 2,216 3,798 3,871 2,599 2,712 29,274 14,079 51.9% 29,274 Total 292 - Animal Control 160,208 36,489 40,654 40,508 42,557 2,712 181,330 18,410 89.8% 181,330 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised FIRE DIVISION 220 - Fire Department Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 9,465,180 2,100,621 2,443,507 2,392,656 2,528,396 - 9,500,226 35,046 99.6% 9,387,969 5110 Part-time Salaries 4,688 - 1,732 2,560 396 - 4,688 - 100.0% - 5120 Overtime 1,502,023 336,589 357,345 423,517 384,571 - 1,539,833 37,810 97.5% 1,190,000 5130 Differential 2,292,259 127,918 1,399,459 69,605 695,277 - 2,308,593 16,334 99.3% 2,468,836 5140 Other Personnel Services 151,453 11,737 50,875 28,772 60,069 - 151,530 77 99.9% 136,065 5150 Total Personnel 13,415,603 2,576,866 4,252,918 2,917,110 3,668,709 - 13,504,870 89,267 99.3% 13,182,870 Energy 149,074 35,710 34,385 39,415 39,565 - 150,271 1,197 99.2% 209,066 5210 Repairs & Maintenance 241,747 29,991 101,740 37,134 72,882 - 245,425 3,678 98.5% 182,350 5240 Professional & Tech Services 101,730 14,176 56,654 9,149 21,751 - 103,600 1,870 98.2% 115,000 5300 Communications 23,253 3,518 5,606 5,932 8,198 - 26,448 3,195 87.9% 36,548 5340 Supplies 71,966 15,260 27,544 13,969 15,194 - 78,346 6,380 91.9% 77,046 5420 Technical Supplies 10,253 1,692 7,760 802 - - 10,525 272 97.4% - 5440 Vehicular Supplies 158,235 38,798 38,769 41,211 39,457 - 159,386 1,151 99.3% 154,291 5480 Professional Development 15,114 5,327 3,237 2,454 4,247 - 15,800 686 95.7% 15,100 5710 Additional Equipment 125,997 48,804 10,589 51,512 15,092 - 126,100 103 99.9% 67,500 5850 Total Operating 897,370 193,275 286,283 201,578 216,384 - 915,901 18,531 98.0% 856,901 Total 220 - Fire Department 14,312,972 2,770,141 4,539,201 3,118,688 3,885,093 - 14,420,771 107,799 99.3% 14,039,771 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION 424 - Streetlights Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 329,888 75,271 83,283 82,494 88,840 - 329,894 6 100.0% 330,061 5110 Part-time Salaries 22,504 4,198 5,837 5,968 6,502 - 22,600 96 99.6% - 5120 Overtime 26,601 7,471 5,837 9,222 4,071 - 26,700 99 99.6% 52,000 5130 Differential 13,683 10,100 1,000 (250) 2,833 - 13,684 1 100.0% 17,133 5140 Other Personnel Services 21,269 3,351 5,487 6,728 5,703 - 21,725 456 97.9% 12,676 5150 Total Personnel 413,945 100,391 101,443 104,162 107,950 - 414,603 658 99.8% 411,870 Energy 287,481 67,273 71,185 59,177 95,116 22,092 357,704 48,131 86.5% 430,043 5210 Repairs & Maintenance 75,580 750 1,913 54,228 18,689 7,046 84,023 1,397 98.3% 75,000 5240 Rentals & Leases - - - - - 2,692 2,693 1 100.0% - 5270 Professional & Tech Services 402 402 - - - - 402 - 100.0% - 5300 Communications 2,965 678 716 453 1,117 825 4,308 518 88.0% 1,000 5340 Other Purchased Services 1,651 - - 1,651 - 8,349 10,000 - 100.0% - 5380 Supplies 29,134 326 2,023 735 26,050 865 30,270 271 99.1% 42,000 5420 Technical Supplies - - - - - - 500 500 - % 500 5440 Vehicular Supplies 9,814 1,879 2,646 2,465 2,825 - 12,203 2,389 80.4% 13,000 5480 Public Works Supplies 51,995 6,336 16,009 3,222 26,427 1,337 58,138 4,806 91.7% 21,500 5530 Professional Development 3,472 135 160 425 2,752 3,140 6,612 - 100.0% - 5710 Additional Equipment 13,412 1,275 - 599 11,537 4,495 18,190 283 98.4% 2,000 5850 Total Operating 475,904 79,054 94,651 122,956 184,514 50,842 585,043 58,297 90.0% 585,043 Total 424 - Streetlights 889,849 179,444 196,094 227,117 292,464 50,842 999,646 58,955 94.1% 996,913 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION 411 - Engineering Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 863,780 197,700 217,149 212,650 236,282 - 863,781 1 100.0% 848,273 5110 Part-time Salaries 3,794 3,794 - - - - 3,794 - 100.0% 5,367 5120 Overtime 3,458 315 1,185 525 1,432 - 3,458 - 100.0% 7,500 5130 Differential 19,902 5,121 6,082 5,309 3,390 - 19,903 1 100.0% 19,520 5140 Other Personnel Services 10,108 1,469 2,412 3,588 2,639 - 10,109 1 100.0% 12,214 5150 Total Personnel 901,042 208,399 226,828 222,072 243,744 - 901,045 3 100.0% 892,874 Repairs & Maintenance 3,888 5 3,180 195 508 - 6,426 2,538 60.5% 11,128 5240 Rentals & Leases 4,665 1,166 1,166 1,166 1,166 - 4,665 - 100.0% 4,750 5270 Professional & Tech Services 33,148 1,418 791 9,058 24,856 7,779 43,908 2,982 93.2% 52,400 5300 Communications 4,661 690 1,409 980 1,582 - 5,214 553 89.4% 7,000 5340 Supplies 7,275 2,379 936 2,210 1,750 - 7,696 421 94.5% 6,500 5420 Technical Supplies 1,162 191 - 722 249 - 1,321 159 88.0% 5,400 5440 Vehicular Supplies 2,572 630 670 478 794 - 3,011 439 85.4% 3,011 5480 Meals/Special Functions 587 - 257 330 - - 587 - 100.0% - 5490 Public Works Supplies 725 - - - 725 - 725 - 99.9% - 5530 Professional Development 13,021 7,993 307 1,494 3,228 - 13,122 101 99.2% 8,800 5710 Additional Equipment 18,310 - - 6,769 11,541 - 18,314 4 100.0% 6,000 5850 Total Operating 90,013 14,472 10,507 23,401 46,399 7,779 104,989 7,197 93.1% 104,989 Total 411 - Engineering 991,055 222,871 237,335 245,473 290,143 7,779 1,006,034 7,200 99.3% 997,863 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION 421 - Administration Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 493,083 120,015 133,917 112,579 126,571 - 504,809 11,726 97.7% 510,643 5110 Overtime - - - - - - 1,500 1,500 - % 2,000 5130 Differential 3,450 - 3,000 250 200 - 3,450 - 100.0% 6,450 5140 Other Personnel Services 42 - - 42 - - 42 - 100.0% - 5150 Total Personnel 496,575 120,015 136,917 112,871 126,771 - 509,801 13,226 97.4% 519,093 Repairs & Maintenance 2,758 2,593 40 45 80 - 2,768 10 99.6% 6,573 5240 Rentals & Leases 1,571 393 393 393 393 96 1,900 233 87.7% 1,900 5270 Professional & Tech Services 14,291 33 3,320 10,471 467 8,560 23,152 301 98.7% 16,300 5300 Communications 3,755 651 1,014 760 1,329 797 9,267 4,715 49.1% 9,000 5340 Supplies 2,628 367 880 261 1,120 - 6,000 3,372 43.8% 6,000 5420 Technical Supplies 866 - - 866 - - 1,094 228 79.2% 5,200 5440 Vehicular Supplies 1,373 382 315 389 287 - 2,369 996 58.0% 2,369 5480 Meals/Special Functions 1,030 - 234 719 77 453 1,483 - 100.0% - 5490 Public Works Supplies 147 - 147 - - - 147 - 100.0% - 5530 Professional Development 3,329 736 166 2,121 306 - 4,862 1,533 68.5% 5,700 5710 Total Operating 31,747 5,154 6,510 16,025 4,059 9,906 53,042 11,389 78.5% 53,042 Total 421 - Administration 528,322 125,169 143,427 128,897 130,830 9,906 562,843 24,615 95.6% 572,135 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION 422 - Highway Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 1,795,092 422,762 455,526 445,368 471,435 - 1,795,275 183 100.0% 1,679,212 5110 Part-time Salaries 61,970 24,255 10,780 12,330 14,605 - 63,897 1,927 97.0% 63,897 5120 Overtime 313,662 57,464 56,116 53,376 146,705 - 320,812 7,150 97.8% 209,541 5130 Differential 136,890 77,527 37,452 13,861 8,049 - 140,508 3,618 97.4% 165,182 5140 Other Personnel Services 118,764 18,860 28,107 43,046 28,751 - 121,619 2,855 97.7% 121,067 5150 Total Personnel 2,426,377 600,869 587,982 567,980 669,546 - 2,442,111 15,734 99.4% 2,238,899 Energy 32,116 5,623 7,439 10,982 8,071 - 41,823 9,707 76.8% 46,012 5210 Repairs & Maintenance 684,317 61,529 276,959 40,459 305,371 9,164 695,370 1,889 99.7% 812,530 5240 Rentals & Leases 11,112 2,037 332 422 8,322 - 11,211 99 99.1% 36,000 5270 Professional & Tech Services 146,024 1,948 2,550 20,804 120,722 564 147,119 531 99.6% 48,500 5300 Communications 20,839 2,920 5,742 3,112 9,065 1,062 23,467 1,566 93.3% 28,570 5340 Other Purchased Services 76,737 7,428 22,668 2,347 44,294 2,826 79,563 - 100.0% 38,000 5380 Supplies 23,366 1,376 9,941 6,278 5,771 2,171 26,026 489 98.1% 5,000 5420 Technical Supplies 5,903 - 1,197 1,525 3,181 - 5,904 1 100.0% - 5440 Vehicular Supplies 149,990 30,417 28,452 42,279 48,843 798 152,197 1,409 99.1% 178,013 5480 Meals/Special Functions 6,837 - 524 2,085 4,228 1,275 8,360 248 97.0% - 5490 Public Works Supplies 474,994 86,467 70,932 77,248 240,347 16,396 492,559 1,169 99.8% 367,000 5530 Professional Development 22,479 6,596 4,898 6,313 4,672 777 23,736 480 98.0% 23,000 5710 Land/Building/Plant 19,829 - 2,437 118 19,064 - 20,310 481 97.6% - 5810 Additional Equipment 23,073 2,498 4,703 11,646 27,726 1,288 24,363 2 100.0% 24,000 5850 Total Operating 1,697,617 208,839 438,772 225,619 849,678 36,320 1,752,008 18,070 99.0% 1,606,625 Total 422 - Highway 4,123,994 809,708 1,026,754 793,599 1,519,224 36,320 4,194,119 33,804 99.2% 3,845,524 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION 423 - Snow & Ice Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Overtime 897,773 21,193 156,607 711,382 8,592 - 897,778 5 100.0% 473,838 5130 Other Personnel Services 8,094 - 1,482 6,612 - - 8,100 6 99.9% 10,500 5150 Total Personnel 905,867 21,193 158,089 717,994 8,592 - 905,878 11 100.0% 484,338 Repairs & Maintenance 92,107 - 15,656 40,666 35,785 873 92,985 5 100.0% 88,700 5240 Professional & Tech Services 805,227 - 57,018 632,273 115,937 10,440 821,809 6,142 99.3% 304,074 5300 Communications 2,814 - 2,182 633 - - 2,825 11 99.6% 500 5340 Other Purchased Services 9,975 - - 4,688 5,287 25 10,000 - 100.0% - 5380 Supplies 67,469 - 8,502 49,050 9,917 2,878 71,740 1,394 98.1% 10,000 5420 Vehicular Supplies 297,707 21,960 77,013 107,483 91,251 5,781 303,490 2 100.0% 75,000 5480 Meals/Special Functions 16,476 - 125 11,876 4,475 2,025 18,925 424 97.8% - 5490 Public Works Supplies 618,868 - 222,945 395,923 - - 622,941 4,073 99.3% 657,076 5530 Additional Equipment 26,095 - - 26,095 - - 26,095 - 100.0% 35,000 5850 Total Operating 1,936,738 21,960 383,441 1,268,686 262,650 22,022 1,970,810 12,050 99.4% 1,170,350 Total 423 - Snow & Ice 2,842,605 43,153 541,530 1,986,680 271,242 22,022 2,876,688 12,061 99.6% 1,654,688 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION 429 - Fleet, Facilities & Communications Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 514,740 121,634 121,306 131,893 139,906 - 514,775 35 100.0% 501,731 5110 Part-time Salaries 7,675 4,655 (1,068) 1,963 2,124 - 7,675 - 100.0% - 5120 Overtime 27,250 4,499 7,912 3,860 10,980 - 27,252 2 100.0% 30,710 5130 Differential 36,690 21,557 7,743 1,975 5,414 - 36,728 38 99.9% 35,258 5140 Other Personnel Services 24,792 3,352 5,391 8,849 7,200 - 24,792 - 100.0% 29,198 5150 Total Personnel 611,146 155,697 141,284 148,541 165,625 - 611,222 76 100.0% 596,897 Energy 44,383 10,124 8,711 16,980 8,568 - 44,986 603 98.7% 75,467 5210 Repairs & Maintenance 176,538 22,489 42,429 39,940 71,866 9,781 189,046 2,727 98.6% 140,527 5240 Rentals & Leases 2,922 738 502 951 730 78 3,000 - 100.0% 1,560 5270 Professional & Tech Services 3,737 - 578 3,159 - 69 4,072 266 93.5% 3,500 5300 Communications 7,269 828 1,283 1,246 3,912 246 8,177 662 91.9% 7,300 5340 Supplies 41,650 12,042 8,770 14,870 5,968 323 42,786 813 98.1% 24,837 5420 Technical Supplies 1,187 - 188 999 - - 1,188 1 99.9% - 5440 Vehicular Supplies 279,030 76,903 69,702 65,080 67,344 1,634 283,881 3,217 98.9% 330,281 5480 Public Works Supplies 8,822 1,981 3,365 2,094 1,383 400 9,269 47 99.5% 3,900 5530 Professional Development 5,539 2,384 1,264 599 1,292 120 5,842 183 96.9% 4,375 5710 Compliance/Licensing Fees 100 100 - - - - 125 25 80.0% 125 5750 Additional Equipment 9,410 9,410 - - - - 9,500 90 99.1% 10,000 5850 Total Operating 580,586 136,997 136,792 145,918 161,064 12,652 601,872 8,634 98.6% 601,872 Total 429 - Fleet, Facilities & Communications 1,191,732 292,694 278,076 294,458 326,688 12,652 1,213,094 8,710 99.3% 1,198,769 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION 433 - Sanitation Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 1,132,497 256,846 293,345 279,182 303,125 - 1,132,497 - 100.0% 1,098,745 5110 Part-time Salaries 26,588 15,268 6,553 2,320 2,447 - 26,588 - 100.0% 30,048 5120 Overtime 228,968 56,415 60,328 41,414 70,811 - 229,344 376 99.8% 211,356 5130 Differential 70,038 32,037 22,427 8,821 6,752 - 70,039 1 100.0% 57,152 5140 Other Personnel Services 75,352 11,949 17,613 25,608 20,182 - 75,352 - 100.0% 53,670 5150 Total Personnel 1,533,442 372,515 400,266 357,345 403,317 - 1,533,820 378 100.0% 1,450,971 Energy 42,285 3,323 8,169 20,461 10,332 - 45,482 3,197 93.0% 64,367 5210 Repairs & Maintenance 44,923 4,042 12,446 13,714 23,540 1,696 47,140 520 98.9% 20,456 5240 Rentals & Leases 41,052 808 19,948 16,908 3,388 - 41,796 744 98.2% 40,000 5270 Refuse Removal 1,542,524 282,650 346,775 395,841 517,826 10,162 1,571,831 19,145 98.8% 1,666,000 5290 Professional & Tech Services 2,840 - 1,672 80 1,088 5,312 8,160 8 99.9% 26,000 5300 Communications 12,958 1,298 2,358 3,135 6,167 1,546 14,893 389 97.4% 23,000 5340 Other Purchased Services 4,050 110 1,669 110 2,161 - 4,050 - 100.0% 4,350 5380 Supplies 16,053 3,209 3,485 3,892 5,467 376 16,825 396 97.6% 16,000 5420 Technical Supplies 886 - - 722 164 - 886 - 100.0% 3,500 5440 Vehicular Supplies 179,331 38,555 42,132 42,305 56,338 3,524 183,001 146 99.9% 197,481 5480 Meals/Special Functions 502 - 59 - 442 1,275 2,775 998 64.0% - 5490 Public Works Supplies 30,678 3,616 4,409 1,810 20,842 416 31,111 16 99.9% 20,000 5530 Professional Development 14,393 1,944 6,802 1,592 4,055 - 14,457 64 99.6% 7,500 5710 Additional Equipment 50,902 - - 5,444 45,458 55,202 106,247 143 99.9% - 5850 Total Operating 1,983,376 346,122 451,715 506,014 697,269 79,510 2,088,654 25,768 98.8% 2,088,654 Total 433 - Sanitation 3,516,819 718,637 851,981 863,359 1,100,586 79,510 3,622,474 26,146 99.3% 3,539,625 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised PARKS & RECREATION DIVISION 491 - Cemeteries Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Repairs & Maintenance 26,336 - 4,905 - 21,431 - 37,740 11,404 69.8% 41,280 5240 Supplies 3,540 - - - 3,540 - 3,540 - 100.0% - 5420 Total Operating 29,876 - 4,905 - 24,971 - 41,280 11,404 72.4% 41,280 Total 491 - Cemeteries 29,876 - 4,905 - 24,971 - 41,280 11,404 72.4% 41,280 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised PARKS & RECREATION DIVISION 541 - Council on Aging Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 368,577 80,039 98,890 88,135 101,512 - 369,622 1,045 99.7% 357,447 5110 Part-time Salaries 56,451 8,879 9,224 15,782 22,567 - 57,693 1,242 97.8% 98,493 5120 Differential - - - - - - - - - % - 5140 Total Personnel 425,028 88,918 108,114 103,917 124,079 - 427,315 2,287 99.5% 455,940 Repairs & Maintenance 2,998 990 - - 2,008 - 3,490 492 85.9% 2,076 5240 Professional & Tech Services 425 45 180 200 - - 957 532 44.4% 1,690 5300 Communications 2,225 266 500 578 881 - 2,923 698 76.1% 6,423 5340 Other Purchased Services 1,822 175 345 596 707 - 2,200 378 82.8% 2,200 5380 Supplies 4,885 1,058 1,045 736 2,045 - 5,950 1,065 82.1% 5,950 5420 Technical Supplies 1,388 170 - 463 755 - 1,400 12 99.1% 1,400 5440 Meals/Special Functions 2,351 - 788 - 1,563 - 2,600 249 90.4% 2,600 5490 Professional Development 2,156 178 505 329 1,145 - 2,559 403 84.2% 3,240 5710 Additional Equipment - - - - - - - - - % - 5850 Total Operating 18,250 2,881 3,363 2,901 9,105 - 22,079 3,829 82.7% 25,579 Total 541 - Council on Aging 443,278 91,800 111,476 106,818 133,184 - 449,394 6,116 98.6% 481,519 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised PARKS & RECREATION DIVISION 650 - Parks & Recreation Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 1,507,448 346,149 370,011 384,128 407,160 - 1,507,455 7 100.0% 1,448,283 5110 Part-time Salaries 423,355 204,711 73,780 21,162 123,702 - 423,403 48 100.0% 432,899 5120 Overtime 135,134 42,507 15,859 8,405 68,363 - 135,151 17 100.0% 135,000 5130 Differential 40,059 5,981 23,364 2,457 8,257 - 40,066 7 100.0% 44,138 5140 Other Personnel Services 59,603 11,125 11,070 15,902 21,506 - 59,608 5 100.0% 54,653 5150 Total Personnel 2,165,600 610,472 494,084 432,055 628,989 - 2,165,683 83 100.0% 2,114,973 Energy 75,984 20,685 18,191 16,727 20,381 - 76,152 168 99.8% 77,041 5210 Repairs & Maintenance 222,435 19,402 58,318 13,734 130,981 - 224,914 2,479 98.9% 223,587 5240 Rentals & Leases 7,959 2,320 2,038 1,220 2,380 - 8,210 251 96.9% 10,210 5270 Professional & Tech Services 66,654 7,628 12,361 2,948 43,716 - 66,654 - 100.0% 95,493 5300 Communications 10,200 2,288 2,572 2,584 2,755 - 10,453 253 97.6% 10,103 5340 Other Purchased Services 2,384 1,100 - - 1,284 - 2,385 1 100.0% 4,127 5380 Supplies 166,798 24,805 15,404 10,236 116,354 - 168,469 1,671 99.0% 165,500 5420 Technical Supplies 2,388 178 1,513 357 341 - 2,410 22 99.1% 2,300 5440 Vehicular Supplies 78,195 25,793 13,866 17,808 20,728 - 78,381 186 99.8% 93,204 5480 Meals/Special Functions 22 - 22 - - - 30 8 73.3% 500 5490 Professional Development 7,073 1,668 2,029 2,907 469 - 7,356 283 96.2% 8,840 5710 Additional Equipment 33,712 1,500 27,548 - 4,664 - 33,724 12 100.0% 26,025 5850 Total Operating 673,803 107,367 153,863 68,522 344,052 - 679,138 5,335 99.2% 716,930 Total 650 - Parks & Recreation 2,839,403 717,839 647,947 500,577 973,041 - 2,844,821 5,418 99.8% 2,831,903 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised PARKS & RECREATION DIVISION 680 - Arena Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 235,982 53,169 59,899 59,105 63,809 - 235,990 8 100.0% 220,461 5110 Part-time Salaries 48,920 4,174 19,866 21,978 2,903 - 48,921 1 100.0% 53,567 5120 Overtime 3,836 1,311 1,154 1,093 278 - 3,836 - 100.0% 4,716 5130 Differential 14,434 - 5,048 357 9,029 - 14,452 18 99.9% 11,190 5140 Other Personnel Services 11,806 1,469 2,474 3,615 4,248 - 11,816 10 99.9% 11,746 5150 Total Personnel 314,978 60,123 88,440 86,148 80,267 - 315,015 37 100.0% 301,680 Energy 112,896 9,421 21,362 51,782 30,331 - 119,453 6,557 94.5% 138,479 5210 Repairs & Maintenance 32,529 5,250 5,544 5,370 16,366 - 32,780 251 99.2% 28,080 5240 Rentals & Leases 2,969 - - - 2,969 - 2,970 1 100.0% 2,400 5270 Professional & Tech Services 4,944 3,206 1,538 199 - - 5,080 136 97.3% 5,380 5300 Communications 3,192 1,313 539 528 812 - 3,450 258 92.5% 2,290 5340 Other Purchased Services - - - - - - - - - % 500 5380 Supplies 58,232 16,301 5,309 8,069 28,552 - 67,072 8,840 86.8% 32,630 5420 Technical Supplies 536 341 - - 195 - 550 14 97.5% 500 5440 Vehicular Supplies 3,516 148 760 558 2,050 - 3,776 260 93.1% 3,976 5480 Professional Development 150 150 - - - - 150 - 100.0% 650 5710 Additional Equipment 23,315 450 593 4,376 17,896 - 23,900 585 97.6% 18,900 5850 Total Operating 242,278 36,580 35,646 70,882 99,170 - 259,181 16,903 93.5% 233,785 Total 680 - Arena 557,257 96,703 124,086 157,030 179,438 - 574,196 16,939 97.0% 535,465 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised INSPECTIONAL SERVICES DIVISION 241 - Building Inspection Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 883,678 200,405 225,736 215,702 241,835 - 925,826 42,149 95.4% 970,111 5110 Part-time Salaries 44,826 11,948 18,332 7,728 6,818 - 44,869 43 99.9% 35,259 5120 Overtime 2,739 204 29 983 1,524 - 2,945 206 93.0% 15,000 5130 Differential - - - - - - 650 650 - % 1,500 5140 Other Personnel Services 2,285 116 650 468 1,051 - 4,180 1,895 54.7% 3,580 5150 Total Personnel 933,527 212,673 244,746 224,880 251,227 - 978,470 44,943 95.4% 1,025,450 Repairs & Maintenance 9,839 163 217 407 9,052 - 16,650 6,811 59.1% 8,750 5240 Professional & Tech Services 27,032 5,766 5,583 6,722 8,962 - 32,025 4,993 84.4% 17,000 5300 Communications 6,653 1,794 1,808 1,750 1,301 - 12,000 5,347 55.4% 8,500 5340 Supplies 5,227 871 808 1,591 1,958 - 6,000 773 87.1% 6,000 5420 Technical Supplies 2,505 - - 389 2,117 - 4,010 1,505 62.5% 3,500 5440 Vehicular Supplies 6,584 1,838 1,642 1,498 1,605 - 7,000 416 94.1% 11,000 5480 Meals/Special Functions 30 - 30 - - - 30 - 99.9% - 5490 Professional Development 4,879 1,084 996 2,413 386 - 10,690 5,811 45.6% 8,700 5710 Additional Equipment 29,844 - - - 29,844 - 30,000 156 99.5% - 5850 Total Operating 92,593 11,516 11,083 14,769 55,225 - 118,405 25,812 78.2% 63,450 Total 241 - Building Inspection 1,026,120 224,189 255,829 239,649 306,453 - 1,096,875 70,755 93.5% 1,088,900 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised INSPECTIONAL SERVICES DIVISION 244 - Weights & Measures Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 55,648 17,329 19,012 19,307 - - 68,148 12,500 81.7% 74,614 5110 Part-time Salaries 35,630 7,633 7,731 8,252 12,015 - 39,631 4,001 89.9% 35,365 5120 Differential - - - - - - - - - % 200 5140 Other Personnel Services - - - - - - - - - % 600 5150 Total Personnel 91,278 24,962 26,743 27,559 12,015 - 107,779 16,501 84.7% 110,779 Repairs & Maintenance 1,333 - - - 1,333 - 1,334 1 100.0% 2,800 5240 Professional & Tech Services - - - - - - - - - % 2,100 5300 Communications 277 67 55 121 34 - 321 44 86.4% 500 5340 Supplies 1,282 461 47 333 442 - 1,300 18 98.6% 1,200 5420 Technical Supplies 89 89 - - - - 100 11 88.7% - 5440 Vehicular Supplies 9 9 - - - - 35 26 27.1% 1,800 5480 Professional Development 660 500 60 - 100 - 710 50 93.0% 4,000 5710 Total Operating 3,651 1,126 162 454 1,909 - 3,800 149 96.1% 12,400 Total 244 - Weights & Measures 94,929 26,088 26,904 28,013 13,924 - 111,579 16,650 85.1% 123,179 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT 511 - Health Department Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 723,999 175,049 206,185 144,446 198,318 - 725,065 1,066 99.9% 847,992 5110 Part-time Salaries - - - - - - 40,497 40,497 - % 43,680 5120 Overtime 279 - - - 279 - 8,800 8,521 3.2% 8,800 5130 Differential 200 - 200 - - - 400 200 50.0% 400 5140 Other Personnel Services - - - - - - 1,500 1,500 - % 1,500 5150 Total Personnel 724,478 175,049 206,385 144,446 198,597 - 776,262 51,784 93.3% 902,372 Repairs & Maintenance 450 - 450 - - - 500 50 90.0% 1,000 5240 Rentals & Leases - - - - - - - - - % 400 5270 Professional & Tech Services 168,012 23,792 57,103 54,660 32,457 1,950 169,965 3 100.0% 185,390 5300 Communications 10,222 1,686 3,002 2,189 3,346 2,366 14,003 1,415 89.9% 17,960 5340 Other Purchased Services - - - - - - 425 425 - % 800 5380 Supplies 5,807 137 734 565 4,371 1,131 7,650 712 90.7% 8,500 5420 Technical Supplies 5,232 1,698 - 28 3,506 22 6,500 1,246 80.8% 3,200 5440 Vehicular Supplies 695 94 102 81 418 485 2,500 1,320 47.2% 2,500 5480 Meals/Special Functions 572 11 - 488 74 - 573 1 99.9% 200 5490 Professional Development 14,938 3,776 5,448 1,012 4,702 11 19,550 4,601 76.5% 15,000 5710 Land/Building/Plant 6,196 - - - 6,196 - 6,550 354 94.6% - 5810 Additional Equipment 6,721 - - - 6,721 - 6,734 14 99.8% - 5850 Total Operating 218,845 31,194 66,839 59,022 61,791 5,964 234,950 10,140 95.7% 234,950 Total 511 - Health Department 943,323 206,243 273,224 203,468 260,388 5,964 1,011,212 61,924 93.9% 1,137,322 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised ELECTED BOARDS 610 - Library Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 2,194,146 478,066 568,391 571,286 576,402 - 2,194,146 - 100.0% 2,110,309 5110 Part-time Salaries 344,710 76,329 94,364 84,425 89,592 - 344,711 1 100.0% 282,660 5120 Overtime 17,167 5,763 4,198 4,378 2,828 - 17,168 1 100.0% 6,500 5130 Differential 56,759 12,179 13,094 15,464 16,022 - 56,760 1 100.0% 140,814 5140 Other Personnel Services 500 - - - 500 - 500 - 100.0% 500 5150 Total Personnel 2,613,282 572,337 680,047 675,554 685,344 - 2,613,285 3 100.0% 2,540,783 Energy 155,758 36,343 36,168 34,239 49,008 48,162 204,947 1,027 99.5% 204,947 5210 Repairs & Maintenance 101,700 77,164 11,012 5,892 9,098 654 104,126 1,772 98.3% 111,124 5240 Professional & Tech Services 2,271 57 - 30 2,226 400 1,565 (1,106) 170.7% 7,000 5300 Communications 15,005 2,183 3,729 4,723 4,371 970 17,541 1,566 91.1% 15,420 5340 Supplies 268,674 59,671 121,713 40,828 47,578 7,097 273,226 (2,545) 100.9% 273,493 5420 Technical Supplies 2,505 63 1,428 283 731 146 3,000 349 88.4% 3,000 5440 Vehicular Supplies 1,542 704 397 215 227 - 2,408 866 64.1% 1,800 5480 Professional Development 7,816 - 289 279 7,248 18 12,394 4,560 63.2% 2,675 5710 Land/Building/Plant 251 - - - 251 - 252 1 99.8% - 5810 Additional Equipment 18,532 1,286 16,666 580 2,037 - 18,568 36 99.8% 18,568 5850 Total Operating 574,055 177,470 191,402 87,068 122,775 57,447 638,027 6,524 99.0% 638,027 Total 610 - Library 3,187,337 749,808 871,450 762,622 808,119 57,447 3,251,312 6,527 99.8% 3,178,810 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised WATER & SEWER DIVISION 450 - Water Department Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 1,949,732 431,499 469,954 485,799 562,480 - 1,953,746 4,014 99.8% 2,023,746 5110 Part-time Salaries 73,270 26,077 17,403 13,386 16,404 - 73,271 1 100.0% 61,393 5120 Overtime 431,979 102,917 98,078 136,311 94,673 - 470,405 38,426 91.8% 412,283 5130 Differential 120,850 65,651 38,360 3,525 13,314 - 132,751 11,901 91.0% 138,886 5140 Other Personnel Services 130,005 20,098 31,136 44,930 33,841 - 134,065 4,060 97.0% 127,930 5150 Contributory and Non-Contributory Retirement 293,038 75,365 71,294 72,540 73,840 - 471,133 178,095 62.2% 471,133 5170 Total Personnel 2,998,873 721,606 726,224 756,491 794,552 - 3,235,371 236,498 92.7% 3,235,371 Energy 318,221 63,848 83,640 60,390 110,343 - 337,853 19,632 94.2% 428,784 5210 Other (Town/School Water Charges) 97,275 - 54,178 - 43,097 - 125,000 27,725 77.8% 125,000 5230 Repairs & Maintenance 164,357 28,825 58,483 40,459 37,118 17,275 190,689 9,057 95.3% 261,612 5240 Rentals & Leases 11,126 5,108 2,804 9,074 3,912 96 19,107 7,885 58.7% 29,445 5270 Refuse Removal 57,436 5,775 27,272 19,621 4,768 2,207 70,228 10,585 84.9% 50,000 5290 Professional & Tech Services 359,476 31,074 53,955 146,315 131,565 58,881 318,160 (100,196) 131.5% 312,000 5300 Communications 33,305 5,401 10,462 5,476 11,966 3,968 42,101 4,828 88.5% 44,750 5340 Other Purchased Services 72,665 16,213 11,581 26,872 18,000 - 73,797 1,132 98.5% 72,100 5380 Supplies 40,986 4,918 17,145 12,202 6,721 2,339 44,221 896 98.0% 20,000 5420 Technical Supplies 114,176 13,728 25,409 35,585 39,454 3,292 122,962 5,494 95.5% 94,000 5440 Vehicular Supplies 118,192 24,002 26,466 35,960 31,764 451 125,200 6,557 94.8% 158,360 5480 Meals/Special Functions 1,880 320 316 80 1,165 712 5,354 2,761 48.4% 400 5490 Public Works Supplies 296,493 73,549 61,277 69,991 91,676 24,102 325,085 4,490 98.6% 276,200 5530 MWRA Assessment 8,023,013 2,400,913 1,620,578 2,400,913 1,600,609 - 8,056,710 33,697 99.6% 8,056,710 5690 Professional Development 34,973 13,559 8,336 5,911 7,166 247 36,299 1,079 97.0% 23,875 5710 Refunds/Reimbursements 900 - - 900 - - 900 - 100.0% - 5780 Land/Building/Plant 186,052 9,841 32,712 103,836 65,530 4,489 216,547 26,006 88.0% 250,000 5810 Additional Equipment 106,786 3,397 12,911 19,033 71,444 8,794 118,273 2,694 97.7% 25,250 5850 Interest On Temporary Borrowin 6,774,030 41,029 4,439,605 285,379 2,008,018 - 6,669,304 (104,726) 101.6% 6,669,304 5910 Transfer To General Fund 1,658,315 414,579 414,579 414,579 414,579 - 1,658,316 1 100.0% 1,658,316 5960 Total Operating 18,469,657 3,156,079 6,961,708 3,692,577 4,698,895 126,852 18,556,106 (40,403) 100.2% 18,556,106 Total 450 - Water Department 21,468,531 3,877,685 7,687,932 4,449,068 5,493,447 126,852 21,791,477 196,094 99.1% 21,791,477 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 Revised WATER & SEWER DIVISION 440 - Sewer Department Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Salaries 1,831,384 401,425 452,230 473,290 504,438 - 1,834,567 3,183 99.8% 1,903,067 5110 Part-time Salaries 50,008 18,470 8,871 8,242 14,425 - 51,377 1,369 97.3% 51,377 5120 Overtime 293,755 76,643 72,332 72,350 72,430 - 307,399 13,644 95.6% 233,652 5130 Differential 119,137 60,449 37,827 3,750 17,111 - 126,508 7,371 94.2% 124,827 5140 Other Personnel Services 106,299 16,898 24,931 36,538 27,932 - 107,932 1,633 98.5% 114,860 5150 Contributory and Non-Contributory Retirement 219,204 57,503 55,704 51,244 54,753 - 366,244 147,040 59.9% 366,244 5170 Total Personnel 2,619,788 631,388 651,896 645,414 691,090 - 2,794,027 174,239 93.8% 2,794,027 Energy 307,864 48,380 61,223 67,816 130,446 - 324,574 16,710 94.9% 393,592 5210 Other (Town/School Water Charges) 83,815 - 38,901 - 44,914 - 83,816 1 100.0% 80,000 5230 Repairs & Maintenance 244,491 21,961 62,353 69,811 90,431 11,891 269,569 13,187 95.1% 252,685 5240 Rentals & Leases 33,327 10,807 22,379 4,995 4,917 996 42,509 8,186 80.7% 79,545 5270 Refuse Removal 38,522 8,189 8,217 18,814 3,302 - 56,083 17,561 68.7% 65,000 5290 Professional & Tech Services 377,521 59,248 100,546 95,833 148,139 82,456 346,313 (113,664) 132.8% 440,000 5300 Communications 40,489 7,361 12,810 7,603 12,716 4,541 57,501 12,471 78.3% 51,898 5340 Other Purchased Services 68,015 15,447 12,059 19,342 21,168 2,828 73,322 2,480 96.6% 64,272 5380 Supplies 37,422 3,936 15,362 11,023 7,100 2,305 42,422 2,695 93.6% 19,500 5420 Technical Supplies 53,872 23,719 7,798 6,778 15,576 - 55,277 1,405 97.5% 27,500 5440 Vehicular Supplies 106,389 22,691 28,405 29,223 26,071 2,650 147,830 38,791 73.8% 137,581 5480 Meals/Special Functions 1,880 320 316 80 1,165 712 4,000 1,407 64.8% 400 5490 Public Works Supplies 180,893 22,651 52,081 31,548 74,624 1,706 198,199 15,600 92.1% 196,750 5530 MWRA Assessment 13,063,056 3,918,917 2,612,611 3,918,917 2,612,611 - 13,125,770 62,714 99.5% 13,125,770 5690 Professional Development 29,053 7,281 3,802 12,349 5,622 222 33,342 4,067 87.8% 29,000 5710 Settlements - - - - - - 7,000 7,000 - % 25,000 5761 Land/Building/Plant 44,850 15,516 24,327 5,462 17,700 1,084 47,092 1,158 97.5% 50,000 5810 Additional Equipment 108,905 651 49,923 24,246 62,186 20,923 144,124 14,295 90.1% 20,250 5850 Interest On Temporary Borrowin 9,877,673 2,973,652 4,502,421 926,061 1,475,539 - 9,612,373 (265,300) 102.8% 9,612,373 5910 Transfer To General Fund 1,536,455 384,114 384,114 384,114 384,114 - 1,536,454 (1) 100.0% 1,536,454 5960 Total Operating 26,234,494 7,544,841 7,999,645 5,634,012 5,138,341 132,314 26,207,570 (159,237) 100.6% 26,207,570 Total 440 - Sewer Department 28,854,282 8,176,229 8,651,542 6,279,426 5,829,431 132,314 29,001,597 15,002 99.9% 29,001,597 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 RevisedUNCLASSIFIED Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Property/Liability Insurance 1,701,593 1,664,407 35,200 1,352 634 - 1,725,320 23,727 98.6% 1,823,320 Self Insurance 172,206 73,069 46,533 23,787 28,817 - 172,207 1 100.0% 40,000 Retired Police and Fire Medical 54,544 1,979 18,599 7,172 26,795 67,187 121,735 3 100.0% - Worker's Compensation 454,245 160,300 85,145 71,985 136,815 220,755 675,000 - 100.0% 675,000 Unemployment Insurance 281,193 47,868 81,130 50,598 101,596 78,881 375,000 14,926 96.0% 400,000 Sick Leave Buyback 16,861 969 4,192 5,700 6,000 - 40,000 23,139 42.2% 40,000 Group Insurance 28,941,158 6,355,646 7,330,810 7,558,449 7,698,441 6,508 29,912,877 965,211 96.8% 31,255,642 Stabilization Fund 321,498 80,375 80,375 80,375 80,375 - 321,498 - 100.0% 321,498 Capital Stabilization Fund 5,010,015 1,252,504 1,252,504 1,252,504 1,252,504 - 5,010,015 - 100.0% 5,010,015 Contingency Fund/Salary Reserve - - - - - - - - - % 180,000 Reserve Fund - - - - - - 200,000 200,000 - % 400,000 Medicaid Part 1 Contract 155,356 - 12,627 10,804 131,926 - 155,375 19 100.0% 75,000 Total Miscellaneous 37,108,669 9,637,117 8,947,115 9,062,724 9,463,903 373,332 38,709,027 1,227,026 96.8% 40,220,475 Total UNCLASSIFIED 37,108,669 9,637,117 8,947,115 9,062,724 9,463,903 373,332 38,709,027 1,227,026 96.8% 40,220,475 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 RevisedRETIREMENT Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Retirement 14,584,129 14,584,129 - - - - 14,584,129 - 100.0% 14,584,129 Medicare/FICA 2,064,962 448,353 542,540 545,474 528,594 - 2,092,106 27,144 98.7% 2,017,106 OPEB 500,600 125,150 125,150 125,150 125,150 - 500,600 - 100.0% 500,600 Total Retirement/FICA/OPEB 17,149,691 15,157,632 667,690 670,624 653,744 - 17,176,835 27,144 99.8% 17,101,835 Total RETIREMENT 17,149,691 15,157,632 667,690 670,624 653,744 - 17,176,835 27,144 99.8% 17,101,835 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 RevisedDEBT Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Principal & Interest Bonds 13,661,612 171,533 8,260,268 2,286,020 2,943,792 - 13,632,232 (29,380) 100.2% 13,632,232 BAN Interest 148,859 436 85,329 49,271 13,822 98,608 336,661 89,194 73.5% 658,661 Interest on Abatements 56,400 2,791 8,149 65,047 (19,587) - 305,000 248,600 18.5% 305,000 Total Debt 13,866,871 174,760 8,353,745 2,400,338 2,938,027 98,608 14,273,893 308,414 97.8% 14,595,893 Total DEBT 13,866,871 174,760 8,353,745 2,400,338 2,938,027 98,608 14,273,893 308,414 97.8% 14,595,893 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 RevisedNON-APPROPRIATED ITEMS Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Cherry Sheet Charges 7,439,538 1,894,781 1,873,329 1,829,053 1,842,375 - 7,600,694 161,156 97.9% 7,190,210 Tax Recap Items - - - - - - 2,163,617 2,163,617 - % 2,900,000 Tax Title Costs 79,319 9,375 18,821 3,790 47,333 - 78,275 (1,044) 101.3% 78,275 Total Non-Appropriated 7,518,857 1,904,156 1,892,150 1,832,843 1,889,708 - 9,842,586 2,323,729 76.4% 10,168,485 Total NON-APPROPRIATED ITEMS 7,518,857 1,904,156 1,892,150 1,832,843 1,889,708 - 9,842,586 2,323,729 76.4% 10,168,485 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 RevisedKeefe Technical Description FY 2018 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 % Spent Reg.School Assessment (Keefe) 9,281,407 2,320,352 2,320,352 2,320,352 2,320,352 - 9,281,407 - 100.0% 9,281,407 Total Operating 9,281,407 2,320,352 2,320,352 2,320,352 2,320,352 - 9,281,407 - 100.0% 9,281,407 Total Keefe Technical 9,281,407 2,320,352 2,320,352 2,320,352 2,320,352 - 9,281,407 - 100.0% 9,281,407 CITY OF FRAMINGHAM FISCAL YEAR 2018 QUARTERLY CITY BUDGET 2:44:02PM 9/20/2018 Through Period 13 FY 2018 Balance FY 2018 Encumb FY 2018 Q4 Actual FY 2018 Q3 Actual FY 2018 Q2 Actual FY 2018 Q1 Actual FY 2018 ActualPERSONNEL & OPERATING TOTALS FY 2018 Revised FY 2018 Adopted FY 2018 % Spent Personnel 52,198,486 11,211,312 14,236,532 12,628,826 14,127,265 1,985 52,985,242 784,771 98.5% 52,549,882 Operating 70,061,080 16,267,356 20,878,791 15,748,819 17,374,526 680,170 71,561,335 820,086 98.9% 70,152,479 Non-Operating 75,644,088 26,873,664 19,860,700 13,966,530 14,945,383 471,940 80,002,341 3,886,313 95.1% 82,086,688 GRAND TOTAL 204,789,049 204,548,918 54,352,332 197,903,653 54,976,024 42,344,175 46,447,174 1,154,094 97.3% 5,491,170 One Framingham – Focused on the Future Honorable Yvonne M. Spicer, Mayor City of Framingham 150 Concord Street Framingham, MA 01702 (508) 532-5411