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HomeMy WebLinkAbout2007 Annual Report and Town Meeting JournalTOWN OF IFRAmINGHAM MASSACHUSETTS Annual Report Year Ending December 31, 2007 Framingham's Town Seal: In the year 1900, the Framingham Town Seal was redesigned for the Town's bicentennial to recognize our community's prominence in education and transportation. The Framingham State Normal School, a free public school and the first of its kind in America, is represented by the structure at the top of the design. Governor Danforth, the founder of Framingham and owner of much of its land, is acknowledged by the words "Danforth's Farms 1662" on the shield at the center. The wheel on the shield with spokes drawn as tracks radiating in six different directions represents the steam and electric railroads and signifies the Town's position as a transportation hub. Surrounding the words "Town of Framingham Incorporated 1700" is an illustrative border of straw braid, which honors the prominent role Framingham played in the manufacture of hats and bonnets in the 1800s. TABLE OF CONTENTS DEDICATION IV ORGANIZATIONAL CHART, 43 V ELECTED & APPOINTED OFFICIALS 44 VI GENERAL GOVERNMENT• 61 1 BOARD OF SELECTMEN 1 TOWNMANAGER ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- - - - - - TOWN CLERK 4 ELECTION RESULTS 6 71 TOWN COUNSEL 8 HUMAN RESOURCES 33 VETERANS' SERVICES 39 BUILDING SERVICES 41 MEDIA SERVICES 42 FINANCE 43 CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER 43 TOWN ACCOUNTANT 44 TREASURER/ COLLECTOR 61 BOARD OF ASSESSORS 66 PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 69 RETIREMENT SYSTEM 70 PUBLIC SAFETY & HEALTH 71 POLICE DEPARTMENT 71 ANIMAL CONTROL 85 FRAMINGHAM AUXILIARY POLICE --------------------------------------------------------------------- ---- FIRE DEPARTMENT 90 INSPECTIONAL SERVICES 104 DEPARTMENT OF BUILDING INSPECTIONS 104 DEPARTMENT OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 107 BOARD OF HEALTH --------------------------------------- - - - - -- -- - - - - -- -- - - - - -- -- - - - - -- -- - - - - -- -----------------109 LICENSING 118 PUBLIC WORKS 119 PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 119 ENGINEERING & TRANSPORTATION 119 HIGHWAY 125 SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT 128 WATER & SEWER 130 FLEET & FACILITIES 133 BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 135 PLANNING, COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ----------------------------------------------------------------- 140 COMMUNITY & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT 140 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL CORPORATION 152 START PARTNERSHIP 157 ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 164 CONSERVATION COMMISSION 165 PLANNING BOARD 170 METROWEST GROWTH MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 176 METROWEST AREA PLANNING COUNCIL ---- -- --- ---- -- --- ---- -- --- ---- -- --- ---- -- ---------- ---- -- - 178 METROWEST REGIONAL TRANSIT AUTHORITY 183 RECREATION AND CULTURAL AFFAIRS 186 PARKS AND RECREATION COMMISSION ---------------------------------------------------------------------- ---- -- - 186 PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT 187 RECREATION 187 PARK MAINTENANCE 188 COUNCIL ON AGING /CALLAHAN CENTER 189 LORING ARENA 192 CEMETERY COMMISSION 193 EDGELL GROVE CEMETERY 194 HUMAN SERVICES 241 195 HUMAN SERVICES POLICY & PROGRAM COORDINATOR 195 242 HUMAN RELATIONS COMMISSION 196 FRAMINGHAM CELEBRATION COMMITTEE FRAMINGHAM HOUSING AUTHORITY 198 ---- -- - 243 TECHNOLOGY 243 201 TECHNOLOGY SERVICES 201 247 TECHNOLOGY ADVISORY COMMITTEE .----------------------------------------------------------------------- ---- -- - 208 FRAMINGHAM HISTORICAL COMMISSION EDUCATION HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 210 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS 210 TOWN MEETING KEEFE TECHNICAL SCHOOL 232 - - - --- 361 LIBRARY 399 238 GENERAL COMMITTEES NOVEMBER 27, 2007 SPECIAL TOWN MEETING ------------------------------------------------------ 241 AGRICULTURAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE 241 CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 241 CAPITAL BUDGET COMMITTEE 242 CUSHING CHAPEL ADVISORY COMMITTEE 242 FRAMINGHAM CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 242 FRAMINGHAM CULTURAL COUNCIL .--------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---- -- - 243 FRAMINGHAM DISABILITY COMMISSION 243 FINANCE COMMITTEE 245 GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 247 GREENER FRAMINGHAM COMMITTEE ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---- -- - 248 FRAMINGHAM HISTORICAL COMMISSION 249 HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 249 REAL PROPERTY COMMITTEE 250 TOWN MEETING 251 MODERATOR'S REPORT ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 251 STANDING COMMITTEE REPORTS 253 STANDING COMMITTEE ON COMMUNITY SERVICES 253 STANDING COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION 253 STANDING COMMITTEE ON PLANNING AND ZONING 254 STANDING COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC SAFETY 254 STANDING COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC WORKS 255 STANDING COMMITTEE ON RULES ------------------------------------------------------------------ ---- -- 255 STANDING COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS 256 TOWN MEETING JOURNAL 259 TOWN MEETING ATTENDANCE 260 FEBRUARY 13, 2007 SPECIAL TOWN MEETING_______________________ _______________________________ 264 APRIL 24, 2007 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING_____________________________ _______________________________ 269 APRIL 26, 2007 SPECIAL TOWN MEETING_____________________________ _______________________________ 360 MAY 15, 2007 SPECIAL TOWN MEETING --------------------------------------------------------- - - - --- 361 SEPTEMBER 5, 2007 SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 399 OCTOBER 23, 2007 SPECIAL TOWN MEETING--------------------------------------------------------- 400 NOVEMBER 27, 2007 SPECIAL TOWN MEETING ------------------------------------------------------ 406 DEDICATION Paul Raffa October 8, 1946 — November 6, 2007 The Board of Selectncen dedicates Fvancinghanc's 2007 Annual Town Keport in ncencory of Veterans Services Agent Paul Kaffa, xho served his country, his fancily, and our Town pith honor IV Town of Framingham Organizational Chart ELECTED TOWN OFFICIALS As of 92139107 Town Clerk Valerie Mulvey 2008 Moderator Joel Winett 2008 Board of Selectmen Dennis L. Giombetti 2008 John H. Stasik 2008 Jason A. Smith 2009 A. Ginger Esty 2010 Charles J. Sisitsky 2010 School Committee David F. Miles 2008 Diane M. Throop 2008 Philip A. Dinsky 2008 Andrew Limeri 2009 Beverly K. Hugo 2009 Cesar A. Monzon 2010 Adam S. Blumer 2010 Library Trustees Kurt Samuelson 2008 Marjorie C. Sisitsky 2008 Jo -Anne Thompson 2008 Danielle G. Barney 2008 Janet L. Harrington 2009 Ann G. Arvedon 2009 Sheila Burke Fair 2009 Nancy Coville Wallace 2009 Ruth S. Winett 2010 Ann Dickson 2010 Elizabeth F. Fideler 2010 Robert M. Dodd 2010 Regional Vocational School Committee A. J. Mulvey 2008 Michael M. Rossi 2008 Nelson H. Goldin 2009 Argentina Arias 2009 Esther A.H. Hopkins 2009 John M. Kahn 2010 Larry Cooper 2010 Linda B. Fobes 2010 Planning Board Ann Victoria Welles 2008 R. Kathy Vassar (Associate Member) 2008 Appointed by Board of Selectmen 2011 Thomas F. Mahoney 2009 Carol J. Spack 2009 Susan P. Bernstein 2010 Andrea Carr -Evans 2010 Housing Authorit Phyllis A. May 2008 Edward F. Convery 2009 Robert L. Merusi 2011 Stephen P. Starr 2012 Edgell Grove Cemetery Trustees William F. Welch 2008 John J. Silva 2009 Vacant 2010 Stanton T. Fitts 2011 Barbara W. Ford 2012 State Legislators Senator Karen Spilka (D) Representative Tom Sannicandro (D) Representative Pam Richardson (D) VI SENIOR MANAGERIAL APPOINTMENTS As of 92139107 Town Manager Town Engineer Julian M. Suso 2009 William Sedewitz 2010 Chief of Police Director of Parks and Recreation Steven B. Carl 2010 Robert Merusi Indefinite Fire Chief Director of Public Health 011ie D. Gadson 2008 Lise Mespelli (Interim) Indefinite Town Counsel Director of Veterans Benefits and Services Christopher J. Petrini 2010 Paul Raffa*nasSea awa 11 /6/07 2009 Chief Financial Officer Conservation Administrator Mary Ellen Kelley 2008 Michele Grzenda 2009 Director of Technology Services Director of Elder Services /Callahan Kathleen McCarthy 2008 Senior Center Mary Parcher 2006 Town Accountant Richard G. Howarth, Jr. 2009 Director of Public Works Peter Sellers 2008 Treasurer - Collector Dennis E. O'Neil 2008 Director of Town Owned Buildings James W. Egan 2006 Chief Assessor Michael P. Flynn 2009 Human Services Policy & Program Coordinator Human Resources Director Alexis J. Silver Indefinite Sandra A. Charton 2010 Superintendent of Schools Chief Procurement Officer Eugene H. Thayer (Interim) Indefinite Timothy D. Goddard 2009 Keefe School Superintendent Building Commissioner Peter Dewar Indefinite Michael F. Foley 2010 Planning Board Administrator Director of Community & Economic Jay Grande 2008 Development Timothy D. Goddard (Interim) Indefinite Housing Authority Director Kevin Bumpus Indefinite Director of Inspectional Services Michael F. Foley 2010 Director of Libraries Mark J. Contois Indefinite VII OFFICIALS APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN As of 92139107 Cable Advisory Committee William Peter Barnes Vacant Annabel Z. Dodd Vacant Russell G. Ohanian 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 Vacant Vacant Vacant Vacant Vacant James Rizoli Sarah K. Donato Vacant Vacant Vacant Vacant Vacant Vacant Vacant Vacant Vacant Vacant 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 Cemetery Commission Robert Brown Barry Bograd Kevin Salvi Community Development Committee Anne Arvedon Beverly C. Good Robert Schecter Barbara J. Melendez Cynthia Laurora Jo -Anne Thompson Marlene Aron Edward J. Kross Laurie Lee Patricia Woodward Ellen Bellantoni Karolyne White Michael Devlin Roger Small Pablo Maia Conservation Commission Sampath K. Bade Kevin D. O'Neill Robert McArthur Judith Perry William G. Merriam Steven W. Orr Pam Helinek Cultural Council Amanda Fargiano Janice L. Kiley John B. Steacie Karen Sue Avery Vacant 2008 2009 2010 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2009 2009 2010 2010 2007 2008 2008 2008 2008 VIII Cushing Chapel Board of Trustees Vacant Stanton T. Fitts John Speranza Karolyne U. White Edward T. Levay, Jr. M. Elizabeth Gavin Nicholas Paganella Anne M. Mozdiez Elizabeth Sleczkowski Cynthia Laurom James W. Egan Disability Commission Elise A. Marcil Kathleen M. Hughes Thelma Berman Debra Freed Keith M. Marable, Sr. Dennis Polselli Karen Foran Dempsey Rose Quinn Kathleen T. McCarthy 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2010 2008 2008 2008 2009 2009 2009 2010 2010 2010 Economic Development & Industrial Vacant Indefinite Corporation John B. Steacie 2008 Kevin Looby 2008 Historic District Commission Andrew Rogers 2009 Charlene Frary (Alternate) 2005 M. Phaldie Taliep 2009 James R. Kubat (Alternate) 2007 Laurie Lee 2010 Helen Lemoine (Alternate) 2008 Edwin Stoll 2010 Henry Field2(*ltemate) 2008 Martin F. Mulvey 2010 Christopher Walsh 2008 Todd S. Robecki 2008 Director of Emergency Management Gerald Couto 2008 Steven Trask Indefinite Adam Sisitsky 2009 Susan Bernstein 2009 Asst. Director of Emergency Mgt. Julie A. Ferrarai 2010 John C. Magri Indefinite Ted Grenham 2010 Ronald M. Lamphere (Alternate) 2010 Fair Housing Committee Robert Anspach (Ex- officio, HR Comm.) 2008 Historical Commission Sam Swisher (Ex- officio, CED Dept.) 2008 Vacant 2008 Beth O'Grady (Ex- officio, Housing Authority) 2008 Perry L. Bent 2008 Vacant (Ex- officio, Planning Board) 2008 David T. Marks 2008 Ozzy Diagne 2008 Gerald Couto 2009 Vacant 2008 Elizabeth Funk 2009 Vacant 2008 Todd S. Robecki 2010 Vacant 2008 Frederic Wallace 2010 Roger Small 2009 Bricio Baez 2009 Human Relations Commission Rev. Faith Tolson- Pierce 2009 Robert Anspach 2008 Douglas Rich 2010 Timothy Lee 2008 Cynthia M. Higgins 2010 Laura Medrano- Carillo 2008 Lisa Rohmer 2010 Vacant 2008 Vacant 2008 Fence Viewer Vacant 2008 Vacant 2007 Vacant 2008 John Schaefer 2009 Board of Health Vacant 2009 Tammy C. Harris 2008 Vacant 2009 Nelson H. Goldin 2009 Arlene Bernstein 2010 Michael R. Hugo 2010 James Bauchman 2010 Mahmood M. Akhtar 2010 High School Building Committee Insect Pest Control Officer Philip A. Dinsky Indefinite George L. Drummey Indefinite Vacant 2007 Laurie Jean Carroll Indefinite Metro Area Planning Council Diane Montgomery Indefinite Susan Bernstein Indefinite A. Ginger Esty 2008 John Silva Indefinite 10 MetroWest Regional Transit Authority Tree Warden John Stasik 2008 Daniel S. Nan Park and Recreation Commission Zoning Board of Appeals Daniel F. Jones 2008 Christine Long (Associate Member) Mark J. Goldman 2008 Thomas Levenson (Associate Member) Joan Klan Rastani 2009 Karl B. Thober (Associate Member) Robert P. Healy 2009 David R. Norton (Associate Member) Robert L. Brown 2010 Susan S. Craighead Philip R. Ottaviani, Jr. Board of Public Works Stephen Meltzer Ralph Robert Funk 2008 Jim Wade Hansen 2009 Wolf Haberman 2010 Town Historian Frederic Wallace Indefinite 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2009 2010 OFFICIALS APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR As of 92139107 Capital Budget Committee Edward V. Cosgrove 2008 Jeanne Bullock 2008 Kevin P. Crotty 2009 Edward J. Kross 2009 William G. McCarthy 2010 Richard J. Weader, II 2010 Finance Committee Laurence W. Marsh 2008 John A. Zucchi 2008 C. Duncan Fuller 2008 Linda W. Dunbrack 2009 Nancy Wilson 2009 Katherine Murphy 2009 Anthony J. Agostino 2010 Elizabeth Funk 2010 Kurt T. Steinberg 2010 Government Studv Committee Wesley J. Ritchie 2008 Melanie L. Goddard 2008 Melvin S. Warshaw 2008 J. Christopher Walsh 2008 Wolf Haberman 2009 Christine Long 2009 Rebecca A. Connelly 2009 Michael Bower 2009 Laurence M. Scheidler 2010 Richard Lee 2010 Joel A. Feingold 2010 Andrew B. Eisman 2010 Personnel Board Creighton R. Nichols 2008 Burton R. Marmer 2009 James M. O'Loughlin 2009 Stanley L. Shindler 2010 Thomas W. Komola 2010 Real Property Committee Robert Bolles 2008 Betty Muto 2008 Shelley R. Strowman 2008 David Longden, Jr. 2008 Janet Leombruno 2009 Norman Snow 2009 Harold J. Geller 2009 Martin Ned Price 2010 Linda Romero 2010 Edward T. Levay, Jr. 2010 Technologv Advisory Committee Scott W. Wadland 2008 Andrew Limeri 2008 Robert A. Berman 2009 Kenneth M. Schwartz 2009 Adam C. Levensohn 2010 Teri S. Banerjee 2010 ff ISCELLANEOLJS APPOINTMENTS As of 92139107 Council on Aging Loring Arena Committee Howard Hill 2008 David Friday 2007 Thomas Pedulla 2008 Robert Brown 2008 Evelyn Langley 2008 Joseph Tersoni 2008 Patricia Paganella 2008 Richard Callahan 2008 Morton J. Shuman 2010 John Hart 2009 Martin I. Sack 2007 Jack Jagher 2009 Elizabeth Matterazzo 2007 Joan Rastani 2009 Ray Shorey 2007 Appointed by Town Manager Richard Bonvini 2007 Francis Leporati 2008 Registrar of Voters John Pugh 2009 Eng Cho 2008 Five appointed by the Board of Selectmen, six by Linda A. Fields 2009 the Council on Aging Bradford Freeman 2010 Above appointed by Board of Selectmen Greener Framingham Committee Valerie Mulvey 2008 Dawn Harkness 2010 Appointed by default as Town Clerk Thomas W. Murphy 2010 Mark Racicot 2010 Retirement Board Jennifer Bogle *Did °` accept appointment 2010 Mary Ellen Kelley 2008 Lisa A. Hartman 2010 Paul Barbieri 2008 Bob Valair 2010 Sydney Lebewohl 2009 Paul Spear 2010 Peter Rovinelli 2010 Mandy Couturier 2010 Richard Howarth, Jr. Indefinite Matt Torsi 2010 Two members appointed by Selectmen, two elected First three appointed by the Moderator, next by members, one appointed by Retirement Board three appointed by the Board of Selectmen, and final three appointed by the School Committee Town Assessors William Figler 2007 Housing Authority Arthur Holmes 2008 Mark R. Galante 2009 Michael Flynn 2009 Appointed by the MA Department of Housing Appointed by the Chief Financial Officer with & Community Development approval of the Town Manager M W Town of Framingham Board of Selectmen 150 Concord Street, Room 121 Framingham, NIA 01702 L to R. John Stasik, Charles Sisitsky (Clerk), Dennis Giombetti (Chair), Jason Smith (Vice Chair), and Ginger Esty The Board of Selectmen had a busy and productive 2007, meeting over 50 times and addressing a wide variety of critical issues facing the Town of Framingham in the process. The Board's goals in fiscal year (FY) 2007 were centered on five broad categories: community development, transportation, long -term capital infrastructure needs, social services and PILOT recommendations, and benchmarking. Community development and financial issues received significant attention from the Board in 2007. For example, numerous meetings with town staff and officials from the Genzyme Corporation resulted in a framework for addressing a sewer system capacity problem that would enable the biomanufacturing company to proceed with a planned several million dollar phased expansion of its Framingham campus. This and related expansions are expected to create several hundred new jobs. The Board also voted to enter into a Brownfields Agreement with a local developer for 350 Irving Street. This previously tax- delinquent property is expected to be transformed into a commercial, tax- paying use while being cleaned up to EPA standards. The Board also 2007 Annual Report 508 - 552 -5400 508 - 620 -5910 (fa-) selectmen @f raniinghaninia.gov approved the recommendation of the Cable Advisory Committee to grant a cable television franchise to Verizon, allowing Framingham subscribers the choice of three different providers. We also allocated Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds to assist with hiring of two new code enforcement officers who work night and weekend hours to enhance our enforcement capabilities. This fits with our overall vision to make Framingham a "wonderful place to live, play, work and to do business." The Board was one of the first municipalities to endorse Governor Deval Patrick's Municipal Partnership Act (MPA), a portion of which includes the local option meals tax and closing a corporate telecommunications loophole that could generate $4 million a year in non - property tax revenue for the Town, if passed by the Legislature. Governor Patrick held a press conference in the Memorial Building in May 2007 to address the benefits of the MPA. The Board met frequently with the School and Finance Committees to discuss the fiscal health of the town, including the need to comply with the Town Meeting resolution of limiting collective bargaining salary increases to percentage growth in local revenues. The Board also adopted new Water and Sewer rates, which will reward users who conserve water, and enacted an energy policy with a goal of accomplishing more with fewer natural resources and thus reducing operating expenses and negative environmental impacts. Finally, through the Board's efforts a tax -title auction was held which resulted in over $50,000 in revenue to the Town as well as returning 18 different parcels of land back to the tax- paying rolls. General Government Town of Framingham For transportation, several items that the Board had been involved in prior to 2007 either came to fruition or made significant strides. The MetroWest Regional Transit Authority officially took over transportation services for the region in 2007. Funds that normally would have been designated for the MBTA cover Framingham's share of the cost to operate the service. The Downtown Railroad Crossing Committee that was created by the Board has also been actively meeting and discussing existing conditions, the future of the downtown, and solutions to the traffic congestion issues posed by the 126/135 railroad crossing. Social services was another issue that the Board took action on in 2007. At the beginning of the year, Alexis Silver began duties as the Town's first Human Services Policy and Program Coordinator to serve as a liaison between the Town and the various social service agencies. After several months of work, the Board adopted a Payment In Lieu Of Taxes (PILOT) policy in hopes of collecting revenue from some of the tax - exempt agencies in Town. This policy is similar to ones found in other Massachusetts communities and we would like to thank Ms. Silver and Chief Assessor Michael Flynn for their work on this document. We hosted a forum on the PILOT program, as well as on the impact of social services and the siting of a social service program on William J. Heights. Finally, we presented a Lodging House Bylaw to Town Meeting that was 2007 Annual Report approved and enacted with minor modifications from the Attorney General's office. In 2007, the Board adopted or modified several other policies in addition to the ones previously mentioned. These policies included: Free Cash, Nevins Hall Rental, Street Opening Permit, & Affirmative Action. Although the U.S. Census will not be conducted until 2010, the Board took action in 2007 by designating Town Clerk Valerie Mulvey as the Town's liaison between Framingham and the Census Bureau. The Board is committed to ensuring the most accurate count of the Framingham citizenry so the Town can receive its fair share of state and federal resources. With a heavy heart the Board voted to accept the recommendation of resident Cheryl Tully Stoll that the Public Hearing Room be renamed the Representative Deborah D. Blumer Community Room in honor of the late representative and her tireless efforts on behalf of our community. The dedication ceremony was very well attended by a wide variety of people, ranging from state and local leaders to family and friends to Framingham citizens. This is the first room in the Memorial Building to be named in honor of a woman and it is a symbol of our appreciation of Rep. Blumer. Finally, the Board would like to offer a sincere thank you to the many dedicated individuals who work so diligently to make Framingham such a rich and wonderful community. From senior town officials to front line employees to elected and appoint board, committee, and commission members, the Town has a dedicated and highly professional group of people working on its behalf. We look forward to continued progress on the aforementioned issues and others in 2008. Respectfully Submitted, Dennis L. Giombetti, Chair General Government 2 Gov. Patrick with Board members and Town Manager Julian Suso at a May 2007 press conference in the Ablondi Room where he outlined the benefits of the Municipal Partnership Act Town of Framingham Town Manager Julian M. Suso 150 Concord Street, Room 121 Framingham, MA 01702 I am pleased to present this Town Manager's Report for Framingham for the year 2007. There have been transitions in several Town staff positions. I appointed Mike Foley to the position of Building Commissioner. Sandra Charton was appointed to the position of Human Resources Director. The position of Director of Planning and Economic Development became vacant later in the year. The decision was made to re -name that Division Community and Economic Development, more appropriately reflective of its fundamental mission. Assistant Town Manager Tim Goddard is serving as acting Director of that Division during the search process. Also, the position of Director of Public Health opened with the retirement of long -time Director Bob Cooper, having served the Town with distinction for over thirty years. Lise Mespelli is serving as acting Public Health Director during this transition. The FY07 budget year drew to a close at the end of June with the need to provide an additional infusion of $1.6 million in operating funds to the School Department. These funds, as approved by Town Meeting, came from turn backs from Town departments as well as from a reduction in existing, modest Town reserves. While this brought that budget year to a close in an orderly manner, it laid the seeds for challenging budget years FY08, FY09 and FY10 to come, as this represents $1.6 million forever unavailable for future operating budgets. We are appreciative of the support of Town Meeting for some capital funds earmarked in several areas in the FY08 budget. This includes initial funds to begin the process of critically- needed maintenance upgrades to 2007 Annual Report 508 - 552 -5400 508 - 620 -5910 (fa.) town .nianager@franiinghaninia.gov both Nevins Hall and the Memorial Building. In addition, some funds were set aside for the beginning of ADA handicapped- access improvements to portions of the Memorial Building. This is pursuant to a recently - completed comprehensive ADA Plan for public facilities in Framingham. Much lies ahead, but we are very pleased to be starting to address long - delayed maintenance work to these important public facilities. In the summer the Board of Selectmen adopted an entirely new rate schedule for water and sewer use. This was the result of considerable work by the Board of Public Works as well as the administrative staff of the Department of Public Works. The result is a set of utility rates that we feel represents a more equitable distribution across the community, while encouraging water conservation. An enhanced partnership with Framingham State College was initiated, in cooperation with new President, Dr. Tim Flanagan. This included cooperative discussions regarding the landscaped design of the approach areas to the College at SR9 and Edgell Road as well as related improvements. We look forward to further collaboration with the College as the campus master planning process is pursued. We initiated ongoing meetings with Tech Park businesses, particularly Genzyme and Bose, to work with them as economic development possibilities arose. Genzyme recently completed the construction of a state- of -the- art science and utilities building. Future high tech job creation is probable within the Tech Park campus. We are working closely with these businesses to match utility capacity with needed services. General Government 3 Town of Framingham The work with the consultant and the Downtown Rail Committee in pursuit of one or more railroad grade separation alternatives continues. Our staff efforts in furtherance of related downtown initiatives also continue. This includes completing a much - needed utility /infrastructure inventory of downtown areas. With funding made available through the Commonwealth, a downtown pedestrian study is underway, exploring critical linkages to transportation alternatives. This is intended to evolve into one or more transit - oriented- development project(s) downtown, with follow -up efforts to secure additional State funding support. During 2007, we worked with the Governor's Office, Senator Karen Spilka and Representatives Pam Richardson and Tom Sannicandro in support of the Governor's Municipal Partnership initiative. As Town 150 Concord Street, Room 105 Framingham, NIA 01702 The Framingham Town Clerk's office is the largest joint clerk /election operation in Massachusetts. We are also one of the busiest Clerk's offices in the state. The presence of a birthing hospital, numerous nursing homes and assisted living facilities and a population of over 66,000 residents contribute to the substantial work load. The Town Clerk Division is responsible for creating and preserving all vital Town records. Assistant Town Clerk Lisa Ferguson manages our daily operations and trains and supervises staff. Our two administrators Lauren DiGiandomenico and Chris Sullivan process vital records. They registered and issued 1927 birth certificates, 615 death certificates, 557 marriage licenses, 3612 dog licenses and 682 2007 Annual Report proposed, this would make additional funds available to local governments throughout the Commonwealth, easing the burden on property tax payers and helping to restore a healthier balance in State /local funding of critical municipal services. This initiative has yet to be translated into legislative form. I am grateful to the Board of Selectmen for their leadership and support during 2007. I commend the Division and Department heads comprising Framingham's excellent administrative team for their commitment and spirit of teamwork during the year just completed. I also thank Town Meeting for your spirit of discussion, engagement and budget support for the many Town services which we are privileged to deliver to fellow residents of Framingham. Respectfully Submitted, Julian M. Suso, Town Manager 508 - 552 -5521 508 - 628 -1558 (fax) townclerk@franiinghaninia.gov business certificates in 2007. Other administrative responsibilities include: collecting fines for the Board of Health, Conservation Commission, Building and Public Works departments and Animal Control; filing Zoning Board of Appeals, Planning Board and Historic Commission decisions; and conducting genealogy searches. Our 2007 revenues were $228,767. The Election Division is responsible for conducting the Annual Town Census and all elections. Town meeting original documents and votes are filed in our office. We prepare the Attorney General Bylaw submissions and post the bylaws when they are approved. General Government 4 Town of Framingham In 2007, Elections Coordinator Michelle Antonio Jenkins registered 1919 people, deleted 4820 voters and amended 5642. There was a 14% turnout at the Annual Town Election. The Board of Selectmen has named me as the Town liaison to the U.S. Census Bureau for the 2010 Federal Census. Lisa, Michelle and I have been trained to participate in the Local Update of Census Addresses (LUCA) Program and will be completing that work in the first quarter of 2008. The Annual Town Meeting met over seventeen nights in April and May. Six Special Town Meetings were held on February 13 and 15, April 26, May 15, May 22, September 5, October 23 and 24, and November 27. Many people have contributed to our success. Our town employees are professional, 2007 Annual Report knowledgeable and always willing to help. We are especially grateful to Jim Egan and the Building Services staff for facilitating elections. The Board of Selectmen, Town Officials and Town Meeting members provide consistent support to this office; it is a genuine pleasure to work with them and with all those who participate in our government. Our pollworkers continue to work fourteen hour days to ensure that the public is well served when they vote. Finally and most importantly I thank and commend my staff for their hard work, professionalism and friendly attitudes when dealing with the public. They exemplify the Town's commitment to excellent customer service. Respectfully Submitted, Valerie Mulvey, Town Clerk General Government 5 0 ti 0 m m Annual Town Election Official Results - March 27, 2007 O 0 w ac w 5 N 0 0 C CD 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Total Moderator Blanks 133 122 78 113 104 126 102 84 35 17 165 59 59 37 52 17 5 22 1330 Joel Winett 280 337 202 298 247 224 238 235 102 60 312 106 135 72 115 37 32 65 3097 Write -Ins 16 18 10 19 23 16 13 10 9 5 37 8 6 7 14 4 0 1 216 Selectmen Blanks 139 121 75 151 94 122 111 109 39 21 163 58 67 49 74 21 15 30 1459 A. Ginger Esty 263 286 180 243 236 228 230 221 82 49 383 109 131 80 123 37 23 57 2961 Charlie Sisitsky 281 320 185 295 245 222 231 222 105 58 303 117 128 52 91 30 20 50 2955 Christine A. Long 169 223 137 167 171 159 128 104 63 34 177 62 70 49 73 28 16 39 1869 Write -Ins 6 4 3 4 2 1 6 2 3 2 2 0 4 2 1 0 0 0 42 School Committee (Three Year Term) Blanks 193 201 100 199 163 193 147 151 61 39 257 81 98 54 100 28 15 43 2123 Cesar A. Monzon 236 260 164 231 212 182 202 177 77 48 300 90 107 65 91 30 22 43 2537 Adam S.Blumer 319 362 222 331 296 264 270 252 110 55 371 129 148 81 113 39 25 58 3445 Steven Hakar 107 124 93 93 77 93 83 75 44 21 98 45 44 31 56 19 12 32 1147 Write -Ins 3 7 1 6 0 0 4 3 0 1 2 1 3 1 2 0 0 0 34 School Committee (One Year Term) Blanks 155 111 89 150 104 142 118 99 46 26 186 69 61 34 56 15 7 26 1494 Beverly K. Hugo 271 363 195 271 268 221 232 226 100 55 325 103 136 81 123 42 30 62 3104 Write -Ins 3 3 6 9 2 3 3 4 0 1 3 1 3 1 2 1 0 0 45 Planning Board Blanks 342 368 220 374 314 311 305 238 100 54 401 164 151 90 143 39 19 62 3695 Susan P. Bernstein 254 281 151 238 202 204 204 212 93 55 307 89 119 68 104 39 28 54 2702 Andrea Carr -Evans 255 297 205 239 230 212 197 206 95 52 318 90 119 70 114 38 27 60 2824 Write -Ins 7 8 4 9 2 5 0 2 4 3 2 3 11 4 1 0 0 0 65 Library Trustee (Three Year Term) Blanks 972 1102 635 940 851 908 770 729 313 171 1167 407 449 252 416 132 81 200 10495 Robert M. Dodd 233 255 166 240 199 183 203 186 83 48 277 88 109 66 101 32 24 50 2543 Ruth S. Winett 236 274 170 254 209 175 212 187 87 56 271 89 106 66 101 32 20 49 2594 Ann Dickson 231 259 174 248 214 182 206 192 93 50 319 96 120 74 104 36 23 51 2672 Write -Ins 3 7 5 17 4 4 3 20 1 0 22 0 6 3 2 0 0 0 97 Danielle Green Barney 3 2 2 4 1 1 3 1 0 1 0 9 0 1 0 0 0 0 28 Elizabeth F. Fideler 38 9 8 17 18 11 15 1 7 2 0 3 10 2 0 0 0 2 143 Library Trustee (One Year Term) Blanks 392 449 265 388 336 339 325 299 133 78 479 157 175 108 162 52 35 78 4250 Write -Ins 12 18 15 30 17 16 17 28 0 1 6 15 14 8 19 6 2 9 233 Danielle Green Barney 18 9 6 10 21 10 11 2 6 3 17 1 11 0 0 0 0 1 126 Elizabeth F. Fideler 7 1 4 2 0 1 0 0 7 0 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 34 O 0 w ac w 5 N 0 0 C CD 0 is --A Annual Town Election Official Results - March 27, 2007 Blanks 1671 1641 951 171 131 1371 125 851 44 231 182 651 52 241 50 131 5 21 15541 Barbara W. Ford 1 2611 3111 1941 257 243 225 227 243 101 58 328 107 147 91 130 45 32 67 3067 Write-ins 1 11 21 11 2 0 41 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 221 Blank 190 1791 104 189 142 1611 142 105 54 26 197 76 Larry Cooper 32 54 18 8 24 17681 Stephen P. Starr 239 295 183 238 232 Linda B. Fobes 210 222 91 56 314 97 131 84 126 40 29 64 John M. Kahn Write-ins 0 3 3 3 0 2 1 2 1 0 3 Thomas M. Leddy 2 0 1 0 0 0 21 Total Voter Turnout 477 477 290 430 374 366 353 329 146 82 514 173 200 116 181 58 37 Blanks 1671 1641 951 171 131 1371 125 851 44 231 182 651 52 241 50 131 5 21 15541 Barbara W. Ford 1 2611 3111 1941 257 243 225 227 243 101 58 328 107 147 91 130 45 32 67 3067 Write-ins 1 11 21 11 2 0 41 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 221 Blank 190 1791 104 189 142 1611 142 105 54 26 197 76 67 32 54 18 8 24 17681 Stephen P. Starr 239 295 183 238 232 203 210 222 91 56 314 97 131 84 126 40 29 64 2854 Write-ins 0 3 3 3 0 2 1 2 1 0 3 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 21 Total Voter Turnout 477 477 290 430 374 366 353 329 146 82 514 173 200 116 181 58 37 88 4643 Total Registered Voters 2507 2551 2184 2553 2428 23791 2266 2173 1668 1590 2657 1494 1667 1277 1554 741 938 1175 33802, Percentage 19% 19% 13% 17% 15% 115% 16% 15% 9% 5% 19% 12% 12% 9% 12% 8% 4% 7% 14% A True Copy Attest: Valerie Mulvey, Town Cler Winners are indicated in bold italics O O Town of Framingham Town Counsel 10 Concord Street, Room 127 amingham, MA 01702 Introduction & Overview Petrini & Associates, P.C. ( "P &A ") is pleased to provide the 2007 Annual Report of the Office of the Town Counsel. P &A operates the Office of the Town Counsel in accordance with Article II, Section 5 of the General Bylaws. We represent the Town in various litigation in which the Town is involved, and appear on behalf of the Town before all courts and administrative agencies of the Commonwealth. In addition, we serve as a liaison and a resource to various special counsel and insurance counsel representing the Town in a variety of legal matters. We also attend meetings of all boards, committees and commissions of the Town that we are requested to attend. P &A also drafts legal documents for Town officials, boards and commissions upon requests, and reviews legal contracts, deeds and agreements to which the Town is a party. We provide advice and opinions to the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, and various division heads and department heads in accordance with the Town bylaws and the Policy for Access to Town Counsel. In my capacity as Town Counsel, I also report periodically to the Litigation Liaison Committee (presently consisting of two Selectmen, two Finance Committee appointees, one representative each from the Planning Board and the Zoning Board of Appeals, the Town Manager and myself). I attend the Annual Town Meeting and all special town meetings, and am available to provide opinions at such meetings upon request. I review all non - petition warrant articles prior to inclusion in the warrant, and also am available to review and comment upon written motions submitted to me in advance in conjunction with specific warrant articles. 2007 Annual Report 508 - 552 -5406 508 - 620 -5910 (fax) cpetrini @f raminghaninia.gov Over the past several years, the litigation in which the Town is named as a party has grown in volume, scope and complexity. We historically have found that a variety of the Town's features make it attractive to developers, social service agencies, and corporations and these proponents usually pursue their proposed projects full bore. If the proponents' development projects are not permitted by our land use boards, the proponents often expend substantial resources to challenge the denial of the permits in court. Litigation filed in recent years by Paulini Loam, Wayside Youth and Family Services, Great Brook Valley Health Center, Inc. and South Middlesex Opportunity Council, Inc., all discussed in further detail below, constitute recent examples of this. This office has continued to handle the increasingly complex and heavy volume of litigation in which the Town is involved with efficiency, focus and positive results. Included in Section II of this report is a comprehensive list describing the status of litigation or substantial matters that were active in 2007, as required by Article II, Section 5.8 of the General Bylaws. Included in Section III of this report is a Budgetary Overview section that analyzes the Town Counsel budget as compared to other municipalities, and which also summarizes the positive revenue streams that the efforts of this office has helped yield in 2007 and in prior years. Positive accomplishments which this office achieved or helped to achieve in 2007 include the following: Completion of a new 20 -year Intermunicipal Agreement (IMA) effective January 1, 2007 - December 31, 2026 with the Town of General Government 8 Town of Framingham Ashland, whereby Framingham will continue to transport Ashland's wastewater to the MWT. -A system (as it has since 1963), and receive in return approximately $600,000 per year on an annual basis In addition to the annual payments received by Framingham for wastewater transport, the Town will receive an additional $200,000 per year for the first five years, until one million dollars is paid, in settlement of litigation pending in Middlesex Superior Court that was filed seeking compensation for system impacts caused by Ashland's sewage flow through the Framingham system. (The first $200,000 payment for the settlement was received in FY 2007.) Between 1963 and 2003, the Town of Framingham received only $5500 per year for providing this service, but the successful prosecution of litigation filed with the Department of Telecommunications (DTE) by this office resulted in nearly a 130 -fold annual increase of the annual payment previously made by Ashland, and the new formula approved by the DTE has been incorporated into the New IMA. In FY 2007 the Town continued to receive the benefits of its settlements with Comcast and RCN, all as described in greater detail in Section III below. In FY 2007 the Town continued to reap the benefits of past litigation successes. For instance, as described in more detail in Section III below, the Town received $706,814.11 from Ashland in FY 2007 for sewage transport after the successful completion of the DTE sewer litigation in 2004. The Town also received payments for mitigation from Natick Mall developer 2007 Annual Report General Growth Properties in FY 2007 in the amount of $250,000 obtained by way of a settlement of litigation brought by the Town and the Planning Board in 2004 challenging the Natick Planning Board's issuance of a special permit in connection with the construction of improvements at the Natick Collection and the associated residential expansion. As set forth in last year's Annual Report, this settlement includes various cash payments to Framingham for designated mitigation purposes, such as open space preservation and the construction of the Cochituate Rail Trail, funding various signalization and traffic studies, and performing various in -kind work. The Natick Mall litigation settlement realized tangible benefits in FY 2007 and will realize continued benefits in future fiscal years. I was able to avoid substantial expense to the Town by persuading the Town's insurance provider, the Massachusetts Interlocal Insurance Association (MIIA), to substantially cover special counsel defense costs to the Town and various individually named public officials in civil rights litigation brought by the South Middlesex Opportunity Council, Inc. ( "SMOC ") and its subsidiary in federal district court. 2007 Report on Status of Framingham Cases In accordance with Art. IL Secs. 5.8 and 1.5 of the General Bylaws, set forth below is a list of the Framingham cases that were active in 2007. I have included the case name, type of case, and a brief description of the case with the 2007 activities summarized in the last column on the right. OFFICE OF TOWN COUNSEL CASES MATTER TYPE 2007 STATUS/DISPOSITION Amerada Hess v. Zoning Board of Zoning Gasoline station corporation appealed denial Appeals of special permits to add convenience store to gas station on Hollis Street. In 2005, applicant dismissed prior appeal and filed a lication for smaller convenience store. General Government 9 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report General Government 10 The ZBA denied the revised proposal and Hess appealed this denial. Trial was held in the Land Court on October 16, 2006. On March 23, 2007, the Land Court issued a decision affirming the ZBA's denial and dismissing Hess' complaint. This matter is now closed. Balboni v. Town of Framingham Handicap The claimant filed this claim with the Discrimination Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination alleging that the Town discriminated against him on the basis of an alleged handicap. The matter arose after the Town declined to hire the complainant for a laborer's position in the DPW after the complainant revealed he had a back condition. The claimant argued the Town violated G.L. 151B after failing to properly examine the claimant. The Town's position is that the complainant cannot perform the essential duties of the position. In 2006 the Town filed its Position Statement in response to the claimant's Charge of Discrimination. On January 18, 2008, the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination ( "MCAD ") issued a Probable Cause Finding in the case, and it will now proceed to a conciliation hearing on March 6, 2008. If the parties are unable to settle the matter at the conciliation hearing, the MCAD will order a full hearing to take place, likely in the spring or summer of 2008. Bicalho, et al. v. Framingham Zoning The plaintiffs, owners of a transmission repair Zoning Board of Appeals I and II shop on Howard Street, filed an application with the ZBA in the fall of 2005 to expand the terms of their 2001 Special Permit to authorize the conduct of general automotive activities in addition to transmission repair work. The ZBA denied the application and issued a finding that the original 2001 Special Permit had lapsed and been abandoned. The plaintiffs filed an appeal of the Board's denial of the special permit application. Subsequently, after the ZBA upheld the Building Commissioner's issuance of an order and citation commanding the plaintiffs to cease all activities at the property (including transmission repair), the plaintiffs filed a second land action appealing that decision. General Government 10 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report General Government 11 Soon after the second appeal the plaintiffs sought and obtained a preliminary injunction to enjoin the Town from prohibiting the plaintiffs from performing transmission repairs upon the property. In approximately January of 2007, the parties agreed to a settlement whereby the plaintiffs agreed to use the Property exclusively for transmission repair work, and the ZBA would cease to challenge the Plaintiffs' use of the Property for such purposes. The parties' settlement was effected through their filing of mutually unopposed motions for summary judgment, which the Land Court decided in accordance with the parties' request on May 14, 2007. This case is now closed. Blais Civil Service Appeal Civil Service In 2004 Officer Albert Blais appealed various internal suspensions to the state Civil Service Commission. The Commission held a full hearing in this matter on May 15, 2007 and June 25, 2007. On November 30, 2007, the Civil Service Commission upheld the Police Department's suspensions of Officer Al Blais for 10 days and 30 days, respectively. This matter is now closed. In a settlement reached in December of 2007, Mr. Blais subsequently resigned his patrolman's position with the Police Department. Calvao, Duarte and all others Fair Labor This action was filed in the United States similarly situated v. Town of Standards Act District Court on May 5, 2005, under the Fair Framingham Statutory Claim Standards Labor Act ( "FLSA "), by Framingham police officers against the Town of Framingham alleging that the Town failed to appropriately compute and pay overtime wages as required by FLSA. The plaintiffs specifically claim that that the Town failed to include in their hourly overtime rate regular amounts received by the plaintiffs for educational incentives, shift differentials, specialty assignment payments, and other regular elements of compensation received by plaintiffs as required by the FLSA. The plaintiffs' claim that the Town's conduct amounts to a willful violation of FLSA, which would allow for the award of liquidated damages, attorney fees and other costs. Depending on whether or not the Town's conduct is determined to be willful, the General Government 11 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report General Government 12 plaintiffs may be able to recover FLSA wage differentials from two (regular violations) to three years (willful violations) prior to the April, 2005 filing of the complaint. A mediation held before retired federal magistrate Charles Swartwood in March of 2007 was unsuccessful. On June 29, 2007, the Court issued a Scheduling Order whereby the parties would first attempt to adjudicate through summary judgment the issue of whether the Town adopted a 24 -day work period pursuant to Section 207(k) of the Fair Labor Standards Act. The Town filed a Motion for Summary Judgment on this issue on January 4, 2008 and is awaiting receipt of the plaintiffs' opposition to such motion. The Court is expected to schedule a hearing on the Town's Motion for Summary Judgment in the s rin of 2008. Corcoran Management Co., Inc., Municipal/ Action before the Superior Court seeking to Pelham I and Pelham II v. Town of Contract enjoin Town from discontinuing trash pick - Framingham up. Town filed counterclaim to recover cost of services provided. In 2003, summary judgment entered in favor of Town on all of plaintiffs' counts, as well as on its counterclaims. Approximately $100,000 in escrow funds were released to Town upon favorable summary judgment decision. In 2004, the Court awarded the Town judgment totaling approximately $350,000 on its counterclaim after a three day assessment of damages hearing. Plaintiffs appealed this decision to the Appeals Court, and the parties filed appeals briefs in August, 2007, and are presently awaiting the Court's scheduling of a hearing on the appeal. Courtade, Maria v. H.R. Director, Handicap In this matter, the complainant filed a Town of Framingham Discrimination complaint with the MCAD in March of 2007. The complainant alleged the Town discriminated against her on the basis of race, sex and disability when the Town terminated her in February 2007 from her position as Parking Enforcement Officer. The Town filed a Position Statement with the MCAD stating that the Town provided the complainant with her requisite twelve weeks of leave. Then, after the twelve week period, the Town gave the complainant the General Government 12 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report General Government 13 opportunity to return but she advised the Town she was unable to work due to an unspecified condition. After reviewing the Town's Position Statement, the MCAD dismissed the complaint on the grounds there was no evidence the Town acted unlawfully. This matter is now closed. C &B (Cramer and Bosworth) v. Zoning The plaintiffs, Cheryl B. Cramer and Carol L. Staples Bosworth, have appealed the special permit granted by the Planning Board to Staples, Inc. for land clearing under Section IV.H.4 of the Zoning Bylaw. Staples was granted the special permit for land located at 225 Crossing Boulevard in Framingham in order to remove trees and clear a portion of the property for snow storage. Since Staples is the real party in interest in this case, in accordance with longstanding policy, the Board has allowed Staples to defend its special permit and has not taken an active role in this case. This office will continue to monitor this litigation as it proceeds. Dicenso, Rita and West Union Zoning This case involved an appeal from the Development, LLC v. ZBA, et al. decision of the Zoning Board denying a special permit for property located at 561 Hollis Street. The applicant sought to convert the use of the existing building on the property from its current use as a first floor restaurant with two apartments on the upper floors, to three dwelling units without a restaurant. The existing structure was nonconforming as to front setback and minimum landscaped open space surface ratio. The restaurant use is also nonconforming in the zoning district, which is General Residence. The application for a special permit failed on a vote of two members in favor and one opposed. DiCenso appealed and sought to remand the matter to the Board for reconsideration as a finding under G.L. c. 40A §6 for alteration of a nonconforming use, which requires only a majority vote. After the remand, the a lication was granted. Direct Capital Corp. v. Kenneco, Licensing The plaintiff brought this complaint against Inc. d /b /a/ The Liquor Store and the the Town and the holder of a liquor license, Town of Framingham, et al. seeking a preliminary injunction enjoining the Town from transferring the license of General Government 13 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report General Government 14 Kenneco Inc. to a third party. Upon receipt of this action, we contacted plaintiff s counsel to request him to voluntarily dismiss the case against the Town because the Board of Selectmen had recently denied Kenneco Inc.'s application for renewal of their liquor license for 2008, and therefore there was no need to enjoin the Town from transferring the license because the license would expire by its own terms as of December 31, 2007. Based on these discussions, plaintiff s counsel agreed to file a Notice of Voluntary Dismissal of the claim against the Town, and this notice was filed on or about December 18, 2007. Firefighters IOD Arbitration Labor Local 1652, the Framingham Firefighters Union, is grieving the inception date of when an injured firefighter should begin to receive injured on duty benefits Provided for under state law. The arbitration is scheduled for February 14, 2008. Framingham Police Officers Union Labor The Framingham Police Officers Union (FPOU) v. Town of Framingham (FPOU) filed this unfair labor practice charge (24 -day work period ULP) following the Town's issuance of correspondence to the FPOU in April of 2007 reaffirming the existence of the Town's 24- day work period pursuant to 29 USC 207(k) of the Fair Labor Standards Act. Following the FPOU's filing of this unfair labor practice charge with the Massachusetts Labor Relations Commission, the Town prepared a responsive submission and then moved to stay this matter pending the outcome of the Federal Court litigation in which the Court is scheduled to determine the effectiveness of the Town's establishment of the 24 -day work period. In November of 2007, the Division of Labor Relations (DLR) administratively closed this matter without prejudice, allowing the FPOU six months to initiate the charge. It is likely that the FPOU will reopen this unfair labor pr actice charge in the coming months. FPOU Computer Usage ULP Charge Labor The FPOU filed this charge of a prohibited practice with the DLR alleging that the Town violated its duty to bargain when the Police Department mandated that all report writing be done via computer. The Town filed a written response to the charge. The matter is awaiting the scheduling of a hearing. General Government 14 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report FPOU Computer Conversion (600- Labor This matter relates to the same subject matter 173) pending at the Labor Relations Commission as described in the previous entry. The union has filed a demand for arbitration with the American Arbitration Association as allowed under the CBA. The arbitration of this case will be held in February or March of 2008. FPOU E. Rivera Sick Leave Labor Patrolman Eduardo Rivera filed a demand for Arbitration and Declaratory arbitration seeking to arbitrate his appeal of a Judgment Action one day suspension. The Town filed an action in Middlesex Superior Court to enjoin the arbitration on the grounds that the CBA expressly provides that the proper forum to appeal disciplinary decisions is the Civil Service Commission rather than via arbitration. On January 18, 2008, the Superior Court granted the Town's motion to enjoin the arbitration. Franchi, Pasquale v. Town of Land Use Planning Board denied endorsement of two Framingham ANR plans for a proposed 12 -lot project. Landowner appealed to Land Court. Case was tried in November, 2004. In January of 2006, the Land Court (Lombardi, J.) issued a decision in favor of the developer and instructed the Planning Board to endorse the two ANR plans at issue. The Town and Planning Board appealed this decision, and the Appeals Court upheld the Land Court's decision in August of 2007. This case is now closed. Freni Bypass Appeal Employment Richard Freni is a candidate for a Framingham Police Officer. In August 2007, the Town bypassed Mr. Freni for a job based upon evidence of poor performance at his prior employment. Mr. Freni filed an appeal of his bypass with the Civil Service Commission. The Town moved to Dismiss the appeal on the grounds the Town had good reason to bypass him. The Civil Service Commission denied the motion and ordered a full hearing for March 7, 2008. Great Brook Valley Health Center, Civil Rights These cases were brought in Federal and State et al. v. Town of Framingham Court, respectively, in connection with the Planning Board's denial of the Plaintiffs' applications for a series of special permits to Great Brook Valley Health Center, Land Use develop a proposed health center on Waverly General Government 15 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report et al. v. Framingham Planning Board Street. The parties worked collectively throughout much of the year to attempt to craft a global settlement of both cases. On December 17, 2007, the parties obtained a stay of the State Court action to allow for settlement to be effected. On December 21, 2007, the parties filed a settlement agreement and consent decree with the federal court whereby the Plaintiffs will present a revised project plan before the Planning Board. The settlement agreement includes nearly a 60% increase in the mitigation to be paid should the application be approved, and also contains assurances and protections with respect to groundwater and stormwater management that were of concern to the Town. The Planning Board is scheduled to consider the renewed applications for this proposed facility in February of 2008. Hanna Management and Zoning This case involves an appeal of the Zoning Development Trust et al v. Zoning Board's grant of a special permit to Chipotle Board of Appeals and Chipotle Mexican Grill for a restaurant to be located at Mexican Grill 85 Worcester Road. The special permit was appealed by an abutter, Hanna Management and Development Trust and Ken's Steak House, Inc. Since Chipotle Mexican Grill is the real party in interest, I recommended consistent with past practice that the Town take a passive role in the defense of this case, and instead allow the real party in interest to defend the challenged permit. Chipotle's, however, has not yet entered an appearance in the case. It is not clear if Chipotle's will defend the Board's decision, or elect to forego this particular site. Highway Safety Systems v. Town of Contract This is an action brought by Highway Safety Framingham Systems, Inc. against the Town alleging breach of contract due to the Town's alleged failure to pay the plaintiff $13,487.59 plus interest for work allegedly performed for the DPW in May of 2005. The plaintiff filed its complaint on September 26, 2005 in Framingham District Court. The Town and Plaintiffs agreed to a settlement of this case which was finalized in January, 2007. This case is now closed. General Government 16 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Howland, Kenneth v. Town of Handicap This case involved a complaint filed at the Framingham Discrimination Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination asserting handicap discrimination, as well as a labor arbitration alleging wrongful discharge. In 2006 the parties agreed to settle these cases and requested that further arbitrations be placed in abeyance until March, 2007 pending finalization of the settlement. Settlement was subsequently finalized and this matter is now closed. Ipanema Brazilian Grill — ABCC Licensing The Board of Selectmen indefinitely Appeal suspended the alcohol license of Impanema for various alcohol violations. The license holder appealed this decision to the Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission (ABCC). After negotiations, the Board agreed to a settlement whereby the Town agreed not to revoke the license on the condition the current owners sell the business to new owners. The Town executed the settlement agreement on April 17, 2007. The business was sold and the matter is now closed. Jemida Corp. v. Framingham Land Use This case involves the plaintiff s appeal of the Planning Board, et al. Planning Board's April 14, 2005 decision approving a definitive subdivision plan filed by Pulte Homes of New England in connection with the proposed development of 136 acres of property as a planned unit development. The parties have reached a settlement of this matter. A stipulation of dismissal with prejudice was filed on January 23, 2008 and the case is now concluded. Levin, Martin and Carol, et al. v. Land Use The Zoning Board of Appeals granted a Framingham JCHE Elderly, Inc. and special permit pursuant to G.L. c. 40B to Zoning Board of Appeals construct an elderly affordable housing project on Edmands Road. Abutters and neighbors filed an appeal in the Land Court. The Court dismissed the appeal for lack of standing in accordance with the Supreme Judicial Court's ruling in Standerwick v. Andover Zoning Board of Appeals The Plaintiffs appealed the dismissal and the Appeals Court issued a decision on November 30, 2007 affirming the Land Court's decision. The Plaintiffs have filed a petition for rehearing with the Appeals Court and the General Government 17 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report General Government 18 p etition is currently pending. Local 1652 Discipline Arbitration Labor Local 1652 filed this grievance in 2006 in protest of a two day suspension given to a firefighter captain. The parties held an arbitration in this case on October 27, 2006. The Town's position was that it had ample evidence to support its position and that there was just cause for the suspension. The union argued the evidence supporting the charges was lacking. The parties submitted Post Arbitration Briefs in December 2006. After review, the arbitrator partially upheld the sus ension, reducing it to one day. Local 1652 Assignment of Non- Labor Local 1652 filed this grievance in early 2006 Firefighter Duties Arbitration to object to management's order to strip and clean the floors on the first floor of the Fire Department Headquarters. The parties held an arbitration on September 26, 2006. The Town's position was that the fire fighters had always been responsible for maintaining the floors and that the Union did not previously grieve the issue. The union's position was that the past practice was to have the firefighters mop the floors only and not strip them. The parties filed Post Arbitration Briefs in December of 2006. In early 2007, the arbitrator ruled in favor of the Town, finding that past practice dictated the firefighters were responsible for the stripping and cleaning of the floors at Department Headquarters. Local 1652 Promotional Exam Labor Local 1652 filed this grievance in 2006 to Arbitration protest the Department's calling of a promotional exam in November 2006 after having the same exam in November 2005. The union's positions was that it was an established past practice that the promotional exam is taken only every two years. The Town's position was that it was a management right to schedule promotional exams and the Department was required by law to call the exam to fill an open lieutenant's position. Members of the union did not apply to take the examination and it was canceled. The union subsequently agreed to withdraw the grievance because no members took the exam. General Government 18 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report General Government 19 In response to the events leading up to the cancellation of the exam, the Town filed an Unfair Labor Practice Charge with the DLR alleging that the union unlawfully threatened union members with sanctions, including expulsion from the union, if any members took the examination. The parties held a settlement conference of the ULP in Se tember of 2007. The matter is pending. Lopez, George, Bypass Appeal Police officer applicant George Lopez filed an appeal with the Civil Service Commission after the Town bypassed him for a position as a full time police officer. The Town bypassed the candidate on the grounds that the applicant did not meet the standards of a Framingham police officer. After a hearing at the Civil Service Commission, the complainant voluntarily withdrew his appeal. Framingham Firefighters Local 1652 Labor Local 1652 filed this unfair labor practice v. Town of Framingham Unfair charge at the Massachusetts Labor Relations Labor Practice Commission concerning the Town's coverage of medical payments for a firefighter who was out on injured on duty status. The parties disputed the cause of the firefighter's injuries. In July of 2006, the parties reached a settlement whereby the Town would cover the cost of a specialist to examine the firefighter's injuries. The parties also agreed that if all parties complied with the July 2006 settlement agreement, then the union would withdraw with prejudice its unfair labor practice charge in late January 2007. L. Perrina Construction Co. v. TOF Construction The contractor for the Hemenway Pump (600 -190) Station project has filed an action in the Middlesex Superior Court alleging that it is entitled to additional compensation due to a differing site condition encountered during construction of the project. Representatives of the Town and contractor have met to discuss possible settlement of this claim. The matter resently remains pending. Paulini Loam v. Zoning Board of Zoning In December of 2005, the Zoning Board Appeals /597 Old Connecticut Path denied applicant's request for a special permit or a determination that the proposed use, a concrete batching plant, was a permitted use in the zoning district. That month, a Special Town Meeting also approved an amendment General Government 19 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report General Government 20 to the Zoning By -law which changed the zoning designation of the property to Office Professional, such that the proposed use became prohibited and could not be authorized even through a special permit. Paulini filed two subsequent lawsuits in the Land Court. The first lawsuit was an appeal seeking to overturn the ZBA's denial of the special permit and to obtain a declaration from the Court that the proposed project did not require a special permit. The second lawsuit was a challenge to the validity of the Zoning By -law Amendments. The parties completed expert disclosures and other discovery in the first action through the spring and summer of 2007. The Town is currently preparing to defend itself at trial, which the Land Court has scheduled for March 10 -12, 2008. The Town moved for summary judgment in the second action in July, 2007. The Court held a hearing on the Town's motion on October 1, 2007 and took the matter under advisement. The parties are currently awaiting a decision from the Court. Pilzer, Nomi v. Zoning Board of Zoning This case involves an appeal of a Appeals, Land Court determination made by the Building Commissioner for property located at 21 Purchase Street. Nomi Pilzer, the owner, was notified by the Building Commissioner that the use of the property as a two - family dwelling was in violation of the Zoning Bylaw and that the use as a two - family must cease. Pilzer applied for a permit to allow the second dwelling unit, which the Building Commissioner denied. Pilzer than appealed to the Board of Appeals, which voted to uphold the Building Commissioner's decision. Pilzer then appealed to the Land Court. The parties have been conducting discovery. In addition, the Town moved to add the Building Commissioner as a defendant and bring a counterclaim for enforcement, and plaintiff moved to remand the matter to the Board of Appeals for further findings. Police Superiors (FPSOA) Labor The Superior Officers filed this certification Certification Petition (600 -180) petition in July of 2007 with the DLR for certification as a union. The Town has not General Government 20 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report General Government 21 opposed such certification. The DLR is handling the election of the officers for the new union. After the union has been properly certified and officers have been elected, the Town will be able to close this matter. Public Works Supply, Inc. v. Town Public This lawsuit was filed in 2006 by Public of Framingham Procurement Works Supply, Inc. ("PWS"), a supplier of fire hydrants, after the Town awarded a contract for fire hydrants to one of PWS's competitors. PWS filed a complaint and motion for preliminary injunction against the Town in Middlesex Superior Court, alleging that the Town's specifications for a particular hydrant were illegal. This office opposed PWS' motion. After oral argument, the Court issued a decision in favor of the Town on the grounds the Town had legitimate public policy reasons to decide which type of fire hydrant it wanted, and in requiring the same type of fire hydrant throughout town for purposes of uniformity, even if it had the effect of reducing competition. Along with its Answer to PWS complaint, the Town filed a counterclaim for interference with its contractual relationship with the successful bidder. In 2007, PWS filed a motion to dismiss the counterclaim on the grounds that the counterclaim violates the Anti -SLAPP statute, which the Town opposed. After review, the Superior Court denied PWS' motion. Discovery in the matter is ongoing. The Town intends to move for Summary Judgment in the spring of 2008. Revoli Construction Co., Inc. v. Construction The plaintiff filed this case in September of Town of Framingham 2007, alleging breach of contract and seeking payment for work purportedly performed by Revoli in connection with the Doeskin Pump Station and Water Line project. The plaintiff alleges specifically that the Town failed to make payment in the amount of $48,286.16 for loaming and seeding work. The Town filed an answer and counterclaim seeking damages and alleging that the plaintiff failed to complete the project and committed various other violations of the contract. The plaintiff filed an answer to the Town's counterclaim and the case is currentl General Government 21 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report General Government 22 pending for discovery and other pretrial proceedings. R.M. Technologies v. Eastern Construction This action was filed by an asbestos Contractors, Inc. v. Framingham abatement subcontractor, R.M. Technologies, Inc. ( "R.M. ") who performed work on the Framingham High School Renovation and Addition project ( "the Project "). In 2003, R.M. filed suit against Eastern Contractors, Inc. ( "Eastern "), the general contractor, claiming breach of contract and seeking recovery of $415,000 plus interest in quantum meruit for Eastern's alleged failure to compensate R.M. for work performed on the Project. Eastern in turn brought a third party claim against the Town of Framingham ( "Town ") in 2004 for indemnification and contribution towards R.M.'s claims. The parties negotiated a global settlement of this matter whereby R.M. agreed to accept $50,000 in full and complete settlement of its claims. The parties executed a stipulation of dismissal in November of 2007 and this matter is now closed. Route 30 LLC v. Town of Eminent Domain The plaintiff is an abutter to Route 30 and the Framingham Town took a strip of the plaintiff s land as part of the Route 30 widening project. The plaintiff claimed the Town's rho tanto initial damage award for the taking of $16,292 was inadequate. The plaintiff claimed in the litigation that its damages were actually $122,000 plus interest of 12% per year based on a professional appraisal. The Town hired its own appraiser who assessed the taking damages at $33,000, including the $16,292 rLoo tanto award the Town initially paid the plaintiff for the taking. After negotiations, the plaintiff and the Town agreed to settle this case for $40,000. The parties filed a stipulation of dismissal on April 5, 2007. This matter is now closed. South Middlesex Non - profit Land Use SMNPHC applied to the Building Housing Corporation /90 Lincoln Commissioner for a building permit for Street conversion of this property from an office use to the proposed use as "Larry's Place ", described as a program for homeless veterans with physical or mental disabilities. SMNPHC claimed that Larry's Place is an General Government 22 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report General Government 23 educational use protected under the Dover Amendment. Further, SMNPHC claimed that a building permit should issue because site plan review should not required, that parking was adequate under the Zoning Bylaw, and that the proposed use was not a change in use. The Building Commissioner initially denied the application based in part on the applicant's failure to provide complete information. The Building Commissioner's denial was appealed to the Board of Appeals, where it is pending. S & S Realty Trust v. Zoning Board Zoning This is an appeal from a decision of the of Appeals Zoning Zoning Board of Appeals granting Xtreme Performance and Audio, Inc., a special permit to allow the sale and rental of motor vehicles at 277 Worcester Road. Xtreme sought to purchase the other half of the building where its business is now located, convert it from a former futon store to a motorcycle showroom, and expand its existing repair business. S &S Realty Trust, owner of abutting property, appealed the Board's decision to Middlesex Superior Court. We filed a motion to dismiss on the grounds that S & S failed to name Xtreme as a defendant as required by state law. The court required S &S to amend the complaint to add Xtreme. Once added to the case, Xtreme failed to defend the special permit, and the plaintiff moved for entry of judgment. The Court granted the plaintiff's motion, thereby annulling the plaintiffs' s ecial ermit. This matter is now closed. Tessicini Arbitration (600 -153) Labor This FPOU union filed this arbitration after the Police Department suspended Officer Tessicini for one day and impose a written reprimand upon him for untruthfulness and insubordination. The FPOU disputed whether the Department had just cause for the suspension while the Department contended that it did have just cause. Following the arbitration and the filing of post- arbitration briefs, the arbitrator denied the union's grievance in July, 2007, and found that the Department had just cause to suspend Officer Tessicini. This matter is now closed. General Government 23 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Terrill, Richard and Fafard, ConCom In 1999, the Conservation Commission Madelyn, as Trustees of the Winch Wetlands denied an order of conditions for a wetlands Pond Trust v. Conservation Appeal/DEP crossing to access a parcel of land and Commission; Biagio Conte v. Appeal construct a subdivision of between 40 -45 Conservation Commission and homes. Winch Pond Trust appealed decision Winch Pond Trust ( Fafard Wetlands under bylaw to Superior Court and obtained a Litigation) Superceding Order of Conditions from the DEP, which the Town appealed. In 2004, the Town opposed the Trust's motion to substitute a revised plan in the DEP proceeding showing certain changes to the wetlands crossing plan shown to the Conservation Commission in 1999. After hearing oral argument, the Administrative Law Judge ruled that the Trust must either proceed under the original plan or file a new notice of intent with the Conservation Commission. The Trust filed a new notice of intent with the Conservation Commission on or about February 18, 2005. After extensive hearings, the new notice of intent was approved by the ConCom with extensive conditions in August of 2006. The ConCom's Order of Conditions was appealed to the DEP and the Middlesex Superior Court by Dr. Biagio Conte, and the plaintiff and the defendants filed cross - motions for judgment on the pleadings. The DEP subsequently denied the appellant's request for a denial superceding order of conditions. After briefing and oral argument, the Superior Court issued a Memorandum and Order denying plaintiff s motion for judgment on the judgment on the pleadings, and allowing the cross - motion of the applicant and the Conservation Commission. The plaintiff filed a notice of appeal of this case on January 2, 2008. This appeal will likely continue through all of 2008 and into 2009. Town of Framingham v. Regulatory/ Action was filed by Framingham before the Town of Ashland Contract Department of Telecommunications and Energy (DTE) to establish a new sewer rate under a 1963 Intermunicipal Agreement to compensate Framingham for transporting Ashland's sewage through Framingham to the MWRA Extension Sewer on Arthur Street. After extensive briefing, filing of prefiled testimony, and several days of hearings and General Government 24 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report testimony before the DTE, the DTE issued a decision in February of 2004 that awarded Framingham virtually complete relief on most of its claims, and adopted nearly the entirety of the sewage transport rate formula proposed by Framingham for the time period covering December 19, 2003 - December 18, 2008. In 2004, the Town of Framingham commenced a second action in Middlesex Superior Court against the Town of Ashland seeking to obtain further recovery from Ashland for past sewage transport and damage caused to the Framingham system. In 2006, a new 20 -year Intermunicipal Agreement (IMA) was negotiated between Framingham and Ashland, whereby Framingham will continue to transport Ashland's wastewater to the MWRA system (as it has since 1963), and receive in return approximately $500,0004600,000 on an annual basis. Between 1963 and 2003, the Town of Framingham received only $5500 per year for providing this service, but the successful prosecution of this litigation and subsequent negotiations with Ashland have resulted in more than a 100 -fold annual increase in the amounts of annual payments received from Ashland. The favorable flow - based formula approved by the DTE has been incorporated into the new IMA. In addition to the annual payments received by Framingham for wastewater transport based on Ashland's rLoo rata share of flow contributed to the Framingham system, the Town will receive an additional $200,000 per year for five years, until one million dollars is paid, in settlement of the pending Middlesex Superior Court litigation. On July 17, 2007, the parties filed a stipulation of dismissal with the Court. The New IMA was approved by the Framingham and Ashland Town Meetings in the spring of 2006, and subsequently executed by the respective boards of selectmen of the two towns. The New IMA covers the time period of January 1, 2007 - December 31, 2006, with a five year right of renewal. General Government 25 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Vasquez, Lee v. Town of Handicap This is a handicap discrimination claim filed Framingham Discrimination with the MCAD. Mr. Vasquez's original complaint of discrimination was based on the decision of the Parks and Recreation Department not to hire him for full time positions for which he had applied. The MCAD issued a Lack of Probable Cause Finding as to these two claims in 2005. In 2006, Mr. Vasquez subsequently filed a complaint of retaliation, alleging that his driving privileges were restricted due to the fact that he had filed a charge of discrimination. After reviewing written submissions, the MCAD issued a Finding of Probable Cause on the retaliation claim. At a conciliation held in October of 2007, the Town agreed to settle the matter by way of a payment of $7,500 to the complainant, without any admission of liability. Whitkin, Steven et. Al v. Ottaviani Zoning Abutters appealed the issuance of a building (Wayside Youth and Family permit for the construction of a non - profit Services Land Court Appeal) facility that had inadequate frontage. The Building Commissioner determined that the building permit should issue despite this deficiency on the grounds that the facility was afforded protection pursuant to the Dover Amendment. Abutters appealed this decision to the Zoning Board but failed to obtain a unanimous vote as required by state law to overturn the Building Commissioner decision. The abutters then appealed this decision to the Land Court. In December of 2005, Wayside moved for summary judgment. In the spring of 2006, the Land Court heard arguments on Wayside's motion for summary judgment and on February 13, 2007 the Court issued a decision allowing the defendant's Motion for Summary Judgment. This matter is now closed. Whittemore v. Framingham Zoning Zoning/Land Use This case involves an abutter's challenge of Board of Appeals the Zoning Board of Appeals' grant of a variance authorizing the construction of a dwelling upon property located at 765 Edmands Road. In accordance with established policy, because this case involves the issuance of a variance, the Office of the Town Counsel has maintained only limited involvement in this case, instead requiring the General Government 26 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report real party in interest, the successful variance grantee, to prosecute this litigation. In October, 2007, following a jury- waived trial, the Court issued a ruling annulling the variance in favor of Douglas Aron, as Trustee of the LBA Trust. The Court found that the Board acted arbitrarily and capriciously and exceeded its authority in granting the variance. The defendants did not appeal this decision, and this matter is now closed. Insurance Defense Counsel Cases Below is a list of significant cases that presently are being handled by Town of Framingham insurance defense counsel. I have included a brief description of the status of these cases as well. MATTER TYPE STATUS Gorman, Jean v. Verizon of New Tort These related actions arise from a personal injury England and Boston Edison; Verizon of claim asserted by the plaintiff against the New England v. Town of Framingham defendants, seeking recovery for injuries (3 Party Complaint) stemming from a bicycle accident near a Verizon work site on Town property. The first action was a third party complaint brought against the Town, asserting that, to the extent Verizon was found responsible for the plaintiff's injuries, the Town was responsible to Verizon. The second case was a complaint brought against the Town by Verizon alleging that it had suffered economic and other injuries, including having to reinstall a utility pole, as a proximate result of the Town's alleged violation of "dig- safe" laws. In November and December 2007, the parties agreed to dismiss the Town from both cases without any payment of any funds from the insurer on the Town's behalf. The Gorman matter is still active, however. Town witnesses likely will be called for depositions at some point during 2008. General Government 27 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report South Middlesex Opportunity Council, Civil The plaintiffs are not for profit organizations that Inc., et al. v. Town of Framingham, et Rights/Land provide housing and other social services to al. Use individuals who are disadvantaged and in need of services. In recent years the plaintiffs have proposed and obtained the siting of several programs, facilities and housing throughout the Town. The plaintiffs have sued the Town and several Town officials and employees in their official and individual capacities, and other individuals, alleging a series of violations of federal and state laws in connection with an alleged coordinated effort by the defendants to wrongfully exclude the plaintiffs and their clients from siting new programs and facilities in the Town. The Town's insurer, the Massachusetts Interlocal Insurance Association (MIIA) accepted the tender of the case and agreed to help fund the Town's retention of special counsel Mintz Levin Cohn Ferris Glovsky and Popeo P.C. to represent it in this matter. Counsel for the Town and the individual defendants presently are preparing motions to dismiss which are due to be filed on February 1, 2008. The Town further is compiling initial discovery as this litigation proceeds through its early stages following the parties' recent attempt to mediate this case. Ward, Alfred v. Chief of Police (600- Licensing This case was brought as a complaint for judicial 166) review in the Framingham District Court seeking an order requiring the Chief of Police to issue the plaintiff a license to carry firearms. After a hearing, the judge ordered the Chief to issue the license, the license was issued, and the matter is now resolved. Wayside Youth and Family Services Civil Rights Wayside brought this civil rights action in superior Appeal v. Town v. Town of court in May of 2006 against the Town and the Framingham Board of Selectmen after the Board of Selectmen denied Wayside's application for a public way access permit (PWAP) in connection with the proposed development of Wayside's proposed campus facility off of Lockland Avenue in Framingham. The complaint alleges that the Board's decision was motivated by discriminatory animus in violation of various federal statutes and in contravention of constitutional protections set forth in the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments to the United States Constitution. General Government 28 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report The Town's insurance defense counsel removed the case to federal court in view of the federal claims asserted in the litigation. Wayside moved for partial summary judgment, arguing that the Selectmen's denial of the PWAP was arbitrary and capricious and in violation of law. Insurance counsel opposed Wayside's motion for summary judgment. After oral argument, the Court (Sorokin, J.) issued a decision in favor of Wayside. In June, 2007, the parties settled this litigation Without admission of liability by the Town. Under the terms of the settlement, the Town issued a Public Way Access Permit and Letter of Conditions and Wayside made payment to the Town in the amount of $130,000, $50,000 for the purchase and installation of a surveillance camera at the entrance to the Wayside project and $80,000 for other project mitigation. The Town's insurance carrier reimbursed Wayside for $80,000 in attorney's fees. This matter is now closed. Budgetary Overview As in past years, I would like to conclude this report with a discussion of budgeting and legal expenses. It has been my experience that a proper commitment to adequate municipal funding for legal services is essential to maintaining the quality of life within a community. Generally speaking, the more a community prudently spends per capita for legal services, the more likely it is that a community will be a desirable place to live and protective of its citizens' rights and interests. As is its job, Town Meeting properly analyzes the spending of all town departments to ensure that the Town receives commensurate public benefits for the funding provided. An analysis of the legal spending in Framingham as compared to other communities (especially in light of the results obtained) shows that Framingham has continued to obtain excellent value for its legal dollars. Based on data provided by the Massachusetts Department of Revenue Division of Local Services, Framingham's per capita spending for legal services and judgments in FY 2006 (the most recent year for which such data is available from DOR) was $11.89, favorable relative to that of many other similarly situated Massachusetts municipalities, as the below tables reflect: General Government 29 Town of Framingham TABLE 1: FY2006 Per Capita Legal Expenditures for Municipalities Abutting Framingham (Without accounting for revenue intake) Municipality 2006 Actual Per Capita Legal Expenditure Sherborn $36.83 Southborough $17.01 Wayland $16.89 Marlborough $16.43 Sudbury $13.70 Framingham' $11.89 Natick $9.45 Ashland $8.61 TABLE 2: Sampling of Municipalities with More Per Capita Legal Spending than Framingham (Without accounting for revenue intake) Municipality 2006 Actual Per Capita Legal Expenditure Melrose $25.24 Arlington $23.30 Wayland $16.89 Marlborough $16.43 Waltham $14.92 Newton $14.53 Cambridge $13.27 Fall River $12.77 (up from $3.60 in FY2005 Framingham $11.89 TABLE 3: Sampling of Municipalities with Less Per Capita Spending than Framingham (Without accounting for revenue intake) + This per capita spending figure is based on a presumed population of Framingham of 64,762, the most recently available population figure reported for the Town by the Massachusetts Department of Revenue, Division of Local Services. Framingham's actual population undoubtedly is higher than the DOR's estimate in view of the Town's high undocumented immigrant population and college students who live in Framingham while attending Framingham State College and other colleges but who report their permanent address to be elsewhere. In view of this fact, it is highly likely that the Town's actual per capita expenditure for legal services is significantly lower than reported by the DOR. 2007 Annual Report Municipality FY 2006 Actual Per Capita Legal Expenditure Framingham $11.89 Lawrence $9.24 FY 2006 Brockton $7.11 FY 2006 Chelsea $5.95(FY 2006) Revere $5.83(FY 2006) Leominster $3.84(FY 2006) The track record of success I have achieved as Town Counsel since my appointment in December of 2001 has validated Town Meeting's increased financial commitment to legal services in recent years. While it is not reasonable to expect that a cost center such as the legal budget will yield positive net revenue on an annual basis, this office in fact has helped procure new revenue for the General Fund or helped avoid additional costs that, on an annual basis, far exceed the total annual legal budget spent by the Town in recent years. The services provided by the Office of the Town Counsel have resulted in monetary benefits to the Town that has, in terms of direct revenue, mitigation and avoided expenses, resulted in annual revenues and value more two to three times greater than the Town's FY 2007 appropriation of $610,000. To elaborate on this point, below is a chart I have prepared summarizing the revenue, mitigation and avoided expenses achieved in FY 2007 and likely to be achieved in FY 2008 by the efforts of the Office of the Town Counsel, or through the substantial assistance of the Office of the Town Counsel. General Government 30 FY 2007 Revenue, Mitigation and Avoided Expenses Matter_ Description; Payments Received from Payments received in FY2007 for sewage transport under the Ashland in FY 2007 February 13, 2004 Decision issued by the Department of $706,814.11 Telecommunications and Energy. This represents a 128 -fold (Revenue) increase over what Framingham received from 1964 -2003 under the 1963 Intermunicipal Agreement with Ashland. Pelham Apartments and By virtue of a prior year's favorable summary judgment ruling Framingham Housing Authority achieved in the Pelham litigation, the Town was able to cease Trash Collection trash collection at the 550 units at the Pelham Apartments, $300,000 which results in avoided expenses estimated at more than (Avoided Expense) $100,000 per year. By virtue of the Pelham ruling, the Town also was able to cease trash collection at approximately 1,000 units owned by the Framingham Housing Authority, thus realizing savings of approximately an additional estimated $200,000 per year. These savings amount to approximately $300,000 per year on an annual recurring basis. Natick Mall Settlement In FY 2007, General Growth Properties, Inc., the developer $250,000 of Natick Mall, made a further payment of $250,000 of the (Revenue) $1,065,000 sum it agreed to pay to settle the litigation that the Town and Planning Board had initiated against the developer of the Natick Mall in 2004. Payments from Comcast In settlement of the litigation between the Town and $163,368.44 Comcast, Comcast agreed (among other concessions) to (Revenue) provide capital payments to the Town and /or the Town Access Corporation of sums totaling $175,000 for FY 2007 and $50,000 annually thereafter through 2011. The $175,000 in revenue does not include the quarterly payments due from Comcast in an amount totaling 5% of gross annual revenues for use by the Town, School Department and Public Access Corporation to utilize in connection with providing public, educational, and governmental cable programming. Payments from RCN In resolving its dispute with the Town, RCN paid the Town $100,000 $100,000, and to forgive credits in the amount of $55,335 (Revenue) owed by the Town. $55,335 (Avoided Expense) Subtotal FY 2007 $1,575,51750 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report FY 2008 Revenue, Mitigation and Avoided Expenses Matter_ Description; Natick Mall Settlement The total value of the Natick Mall mitigation package is $355,000.00 $1,065,000, consisting of various cash payments to the Town (Revenue /Mitigation) for designated purposes such as open space preservation or the Cochituate Rail Trail, funding various studies and performing in -kind work. I have attributed $355,000 of this mitigation package to FY 2008, as it is likely that most of the payments and mitigation will continue to be made in FY 2008 and FY 2009, depending on the progress of the work. The Town already received a payment in the amount of $250,000 from General Growth in October, 2007. The above - referenced total mitigation package was obtained at no net legal cost to the Town because General Growth reimbursed the Town for its legal expenses incurred in prosecuting the appeal and in negotiating the settlement agreement. Judgment on Pelham At the time the Town received summary judgment in 2003 Counterclaim defeating Pelham's claim for continued trash collection, the $350,000+ Town also was awarded summary judgment on its (Revenue) counterclaim to recover the cost of certain trash collection services delivered to Pelham. After a three day bench trial, the Superior Court awarded the Town approximately $350,000 (inclusive of interest) for this claim. Pelham has appealed this decision. Appeals briefs were filed in August, 2007, and it is likely that some or all of the above - referenced sum will be received by the Town in FY 2008 or FY2009, assuming the Appeals Court upholds the Town or a settlement is reached. Payments Received from The Town has already received $840,298.00 from Ashland in Ashland in FY 2008 FY 2008 pursuant to the New IMA negotiated by the Office $1,200,000 of the Town Counsel. The next $200,000 installment for the (Revenue) settlement is due February 1, 2008, and the Town can reasonably expect to receive one more quarterly payment of approximately $170,000 for operations and maintenance. Pelham Apartments and The savings seen in FY2007 will continue in FY2008 on an Framingham Housing Authority annual recurring basis absent reversal of the summary Trash Collection judgment decision in favor of the Town by the Appeals $300,000 Court. (Avoided Expense) Payments from Comcast Comcast has already made payments to the Town in the $74,452.92 amount of $74,452.92 in FY 2008. Revenue Subtotal FY 2008 $2,227,945.90 TOTAL FY 2007 & 2008 $3,854,970.40 In addition to the foregoing revenue, mitigation and avoided expenses achieved by the efforts or substantial assistance of the Office of the Town Counsel, the Town will General Government 32 Town of Framingham avoid the costs of litigating the SMOC federal civil rights action by virtue of the successful demand upon MIIA that it defend the Town and all individually named municipal defendants in this matter, and pay for the costs incurred by this office assisting in the defense of the Town. While it is premature to predict the exact legal fees that will be paid by MIIA to various counsel in FY 2008, it is reasonable to assume that the total amount paid for such defense costs will amount to several hundred thousand dollars. By virtue of the foregoing, the Office of the Town Counsel has either procured, or made a substantial contribution towards procuring, $1,575,51750 in revenue for the General Fund or the Sewer Enterprise Fund, or via direct payments by developers for mitigation to enhance the quality of life in Framingham, or in avoided expenses in FY 2007. In addition, the Town has received or is likely to receive up to $2,227,945.90 in direct revenue, mitigation and avoided expenses in FY 2008. The total sum of received or anticipated revenue, mitigation or avoided expenses received or likely to be received in FY 2007 and 2008 is approximately three times the amount appropriated to fund the entire regular Legal Services budget in FY 2007 and FY 2008 combined. Human Resources 150 Concord Street, Room B7 Framingham, NIA 01702 The Human Resource Division consists of the Department of Human Resources and the Department of Veterans' Services. Sandra Charton is the Director of the Division of Human Resources. Human Resources The Department of Human Resources has several responsibilities. We oversee the recruitment process for all Town positions 2007 Annual Report While I certainly cannot promise the revenue results of the nature and extent achieved to date on an ongoing basis in the future, I will continue to exercise creativity, diligence, and employ my best legal skills to make the most of the opportunities that do arise as I advocate on behalf of the best interests of the taxpayers of the Town of Framingham. As always, I will steadfastly endeavor to deliver cost - effective, proactive, and quality legal services to the Town of Framingham at the lowest achievable costs, consistent with the requests and policy objectives of the Board of Selectmen, the Town Manager, and other boards, officials, committees of the Town, and continue to protect the interests of the residents of the Town of Framingham in the many cases, proceedings and matters of which the Town is named as a party. Conclusion In closing, I wish to thank the Board of Selectmen and the residents of the Town for the opportunity to serve as your Town Counsel. I look forward to a long and productive relationship with this fine community, which is also my hometown. Respectfully Submitted, Christopher J. Petrini, Town Counsel Petrini & Associates, P.C. 508 - 552 -5490 508 - 424 -5407 (fa-) human.resources @ franiinghaninia.gov and conduct orientations for new Town and School employees. In addition, we maintain the Town's classification and pay plan; draft, revise and interpret the Town's personnel policies and procedures; play a key role in negotiating and interpreting all collective bargaining agreements; foster harmonious and productive labor and employee relations; perform cost and staff analyses; assist in staff development and training; and oversee General Government 33 Town of Framingham employee recognition programs. Finally, our Department administers the Town's payroll, benefits, and workers' compensation and unemployment insurance programs. Cindy McKellick is the Department's Benefits Coordinator. She administers health, dental and life insurance programs for the Town, the Schools, and our retirees. Anne Wynne, Payroll Administrator, maintains and processes the Town's weekly payroll. Judith Caron is our Human Resource Generalist. She manages the employment and recruitment process, including advertising, reviewing employment applications, and interviewing candidates. Claudia Araujo is our Administrative Assistant and the staff member who usually greets visitors to our Department. Claudia provides customer service and overall department support. I am the newest member of the Department. Our previous director, Monica Visco, left in May of 2007 to take another position. Timothy Goddard, Assistant Town Manager, served as Acting Director of Human Resources from that time through the end of September, when I joined the Department as the Director. All of us in Human Resources work as a team and emphasize customer service as a primary goal. Although we each specialize in certain areas, all of us can answer a benefit or payroll related question. Continued cross - training and integration of our various systems is very important to our Department. Veterans' Benefits and Services This has been a year of transition and changes for the Town's Department of Veterans' Services. Our director, Paul Raffa, tragically passed away in November of 2007. We have been busy interviewing replacements for Paul so that we can serve our veterans as quickly, thoroughly, and compassionately as possible. Please refer to the Veterans' Services section of this Annual Report for more details. Personnel Board 2007 Annual Report The Personnel Board, which meets monthly, serves in an advisory capacity to the Town Manager and the Human Resources Director, who has jurisdiction over personnel functions. The five (5) member Board is appointed by the Town Moderator. Board members must be Framingham residents, serve for three (3) year terms, and may not hold other Town Offices. The Board's functions include reviewing the qualifications of finalists for Department Head, Division Head and managerial positions. We will continue to utilize the Board's experience and expertise in this area. The Board's mandate also includes conducting, at the request of the Town Manager, studies of pay rates in comparable communities. The Personnel Board has recently undertaken that function, which will assist us in making sure we compensate our employees in a fair and equitable manner. I wish to thank all the hardworking members of the Board for their concern, interest and enthusiasm. I look forward to working with them in the months and years ahead. Recruitment 2007 continued to be an active year for recruitment, starting with our own Department. I started as the Director of Human Resources at the end of September of 2007. I came to the Town with an extensive background in the field of labor relations. I worked most recently as in -house labor and employment counsel for Boston Medical Center. . We are currently recruiting for the positions of Director of Veterans' Services, the Director of Community and Economic Development, and the Director of the Public Health Department In addition, we have been pleased to be able to promote qualified current employees to available vacant positions, and are now seeking candidates to "backfill" the newly opened positions. Finally, our Department has worked hard to fill new positions created by the expanded General Government 34 Town of Framingham responsibilities of the Department of Public Works and the Inspectional Services Department. We invite interested and qualified applicants to view current openings by looking at positions posted on our bulletin board (located outside our office) and /or by viewing the positions online at www.framinghamma.gov/human Employee Recognition According to the Board of Selectmen's Customer Service Policy, the mission of every division and department is to provide quality customer service to both internal and external customers. The policy provides guidelines regarding employee responsibility, standards of performance and measurement of performance. The Human Resources Department sponsors an annual Employee Recognition Dinner each fall. This dinner honors employees for promoting the Town's commitment to operate in an efficient customer service oriented manner and awards special recognition to employees who have demonstrated extraordinary efforts in the delivery of customer service. The dinner also recognizes employees who reach milestones in their years of employment with the Town. This year's Employee Recognition Dinner was held on October 17, 2007 at the Joseph P. Keefe Technical High School. The students were involved in every aspect of the dinner. They designed and created the program distributed to all attendees and decorated the dining area. The School's culinary art students prepared and served the meal. The food was delicious, the decorations were wonderful, and the service was phenomenal. Approximately 200 employees, family and friends participated in the festivities as they recognized and honored our employees. Individuals who completed five, ten, fifteen, twenty, twenty -five and thirty years of service 2007 Annual Report were awarded service pins in recognition of their commitment to Town service. Human Resources and Accounting staff at the Employee Recognition Dinner. Front (L -R): Anne Wynne, Judy Moore, and Judith Caron. Back (L -R): Claudia Ara ujo, Nancy Lomas, Richard Howarth, Sandra Charton, and Cindy McKeKck The prestigious Customer Service awards are also presented at the annual dinner. Nominations for recipients of this award are made throughout the year. (L -R): Wilma Kawachi, Harriet Weiner, Richard Howarth, and CarlyPremo -Melo A committee composed of Town employees, managers and officials met in October for the difficult task of reviewing the many nominees and choosing those efforts that stood out among the many accomplishments of our General Government 35 and wife Stephanie, Human Services Coordinator Alexis Silver, Executive Assistant Scott Morelli, Assistant Town Manager Timothy Goddard, and Town Counsel Christopher Petrini at the Employee Recognition Dinner Town of Framingham colleagues. We honor the following 2007 recipients: Maryellen Rupp has demonstrated a sincere desire to go beyond the job description in each of the several positions that she has held during her many years with the Town. In the Assessor's Department, she always helped citizens who were sometimes bewildered by the tax abatement process and in the Planning and Economic Development Department, she always displayed compassion for riders of the LIFT bus and took the time to explain to them how to use the bus system. In her current role as Licensing Administrator, Maryellen is extremely helpful to all licensees who come in and seek assistance, taking the time to explain to them the information they need to know about an often long and complicated process. She has also been a great asset to the Selectmen's office, assisting callers and citizens in person with a variety of complaints, even though this is not necessarily within her job description. Finally, Maryellen is an employee who will help someone find the answer they need, rather than bounce them around blindly, and can always be counted on to get the job done. Michelle Le Monde - McIntyre is the Community Services Librarian for the Framingham Public Library. She has worked tirelessly over the past two years to help bring about a 400% increase in the adult programming events that are offered free of charge to Framingham residents. She is unfailingly gracious and welcoming to all attendees and her dedication, hard work, and enthusiasm is a major contribution to the good will generated by these programs. Through her efforts, the Library has hosted a number of full capacity crowds and Michelle has accomplished all of this as only one part of the myriad responsibilities of her job. Michelle also provides tours of the Library; does outreach to the community; is the volunteer coordinator; provides reference service; and represents the Library at fairs, festivals, and other community events. She is an active member of the Assistive Technology 2007 Annual Report Committee of the Minuteman Library Network and has regularly contributed her expertise to the Town's START Partnership program. Eric Wells and David Aucoin work for the Town's Department of Public Works. They acted quickly and alerted the Police and Fire Departments after a trash bag they had picked up caught on fire inside the trash packer while they were collecting trash on Howe Street. Eric and David extinguished the fire quickly and prevented further damage to the vehicle and surrounding homes. Their efforts also helped lead to the arrest of a suspected methamphetamines dealer, as recognized in a recent edition of the Metrowest Daily News. Edna Bernard works in the Treasurer/ Collector's Office. One of the most important and stressful jobs in the Town is the Town's weekly payroll, which is Edna's primary responsibility. Many times there have been system problems where the payroll files are not received at the bank or there have been check printing issues. In her usual way, Edna takes these challenges in stride and pushes forward to make sure that all issues are resolved correctly and in a timely manner. She is not a complainer but tackles each task with ease. Edna has wonderful customer service skills and always steps up to the plate to help out fellow employees and the customers with whom she comes into contact. This includes helping anyone who has any issue, even if it is not a Treasurer/ Collector function. For example, even though it was not a part of Edna's job, she was willing to help a fellow employee learn MUNIS. She can be seen working many times past 5 PM to ensure that payroll has printed properly and that direct deposit accounts were funded correctly. John Nolan works for the Town's Department of Public Works. He has saved the Town in excess of $25,000 over the last year and a half through his initiative, creativity, and technical skills. John designed and installed new support structures for two General Government 36 Town of Framingham of DPW's snow fighters with sander units. This will improve the maintenance and longevity of these units over the coming years and they can also be transferred to other cabs & chassis for future savings. John was also involved in setting up another permanent mount sander onto an existing cab & chassis. His work on this project saved the Town in excess of $10,000 by doing the work in house. This new sander has increased DPW's ability to respond to snow and ice emergencies and has also increased the life expectancy of the cab & chassis. John's ability to design and implement projects like these is a credit to his initiative and technical abilities. He is a definite asset to the Town. I am proud to have John as a member of our team Jayne Gourdeau works for the Town's Department of Public Works. Framingham recently revised its water and sewer billing system to a model that promotes water conservation and rewards residents with low water /sewer volumes. This significant change from a three tier annualized model to a five tier model with quarterly resets required an extensive usage analysis, considering various types of solutions, financial modeling, and significant planning to assure a smooth transition once adopted. Jayne was instrumental in accomplishing this important goal. Jayne brings strong technical skills and extensive knowledge of water and sewer billing processes to DPW. She has implemented numerous improvements to enhance customer service since joining DPW, including introducing technology to allow residents to pay their bills on line, extending office hours (Monday evenings until 7:00 pm), and creating spreadsheets to help residents understand how their charges are calculated. Claudia Araujo and Anne Wynne work for the Town's Human Resources Department. The Department experienced a loss of several staff over the last few months. The impact of such a significantly reduced workforce could have been disastrous for the many town departments that regularly rely on HR services. Both Claudia and Anne stepped up 2007 Annual Report and took on considerably more responsibilities and kept the department afloat. This summer was particularly busy with hiring DPW staff to support capital programs and bringing on temporary staff for summer work. Claudia and Anne were helpful, pleasant and responsive to DPW's needs. Their professional attitude and friendly manner speaks volumes about the way they approach their positions and the level of customer service they provide to town staff who need HR services. Mary Ruth Reynolds works for the Town's Planning Board. During her three years with the Town, Mary has consistently gone the extra mile to ensure that the Planning Board, applicants, and members of the public are provided service at the highest level. Mary brings a professional attitude to her position and does not view her position as simply 8:30 AM to 5 PM. She is required to attend weekly Planning Board meetings that go past midnight several times a year. Such a demand is unique from other positions in the Town. In addition, on several occasions Mary has provided a one person courier service at critical points of the review for several development projects. This effort has ensured that information is received by Board members prior to their meeting so that critical decisions can be made in a timely manner. Projects vital to the Town's economic development have been well served and applicants have expressed great appreciation for her efforts. Likewise, Mary routinely General Government 37 (L -R) Planning Board Administrator Jay Grande, Administrative Assistant Mary Ruth Reynolds, and Chair Anne Wells Town of Framingham interfaces with the public and Town Meeting Members and does not simply direct people to another department, which you might expect in light of the busy role of her position. For example, Mary once assisted an elderly woman with making her way through the Memorial Building, helping the lady gather needed materials from various departments and then carrying these materials back to the lady's car in the parking lot. Finally, Mary has managed to get a backlog of nearly two years of filing and meeting minutes current. Wayne Bolduc, Dean Corbin and Dave Boynton work for the Town's Fire Department. They are to be commended for their electrical, bucket truck, and installation work provided to Technology Services. They have also assisted in setting up computer equipment in the mobile Emergency Operations Center as well as assisting with several wireless initiatives. Whenever asked, they are happy to find the time to be helpful and in doing so have saved the Town money as opposed to having to schedule and pay for outside equipment and services. It is wonderful when departments work as teams and help each other out. Ken Harper works for Technology Services. He should be recognized for his efforts supporting the Police, Fire, and Emergency Operations. Over the years Ken has taken what was a very unstable application to a very stable one in a very up to date environment. He has worked with the departments over the years to identify and resolve processes, train users, and develop enhancements to meet specific needs. He is on call 24 hours a day, seven days a week to both the Police and Fire Departments and is available not only by phone for a problem but is often able to log in from home and even come in as necessary. Special Recognition was given this year to the Town's Building Services Staff. Jim Egan; Walter Premo; Kenny Green; Ray Spurgeon; Ron Spurgeon; Greg Adams; Gene Crowley; Helder Costa; and Doug Thibault. 2007 Annual Report The Building Services Department is charged with maintaining town -owned buildings such as the Memorial Building. Given the age and extreme usage of some of these facilities, this is not an easy task. However, even when called on at the last minute, the necessary set ups are made for various events, such as Selectmen meetings, Town Meetings, and Nevins Hall events (i.e. the troop deployment ceremony). These employees also provide countless hours of set up for outside events like the Concerts on the Green (which are well attended and important to the community) and the September II remembrance ceremony. They recently put on an employee lunch, setting up tents and tables and grilling food for all Town employees. The preparation for and work done at this event was in addition to their regular daily responsibilities. Most of the work done by the Building Services staff is behind the scenes and without fanfare, but what they do is invaluable. The staff does their best with limited resources to make the Town buildings functional and presentable. Payroll The Town's payroll process runs smoothly, thanks in large part to Anne Wynne, our Payroll Administrator who oversees the entire process. Anne patiently trains new staff and is a wonderful mentor to all. Her ability to audit the payroll and gather requested information is outstanding. Our employees are able to track leave accruals on their pay stubs. They are also able to view deductions for each pay period as well as cumulative totals. Group Insurance General Government 38 (L -R) Building Services staff Ray Spurgeon, Kenny Green, Jim Egan, and Walter Premo Town of Framingham In 1993, Framingham accepted G.L.3213, Section 19, which sets out the procedure for providing group health insurance through an agreement with a public employee committee ( "PEC ") composed of union members and a retiree. The current agreement between the Town and the PEC expires at the end of 2008. The Town and the PEC meet monthly to analyze and discuss health care costs and various proposals for controlling those costs. We are currently reviewing wellness programs targeted to Framingham's specific needs and are carefully evaluating the costs and benefits of recommending adoption of G.L.c.3213, Section 18, which many other municipalities have adopted. That Section provides for Town retirees and their dependents who are eligible for Medicare Parts A and B to enroll in a Medicare supplemental plan. Our Benefits Coordinator, Cindy McKellick, with the assistance of the Department's other staff members, ably oversaw the annual Open Enrollment period, during which employees are able to modify their insurance selections. Cindy and the rest of the Department also seamlessly handled the implementation of the Commonwealth's new health reform law, which mandated additional responsibilities for municipal employers. Labor Relations Collective bargaining agreements with unions representing police officers, police superiors, firefighters, deputy fire chiefs, police dispatchers, library employees, and two units of Department of Public Works employees expired June 30, 2007. In addition, the collective bargaining agreement with the School Crossing Guards, which expires on June 30, 2008, contained a "wage re- opener" that called for new negotiations on wages prior to the expiration of the agreement. Human Resources, along with department heads, the Town Manager's office, the Assistant Town Manager, and the Chief Financial Officer, has spent and continues to spend considerable amounts of time trying to negotiate a fair contract that is affordable for the Town in light of its serious financial 2007 Annual Report situation and the sentiments expressed by its citizens at Town Meeting. State law allows the Town Manager or his designee to participate in collective bargaining and vote as a member of the Framingham School Committee, which negotiates separately with unions representing school employees. The Town Manager has designated the Director of Human Resources as his designee for that purpose. As a result, I have attended several meetings of the School Committee. Our Department will continue to explore additional ways in which we can work together, including encouraging active participation in our PEC meetings, discussing ways to express our appreciation of our employees in fiscally tight times, and offering proposals for programs jointly sponsored by the Town and Schools. In conclusion, the Human Resources Division and I wish to extend our appreciation to all employees and the members of the Town's boards, committees and commissions for their ongoing support in helping us fulfill our goals and objections. In addition, I would like to provide a special thank you to my staff — Anne Wynne, Cindy McKellick, Judith Caron, and Claudia Araujo — as well as our wonderful senior volunteers for their hard work, good humor, great customer service skills, and guidance these past few months. Respectfully Submitted, Sandra Charton, HR Director Veterans' Benefits & Services 150 Concord Street, Room B55 Framingham, NIA 01702 508 -n2 -55151 508 - 628 -1580 (fax) veterans@franiinghamma.gov The Department of Veterans' Services is established pursuant to Chapter 115 of the Massachusetts General Laws. The goal of the General Government 39 Town of Framingham Department is to aid, assist, advise and advocate for veterans and their dependents regarding their right to benefits and services under both state and federal law. Some of the services offered by the Department are emergency financial and medical assistance; help with obtaining food, clothing and shelter; and reviewing other resources available to aid veterans and their dependents. It is essential that the Department keep up to date on new policies, legislation and programs available to our clients and have mechanisms to publicize both current and new services. . Assisting veterans in filing claims for benefits and monitoring continued eligibility for such benefits is an integral part of the Department's work. It is essential for the Department to comply with all reporting and record keeping requirements, and seek available funding and reimbursements to help our veterans. Another major responsibility is to explore, develop and maintain a network of social service resources to address the needs of veterans and their dependents. These resources include employment assistance, counseling, and all types of medical care. The Department communicates with the Massachusetts Department of Workforce Development, local employers, and VA Medical Centers on an ongoing basis. Finally, the Director of the Department is responsible for performing the duties of Burial Agent and Veteran' Grave Registration Officer pursuant to state law. On November 11, 2007, the Department and the Framingham Veterans' Council conducted a Veterans' Day Program honoring veterans who served in our military during war and peace time. The Program included prayers, placing of the wreath, a salute to the deceased, the playing of Taps, recital of poems by Walsh Middle School students, the presenting of several awards, and remarks by various speakers. This program was a huge success. 2007 Annual Report This past year has been sad and challenging for the Department. Paul Raffa, the Director of the Department, passed away in November of 2007, leaving a huge void. We have been interviewing candidates and expect to have a new Director starting with us in a short time. We have been trying to meet the needs of our veterans as much as possible. We are grateful for the help of Elizabeth Simpson, our part - time assistant, who has provided a great deal of support. We are also thankful for the services offered by the Commonwealth's Department of Veterans' Affairs, who have come to Framingham and helped us out. In addition, we appreciate the encouragement, energy, and enthusiasm personified by Larry Herson, the President of the Framingham Veterans' Council. Larry and his fellow council members have chipped in to help in so many ways. Our final thank you goes to Gary Brown, Director of Veterans' Services for the City of Marlborough. Gary has exemplified the true meaning of generosity by assisting many Framingham veterans and their dependents in addition to working at his full-time job in Marlborough. He has traveled to Framingham to explain reporting requirements to department heads, has met with veterans in his office and Framingham's office and is constantly available to patiently answer questions and offer suggestions. His selfless assistance during this difficult transition period has been inspiring and very much appreciated. Respectfully Submitted, Sandra Charton, HR Director General Government 40 Town of Framingham Building Services 150 Concord Street, Room 155 Framingham, NIA 01702 Building Services reports to the General Government Division of the town. Building Services is responsible for the maintenance of buildings, garages, and the management of parking functions and facilities. In addition, we provide many other services as administration of preventative maintenance contracts, polling equipment scheduling and set -up in all town precincts. We also initiate construction projects, repair work, set up of public meetings and many special functions throughout the year. This past year Town Meeting approved many Capital Projects that are currently underway, completed or soon to begin. We are grateful to Town Meeting for the support of these much needed projects. The department has been actively involved in working with the future tenants of town buildings given long term leases and approved by Town Meeting last spring. We hope to provide a smooth transition for these worthwhile organizations to occupy these buildings and grow and prosper. The success of the department this past year is by no means a singular effort and many departments have contributed to our success. I would like to thank the Administration and Finance Division for their guidance throughout the year. 2007 Annual Report 508 - 552 -5485 508 - 626 -1999 (fax) building.services @ framinghamma.gov The assistance of the Park & Recreation Division, Public Works Division, Police and Fire Divisions have played a major role in keeping us effective and we knowledge with much thanks the contribution they have made to us. I would also like to thank Tim Goddard, Mary Ellen Kelley, Jennifer Pratt and Town Clerk, Valerie Mulvey for their cooperation in many issues that arose from time to time. In conclusion, my sincere thanks to my Assistant Walter Premo and my dedicated staff who serve the town from year to year in a professional and courteous manner. Thanks for all you do! Respectfully Submitted, James W. Egan, Director General Government 41 Town of Framingham Media Services 150 Concord Street, Room B15 Framingham, NIA 01702 The mission of The Government Channel is to serve the community as a valued resource by providing timely news and events to inform Framingham residents on town programs and services. We do this by producing video coverage of public meetings, development of original series, and displaying important town announcements on our municipal electronic bulletin board. The Government Channel is dedicated to programming which supports the goals and objectives of the various town departments, also to make the proceedings of local government more accessible to the public. Some of the outreach, engagement activities, and production support that the government channel has participated in this year include the Memorial and Veterans Day Observance Ceremony, Flag Day Festival, Master Plan Discussion Programs, Rain Barrel and Conservation forums, Fire Prevention and Emergency Preparedness Outreach, Fair Housing Education, Park and Recreation Updates and Tournaments, Bow Hunting Education, Town Meeting Day, Brownfield Workshops, Senate Representative Discussion Programs, Holiday Season Concert, and Live Election Night Analysis The Government Channel also carries regular live coverage of the Board of Selectmen's Meetings, Planning Board and Town Meeting. Monthly coverage of the Framingham Disability Commission, Downtown Railroad Crossing Taskforce, and Human Relation Commission are an important component of the channel line up that gives residences instant access to Framingham government both on their cable system and via the intemet The Government Channel schedule can be viewed on RCN channel 13, Comcast 2007 Annual Report 508 - 552 -5517 govermzzent.channel @ franiinghaninia.gov Channel 10, and Verizon Channel 42. Programming schedules are available on the town's website, by accessing the government access portion of the department directory. The Government Channel was honored to take part in the dedication of the Deborah D. Blumer Community Room which was named in honor of the late state representative and community activist. Media services created a dedication tribute video that included several achieve clips from Deborah Bulmer's numerous programs and public appearances that was shown during the dedication ceremony. The Deborah D. Blumer Community room was also outfitted with a new multi camera pan and tilt production system. This system allows the cablecast of board meetings and community events from this space with a higher production value. This engineering and installation took place with no interruption to the regular live cable coverage produced by the department. The Government Channel through its programming is compiling the most complete and accurate Public Records for the Town of Framingham government. This provides greater ability to assess the accuracy of official print records of meeting minutes. All programming is available to the public upon request; selectmen, planning, and town meetings are available via streaming video on demand for Internet viewing. Respectfully Submitted, Ron J. Rego, Director General Government 42 Town of Framingham Chief Financial Officer 150 Concord Street, Room 127 Framingham, NIA 01702 The Office of the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) has both financial and policy duties. It is staffed by the CFO and an Assistant CFO. The Office oversees the financial management activities of the Town with the assistance of the three Town departments that have direct responsibility for the primary financial management functions of Town government: assessing, accounting, auditing, collecting taxes and certain local receipts, cash management and investing. The Assessing Department is responsible for the administration of the property tax system including the valuation of real and personal property and the assessment of taxes against these parcels and accounts. The Office of the Treasurer/ Collector is responsible for the collection of and accounting for all town revenues, the investment of all revenues, and the management of the Town's debt. The Accounting Department maintains the Town's accounting records, generates financial management information for use by all Town departments in the management of their operations, directs all audit activity and reviews compliance with internal controls. The Office of the CFO has direct responsibility for the development of the recommended annual operating and capital budgets. To accomplish this, the Office works closely with the Town Manager, Division Heads and department managers, the Board of Selectmen, the Town Finance Committee, the Capital Budget Committee, and the Standing Committee on Ways and Means. Upon adoption of the annual operating and capital budgets, the Office of the CFO monitors the progress of those budgets throughout the year to insure that rates of 2007 Annual Report 508 - 532 -5425 508 -n2 -5428 (fax) office.cfo@framinghamma.gov spending will not create budgetary problems and adversely affect the fiscal condition of the Town. Other responsibilities of the CFO include participation in case management of workers' compensation claims; membership on the Retirement Board, the Memorial Building Study Committee, and the ADA Transition Subcommittee. The CFO is also responsible for the recommendation of annual water and sewer rates, developed in partnerships with the Department of Public Works and the Board of Public Works. Highlights of the CFO's office major accomplishments in 2007 include: The adoption of a balanced $193.6 million FY08 operating budget and a $41 million FY08 Capital Budget. An updated long term financial forecast was presented to advise Town management, Boards, Committees and residents of the Town's financial direction. The FY08 operating budget was developed using program budgeting. This will allow the public to understand the amount of resources spent for specific Town activities and services. The intent is to make the operating and capital budget less complicated to understand in order to make educated decisions with very limited resources. The Free Cash policy was amended to encourage the building of the Town Stabilization Fund. Finally, in conjunction with the Department of Public Works and the Board of Public Works, water and sewer rates were completely restructured. The new structure encourages conservation. The CFO would like to thank the Assistant CFO, Jennifer Pratt, Dennis O'Neil and his Finance 43 Town of Framingham staff in the Office of the Treasurer/ Collector; Michael Flynn and his staff in the Assessing Office and Richard G. Howarth, Jr. and his Town Accountant 150 Concord Street, Room 205 Framingham, NIA 01702 The Office of the Town Accountant is responsible for insuring that all expenditures of the Town conform to the requirements of Massachusetts General Laws, Town Meeting appropriations and grantors, and do not exceed Town Meeting appropriations or grant authorizations. The Office also accounts for all financial transactions of the Town - receipts and expenditures — in conformance with generally accepted accounting principles and the Uniform Municipal Accounting System promulgated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts' Department of Revenue. It then makes this accounting information available to (1) the Town's municipal program managers to facilitate their management of program budgets, (2) independent auditors who must opine on the financial condition of the Town; (3) state and federal agencies for use in generating financial information for program and policy development, and, (4) credit rating agencies for their use in assessing the Town's fiscal stability and creditworthiness and Residents. Significant activities of the Accounting Office include the submission of required financial reports, reconciliation of revenue and expenditure accounts, cash, and accounts receivable as well as auditing all accounts payable invoices for accuracy prior to payment. The June 30, 2007 (FY07) balance sheet was submitted to the DOR on October 2 2007, for certification of available funds. On 2007 Annual Report staff in the Accounting Department. Respectfully Submitted, Mary Ellen Kelley, CFO 508 - 552 -5410 508 - 872 -5616 (fax) town.accountant @ franiinghaninia.gov October 5, 2007, the DOR certified the following amounts as available for appropriation: General Fund Free Cash: $1,246,796, Sewer Enterprise Fund Retained Earnings: $4,769,368, Water Enterprise Fund Retained Earnings $1,364,096. These available funds represent unrestricted surpluses that are available for appropriation by Town Meeting. They are generated from positive operating results in relation to the budget; that is, they are derived from annual receipts in excess of budget estimates and expenditures less than the appropriations authorized by Town Meeting. For Fiscal Year 2007, the Department processed over 9,500 purchase orders, reviewed over 55,900 invoices and issued over 19,800 accounts payable checks. The top ten vendors paid during Fiscal 2007 are as follows: Blue Cross /Blue Shield $30,835,990 US Bank 31,338,362 Framingham Retirement 8,309,556 Keefe Technical School 7,927,408 Accept Ed Collaborative 2,531,359 SEA Consultants, Inc 2,357,640 Waste Management 2,163,636 NStar Electric 1,985,616 First Student Inc 1,755,423 Eastern Contractors, Inc 1,569,620 I would like to thank all the departments who have assisted us during the past year. I would Finance 44 Town of Framingham like to especially thank CFO, Mary Ellen Kelley, Assistant CFO Jennifer Pratt, Treasurer Dennis O'Neil, Chief Assessor Michael Flynn, Director of Technology Services Kathleen McCarthy and their staffs for their guidance and assistance during the past year 2007 Annual Report I would like to recognize the invaluable efforts the members of the staff, Assistant Town Accountant Judy Moore and Shirley Tibbert as well as Nicholas Babineau and Pamela Hache who have moved on other positions within the Town. Your obedient servant, Richard G. Howarth, Jr., Town Accountant Finance 45 a n Assets Cash & Investments Cash Investments Letters of Credit Security Bonds Total Cash & Investments Receivables Taxes Real Estate Personal Property Motor Vehicle Excise Deffered Property Taxes and Tax Foreclosures Tax Liens and Charges Added to Taxes Total Taxes Other Receivables Sewer Usage Receivable Water Usage Receivables Departmental Receivables Intergovernmental Receivables Total Other Receivables Total Receivables Other Assets Tax Foreclosures Other Assets -- Inventories Total Other Assets Amts to be provided for bonds Total Assets Liabilities, Reserves, and Fund Balances Liabilities Accounts Payable Security Deposits BAN Payable Loans Authorized Loans Authorized and Unissued Bonds Payable Total Liabilities Reserves For Uncollectable Receivables For Abatements and Exemptions Total Reserves Fund Balances Reserved for Encumberances Reserved for Petty Cash Reserved for Inventory Reserved for Expenditure Reserve for Premium on Issuance of Debt Excluded BANs Teachers Pay Deferral Undesignated Total Fund Balances Total Liabilies, Reserves and Fund Balances 344,294 344,294 68,675 68,675 412,969 412,969 - 44,863,181 2,700,000 16,158,562 - 63,721,743 $ 25,040,722 $ 4,648,521 $ 48,288,809 $ 2,853,691 $ 22,802,186 $ 14,895,482 $ 6,916,360 $ 13,732,119 $ 139,177,890 $ 9,623,533 $ 1,089,459 Town of Framingham $ 167,180 $ 208,307 $ 484,876 $ 6,388,308 $ 5,495,511 $ 24,578,982 - Combined Balance Sheet 2,567,999 3,300,150 464,710 - - - 6,332,859 As of June 30, 2007 20,777,770 2,156,084 32,824,502 Unaudited (20,777,770) (2,156,084) (32,824,502) Special Capital High School Enterprise Enterprise Health Ins Trusts and Total General Revenue Projects Capital Project Capital Project Funds Trust Fund Agency (Memo) 6,167,330 16,831,579 484,876 6,388,308 5,495,511 94,633,584 5,650,780 $ 16,464,352 $ 2,833,308 $ 937,186 $ 153,691 $ 4,522,474 $ 9,350,903 $ 6,916,360 $ 8,540,498 $ 49,718,772 - - - - - - 1,741,616 1,741,616 2,043,853 7,694,633 287,684 - - 2,121,150 304,200 304,200 17,219,258 2,297,918 495,994 1,887,984 885,879 2,892,800 2,892,800 16,464,352 2,833,308 937,186 153,691 4,522,474 9,350,903 6,916,360 13,479,114 54,657,388 550 68,675 1,863,307 - - - - - - 1,863,307 806,815 - 1,809,665 198,958 3,829,411 806,815 1,942,319 1,942,319 395,651 - - 395,651 3,126, 307 4,413,742 2,685,355 (3,723,376) 491,213 (4,333,616) 6,437,699 3,617,520 8,134, 399 9,757,127 7,722,556 3,271,378 491,213 (3,313,639) 3,849,457 8,625,612 - 8,236,608 27,325,048 $ 25,040,722 2,278,801 $ 48,288,809 $ 2,853,691 2,278,801 - - $ 13,732,119 2,121,150 1,856,275 3,977,425 29,002 287,684 - 118,290 253,005 687,981 - 1,527,529 2,488,442 - 800,000 - 4,815,971 29,002 1,815,213 2,488,442 2,121,150 5,053,366 253,005 11,760,178 8,163,401 1,815,213 2,488,442 2,121,150 5,544,579 253,005 20,385,790 344,294 344,294 68,675 68,675 412,969 412,969 - 44,863,181 2,700,000 16,158,562 - 63,721,743 $ 25,040,722 $ 4,648,521 $ 48,288,809 $ 2,853,691 $ 22,802,186 $ 14,895,482 $ 6,916,360 $ 13,732,119 $ 139,177,890 $ 9,623,533 $ 1,089,459 $ 1,121,808 $ 167,180 $ 208,307 $ 484,876 $ 6,388,308 $ 5,495,511 $ 24,578,982 - - 2,567,999 3,300,150 464,710 - - - 6,332,859 20,777,770 2,156,084 32,824,502 55,758,356 (20,777,770) (2,156,084) (32,824,502) (55,758,356) 44, 863,181 2,700,000 16,158, 562 63, 721, 743 9,623,533 1,089,459 48,552,988 6,167,330 16,831,579 484,876 6,388,308 5,495,511 94,633,584 5,650,780 287,684 1,571,213 - 2,121,150 5,544,578 - - 15,175,405 2,043,853 - - - 2,043,853 7,694,633 287,684 1,571,213 - 2,121,150 5,544,578 17,219,258 2,297,918 495,994 1,887,984 885,879 8,183,073 618,664 16,500 72,361 14,458,373 550 550 68,675 68,675 1,730,759 90,029 - - 1,809,665 198,958 3,829,411 6,742 6,742 (795,830) - - - (795,830) 4,413,742 2,685,355 (3,723,376) (4,199,518) (4,333,616) 6,437,699 511,552 7,965,289 9,757,127 7,722,556 3,271,378 (1,835,392) (3,313,639) 3,849,457 8,866,028 528,052 8,236,608 27,325,048 $ 25,040,722 $ 4,648,521 $ 48,288,809 $ 2,853,691 $ 22,802,186 $ 14,895,482 $ 6,916,360 $ 13,732,119 139,177,890 0 O '77 N O O J C CD O a m Revenues Property taxes Excise Penalties, interest and other taxes Intergovernmental Fees Licenses & Permits Charges for services Interest Earnings Fines and forfeitures Miscellaneous Contributions Total Revenue Expenditures General Government Public Safety Education Public Works Human Services Culture and Recreation Miscellaneous Debt Service Intergovernmental Total Expenditures Excess (deficiency) of revenues over expenditures Other Financing Sources (Uses) Operating transfers in Operating transfers out Total other financing sources (uses) Excess of Revenues and other sources over (under) expenditures and other uses Fund Balance, June 30, 2006 Fund Balance, June 30, 2007 J 0 0 CfQ N O O J >v ` O Town of Framingham Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures, and Changes in Fund Balance All Governmental Fund Types and Expendable Trust Funds For the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2007 Unaudited Special Capital High School EnterpriseCapital Enterprise Health Ins Total General Revenue Projects Project Projects Funds Trust Fund Trusts (Memo) $ 132,734,965 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 132,734,965 7,462,701 7,462,701 1,848,010 1,265 1,849,275 29,406,333 13,976,205 2,753,676 84,823 - 562,647 46,783,684 447,771 - - - 227,657 - 675,428 2,149,077 - - - 2,149,077 1,289,140 1,887,304 - 26,778,817 1,941,963 31,897,224 1,015,876 15,888 23,187 785,288 239,890 693,634 2,773,763 489,254 11,950 - - - - 501,204 948,724 2,893,401 80,888 - - 3,923,013 26,000 1,594,504 34,327,950 1,151,812 37,100,266 177,817,851 20,379,252 2,753,676 84,823 252,109 28,207,640 34,567,840 3,787,409 267,850,600 7,257,827 2,656,916 122,552 - - - - 408,672 10,445,967 22,015,542 279,481 586,115 - 1,862,766 24,743,904 87,701,825 16,528,560 1,112,078 2,208,711 - - - 107,551,174 10,167,899 22,647 3,474,767 - 5,304,886 21,264,802 405,864 40,640,865 1,039,555 106,253 350,825 - - - 1,496,633 4,379,146 650,659 505,799 4,655 482,960 - 32,037 6,055,256 37,377,497 - - - - 34,822,526 - 72,200,023 8,054,950 2,221,099 - - 10,276,049 3,315,267 - 476,409 3,791,676 181,309,508 20,244,516 6,152,136 2,208,711 5,309,541 23,968,861 34,822,526 3,185,748 277,201,547 (3,491,657) 134,736 (3,398,460) (2,123,888) (5,057,432) 4,238,779 (254,686) 601,661 (9,350,947) 2,402,448 56,929 213,940 1,972,434 805,964 521,088 900,000 6,872,803 (1,284,420) (193,740) (11,500) (623,985) (4,012,765) (521,088) (225,305) (6,872,803) 1,118,028 (136,811) 202,440 1,348,449 (3,206,801) 674,695 (2,373,629) (2,075) (3,196,020) (2,123,888) (3,708,983) 1,031,978 (254,686) 1,276,356 (9,350,947) 10,096,185 3,273,453 1,360,628 (1,189,751) 7,558,440 7,834,050 782,738 6,960,252 36,675,995 $ 7,722,556 $ 3,271,378 $ (1,835,392) $ (3,313,639) $ 3,849,457 $ 8,866,028 $ 528,052 $ 8,236,608 $ 27,325,048 0 0 CfQ N O O J >v ` O a m General Government Selectmen Legal Town Buildings Purchasing Department Committees Total Appropriation Finance Finance Committee Chief Financial Officer Accounting Treasurer /Collector Assessors Total Appropriation Technology Services Total Appropriation Human Resources Human Resources Veterans' Services Total Appropriation Planning and Economic Development Conservation Planning Department Zoning Board Total Appropriation cc 0 0 crc N O O J ` O Town of Framingham Summary of Expenditures Fiscal Year 2007 As of June 30, 2007 Finance Committee Special Town Reserve Fund Carryover from Meeting and Municipal Inter Divisional Closed to Fund Prior Year Original Budget Adjustments Relief Transfers Transfers Expended Encumbered Balance $ 6,675 $ 419,718 $ $ $ 4,040 $ 414,543 $ 8,697 $ 7,193 4,697 537,800 975 528,511 410 14,551 10,742 1,443,862 (1,776) (5,015) 1,407,899 1,048 38,866 2,833 141,519 133,901 9,072 1,379 557 6,920 200 1,806 - 5,871 25,504 2,549,819 (1,776) 200 2,486,660 19,227 67,860 - 2,030 (200) 525 - 1,305 - 241,580 - (2,800) 236,554 596 1,630 17,410 247,302 (2,144) (2,000) 257,141 - 3,427 19,646 630,808 11,260 661,078 - 636 1,940 474,845 - (6,460) 430,436 10,131 29,758 38,996 1,596,565 (2,144) (200) 1,585,734 10,727 36,756 41,383 1,067,098 (1,952) 1,063,604 21,496 21,429 6,941 367,163 - (8,840) 359,111 - 6,153 1,101 175,769 40,000 8,840 224,320 1,390 8,042 542,932 40,000 - 583,431 - 7,543 9,578 107,031 - 109,471 6,473 665 12,921 712,932 (1,050) 711,348 582 12,873 6,224 55,659 46,594 3,033 12,256 28,723 875,622 (1,050) 867,413 10,088 25,794 0 0 crc N O O J ` O a m Ic Police Division Police Department Framingham Emergency Management Agen Animal Control Street Lighting Total Appropriation Fire Division Total Appropriation Public Works Public Works Administration Public Works Highway Fleet Services Sanitation Engineering Total Appropriation Snow & Ice Removal Total Appropriation Parks and Recreation Park and Recreation Cemetery Council on Aging Total Appropriation Inspectional Services Building Inspection Health Department Sealer of Weights and Measure Total Appropriation 0 Town of Framingham Summary of Expenditures Fiscal Year 2007 As of June 30, 2007 Finance Committee Special Town Reserve Fund Carryover from Meeting and Municipal Inter Divisional Prior Year Original Budget Adjustments Relief Transfers Transfers 0 crc Closed to Fund Expended Encumbered Balance 51,542 10,270,442 (29,098) (150,000) (3,675) 9,991,924 21,850 125,437 484 31,405 - 28,290 2,997 602 8,762 173,521 25,407 - 185,367 3,361 18,962 - 464,722 - 3,675 466,984 1,413 0 60,788 10,940,090 (3,691) (150,000) 10,672,565 29,621 145,001 48,328 11,303,941 (32,348) (100,000) 11,038,243 58,951 122,727 12,859 544,136 (20,000) 509,923 14,700 12,372 280,919 2,815,771 50,000 2,903,727 222,446 20,517 45,222 1,017,040 - 1,004,976 45,959 11,327 292,505 3,975,757 (50,000) 3,685,390 399,650 133,222 36,125 735,992 (8,686) 20,000 726,380 35,849 21,202 667,630 9,088,696 (8,686) - 8,830,396 718,604 198,640 - 641,500 82,683 724,183 - - 15,436 1,957,750 (1,782) - 1,938,374 176 32,854 - 27,292 24,753 - 2,539 1,517 273,282 265,830 2,501 6,468 16,953 2,258,324 (1,782) 2,228,957 2,677 41,861 2,248 680,156 (3,714) 630,658 2,948 45,084 4,763 566,094 549,405 105 21,347 - 141,599 141,060 3 536 7,011 1,387,849 (3,714) 1,321,123 3,056 66,967 NO w C CD 0 a m Town of Framingham Summary of Expenditures Fiscal Year 2007 As of June 30, 2007 v, O 0 0 crc N O O J ` O Finance Committee Special Town Reserve Fund Carryover from Meeting and Municipal Inter Divisional Closed to Fund Prior Year Original Budget Adjustments Relief Transfers Transfers Expended Encumbered Balance Framingham Schools Total Appropriation 59,725 78,216,178 800,466 699,151 79,746,169 20,215 9,136 Keefe Voke Assessment Total Appropriation - 7,900,000 - 7,900,000 - - Libraries Total Appropriation 1,286 2,414,287 29,826 2,440,772 1,765 2,862 Planning Board Total Appropriation 1,765 208,460 (1,108) - 186,580 1,140 21,397 Town Clerk, Elections Town Clerk - 221,649 2,572 222,222 860 1,139 Elections 178,890 (1,808) (2,572) 147,389 4,500 22,621 Stipend Elected Official 80,968 80,968 - - Total Appropriation 319,571 (1,808) 288,642 5,360 23,761 Total Town Clerk, Elections - 400,539 (1,808) - 369,610 5,360 23,761 Miscellaneous Unclassified Property & Liability Insurance 169 695,604 12,000 98,555 798,768 7,391 169 Workers' Compensation 7,964 600,000 - (75,205) 523,194 1,727 7,838 Unemployment 7,167 300,000 (28,152) 273,897 - 5,118 Sick Leave Buyback - 60,000 (14,135) 45,864 1 Group Insurance - 26,200,952 - 26,200,952 - - Medicallndemnification 5,000 1,067 6,067 - Self- insurance 17,000 30,000 1,368 40,189 6,811 1,368 Medicaid Part 1 Contract 7,540 40,000 - 16,502 55,657 8,385 - Total Appropriation 39,840 27,931,556 12,000 - 27,944,588 24,314 14,494 Reserve Fund Total Appropriation - 400,000 211,161 (561,160) - - 50,001 Stabilization Fund Total Appropriation 750,000 750,000 - v, O 0 0 crc N O O J ` O a m Retirement Contributory Pension Pensions non contributory Medicare Total Appropriation Debt Service Total Appropriation Total General Fund Appropriated Other Financing Uses Transfer to Arena Transfer to Capital Projects Total Other Financing Uses Non appropriated items Unclassified Tax Title Unclassified Overlay Deficit Teachers Pay Deferral Cherry Sheet Charges Debt Exclusion High School Debt Reserve for Overlay Total Non appropriated items Total General Fund Operating v, 0 0 crc N O O J ` O Town of Framingham Summary of Expenditures Fiscal Year 2007 As of June 30, 2007 Finance Committee Special Town Reserve Fund Carryover from Meeting and Municipal Inter Divisional Closed to Fund Prior Year Original Budget Adjustments Relief Transfers Transfers Expended Encumbered Balance 8,166, 783 8,166, 783 - 163,447 142,936 20,511 1,207,500 1,178,849 28,651 9,537,730 9,488,568 49,162 - 8,167,988 (215,000) (52,500) 7,754,325 - 146,163 1,045,974 178,179,174 736,568 177,982,921 927,241 1,051,554 - 194,242 - 181,980 - 12,262 202,440 202,440 - - 396,682 384,420 12,262 2,570 42,000 43,468 1,102 - 207,827 207,827 - 994,788 994,788 - 3,636,271 3,315,267 321,004 300,625 300,625 - - 1,800,862 1,800,862 - 2,570 6,982,373 - 6,662,837 - 322,106 1,048,544 185,558,229 736,568 185,030,178 927,241 1,385,922 0 0 crc N O O J ` O a m Town of Framingham Summary of Expenditures Fiscal Year 2007 As of June 30, 2007 v, N 0 0 crc N O O J ` O Finance Committee Special Town Reserve Fund Carryover from Meeting and Municipal Inter Divisional Closed to Fund Prior Year Original Budget Adjustments Relief Transfers Transfers Expended Encumbered Balance Articles Al STM3 /04 Legal Cons vs WnchPndTrst 130,750 (123,125) 4,002 3,623 A40 ATM Town Master Plan 78,500 25,500 53,000 A27 ATM Self- Evaluation & Trans Plan 5,410 - 5,410 10/05 A6 Framingham Disability Comm 8,132 2,000 6,132 - 10/05 Al2 Meidal Indemnification 275 - - - 275 4/06 ATM A32 Trans Open Space Fund - 150,000 150,000 - - 4/06 ATM A33 Rail Trail - 100,000 100,000 5/16/06A3 Road Improvements 621,500 - 121,581 499,919 5/09 A2 Lowes and Natick Lift Services 45,000 - 45,000 A4(A) STM 2/07 Paulini Loam C - 125,000 99,796 25,204 A4(B) STM 2/07 NEXUM 75,000 39,349 35,651 A4© STM 2/07 FY2007 Legal Budget - - 125,000 125,000 - - Total Articles 889,567 250,000 201,875 567,228 773,939 275 Total General Fund $ 1,938,111 $ 185,808,229 $ 938,443 $ $ $ 185,597,406 $ 1,701,180 $ 1,386,197 v, N 0 0 crc N O O J ` O a m 0 0 crc Town of Framingham Summary of Expenditures Fiscal Year 2007 As of June 30, 2007 Finance Committee Special Town Reserve Fund Carryover from Meeting and Municipal Inter Divisional Closed to Fund Prior Year Original Budget Adjustments Relief Transfers Transfers Expended Encumbered Balance Enterprise Funds Appropriations Summary Arena Enterprise Fund Total Appropriation $ $ 487,663 $ 15,000 $ $ $ 500,469 $ $ 2,194 Indirect Costs 100,579 100,579 - Total Arena Enterprise Fund $ $ 588,242 $ 15,000 $ $ $ 601,048 $ $ 2,194 Sewer Enterprise Fund Total Appropriation $ 289,897 $ 12,461,771 $ $ $ $ 12,016,600 $ 275,370 $ 459,698 Indirect Costs - 924,839 924,839 - - Transfers RE Capital Projects - 1,225,458 1,225,458 - - Total Sewer Enterprise Fund $ 289,897 $ 14,612,068 $ $ $ $ 14,166,897 $ 275,370 $ 459,698 v, w Water Enterprise fund Total Appropriation Indirect Costs Transfers RE Capital Projects Total Water Enterprise Fund $ 192,680 $ 11,775,262 $ - 1,014,914 - 746,975 $ 192,680 $ 13,537,151 $ $ 11,451,792 $ 282,712 $ 233,438 1,014,914 - - 746,975 - - $ 13,213,681 $ 282,712 $ 233,438 N O O J ` O a m School Capital Projects 5/98 ATM A31 E Upgrade School Smoke Detectors 5/02 ATM A15H Brophy School Roof 4/03 ATM A27M Boiler Replacement Walsh School 4/04 ATM A21 M Walsh Roof Replacement 4/05 ATM A26B Vertical Handicap Lifts School 4/05 ATM A26C Elevator Shaft & Piston Repairs Schools 4/05 ATM A26D Stapleton School Roof 4/05 ATM A26F Replace Emergency Generator School 4/05 ATM A26Q Sanitary Line Replacement Fuller Middle School 4/06 ATM A30S Stapleton Roof Supplement 4/06 ATM A30T Boiler Replace 5 Schools 2/07 STM A5 Fuller Auditorium Ceiling 4/07 ATM A4900 Fuller Auditorium Ceiling 4/07 ATM A49PP McCarthy School Roof Replacemtent 4/07 A49QQ DDC Energy Conservation Controls Phase 1 of 3 4/07 ATM A49RR Fire Alarm McCarthy Elementary School 4/07 ATM A49SS 3 Utility Pick -Ups, 2 Cars 4/07 ATM A49YY Thayer Campus Paint Windows Total School Capital Projects Municipal Capital Projects 11/93 STM A18 Computer Equipment 5/94 ATM A24 Road Reconstruction /Upgrade 11/94 STM A21 Municipal Information Systems 5/98 ATM A31 Backflow Preventers Park Drainage 5/98 ATM A31 F Underground Tank Removal 5/00 ATM A25Q Park Street Drainage 5/00 ATM A25U Park & School Fences 5/01 ATM A21 C Stormwater Plan 5/02 ATM A15C Henry Street Remediation 5/02 ATM A15J Financial Management Software 4/03 ATM A27F Multi- purpose Sidewalk Tractor with Attachments 4/03 ATM A27L Tercentennial Park Phase 1 10/03 STM A9 Senior Center at 535 Union Avenue 10/03 STM A10 Tercentennial Park Phase 11 4/04 ATM A21 F Pedestrian Ramps 4/04 ATM A21 G Engine 5 Fire Pumper Town of Framingham Summary of Capital Projects As of June 30, 2007 Expenditures Expenditures Encumbrances Appropriation Transfer Reauthorized Rescinded Prior Years Fiscal 2007 Fiscal 2007 Balance $ 80,000 $ $ $ - $ 77,600 $ $ 2,400 $ 647,000 183,679 (89,710) 557,289 - 1 575,000 (8,166) 532,314 3,908 34,520 1,610,000 24,991 1,607,531 - 2,469 160,000 1,421,112 148,490 6,000 11,510 130,000 - 50,188 1,587 79,812 108,503 68,000 351,497 23,000 505,000 - 72,000 (67,200) - - 4,800 - 108,000 (800) - 17,497 89,703 130,000 - 110,027 129,505 495 480,000 97,993 - 428,279 - 51,721 360,000 (250,000) 164,148 - 27,000 9,000 324,000 360,000 1,768,563 12,921 - - 360,000 560,000 418,625 1,375 - 560,000 255,000 75,000 - 255,000 118,000 429,590 118,000 85,045 85,045 120,000 - - - - 120,000 $ 5,958,548 $ (8,166) $ 351,497 $ (89,710) $ 2,996,412 $ 1,112,081 $ 11,400 $ 2,092,276 $ 587,000 $ $ $ $ 584,065 $ - $ $ 2,935 239,000 183,679 55,321 - 670,406 666,498 - 3,908 25,000 24,991 - 9 1,427,112 1,421,112 6,000 - 300,000 18,413 1,587 280,000 409,425 409,273 - 152 500,000 468,833 997 30,170 62,000 58,358 - - 3,642 715,000 407,234 110,027 164,769 32,970 98,000 97,993 - - 7 420,000 (250,000) 164,148 - 5,852 - 1,800,000 1,768,563 12,921 12,294 6,222 420,000 418,625 1,375 - - 75,000 75,000 - - 430,000 429,590 410 0 0 crc N O O J >y C CD O a m Town of Framingham Summary of Capital Projects As of June 30, 2007 0 0 CfQ N O O J C CD O Expenditures Expenditures Encumbrances Appropriation Transfer Reauthorized Rescinded Prior Years Fiscal 2007 Fiscal 2007 Balance 4/04 ATM A21 K Ford 650 J Hook Dump 121,000 15,500 135,792 - - 708 4/04 ATM A21 ILL Resurfacing of Bowditch Field Track 185,000 - - 182,300 - 1,500 1,200 4/05 ATM A26A Pedestrian Ramps 60,706 14,294 10,403 38,984 2,446 23,167 4/05 ATM A26E Beach Stormwater Management 267,410 - - 96,055 2,145 169,210 4/05 ATM A26G Maynard Stair & Walk Repairs 108,613 66,387 145,304 4,995 - 24,701 4/05 ATM A26H Boiler Bowditch School 40,392 - 39,175 - 1,217 4/05 ATM A261 Municipal Data Storage Upgrade 79,373 12,397 91,726 44 4/05 ATM A26J F450 Crew Cab Dump Truck 42,107 - - 41,973 134 4/05 ATM A26K F250 Pick -up Truck4X4 28,914 587 29,501 - - 4/05 ATM A26L Engine 8 -Brush Truck 60,000 - 54,284 4,680 1,036 4/05 ATM A26M 8800 GVW 4WD Pick -up Truck 36,900 36,900 - - 4/05 ATM A26N 15,000 GVW Utility Truck 45,300 (1,845) 43,455 4/05 ATM A260 8,800 4WD Pick -Up Truck 36,900 1,845 - 38,745 - - - 4/05 ATM A21 Bowditch Athletic Complex Renovation Design 412,188 - 37,812 - 194,813 204,071 51,116 4/05 ATM A26R 40,000 GVW Dump Truck with Slide In Sander 142,500 - 142,500 - - - 4/05 ATM A26S 68,000 GVW Refuse Packer with Plow 157,000 157,000 - - 4/05 ATM A26T Replace Platform 1 850,000 - 751,151 8,700 - 90,149 4/05 ATM A26U Callahan Phase 2 Floor 372,183 - 1,817 18,651 337,903 17,446 - 4/05 ATM A26V Case 570 Loader 68,320 (587) - 61,696 - 3,900 2,137 4/05 ATM A26W Resurfacing of Bowditch Field Track - - 17,000 - - - 17,000 4/06 ATM A30A Engine 2 Fire Pumper 398,750 (16,921) - 373,295 6,439 2,095 4/06 ATM A30B Roof Station 2 Replacement 31,375 6,650 38,025 - - 4/06 ATM A30C Communication Cabling 378,485 - 16,973 351,800 9,712 4/06 ATM A30D Memorial Building Boiler 809,339 - 11,000 798,339 4/06 ATM A30E Pearl Street Garage Caulking 45,000 (21,979) - - 23,021 4/06 ATM A30F McAuliffe Branch Renovations 65,046 45,315 19,731 4/06 ATM A30G F450 4WD Dump Truck 46,060 45,878 182 4/06 ATM A30H F550 Trash Compactor 68,506 68,063 443 4/06 ATM A301 Kubota Tractor 24,300 - 24,300 - - 4/06 ATM A30J Basketball Resurfacing Loring 53,750 32,250 - 86,000 - 4/06 ATM A30K PC Mobile Laptops 157,850 - 144,443 3,980 9,427 4/06 ATM A30L Beaver Dam Stormwater Plan 350,000 104,183 227,353 18,464 4/06 ATM A30M Packer 2 Snow Fighter 62,500 62,500 - - 4/06 ATM A30N Sidewalk/Accessibility 100,000 (2,375) 97,625 4/06 ATM A300 Multi- purpose Sidewalk Vehicle 96,824 (159) 96,665 4/06 ATM A30P 68K GVW Packer with Plow 177,100 5,122 182,222 4/06 ATM A30Q 15K GVW 4WD Dump Truck 52,296 (1,294) 51,002 4/06 ATM A30R 15K GVW Dump Truck 52,296 (1,294) 51,002 - - 4/06 ATM A30U Voice Mail- Telephone Upgrade 40,000 6,763 16,815 16,422 4/06 ATM A30V Tercentennial Park Phase 3 420,000 30,000 14,000 376,000 0 0 CfQ N O O J C CD O a m Town of Framingham Summary of Capital Projects As of June 30, 2007 0 0 CfQ N O O J >y C CD O Expenditures Expenditures Encumbrances Appropriation Transfer Reauthorized Rescinded Prior Years Fiscal 2007 Fiscal 2007 Balance 4/07 ATM A18 Villiage Hall, Edgell Memorial Library, Old Academy 300,000 - - 300,000 4/07 ATM A19 Hollis St Community Center Repaving & Capital 90,000 90,000 4/07 ATM A49A Accu -Vote Machine Replacement (20) 117,000 117,000 4/07 ATM A49B Main Library Doors 44,893 44,893 4/07 ATM A49C Main Library- Parking Lot 75,750 75,750 4/07 ATM A49D Main Library Renovations Restroom & Community Room 66,650 66,650 4/07 ATM A49E Replace SCBA Units 356,545 356,545 4/07 ATM A49F Replace Engine 3 474,000 474,000 4/07 ATM A49G Replace Maintenance Truck 65,550 65,550 4/07 ATM A49H Voice Over Internet Town Phone Intergration 64,248 64,248 4/07 ATM A491 Memorial Building Window Replacement 280,500 280,500 4/07 ATMA49J Memorial Building Stair Replacement 199,500 199,500 4/07 ATM A49K Nevins Hall Stage Renovations 280,500 280,500 4/07 ATM A49L Maynard Chimney Repointing and Repair 470,000 470,000 4/07 ATM A49M Energy Management Upgrade for Police Headquarters 146,000 146,000 4/07 ATM A49N Emergency Generator Systems Callahan Senior Center 60,000 60,000 4/07 ATM A490 Demolition of Badger Road Dog Pound 50,000 50,000 4/07 ATM A49P Old Senior Center Roof Repair 59,500 59,500 4/07 ATM A49Q Maynard Window, Gutter Replacement 201,500 201,500 4/07 ATM A49R Maynard Building Front & Rear Door Replacement 27,000 27,000 4/07 ATM A49S ADA Phase 1 Compliance Multiple Buildings & Schools 228,000 228,000 4/07 ATM A49T Callahan Phase 3 468,268 468,268 4/07 ATM 49X Winch Grandstand Demolition & Replacement 147,275 147,275 4/07 ATM A49Y V #2 F550 Crew Cab Dump Truck 49,350 49,350 4/07 ATM A49Z V #3 Ford F350 Extended Cab 4x4 10,000 GVW 29,794 29,794 4/07 ATM A49AA V #4 Ford 650DumpTruck, 4x2 26,000 GVW 56,174 56,174 4/07 ATM A49BB Communication Center Upgrade 355,000 355,000 4/07 ATM A49CC Sucker Brook Drainage Improvements- Design 50,000 50,000 4/07 ATM A49DD Roadway Improvements 450,000 450,000 4/07 ATM A49EE 40,000 GVW Cab & Chassis with Dump Body and Plow 168,360 168,360 4/07 ATM A49FF 70,000 GVW Cab and Chassis with Dump Body and 100,000 100,000 4/07 ATM A49GG 40,000 GVW Cab and Chassis with Dump Body and 168,360 168,360 4/07 ATM A49HH 35,000 GVW Cab and Chassis with Aerial Lift #440 181,200 181,200 4/07 ATM A4911 40,000 GVW Cab and Chassis with Dump Body and Plow 168,360 168,360 4/07 ATM A49JJ 8,800 GVW Pick -up Truck with Plow #402 35,442 35,442 4/07 ATM A49KK 8,800 Pick -up Truck with Plow #405 35,442 35,442 4/07 ATM A49LL 68,000 GVW Cab & Chassiss with Refuse Packer & 211,327 211,327 4/07 ATM A49MM 15,000 GVW 4 -Wheel Drive Cab and Chassis with 61,841 61,841 4/07 ATM A49NN Roof Replacement Transfer Station 126,000 126,000 4/07 ATM A49TT Web Content Management System 107,873 107,873 4/07 ATM A49UU Pub Safety System Upgrades (Police & Fire) 243,761 243,761 4/07 ATM A49VV Library Generator 30,000 30,000 4/07 ATM A49WW Bombadier Sidewalk Tractor 120,445 120,445 4/07 ATM A49XX Front End Loader #455 153,920 153,920 0 0 CfQ N O O J >y C CD O a m 4/07 ATM A49ZZ Sidewalk Accessibility Total Municipal Capital Projects Mass Highway Chapter 90 Expenditures Bonding Costs financed with bond premiums Senior Center - Village at Farm Pond Planning Board Mitigation Total Expenditures Municipal Capital Projects High School Capital Project 3/00 STM Al High School Renovation 10/04 STM A13 High School Project Additional Appropriation Total High School Capital Project Arena Capital Projects 10/04 STM Al2 Arena Light and Energy Improvements 4/06 ATM A30W Dasher Board Glass Replacement 4/07 ATM A49U Arena Condenser Total Water Enterprise Capital Projects * 5/92 ATM A33 Indian Head Water * DEQE L -4 -030 Leak Detection 5/95 ATM A51 -4 Dump Truck, Four Wheel Drive pickup truck ATM97 A73 Water System Improvement funded by MWRA Grant and 12/96 STM A7 16 Inch Water Main Singletary, Hodder and Checkerberry 12/96 STM A9 1 Ton 4 Wheel Drive Pickup 5/97 ATM A72 F3560 Utility Body Truck 5/98 ATM A28 Water Capital Project voted from Retained Earnings 5/99 ATM A32 Water Capital Project voted from Retained Earnings 5/00 ATM A31 Special Assessment Doeskin, Carter, Woodstock, 10/00 STM A10A Reline 8 Inch Mains in Hollis, Millwood and Wlnch 10/00 STM A1013 Installation of 1200 feet 8 Inch Main Under Waushakum 5/01 ATMA21Y Water Main Replacement Reline 5/02 ATM A15K Water Main Replacement J Town of Framingham Summary of Capital Projects As of June 30, 2007 Expenditures Expenditures Encumbrances Appropriation Transfer Reauthorized Rescinded Prior Years Fiscal 2007 Fiscal 2007 Balance 100,000 - - - - - 100,000 21,997,554 15,500 149,707 (250,000) 9,176,931 2,304,028 1,144,302 9,287,500 1,211,137 19,353 80,000 $ 4,748,024 $ 54,000,000 $ $ $ $ 52,675,777 $ 1,132,413 $ 191,810 $ - 5,237,000 1,002,766 997,350 2,294,740 1,076,298 693,435 694,069 1,171,893 $ 59,237,000 $ $ $ $ 54,970,517 $ 2,208,712 $ 885,879 $ 1,171,893 337,077 336,310 160 607 2,000,000 1,994,494 - 5,506 750,000 498,180 $ - $ $ 23,110 $ $ - $ - $ 20,110 $ 3,000 164,710 - 667 - 4,655 151,865 8,190 37,167 - - - 37,167 $ 201,877 $ $ 23,110 $ $ $ 4,655 $ 171,975 $ 48,357 $ 32,866 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 32,866 4,623 4,623 100,000 94,921 5,079 1,002,766 997,350 5,416 875,000 693,435 181,565 33,500 28,308 5,192 77,609 67,638 9,971 946,074 945,873 201 - 337,077 336,310 160 607 2,000,000 1,994,494 - 5,506 750,000 498,180 251,820 174,000 - - 174,000 1,407,000 1,349,143 17,640 40,217 1,288,000 1,287,333 - 667 0 0 crc N O O J >y C CD O a m Town of Framingham Summary of Capital Projects As of June 30, 2007 Expenditures Expenditures Encumbrances Appropriation Transfer Reauthorized Rescinded Prior Years Fiscal 2007 Fiscal 2007 Balance 5/02 ATM A15L Water Service Replacement 150,000 149,995 4/03 ATM A27R Vulnerability Assessment of the Town's Water System 50,000 47,683 4/03 ATM A27S Franklin Street Water Main Replacement 1,386,500 1,351,988 4/03 ATM A32 Special Assessment Doeskin, Carter, Woodstock, 340,000 315,407 4/04 ATM A21 Franklin Street Water Main Replacement Phase II 969,000 548,116 4/04 ATM 210 Cleaning and Lining of Grove Street Water Mains 1,368,000 1,175,810 4/04 ATM A21 Water Service Replacement 200,000 113,445 4/04 ATM A21Q Water System Management Phase II 304,000 272,758 4/04 ATM A21 Carter Drive Water Main Replacement 1,120,000 1,113,660 4/04 ATM A21 W 70,000 GVW 14 Cubic Yard Dump Truck 145,531 145,481 4/04 ATM A21X Tracked Construction Excavator 151,000 138,325 4/04 ATM A21Y Hydrant Replacements 405,000 394,705 4/04 ATM A21Z Birch Road Well Reactivation 300,000 299,998 4/05 ATM A26X Birch Road Well Reactivation 600,000 217,438 4/05 ATM A26Y William J Heights Water Station Upgrade 200,000 24,985 4/05 ATM A26Z Fire Hydrant Replacement Program 225,000 71,338 4/05 ATM A26AA Water Service Replacements 200,000 81,351 4/05 ATM A26BB 15,000 GVW Four Wheel Drive Utility Truck 45,300 45,300 4/05 ATM A26CC 15,000 GVW Four Wheel Drive Utility Truck 45,300 45,299 4/05 ATM A26DD 15,000 GVW Four Wheel Drive Utility Truck #617 45,300 45,300 4/05 ATM A26EE Cleaning & Lining of Edmands Road Water Mains 2,082,000 1,336,517 4/05 ATM A29 Doeskin Hill Repairs 143,000 5,044 4/06 ATM A30X Birch Road Well Reactivation 400,000 - 4/06 ATM A30Y Fire Hydrant Replacement 225,000 4/06 ATM A30Z Backhoe, Loader and Plow 121,975 4/06 ATM A30AA Cove Ave Water Main Replacement 820,000 4/06 ATM A30BB Fay Road Water Main Replacement 950,000 4/06 ATM A30CC Waverly Street Water Main Replacement 530,000 4/07 ATM A50A Pershing Ave Water Main Replacement 39,250 4/07 ATM A50B Cove Avenue Area Water Main Replacement 1,011,500 4/07 ATM A50C Fay Road Area Water Main Replacement 1,006,375 4/07 ATM A50D Waverly Street Water Main Replacement 552,250 4/07 ATM A50E Grove Street Pumping Station Rehabilitation 235,000 4/07 ATM A50F Goddnow Water Storage Tank Rehabiliation 107,500 4/07 ATM A50G Automated Meter Reading Program - (Water Portion) 1,282,950 4/07 ATM A50H Water Street Replacement Design 372,625 4/07 ATM A501 11,000 GVW 4 -Wheel Drive cab & Chassis with Utility 47,500 4/07 ATM A50J 11,000 GVW 4 -Wheel Drive Cab & Chassis with Utility 47,500 4/07 ATM A50K 11,000 GVW 4 -Wheel Drive Cab & Chassis with Utility 47,500 4/07 ATM A50L 11,000 GVW 4 -Wheel Drive Cab & Chassis with Utility 47,500 4/07 ATM A50M Electronic Message Board 37,500 cc 273,778 5 - 2,317 10,000 10,283 24,229 16,125 11,075 925 12,593 12,168 100,817 307,899 39,988 - 152,202 - - 86,555 31,189 53 - 5,713 269 358 - 50 - - - 12,675 5,026 5,269 - 2 381,919 643 - 38,839 51,175 85,000 129,511 24,151 - 92,504 17,496 8,649 1 273,778 471,705 127,956 - 10,000 275,119 108,756 16,125 103,579 21,127 100,295 96,435 25,540 45,017 11,167 763,817 58,500 14,517 876,983 31,500 7,816 490,684 - - 39,250 1,011,500 1,006,375 552,250 235,000 107,500 1,282,950 372,625 47,500 47,500 47,500 47,500 37,500 0 0 CfQ N O O J >y C CD O a m 4/07 ATM A50N Prospect Street Water Main Replacement Design 4/07 ATMA500 William J Heights Booster Station Rehabilitation 4/07 ATM A50P 11,000 GVW 4 -Wheel Drive Cab & Chassis Utility 4/07 ATM A50W Birch Road Well Reactivation 4/07 ATM A50R Brigham Road Water Design Total Sewer Enterprise Capital Projects • 11/86 STM A17D Farm Pond Sewer Project • A19D ATM88 Interceptor Bates Road • A44 ATM90 Saxon Sewer Pump Station • A20 ATM92 Improvements Sewer • A22 ATM92 Repair Work Sewer Lines 4/93 ATM Al2 Sewer System Improvements 5/95 ATM A51 -4 F250 Pickup Truck, 2 F350 Service Trucks and Backhoe 5/95 ATM A35 Sewer Sump Pump Removal 5/96 STM A2 Sewer Inflow and Infiltration in Sub - basins to Sudbury River 12/96 STM A8 Six Wheel Dump, 1 1/2 Ton Dump and 3/4 Ton 4 Wheel 5/97 ATM A71 9 Foot Utility Truck with Tailgate Lift 12/97 STM A9 16 Inch Sewer Force Main Rte 30 and Speen Street 12/97 STM A10 Replace Singletary Lane Sewer Pump Station 5/98 ATM A27 Sewer Capital Projects voted from Retained Earnings 5/99 ATM A31 Sewer Capital Projects voted from Retained Earnings 5/99 A44 Monitoring Foss Reservoir and Mass Turnpike Authority Right of 10/00 STM A9A Reline Arthur Street 1700 feet with 18 Inch Main 10/00 STM A9C Replace 6 Inch Union Avenue Sewer Main 10/00 STM A9D TV Camera Truck 5/01 ATM A21Q Sewer Main Rehabilitation (Sudbury River Interceptor and 5/01 ATM A21S Vaillencourt Pump Station Elimination (Installation of 11/01 STM A27 Edgewater Drive Submersible Pump Station 5/02 ATM Al 5M Comprehensive Sewer Maintenance Study 5/02 ATM Al 5N Odor Corrosion Mitigation Measures 4/03 ATM A27T Four Wheel Drive Utility Truck 4/03 ATM A27W Six Inch Water Pump and Equipment 4/03 ATM A27Z Franklin Street Sewer Improvements 4/04 ATM A21AA 47,000 All Wheel Drive GVW Crane 4/04 ATM A21 BB Franklin Street Sewer Phase II 4/04 ATM A21GG Howard Street Sewer Replacement Ic Town of Framingham Summary of Capital Projects As of June 30, 2007 0 0 crc N O O J >y C CD O Expenditures Expenditures Encumbrances Appropriation Transfer Reauthorized Rescinded Prior Years Fiscal 2007 Fiscal 2007 Balance 173,185 - - 173,185 765,000 765,000 47,500 47,500 1,400,000 1,400,000 25,700 - - - 25,700 $ 29,796,756 $ $ $ $ 16,232,928 $ 1,770,098 $ 408,779 $ 11,384,952 $ 273 $ $ $ $ - $ - $ - $ 273 28,054 28,054 432 - 432 51,710 51,009 701 2,888 273 - 2,615 1,200,000 1,176,675 23,208 117 171,000 151,190 - 19,810 100,000 23,660 - 76,340 195,000 179,398 15,601.68 - 142,200 129,786 - 12,414 44,204 40,832 3,372 140,000 124,466 15,534 550,000 506,355 - 43,645 367,590 366,308 410 872 300,000 278,803 21,197 - 25,000 - - 25,000 385,000 - 385,000 50,000 39,329 10,671 170,000 165,200 - 4,800 312,695 247,107 - 18,183 47,405 130,000 36,450 6,616 11,591 75,343 148,000 134,494 - 3,677 9,829 350,000 350,000 - - 350,000 187,594 6,906 155,500 29,010 29,007 - 3 26,500 26,355 145 1,050,000 1,049,997 3 165,000 165,000 - - 451,000 429,988 10,283 - 10,729 1,100,000 729,952 323,658 25,650 20,741 0 0 crc N O O J >y C CD O a m Town of Framingham Summary of Capital Projects As of June 30, 2007 O 0 0 crc N O O J >y C CD O Expenditures Expenditures Encumbrances Appropriation Transfer Reauthorized Rescinded Prior Years Fiscal 2007 Fiscal 2007 Balance 4/04 ATM A21HH Infiltration and Inflow Study 375,000 202,542 153,484 18,974 4/04 A2111 Hemenway Pump Station Rehabilitation 1,200,000 135,000 794,394 270,606 4/04 ATM A21JJ 70,000 GVW Cab & Chassis with 12 CY Vactor Unit 275,000 274,655 - - 345 4/04 ATM A21KK Design Facility Expansion 204,000 32,088 - - 171,912 4/05 ATM A26FF Swift Road Sewer Main Replacement 350,000 179,326 39,586 3,584 127,504 4/05 ATM A26GG Hemenway Pump Station Rehabilitation 1,000,000 91,976 830,980 76,179 865 4/05 ATM A26HH Grove Street Sewer Main Improvements 200,000 - 191,797 - 8,203 4/05 ATM A261115,000 GVW Cab & Chassis 68,500 67,958 - 542 4/05 ATM A26JJ 15,000 GVW 4 Wheel Drive Utility Body 45,300 - 45,299 1 Arcade Mitigation - 250,000 250,000 - - 4/06 ATM A30DD Upgrade Sewer Inspection Equipment 56,010 - - 44,100 11,910 4/06 ATM A30EE 15000 GVW 4 Wheel Drive Utility Body Truck 48,152 45,221 2,931 4/06 ATM A30FF 15000 GVW Dump Truck with Plow 52,296 51,710 - 586 4/06 ATM A30GG Gregory Road Sewer Relief Design 38,000 36,677 1,323 - 4/06 ATM A30HH Gregory Road Sewer Relief SRF 2954 portion 707,000 1,199 454,872 250,929 4/06 ATM A3011 SSES SRF 2940 400,000 121,901 268,099 10,000 4/06 ATM A30JJ Pump Station Replacement Design 396,000 384,828 11,172 - 4/06 ATM A30KK Pump Station Replacement SRF2958 Portion 3,104,000 608 2,111,456 991,936 4/06 ATM A30LL Water Street Replacement Design 510,000 421,824 88,176 - 4/06 ATM A30MM Water Street Sewer SRF 2957 Portion 6,785,000 45,510 4,095,310 2,644,181 2/07 STM A4 Herbert & Eames Improvements 125,000 30,413 74,587 20,000 4/07 ATM A51 Wastewater Pumping Station Elimination Project 405,000 - - 405,000 4/07 ATM A51 Water Street Sewer Main Replacement and Gregory 1,592,000 1,592,000 4/07 ATM A51C Concord and School Street Sewer Improvement Project 5,557,500 5,557,500 4/07 ATM A51 Prospect Street Sewer Replacement: Project Design 200,000 200,000 4/07 ATM A51E SCADA Improve ments/Wireless Mesh Networking 351,000 351,000 4/07 ATM A51 F Sewer System Evaluation Survey: Phase 2 540,000 540,000 4/07 ATM A51G East Framingham Sewer Improvement Project Phase 1 2,708,500 2,708,500 4/07 ATM A511 Automated Meter Reading Program (Sewer Portion) 1,282,950 1,282,950 4/07 ATM A511 Cove Avenue Area Sewer Replacement Project 200,000 200,000 4/07 ATM A51J Wastewater Pumping Stations Replacement Project 8,009,800 8,009,800 4/07 ATM A51 Herbert Street Sewer Improvement Project 1,373,250 1,373,250 4/07 ATM A51 L 70,000 Cab and Chassis with Vactor #741 286,405 - - - - 286,405 Total $ 46,481,220 $ 250,000 $ $ $ 7,898,072 $ 3,534,788 $ 7,600,760 $ 27,697,598 * Balances carried over from prior accounting systems O 0 0 crc N O O J >y C CD O Town of Framingham Treasurer /Tax Collector 150 Concord Street, Room 109 Framingham, NIA 01702 Fiscal Year 2007 was a good year in this busy office. The staff remained constant with no turnover. The total number of employees remained unchanged at 10. As always I am indebted to them for the first class job they do on my behalf as well as the Town's. Our operating system on Munis continues to be updated on a regular basis but we have become very comfortable with it. We have continued to enjoy excellent in house support from Scott Jung in the TS Department with Munis and are indebted to him. Because of the time sensitive nature of most of our operation from sending bills to posting payments disruptions can be disastrous. Collection amounts and percentages were as follows. Real Estate taxes collected were $126,644,243.34 (98.15 %) and Personal Property taxes were $6,453,838.95 (96.59 %). Excise Taxes collected were $5,212,430.87 (71.40 %). Excise tax is collected on a calendar year basis which reflects the lower collection percentage. Tax Title collections were $1,529,177.72 including interest and penalties. We have continued to work hard on delinquent taxes in every area and recently entered into a contract for third party collection of out of town water bills and out of state parking tickets. Earnings on investments for the year of $1,002,618.87 were just below budget. We monitor the bank rates to maximize our earnings, as rate increases slow and our investible balance decreases. The Town continued to hold the Aa3 bond rating only with a negative outlook in FY 2007 from Moody's. The future will hold a 2007 Annual Report 508 - 552 -5450 508 - 628 -1509 (fax) treasurer@franiinghaninia.gov challenge to maintain it but the goal is to work to that end. We need to improve our fund balances to help offset those areas that we have little control over such as per capita income levels. We did a Bond Anticipation Note in June and borrowed $6,332,859 for multiple projects. The lowest net rate was 3.748% by Eastern Bank among the 7 bidders. These were very competitive rates in the face of stable Fed Fund rates. This department has worked diligently to meet the requirements of the laws, the challenges of the technology advances and the Town's customer service policy. We try to treat customers with respect while taking their payments, answering their questions regarding process and solving their problems as quickly and efficiently as possible. As per Town By -Law I am reporting the following information regarding authorized debt schedules. The first schedule shows what is authorized and unissued as of June 30, 2007. The second schedule shows the debt issued and out standing during Fiscal Year 2007. Finance 61 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Authorized and Unissued Debt Purpose Date of Vote Article No. Amount Authorized Less New Issues, Retirements and /or Rescissions = Balance Unissued 6/30/07 High School 3/1/2000 1 54,000,000 54,000,000 0 Drainage 5/11/2000 25 300,000 20,000 280,000 Water 10/25/2000 10 924,000 868,180 55,820 Sewer Pump Station 4/24/2001 21S 130,000 51,765 78,235 Water Mains 4/24/2001 21Y 1,407,000 1,393,665 13,335 Software 5/7/2002 15J 199,271 2,200 197,071 Equipment 6/12/2003 27M 575,000 540,480 34,520 Parks 10/7/03 10 420,000 170,000 250,000 Sewer Pump Station 5/06/04 21II 307,881 307,181 700 High School 10/19/04 13 5,237,000 3,080,916 2,156,084 Pedestrian Ramps 6/16/05 26A 60,706 48,000 12,706 Stapleton Roof 6/16/05 26D 108,503 108,503 0 Beach Storm Water Management 6/16/05 26E 267,410 0 267,410 Generator 6/16/05 26F 72,000 72,000 0 Bowditch Athletic Complex 6/16/05 26P 412,188 400,169 12,019 Sanitary Line Replacement 6/16/05 26Q 108,000 108,000 0 Well Activation 6/16/05 26X 600,000 600,000 0 Edmands Sewer 6/16/05 26EE 2 1,999,100 82,900 Engine 2 6/6/06 30A 398,750 358,650 40,100 Station 2 Roof 6/6/06 30B 31,375 31,375 0 Communications 6/6/06 30C 378,485 200,000 178,485 Memorial Boiler 6/6/06 30D 809,339 0 809,339 Pearl St Garage 6/6/06 30E 45,000 0 45,000 McAulliffe Renovations 6/6/06 30F 65,046 40,000 25,046 F550 Compactor 6/6/06 30H 68,506 68,506 0 Kubota Tractor 6/6/06 30I 24,300 24,300 0 BB Resurface Long 6/6/06 30J 53,750 53,7500 0 Police Laptops 6/6/06 30K 157,850 143,000 14,850 Stormwater Beaver 6/6/06 30L 350,000 0 350,000 Sidewalk Improvement 6/6/06 30N 100,000 100,000 0 Sidewalk Tractor 6/6/06 300 96,824 96,824 0 Refuse Packer 6/6/06 30P 177,100 177,1000 0 Dump #413 6/6/06 30R 10,712 10,7120 0 Stapleton Roof 6/6/06 30S 130,000 130,0000 0 Final School Boilers 6/6/06 30T 480,000 427,279 52,721 Phone Upgrade 6/6/06 30U 40,000 0 40,000 Tercentennial Park 3 6/6/06 30V 420,000 0 420,000 Dasher and Glass 6/6/06 30W 164,710 164,710 0 Cove Ave Main 6/6/06 30AA 820,000 0 820,000 Fay Road Main 6/6/06 30BB 950,000 0 950,000 Waverley St Main 6/6/06 30CC 530,000 0 530,000 Gregory Road Main 6/6/06 30HH 707,000 0 707,000 SSES SRF 2940 6/6/06 3011 400,000 0 400,000 Finance 62 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Pump Station Replacement 6/6/06 30KK 3 0 3,104,000 Water St Replacement 6/6/06 30MM 6,785,000 0 6,785,000 Fuller Auditorium 2/15/07 360,000 360,000 Ville Hll, Edgl 4/24/07 18 300,000 300,000 Voting Machines 4/24/07 49A 117,000 117,000 Library Door 4/24/07 49B 44,893 44,893 Library Parking 4/24/07 49C 75,750 75,750 Library Rest 4/24/07 49D 66,650 66,650 SCBA units 4/24/07 49E 356,545 356,545 Engine 3 4/24/07 49F 474,000 474,000 Maintenance Truck 4/24/07 49G 65,550 65,550 VOIP Integration 4/24/07 49H 64,248 64,248 Memorial Windows 4/24/07 49I 280,500 280,500 Memorial Stairs 4/24/07 49J 199,500 199,500 Nevins Stage 4/24/07 49K 280,500 280,500 Maynard Chimney 4/24/07 49L 470,000 470,000 Energy Mgmt Police 4/24/07 49M 146,000 146,000 Callahan Generator 4/24/07 49N 60,000 60,000 Demo Badger Road Kennel 4/24/07 490 50,000 50,000 Old Sr Center Roof 4/24/07 49P 59,500 59,500 Maynard Windows 4/24/07 49Q 201,500 201,500 Maynard Doors 4/24/07 49R 27,000 27,000 ADA 4/24/07 49S 228,000 228,000 Callahan Phase 3 4/24/07 49T 468,268 468,268 Arena Condenser 4/24/07 49U 37,167 37,167 Winch Grandstand 4/24/07 49X 147,275 147,275 #2 F550 Crew Cab 4/24/07 49Y 49,350 49,350 #3 F350 Ext Cab 4/24/07 49Z 29,794 29,794 #4 F650 Dump 4/24/07 49AA 56,174 56,174 Communication Center Up Grade 4/24/07 49BB 355,000 355,000 Sucker Brook Drainage 4/24/07 49CC 50,000 50,000 Roadway Improvement 4/24/07 49DD 450,000 450,000 40K GVW Dump 4/24/07 49EE 168,360 168,360 70K GVW Dump 4/24/07 49FF 100,000 100,000 40K GVW Dump & Plow 4/24/07 49GG 168,360 168,360 35K GVW Aerial 4/24/07 49HH 181,200 181,200 40K GVW Dump 4/24/07 49II 168,360 168,360 8800 Pick up 4/24/07 49JJ 35,442 35,442 8800 Pick up 4/24/07 49KK 35,442 35,442 68K Refuse Packer 4/24/07 49LL 211,327 211,327 15K 4WD 4/24/07 49MM 61,841 61,841 Roof Replacement Recycling 4/24/07 49NN 126,000 126,000 Fuller Auditorium 4/24/07 4900 360,000 360,000 McCarthy School 4/24/07 49PP 560,000 560,000 DDC Energy Costs 4/24/07 49QQ 255,000 255,000 Fire Alarms McCarhty 4/24/07 49RR 118,000 118,000 School Vehicles 4/24/07 49SS 85,045 85,045 Finance 63 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Web Content Mgmt 4/24/07 49TT 107,873 107,873 Public Safety System 4/24/07 49UU 243,761 243,761 Library Generator 4/24/07 49VV 30,000 30,000 Sidewalk Plow 4/24/07 49WW 120,445 120,445 Frontend loader 4/24/07 49XX 153,920 153,920 Thayer Campus 4/24/07 49YY 120,000 120,000 Sidewalk Access 4/24/07 49ZZ 100,000 100,000 Cove Ave Water 4/24/07 50B 1,011,500 1,011,500 Fay Road Water 4/24/07 50C 1,006,375 1,006,375 Waverley St Water 4/24/07 50D 552,250 552,250 Grove St Pump 4/24/07 50E 235,000 235,000 Automated Meters 4/24/07 50G 1,282,950 1,282,950 11K GVW Cab 4/24/07 50I 47,500 47,500 11K GVW 4WD Utility 4/24/07 50J 47,500 47,500 11K GVW 4WD Utility 4/24/07 50K 47,500 47,500 11K GVW 4WD Utility 4/24/07 50L 47,500 47,500 Electronic Message 4/24/07 50M 37,500 37,500 Wm J Heights Booster 4/24/07 500 765,000 765,000 11K GVW 4WD Utility 4/24/07 501) 47,500 47,500 Birch Road Well 4/24/07 50Q 1,400,000 1,400,000 Water St & Gregory Road 4/24/07 51B 1,592,000 1,592,000 Concord St 4/24/07 51C 5,557,500 5,557,500 SCADA Improvements 4/24/07 51E 351,000 351,000 Sewer Evaluation 4/24/07 51F 540,000 540,000 East Framingham Sewer 4/24/07 51G 2,708,500 2,708,500 Automated Meters 4/24/07 51I 1,282,950 1,282,950 Waste Water Pump 4/24/07 51J 8,009,800 8,009,800 Herbert St Sewer 4/24/07 51K 1,373,250 1,373,250 Sewer Main 02 -24 5/7102 15M 350,000 327,600 22,400 Total Authorized and Unissued Debt 55,758,356 Finance 64 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Authorized Issued Debt Long Term Debt Outstanding + Issued - Retired = Outstanding Inside the Debt Limit July 1, 2006 June 30, 2007 Buildings 12,227,005 - 1,732,353 10,494,652 Departmental Equipment 2,150,941 - 591,941 1,559,000 School Buildings 7,888,321 - 736,426 7,151,895 School Other 680,000 - 60,000 620,000 Sewer 4,331,792 275,373 840,373 3,766,991 Solid Waste Landfill - - - - Other Inside 3,122,887 - 661,433 2,461,454 SUB -TOTAL Inside 30,400,946 275,572 4,622,527 26,053,991 Long Term Debt Outside the Debt Limit Airport - - - - Gas /Electric Utility - - - - Hospital - - - - School Buildings 28,166,000 - 2,050,000 26,116,000 Sewer - - - - Solid Waste Landfill - - - - Water 12,616,864 - 1,065,112 11,551,752 Other Outside - - - - SUB -TOTAL Outside 40,782,864 - 3,115,112 37,667,752 GRAND TOTAL 71,183,810 275,572 7,737,639 63,721,743 As ever it is a pleasure to work for the Town of Framingham and its citizens. If you have questions on this report, please contact me at 508 - 532 -5431. Respectfully Submitted, Dennis E. O'Neil, Treasurer/ Collector Finance 65 Town of Framingham Board of Assessors 150 Concord Street, Room 101 Framingham, NIA 01702 The Board of Assessors' annual report for calendar year 2007 with statistics for FY07 follows: Because of the values established in FY07, we received 308 abatement applications. These applications represented only 1.54% of the total tax bills issued. In FY07, new construction in Town and growth in personal property accounts that translated into FY08 "new growth" to the tax levy was as follows. The Town added $32.0 million in residential new construction value. Twelve new homes were completed in 2007. It also added $27.8 million in commercial and industrial new growth value along with $35 million in personal property new growth value. Values were not adjusted for FY08 due to a stagnant residential real estate market. The average value for a single - family home was $384,728. The average value for a residential condominium was $179,841. As in the past, I would like to thank the hardest working staff in Town Hall, Assessors William Figler and Arthur Holmes, and staff members Cindy Lombardi, Jane Piacentim, Daniel Dargon, Jim St. Andre, Sharon Gagne, Paul D'Olympio, Jr. and Wendy Elassy. Also, I would like to thank Mr. James Sullivan, Esquire for his legal assistance. After making a presentation to the Board of Selectmen on December 18, 2007 for the FY08 Tax Rate Classification Hearing, the Board voted to adopt a 75% shift in values of the Commercial, Industrial and Personal Property classes of property to maintain the share of the tax levy borne by these classes in FY08. The FY08 tax rates are: Residential - $12.53 and Commercial, Industrial and 2007 Annual Report 508 - 552 -5415 508 - 620 -4857 (fax) assessing @f raniinghaninia.gov Personal Property - $28.08. They represent an increase of 5.75% for Residential and a decrease oft 1.1% for commercial, industrial and personal property. The Board of Assessors' annual report for year 2007 with statistics for FY2007: Finance 66 Town of Framingham PROPERTY AND TAXES ASSESSED AS OF FY2007 FY08 TAX RATES: RESIDENTIAL$12.53 COMMERCIAL $28.08 FY08 VALUATIONS: REAL ESTATE TAX ASSESSED PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX ASSESSED $8,550,701,500 $134,236,435.75 $250,691,229 $7,041,916.62 MOTOR VEHICLE ASSESSED 2005 BILLS AND TAXES COMMITTED IN FY07 - 109 2006 BILLS AND TAXES COMMITTED IN FY07 - 10,832 $935,277.10 2007 BILLS AND TAXES COMMITTED IN FY07 - 56,497 $6,083,895.52 TOTAL MOTOR VEHICLE TAX ASSESSED 71,597 $7,126,656.69 2007 Annual Report (7/1/06 - 6/30/07) $7,484.07 FISCAL YEAR 2007 ABATEMENTS AND EXEMPTIONS GRANTED (7/1/06 - 6/30/07) CATEGORY GRANTED TAX ABATED REAL ESTATE (61) SURVIVING SPOUSE (17D) (46) HARDSHIP (CL.18) (2) VETERANS (CL.22A -F) (297) BLIND (37A) (45) ELDERLY (41C) (25) WIDOW OF POLICE (CL.42) (1) TAX DEFERRALS (CL.41A) (11) $89,313.56 $8,050.00 $472.82 $163,133.39 $22,000.00 $12,500.00 $4,786.22 $42,374.23 Finance 67 Town of Framingham FYO7 REAL ESTATE ABATEMENTS GRANTED: 2007 Annual Report ADDRESS TAX APPLICANT 0 PARKER RD OFF $ 3,630.84 TOWN OF FRAMINGHAM 114 ELM ST $ 1,425.56 WILLIAM & MARGARET WALENSKI 1500 WORCESTER RD #408 $ 164.71 CHARLES & PANDORA TSOUROS 180 IRVING ST $ 424.23 RAMAN & RAJNI SHARMA 15 WILLIS ST #5 $ 838.98 DANAEE PEREIRA 1025A WAVERLEY ST $ 1,103.23 UMAR F & PARASTOU MANSOOR 95 ELM ST $ 341.28 CRAIG & PAULA DIMIDIS 74 CARTER DR $ 2,699.43 THREE 40 SINGLETARY LANE, LLC 15 AUBURN ST EXTN $ 18,109.17 SOVEREIGN APARTMENTS, INC. 669 WORCESTER RD $ 250.01 MAGUIRES INC 34 FENWOOD ST $ 165.90 BETTY MARIE SCHROEPPEL 15 WILLIS ST #1 $ 1,307.06 RUTH K. DHIONIS 6 AARON ST $ 840.17 ROBERT A NICHOLS 53 COVE AVE $ 144.57 DORIS M. GOULD 28 SWANSON RD $ 298.62 MICHAEL S & NANCY JOAN SWIDLER 23 BEECH ST $ 222.78 SWANCREST INC 3 SPEEN ST $ 571.04 DAVID RICE 239 IRVING ST $ 50.95 JIANMIN LIU 180 WINCH ST $ 1,795.27 RICHARD & SHARON DRUJON 104 HOWE ST $ 347.20 CATHERINE M TUCKER 11 CLOVELLY LN $ 80.58 MARY E ANZA 235 WALNUT ST $ 3,184.76 MATTHEW A. LUZ, ESQ 1 SPEEN ST $ 79.55 DAVID RICE 70 OVERLOOK DR WEST $ 342.28 JAMES & SUSAN UNDERDAH 43 WOODMERE RD $ 260.70 WILLIAM L POWERS 29 DAYTONA AVE $ 772.75 DRAMTIC CLUB OF FRAMINGHAM 59 FOUNTAIN ST $ 10,179.31 RIDGEFIELD VALUATION 22 CHESTNUT ST #1 $ 311.66 JEFFREY & WENDY WILLIAMS 884 OLD CONN PATH $ 296.25 AMY GREENE 418 UNION AVE $ 603.16 ADELE LARSON, TRUSTEE 5 SPEEN ST $ 900.59 DAVID RICE 21 GARVEY RD $ 965.78 ALAN & LYNN KAWADLER 545 EDGELL RD $ 466.89 GERARD V SPAGNUOLO 583 EDMANDS RD $ 689.67 GEORGE TUBIN 1025B WAVERLEY ST $ 1,103.23 BHAGAT SINGH GILL & BALJIT KAUR GILL 19 SUN VALLEY DR $ 1,134.04 DAVID J. & JOAN M. BARRY 420 UNION AVE $ 1,597.38 ADELE LARSON, TRUSTEE 24 MEADOW ST $ 141.01 LYNNE L DAMIANOS, TRUSTEE 17 BLACKBERRY LN $ 410.01 ROBERT Z. FENYVES 3 HANCOCK LN $ 189.60 ARLENE M & JAMES REISS 31 CREST RD $ 2,067.83 QIANG WANG & WEI -YING QIU 6 AUDUBON RD $ 120.87 JOHN M. & CATHY A. KARMAN 10 GRYZBOSKA CIR $ 336.54 PETERS & BRENDA J PLESHAW 1031 B WAVERLEY ST $ 1,103.23 ADVARSHVIR SINGH 49 MORSE RD $ 278.48 DAVID LAROCQUE 775 EDMANDS RD $ 15.40 DAVID WHITTEMORE 795 EDMANDS RD $ 138.64 DAVID WHITTEMORE 85 SALEM END LN $ 122.05 DEBBIE CHASE 11 LARNIS RD $ 354.31 KEITH GALNER 30 PROSPECT ST $ 1,072.43 MARY JOSLIN 25 MILL ST $ 455.04 OCTAVIO & SUSAN BOLIVAR 1500 WORCESTER RD #728 $ 93.61 MIGUEL & MARARITA SUAREZ 200 EDMANDS RD $ 3,169.88 KAREN BOYES -BOGIE 36 PEARL ST $ 1,826.77 MICHAEL & ELIZABETH FORTE 11 DOESKIN DR $ 824.76 JOHN & PATRICIA VALLELY 1031A WAVERLEY ST $ 1,103.23 COURTNEY DUNCAN 2 LAVELLE LN $ 859.13 ANDREEVA, DESSISLAVA & JBLENSKI, A. 0 PROSPECT ST $ 3,953.16 ERIC J. WEINSTEIN 0 MILL ST $ 2,787.12 JOANNE M. BUDRYK Finance 68 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report 11 EDMANDS RD $ 9,619.83 HENRY G. KARA, ESQ. 281 CONCORD ST $ 571.05 E M GONFRADE, TRUSTEE 61 $ 89,313.66 Respectfully Submitted, Michael Flynn, Chief Assessor 150 Concord Street, Room 123 Framingham, NIA 01702 The Department would like to thank all Town Departments for their continued contributions in making this year another successful, cost - saving venture in public bidding. This past year was once again a very busy one in terms of procurement activity. We wish to thank all of you for your cooperation and assistance as we strive to serve your procurement needs. There were several significant purchases and services procured during the year. The Callahan Senior Center Phase II project was awarded and the build out of the second floor of the senior center occurred. Additionally, lease authorizations for the former Hollis Street Fire Station and the "old" Callahan Center in the Danforth Annex were procured competitively and ultimately approved by Town Meeting, effectively providing much - needed space for the Amazing Things Arts Center and the Metro West Boys and Girls' Club and providing the Town with revenue and assistance in maintaining these Town assets. Also, much - needed improvements to the Nevins Hall stage area were bid and a contract awarded shortly before year's end. The largest volume of contracts were for Public Works infrastructure projects, such as building repairs, road reconstruction, water and sewer construction and engineering or consultant services, including major sewer construction projects for Gregory Road /Water Street and the Fenwick Force Main and Pump Station. Parks and 508 - 532 -5405 508 - 620 -4807 (fa.) purchasing@framinghamma.gov Recreation also had a variety of bids this year including: architectural /engineering services for Tercentennial Park Phase III and new Boards and Glass for the Loring Arena. Bids were also issued for the Town's Finance Division this year, including bids for Tax Title Auction Services and Printing Services. Additionally, the Town procured Energy Management Services for the Police and Fire Departments and secured a Website Content management firm for Technology Services. In the coming year, the Purchasing Department will continue to seek out the best available pricing, including leveraging our options and selectively participating in purchasing consortia. We realize that funds will continue to be limited over the next several years, and we will do our part to ensure that the Town gets the best value for its dollar. In August, Administrative Assistant Alice Clapper left to assume the position of Administrative Assistant to the Town Manager /Board of Selectmen. We wish Alice all the best in her new position! We were also fortunate to be able to bring Mona Haywood on board in November as an unpaid intern in the Purchasing Department. Mona has quickly become a tremendous asset for us and we are grateful for her contributions. Respectfully Submitted, Patricia L. Morgan, Procurement Admin. Finance 69 Town of Framingham Retirement Sustem 150 Concord Street, Room 125 Framingham, NIA 01702 508 - 552 -5465 508 - 628 -1572 (fax) reg@framinghamma.gov The Framingham Retirement System is a member of the Massachusetts Contributory Retirement System, governed by Chapter 32 of the Massachusetts General Laws, and is Managed by a five member Retirement Board which consists of- Richard G. Howarth, Jr. Town Accountant -Ex- officio Member Mary Ellen Kelley, CFO Selectmen Appointee Paul F. Barbieri Elected Member Peter J. Rovinelli Elected Member Sidney W. Lebewohl Board Member Appointee Sovereign Bank and MMDT $161,016.25 Pension Reserve Investment Trust $217,814,527.06 Total Assets on 12/31/2007 $217,975,543.31 Membership in the Retirement System: Active /Inactive members 1,447 Retired members and beneficiaries 780 Total Membership 2,227 Respectfully Submitted, Roberta E. Griffin, Executive Director 2007 Annual Report Finance 70 Town of Framingham Police Department 1 William H. Welch Waij Framingham, MA 01702 The Framingham Police Department is charged with protecting and serving those who live, work, and travel in Framingham. The Department accomplishes its mission by establishing partnerships with the community, using innovative problem - solving approaches, and recognizing the value of strong leadership and organizational accountability. In an environment of lean budgets, the Department continues to aggressively seek revenues through grant funding to assist in accomplishing its mission. Our town -wide community survey is one of the core tools used to identify areas upon which to focus our resources, in conjunction with crime and call analysis we deploy officers into the community with purpose and direction. As the Department embarks on a new era of policing, we face significant challenges reflective of large urban communities; our greatest resource continues to be our personnel. To capitalize on this we recruit and hire only the best individuals to be Framingham police officers, presently approximately 60% of all persons attempting to become Framingham Officers are disqualified from the process, only the best and the brightest earn the opportunity to wear a Framingham Police badge. Last year, the Department experienced a significant increase in crime and calls for service. The Department responded by reorganizing and implementing a new crime analysis based deployment strategy. I am pleased to report that this response has 2007 Annual Report 508 - 552 -5906 508 - 620 -4904 (fax) shc@framinghaninia.gov resulted in a reduction of various categories of crime, many of which affect quality of life. In addition to our primary mission of crime reduction, the Department continues to proactively address current and emerging issues in law enforcement, such as immigration and community outreach. Through our recent efforts, the Department successfully initiated a productive dialogue with Framingham's Brazilian community, by developing and implementing a Law and Justice program for immigrant populations. We also received grant funding to enhance our partnerships with other important segments of the community, such as youths and the homeless. The aggressive pursuit of grant funding has also allowed us to provide every police officer with new body armor, at absolutely no cost to the Town. As we move forward in a post -9/11 era, the Police Department will continue to work closely with our state and federal public safety partners to address critical issues such as domestic terrorism, homeland security, gang activity, and emergency preparedness. Through these partnerships, the Department is able to access and leverage otherwise unavailable resources to accomplish our mission. As Chief of Police, I am thankful for the support given to the Police Department from the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, Town Meeting, and especially from our town residents. Public Safety & Health 71 Town of Framingham Mission Statement The Mission of the Framingham Police Department is to protect and improve the quality of life for all who live, work, or visit our community, by delivering the highest quality of public safety service. The men and women of the Framingham Police Department are dedicated to accomplishing this mission by: Maintaining peace and order, through the fair and impartial enforcement of Law and quality police service. Fostering an environment of cooperation and trust between your police department and our community. Valuing our employees as our most important resource. Conducting business efficiently and effectively. Challenging the future with a spirit of optimism and innovation, in the continuous pursuit of excellence. Our determination and effectiveness will be measured by providing a sense of security through the absence of fear, and improving the quality of life, within the community. The Framingham Police, through professionalism and integrity, dedicate ourselves to this mission. 2007 Annual Report Personnel 2007 Police Personnel Resources Chief 1 Deputy Chiefs 3 Captain 1 Lieutenants 11 Sergeants 12 Administrative Aide 1 Assistant to the Chief 1 Patrol Officers 87* Dispatchers 5 Civilian Staff 5FT, 1PT Mechanic 1 Parking Enforcement Officer 1 Animal Control Officers 2FT, 2PT Crossing Guards 19 * This figure changes with resignations, transfers, retirements, and injuries The Deputy Chiefs Chief Carl is assisted by Deputies, Craig Davis, Kenneth Ferguson, and Steven Trask. All three are capable of assuming the duties of the Chief in his absence. Deputy Chief Craig Davis is a 21 year veteran, beginning his career with the department in 1985. Soon after he started, he was assigned to the Detective Bureau, where he worked for many years, several of those in the Narcotics Unit. Davis held the ranks of Sergeant, Lieutenant, and Captain in various capacities before his promotion to Deputy Chief in 2001. Deputy Davis primarily overseas the administrative functions within the department. He has initiated many innovative programs within the department, to include one of the state's first DARE school -based drug education programs, the Jail Diversion Program (a new approach to police response to people with mental illness), and the Special Weapons and Tactics Unit. Davis completed a systematic evaluation of the department's policies, procedures, and protocols. He ensured compliance with the highest law enforcement professional standards leading to the State Accreditation. Davis graduated from the prestigious Federal Public Safety & Health 72 (L -R): Officers Robert Lewis, Garrett Coffin, Chief Carl, Joseph Godino and Christopher Teel Town of Framingham Bureau of Investigation National Academy. Davis holds a Bachelors degree from Northeastern University in Criminal Justice, and a Masters degree from Framingham State College in Public Administration. Deputy Chief Kenneth Ferguson began his career with the department in 1985 as a Patrol Officer. Within six years, he was assigned to the Detective Bureau, where he worked both as a general duty Detective and in the Narcotics Unit. In January of 1996 he was promoted to the rank of Sergeant, and returned to the Patrol Division as a Patrol Supervisor. Promoted to Lieutenant in July of 1998, Deputy Ferguson remained in Patrol Division management until May of 2004, when he was promoted to his current rank of Deputy Chief of Operations. Deputy Ferguson holds both a Bachelors and Masters Degree in Criminal Justice from Western New England College, and is a graduate of the Police Executive Research Forum Senior Management Institute. Deputy Ferguson is also a graduate of the Federal Bureau of Investigation National Academy Class 230. As the Commander of the Patrol Division he has dedicated himself to collaborating with citizens. He fosters respect from the public and the members of the department. Deputy Ferguson is dedicated to Community Policing and Problem Oriented Policing principles. Deputy Chief Steven Trask is a 21 year veteran of the Framingham Police Department As the emergency services director he is responsible for the Town of Framingham's Emergency preparedness. He is highly organized and brings a wide scope of policing experience to this important position. Captain Paul Bridges is the Patrol Division Commander and has served with the Framingham Police Department over 38 years. The three Patrol Shift commanders report directly to him. He is responsible for the integration of patrol strategies through the use of crime analysis. He has worked in many positions within the department. His past assignments have included Commanding 2007 Annual Report Officer Detective Commander, Administrative Services Commander and training coordinator. Captain Bridges encourages decision making in his subordinates. He has a Bachelor of Science Degree in Law Enforcement from Northeastern University. Retirements & Departures The Police Department staffing was impacted by the leave of five officers this year. Officer James Gavin who began his policing career in November of 1968, retired. Gavin was assigned to the patrol division his entire career. Officer Gavin was a quiet and committed servant for the Town of Framingham. We wish him good health and happiness in his retirement. Detective Michael Doherty and Officer Michael McCloy, separated from service with the town of Framingham. Both officers had ten years of service with the Police Department. Officer Brett Poirier transferred to the Attleboro Police Department after serving three years with the Framingham Police Department. Brett's career in patrol and the bicycle unit, were marked by several commendations and awards for excellent police work. Brett's desire to be closer to his family and friends is a loss for the Framingham Community. Officer Keith Kaplan transferred to the Boston Police Department, in pursuit of his Public Safety & Health 73 Retired Offi'cerjames Gavin Town of Framingham lifelong dream of being a Boston Police Officer. He was an affable and energetic officer. He progressed from Patrol to the Street Crimes Unit in his short tenure. His engaging personality and positive work ethic made him an asset to the community. His distinguished performance earned him recognition and praise. One police officer candidate was unsuccessful in completing the rigorous academic and physical training at the Lowell Police academy. New Police Employees The Framingham Police Department constantly changes. As the Department embarks on a new era of policing, we face significant challenges reflective of large urban communities; our greatest resource continues to be our personnel. To capitalize on this we recruit and hire only the best individuals to be Framingham police officers, and dispatchers. We can assure the citizens that our rigorous background investigations allow only the best candidates an opportunity to serve. We presently disqualify approximately 60% of all persons attempting to become Framingham Officers and dispatchers. Only the best and the brightest earn the opportunity to wear a Framingham Police badge. Officer Stephen Buma was accepted as a lateral transfer from the Northbridge Police Department. Officer Garrett Coffin, Christopher Teel, Robert Lewis and Joseph Godino recently graduated from the Lowell Police Academy. The Lowell Police academy produces exceptional officers. It is an academic and physical accomplishment to successfully complete this 23 week academy. Dispatchers Rachel Mickens, Ann Camaro and Anne Marie Gazzaro, were hired after extensive background examination. They have the most difficult task of staffing our communication center answering calls for emergencies. They are the first link in the delivery of services. Patrol Division 2007 Annual Report The backbone of any Police department is the Patrol Division. This is the largest division within our organization, and provides what most citizens regard as traditional police services. Except for what is known as the "Swing Shift," several Officers who work slightly modified hours to cover the overlap period between traditional shifts, most Officers in the Patrol Division are assigned to one of three shifts. Standard shift hours are the "Day Shift" (7.45am- 4.10pm daily), the "Evening Shift" (4.10pm- 12.10am), and the "Midnight Shift" (12.10am- 8.10am). Officers work a rotating weekly schedule, working for 5 days, then off for 3 days, and then back working for 5 days, etc. This alternating schedule means Officers have different days off every week, but it is necessary to provide daily round the clock and weekend Police coverage. There is no question shift work places a strain on Officers and their families, particularly on weekends and holidays. However, it is necessary to provide adequate police coverage with the staffing levels available, and a characteristic of the public safety profession. Officers may request a shift change once a year during a "Shift Bid" process, which is contractually based upon seniority of time with the department. Shift Commanders The day shift is commanded by Lieutenant Edward Yarosz, his executive officer is Lt Paul Farley. The evening shift is commanded by Lt. William Delaney and his executive officer is Lt. Patricia Grigas. The midnight shift is commanded by Lieutenant Frank Divittorio and his executive Officer is Lt. Michael Siaba. These commanders are responsible for directing the patrol activities. Due to fiscal challenges these commanders use appropriate resources to in a variety of patrol strategies. Those deployments include marked patrol, unmarked patrol motorcycle, foot, as well plain clothes. These innovative commanders strive to deliver excellent services in an efficient and effective fashion. Public Safety & Health 74 Town of Framingham The Bureau of Investigation The Bureau of Investigation, under the direction of Lieutenant Kevin Slattery, and assisted by Sergeant Richard Thompson. Investigations conducted by the Bureau are usually complex and require exceptional skills and abilities. Investigations include, but are not limited to, crimes against both persons and properties. Many crimes investigated by the Bureau, are initiated by the Patrol Division, and forwarded to the Bureau for follow -up. The Bureau provides specialized services in department criminal investigations, supporting the Patrol Division in the investigation of major crimes such as homicide, rape, domestic violence, child abuse, armed robbery, fraud, and other felonies. Special investigations are initiated by the Bureau itself, or as directed by the Chief of Police. Components of the Bureau of Investigation are: General Duty Unit These Detectives investigate patterns /profiles of unknown offenders in violent crimes, crime scene reconstruction, threat assessments, interview /interrogation techniques, search warrant affidavits, and prosecution strategy. They are; Detective Darren Crawford Detective Duarte Calvao Detective David DelPrete Detective Larry Hendry Domestic Violence Unit Detective Stacey Macaudda, is assigned to domestic violence cases. These are delicate and sensitive cases that require skill and compassion. The department is a committed partner with local agencies to assist victims of domestic violence. Narcotics Unit Aggressively targets, investigates and brings to prosecution individuals or groups involved in the distribution of illegal drugs. The unit regularly interfaces with federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies. The unit has 2007 Annual Report established a strong bond of cooperation in the fight against illegal drugs at all levels. Sergeant Scott Brown and the Officers assigned to this task are experts and highly skilled investigators. The unit has made many significant drug arrests and asset seizures. Narcotics work is a high scrutiny and high stress assignment that these dedicated officer's relish. These detectives are; Sergeant Scott Brown Detective Matt Gutwill Detective Sean Riley Detective Lenny Pini Identification Unit Officers Jeff Eadie and David Studley share this critically important function. They respond to crime scenes, to identify, collects, forensically examine, photograph, preserve evidence provide expert court testimony. Prosecution Unit Sergeant Richard Thompson is the Departments liaison to the courts. He is the executive assistant to Lt. Kevin Slattery. He reviews upcoming criminal complaints, provides training and legal expertise to the department, prepares and presents criminal complaints to the District Attorney's Office and Clerk Magistrates Office of the various Trial Courts. Street Crimes Unit Sgt. Richard Pomales directs the activities of Officers Jeffrey DeRosa, Denis Avila and Middlesex County Deputy Sheriff Michael Kelley. These work closely with the Bureau of Investigations and patrol. They enforce quality of life crimes in Framingham. They use Crime intelligence gathered from the Sheriffs department as well as the Framingham Police Department crime analysis unit to initiate, identify and investigate street crime activity. Their focused strategies include warrant service, surveillance of suspects and locations involved in ongoing narcotics and criminal activity. Licensing Bureau This Bureau is commanded by Lieutenant Ronald Brandolini, a 15 year veteran of the Public Safety & Health 75 Town of Framingham department. He is responsible for the following subjects: Alcohol Licenses: In 2007 the Police Department's conducted hundreds of compliance checks to insure the Town of Framingham Alcohol Policy and Ma general Laws are being followed. During 2007, the Licensing Bureau conducted two compliance stings of 108 alcohol establishments where underage operatives attempted to purchase alcohol resulting in eight violations which resulted in license suspensions ranging from 3 days to 10 days. Numerous other alcohol investigations were conducted over the course of 2007 resulting in everything from written warnings to suspensions. This bureau also conducts investigations into prospective managers and assistant managers, as well as documenting server training for employees who serve alcohol. Sex Offender Registry. The Licensing Bureau is charged with maintaining the status of all Level -3 and Level -2 Sex Offenders living and or working in Framingham. All Level — 3 and Level — 2 Sex Offenders are required to register annually on their birth month in the city or town that they live in as well as any changes throughout the year. In 2007 the Licensing Bureau conducted hundreds of six month reviews of all Level - 3 and Level — 2 Sex Offenders living and or working in Framingham with the assistance of the street crimes unit. This program consists of a police officer physically checking the home and or work address of every Level -3 and Level -2 sex offenders in Framingham. This verification is conducted six months after their annual registration date to verify the accuracy of the information presented at their annual registration. If the information is inconsistent, the sex offender is subject to being placed in violation or arrested. License to Carry Firearms: The Licensing Bureau issued 422 Licenses to Carry firearms in 2007. 2007 Annual Report The Licensing Bureau also suspended and denied a number of licenses to carry for various reasons. An additional responsibility of the Licensing Bureau is the law enforcement supervision of three tow companies under contract with the Town of Framingham. The Licensing Bureau also oversees the two Taxi Cab Companies that are licensed to operate within the Town of Framingham and all drivers. All complaints or issues are investigated by the Licensing Bureau. At the conclusion of the investigation, if any disciplinary action is recommended, the recommendations are presented to the Board of Selectmen. The Licensing Bureau is also involved in the process of granting entertainment licenses, hawkers /peddlers, sale of second hand articles, common victualers, inn holders and constables. Housing Officer The Framingham Police and the Framingham Housing Authority formed their partnership in 1996. Since creating the partnership, there has been a marked decrease in calls for service to the Housing Authority's properties, freeing officers to respond to other calls in Town. While this program was formed to enhance the "Quality of Life" for the residents, it has also created a network between residents, the Housing Authority and the Police department. This allows the Housing Liaison Officer to interact with the residents more effectively. Officer Brad Newman is assigned as the full - time Housing Liaison Officer. He has developed a working knowledge of the policies and procedures that govern the Housing Authority, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the State Department of Housing and Community Development. This enables him to effectively enforce governing regulations. The Police and the Housing Authority have worked closely with the Pelham Apartments, developing the Computer and Recreation Center for resident youths. A Police Sub- Public Safety & Health 76 Town of Framingham Station is located within Pelham Apartments. The Sub - Station is funded by the FHA and Pelham Apartments. A number of officers are assigned to the Sub - Station, Officers McCann and S. Patriarca during the Day Shift, and Officer O'Toole evenings. Lieutenant Mike Siaba, provides strong supervision. These officers work closely with management and residents to provide a higher quality of life. The Framingham Police Housing Liaison Program has become a model, emulated by other communities. Many Police departments have sent their officers to Framingham to work with Officer Newman in an effort to develop similar programs in their respective communities. Officer Newman reviews all police reports that involve public housing or the rental assistance program, and forwards that information to the FHA for action. Any crimes that are committed in or on FHA property involving narcotics or violence are handled immediately and results in filing of eviction notices or the termination of rental assistance. Hearings were also held for those individuals who were declared ineligible for housing due to the CORI (Criminal Offender Records Information) checks done on all applicants. Housing can be denied if there is a history of violent of drug related criminal activity, however all applicants are entitled to a hearing in which they may present their case. Officer Newman also issues "No Trespass" notices on behalf of the FHA to guests or unwanted guests of housing residents. The notices are issued only after discussion with the families involved. "No trespass" notices are automatically issued to those involved in violent or drug related crimes. There is a "No Trespass" list that is continually reviewed and updated. Police /Landlord Program -This program started with Sec. 8 Landlords through the FHA. It now has over 50 Landlords throughout Framingham involved. The program allows the Police and Landlords to 2007 Annual Report partnership to work together towards safe neighborhoods. Emergency Management Framingham Emergency Management, under the direction of Deputy Police Chief Steven Trask and Assistant Fire Chief John Magri, was very busy during 2007. The Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan (CEMP) has been updated, and printed. Copies are maintained at the Police Department, Fire Department, Public Works, Board of Health, Town Clerk and Board of Selectmen's Office. The Town of Framingham still maintains one of the first fully certified LEPC's (Local Emergency Planning Committee) in the State. The LEPC consists of members of specific disciplines to include elected officials, law enforcement, emergency medical services, emergency management, fire service, public health, local environmental, hospital, transportation, media, community groups, public works and facilities using extremely hazardous substances. The LEPC develops hazardous material emergency response plans, reviews the plan annually and provides information about chemicals in the community to residents. Deputy Chief Trask and Assistant Chief Magri are both members of the State Emergency Response Commission Liaison Committee. Magri currently is the Chair of that committee. On November 14, 2007, the LEPC performed a table top exercise in conjunction with Framingham State College public safety officials. The exercise brought together many of the Town's departments and personnel as well as outside agencies to include members of MEMA (Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency), Massachusetts State Police, and American Medical Response. The exercise was successful and many things were learned and memorialized in the after action report. In an effort to remain NIMS compliant (National Incident Management System), all Public Safety & Health 77 Town of Framingham members of the Fire, Police, Public Works and Board of Health were trained in Incident command to the 100 level. Supervisors were trained to the 200 level and upper management were trained to the 300 level with certain members being trained to the 400 level in accordance with Homeland Security Presidential Directives. In 2007 the emergency notification system Connect CTY was fully operable. The system was used 38 times calling 467,167 residences and businesses. The system has been directly responsible for finding a lost Alzheimer's patient and two missing children. A survey was conducted in December 2007 and 95.4% of respondents stated that they felt safer with the system in place. Framingham will continue to be a leader in the ever increasing role of emergency management in a post 9/11 era. Safety Division The Safety Division is commanded by Lieutenant Stephen Cronin. Lt. Cronin, the Safety Officer, is a member of the Traffic and Roadway Safety Committee, advising on issues of safety and traffic flow, as well as coordinating all marches, walks, and parades through town. He also coordinates the safety aspects of the Boston Marathon as it passes through town. The Safety Officer works closely with the Town Engineer, Department of Public Works and Planning Board, conducting site reviews for existing and proposed construction projects. He is also a member of the Local Emergency Planning Committee, involved in disaster preparedness and Emergency Operations Center staff. Lt. Cronin supervises the Traffic Enforcement Unit. The unit responds to citizen complaints, as well as data collected from the departments Crime /Statistics Analysis Unit. It is staffed by Officers Lester Baker, Jorge Ruiz, Robert Sibilio, and Keith Strange. Officers Ruiz, Sibilio and Strange enforce Commercial Vehicle laws. These laws 2007 Annual Report involve Federal Motor Carrier Regulations and weight enforcement. Officer Lester Baker was injured this past summer while responding to an emergency call. They operate town wide in an effort to reduce accidents and improve traffic safety through education and enforcement. Trailer mounted speed sign boards and "stealth" radar are strategically placed throughout town to render an accurate vehicle count and speed. Residents can request either pieces of equipment be stationed temporarily in their neighborhood by contacting the Safety Officer. His assistant safety Officer, Edward Burman, handles issues relating to school buses, working with the Director of School Transportation, coordinating safe walking routes, bus routes, and stops. He also oversees the town's 17 School Crossing Guards, who come under the direction of the safety officer. Officer Burman assists each school Principal with developing an emergency action plan for their school The Parking Enforcement Officer, Debbie Nan is a member of the Safety Division, and diligently enforces town parking regulations. Bureau of Professional Standards Lieutenant Michael Hill is a 33 year veteran Framingham Police Officer. Lt. Hill has a distinguished career as having served 21 years in the detective bureau. Lt. Hill was the Police Departments prosecutor for five years. Lt. Hill has a Bachelor of Liberal Arts from Framingham State College. He has a Master of Science degree from Westfield State College. Lt. Hill has attended numerous career trainings. He is also a graduate of the Federal Bureau of Investigation National Academy Class # 185. Lt Hill is a member of the Massachusetts Police Accreditation Committee. He is currently the Commander assigned to, investigate, identify, or oversee investigation of all complaints of misconduct made against members of the Framingham Police Department, uncovered from internal or external sources. Complaints may be Public Safety & Health 78 Town of Framingham violations of rules, regulations, policies, procedures, or criminal statutes. Allegations of possible misconduct are taken very seriously and investigated. He is also tasked with the responsibility of recruiting, background investigating and hiring of applicants for police officer. It is the policy of the department to investigate all complaints against the department and its employees. This ensures the integrity of the deportment and protects the rights and interests of both the citizens and departments employees. It is the departments' commitment to strive at all times to be courteous and professional in all dealings with the citizens we serve and protect. Revenue The fiscal responsibilities of day -to -day operations of the department fall under the direction of the Administrative Aide to the chief, Officer Michael Donnelly, and his assistant, Mary McGonagle. They manage fiscal account for the maintenance, repairs, and energy of the town's street lighting. The budget for this function for the fiscal year 2007 was $ 1,735,211.00. The Police Department generates monies for the Town of Framingham through the issuance of licenses, permits, administration fees, and fines associated with parking tickets and traffic citations. Money is also received from the Framingham District Court for fines associated with penalties imposed upon those convicted of various crimes. This revenue is not entered into the Police Department budget, but is deposited into the Town General Fund. Calendar year 2007 revenues are as follows: Finger print $230 Subpoena $64 Report Fees $8,020 Detail Admin fee $110,134 Permit to Carry $12,075 Alarms $52,552 Hackney $1080 Photo $325 Court Fines $83,938 2007 Annual Report Parking Fines $ 220,748 M/V Fines $214,678 Miscellaneous Revenue $3,804 Bureau of Administrative Services This division is commanded by Lieutenant Paul Shastany. Lt. Shastany is a 26 -year veteran officer. He has served as a patrol officer, Detective, Patrol Supervisor and shift Commander. Lt. Shastany is the lead negotiator for the Special Operations Unit. In addition to numerous trainings he has a Bachelors of Science in Criminal Justice from Western New England College as well as a Masters of Science in Law Enforcement from Western New England College. The responsibilities of this bureau are to support operations and administration. Lt. Shastany supervises the Records personnel Priscilla Patuto and Annette Convery. The immense amount of reports generated by officers is cataloged, copied, and filed. Lt. Shastany supervises extra work assignments or "details," as well as evidence, and property control functions. Those functions are administered by Officer Alan Dubeshter. Dubeshter is responsible for the receipt, cataloging, maintenance including delivering evidence to various state labs for testing, and destruction of closed cases. This function requires exacting control and attention. Lt. Shastany is the public information officer. Policing activities generate tremendous interest by the public. The Framingham Police Departments activities in turn, are closely monitored by the print and television media outlets. Our police log is reviewed daily, either on -line, or at the department. The public demands information that is honest and factual regarding what is occurring in our community. We enjoy a positive relationship with the media. We not only provide crime information, but we provide useful information to prevent as crimes, inform the public of the department's day to day operations. By releasing factual and pertinent information we can increase public confidence and trust. We also will reduce fear, Public Safety & Health 79 Town of Framingham deter crime, increase reporting, and reduce inaccuracies. Obviously not all information can be released due to laws and limitations regarding privacy, right to know and other factors. It is the Chiefs philosophy to maintain open lines of communication with the public about our activities. Training is a primary focus of the Chief and the department's command staff. The Framingham Police Department has always been a leader in providing the best available training programs to its personnel. Our continuous training programs are supplemented by a daily reinforcement of "High Risk, Low Frequency" event topics. Training not only helps develop and maintain a better Police Officer, but provides for safer, more efficient delivery of services. In- Service Training The departments' annual 40 hour in- service training program consisted of the following training programs: 0 Incident command 0 Emergency Vehicle Operation 0 Restraint Chair, procedure review 0 Firearms annual qualification and Simunitions / tactical firearms training 0 Code enforcement 0 CPR annual re- certification 0 Enhanced 911 and LEAPS telecommunications training Firearms Training Unit The Firearms Training Unit is responsible for the on -going training and qualification of all sworn department personnel with the various weapons systems used by our Officers. This would include police service handguns, special weapons used by the department's Special Weapons and Tactics Unit. and the various non - lethal and less - lethal weapons systems we employ, such as O.C. (Pepper Spray). This unit is commanded by Sergeant Robert Downing, with Sergeant Michael Esposito as its Executive Officer. The 7 Training Unit Instructors are certified as both MA Criminal 2007 Annual Report Justice Training Council and FBI Firearms Training Instructors. The Unit conducts intensive spring and fall in- service training programs utilizing both live -fire range exercises, and reality based training programs involving extensive use of role - playing scenarios. In these scenarios, Officers train with our state of the art " Simunitions" plastic cartridge type weapons training system. This type of high intensity training best prepares officers for situations in which they may, at any time, be called upon to defend their lives, or the life of another. Should town residents have questions or concerns regarding any type of firearm, safety practices, or firearms training, Firearms Training Unit members will gladly assist you. SWAT Unit The special weapons and tactics unit was established in 2001 to enhance the department's ability to respond to critical incidents, this all volunteer unit is comprised of 19 highly trained Officers from all divisions within the department. Deputy Chief Craig Davis is the Commander of the SWAT Team. The Officer in Charge of the SWAT Team is Lt. Ronald Brandolini. The SWAT team trains rigorously to respond to high risk situations such as hostage situations, armed barricaded subjects, high risk warrant service, and the apprehension of armed or violent suspects. All team members are certified in the use of the various special weapons and equipment available to support the Patrol Division in high risk situations. The team members maintain rigorous physical standards to prepare them for the hazardous situations they may encounter. The Crisis Negotiation Unit members are a crucial part of the team. The negotiators are highly skilled communicators. Lt. Paul Shastany is the Officer in Charge of the Crisis Negotiators. Their training is augmented with their internship at Psychological Emergency Services answering the crisis lines. A specially equipped vehicle is available for rapid deployment of the unit and its equipment. Public Safety & Health 80 Town of Framingham The team conducts frequent, reality based training to maintain a proficient skill level in tactical operations and specialized equipment. Public Safety Dive Team The combined Framingham Police and Framingham Fire Department Dive Team train, practice, and respond as a single, effective unit. Sergeant Blaise Tersom commands the Police Departments members. These highly qualified public safety divers are ready at a moments notice in any weather. Jail Diversion Program The Framingham Jail Diversion Program has been recognized by the Department of Mental Health as a model program in mental health services. People who have mental illness frequently interact with the Framingham Police Department. The program re- directs appropriate non - violent offenders out of the punitive criminal justice system into community based mental health and substance abuse services. Often, these subjects would have no other ways or means of accessing medical treatment for medically based /caused behavioral problems and offences. Outcomes: January 1s` 2007 — December Ms` 2007 In the Year 2007, a total of 457 joint interventions occurred between police officers from the Framingham Police Department and clinicians from the Jail Diversion Program. Number of Evaluations 2007 50 45 47 39 42 39 41 46 39 �40 33 30 ❑ Seriesl z 22 20 – — — ]T — — — — — — — — a10 0 Jan -07 Feb -07 Mar -07 Apr -07 May -07 Jun -07 J607 Aug -07 Sep -07 Oct -07 Nov -07 Dec -07 Month 2007 Annual Report During the Year 2007, there were a total number of 82 diversions from arrests (an average of 73 %) as a result of a JDP intervention. Diversions from arrest 120% 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% 0 0 0 0 O 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Sa o Le o �a� P Q� �a� ��o �1� 1 � 5 p Q o �a Month In the Year 2007, the following chart reveals the breakdown between out patient and in patient referrals as a result of the Jail Diversion Program psychiatric evaluation. During the Year 2007, the following chart reveals the breakdown of where the psychiatric evaluation was conducted following the Jail Diversion Program intervention. Location of Evaluation Public Safety & Health 81 Town of Framingham Community Surveys We at the Framingham Police Department are responsive to the concerns of the community. It is our mission to deliver services that help the community prosper through cooperation and communication. In keeping with the Towns' focus on customer service, we constantly conduct community surveys. Deputy Chief Kenneth Ferguson coordinates the survey program. Lieutenant Michael Siaba administers the process and forwards the information to Officer Chris Murtagh. We have used the survey outcomes to help deliver and direct police activities in the downtown area. Crime /Statistics Analysis Analysis of statistical data is an extremely valuable tool for law enforcement agencies. Geo -based mapping, and tracking incidents by location, has enabled the department to quickly identify emerging crime trends. The use of sophisticated computer and mapping equipment allows us to utilize this valuable information. The officers assigned to this task are Officer Chris Murtagh and Ted Piers. We 2007 Annual Report can identify and implement enforcement, preventative, educational or intervention strategies. The command staff can then best allocate our limited resources most effectively and deploy Officers accordingly. The following Part I and Part 2 crime analysis is based upon the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) standards as defined by the FBI. One limitation is that should a number of crimes be connected, only the most serious one is included in the statistics. For instance, if someone were murdered during a car theft, they would only list murder. Analysis of Part 1 and Part 2 Crime 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Part 1 Crime 1,707 1,885 1,930 1,924 1,639 Part 2 Crime 1,382 1,439 1,606 1,922 1,795 Part 1 and Part 2 Crime - 5 Year Trends 2000 1800 1600 1400 y 1200 a c 0 1000 `w a E 800 Z 600 02003 ®2004 02005 02006 ®2007 82 Part 1 Crime Part 2 Crime Town of Framingham Part 1 & 2 Statistics 2007 vs. 2006 1950 1900 1850 1800 1750 1700 1650 1600 1550 1500 1450 2007 Part 1 Crime Make -up Homicide, 0, 0% Motor V 2006 ❑ 2007 2% Motor Vi lary, 217, 13% ,15% Burglary, 242, 13% Larceny, Larceny, 1' 2007 Annual Report 2006 Part 1 Crime Make -up Homicide, 3, 0% Public Safety & Health 83 Part 1 Part 2 Town of Framingham 2007 Part 2 Make -up Fraud, 11, 1% Forgery and Counterfeiting, 10, 1% ),—Stolen Property, 10, 1% Other Offenses, 425, 2007 Annual Report Vandalism, 538,29% Disorderly Conduct, 86, 5% Drunkenness, 106, 6% Liquor Laws, 21, 1% Driving Under the Influence, 70, 4% Offenses Against Family & Children, 308, 17% 2006 Part 2 Make -up Fraud, 8, 0% Forgery and Counterfeiting, 14,1% /�Sti Other Offenses, 430, Drug Offenses, 127, 7% ** Other Incidents primarily reflect breaches of the peace, disturbance of the peace, town by -law violations, investigations, and Jail Diversion Program interventions Property, 10, 1% Vandalism, 753, 39% Weapons, 47, 2% Offenses Against Children, 261, titution, 4, 0% Sex Offenses, 51, 3% Public Safety & Health 84 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Fleet Maintenance Tom Bowen is the Police Department fleet technician. Tom is responsible for maintenance and administration of 58 town vehicles, including marked and unmarked cruisers, police motorcycles, and specialized vehicles such as prisoner transport, animal control, and Special Operations vehicles, and trailers. Many of our marked emergency vehicles operate 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The severe service they endure requires constant maintenance, and repair. He is also responsible for fleet specifications, design, supply, and warranty management. Respectfully Submitted, Chief Steven Carl Animal Control 50 Western Avenue Framingham, MA 01702 508 -n2- 58701508 - 620- 4872(lax) animal .control@franiinghaninia.gov Although Animal Control is a small department the staff responded to more than 4,000 calls in 2007. The Framingham Animal Control Department is staffed by 2 full -time and 2 part - time Animal Control Officers. The Public Safety & Health 85 2003 >' Change 2004 Change; 2006 Change >2006 Change 2007 Change Alarm - Business 2,917 -4.86 2,496 -14.43 2,418 - 3.13 2,069 - 14.43 2,244 8.46 Alarm - Residential 1,471 - 4.73 1,306 -11.22 ! ! 1,137 -12.94 1,016 -10.64 1,051 3.44 Arrests 1,554 -19.15 1,693 8.94 ! 1,940 14.59 2,027 4.48 ! 1,861 4.19 Assault - Does not include Domestic Assault 193 21.38 172 -10.88 '!'! 200 16.28 204 2.00 '! 142 -30.39 B!E Attempted 44 12.82 47 6.82 46 - 2.13 21 -54.35 35 66.67 B/E 266 -8.28 299 12.41 '! 285 -4.68 222 - 22.11'! 176 -20.72 Citations 10,039 -20.83 7,898 -21.33 ! ! 9,755 23.51 11,060 ! 13.38> 11,256 1.77 Collisions 1,675 7.58 1,861 11.10 2,003 7.63 1,749 - 12.68' 1,890 8.06 Domestics 333 -22.38 316 -5.11 !' 331 4.75 324 -2.11 !' 356 9.88 Drugs 140 -10.26 169 20.71 !' 197 16.57 243 23.35 >' 195 -19.75 E911 Calls 1,776 27.86 2,307 29.90 2,086 - 9.58 1,784 - 14.48' 1,672 -6.28 Emergency RIO (started retarding in 2005 - - - 3 7 ! 133.33 3 -67.14 Family Problem 362 -9.05 457 26.24 544 19.04 636 16.91'' 648 1.89 Inebriate 163 -48.42 1 211 29.45 '! 261 23.70 196 - 24.90! 198 1.02 Log Entries 38,618 2.07 39,444 2.14 ! 46,168 17.05 51,324 1 ! 11.17> 53,320 3.89 Missing Person - Adult 83 12.16 113 36.14 '! 98 -13.27 77 - 21.43! 106 37.66 Missing Person - Juvenile 115 4.55 95 -17.39 !' !' 167 75.79 171 2.40 !' 126 -26.32 Motor Vehicle Break 213 1 -23.10 221 1 3.76 !' 264 19.46 285 7.95 !' 318 1 11.58 Motor Vehicle Stolen 190 -19.15 246 29.47 ! 226 1 -8.13 203 - 10.18' 176 -13.30 Rape - includes rape kits with no charges 24 0.00 9 -62.50 !' !' 17 88.89 13 !' - 23.53' 5 -61.54 !' Robbery (includes all ) 39 50.00 45 15.38 45 0.00 39 - 13.33' 28 -28.21 Fleet Maintenance Tom Bowen is the Police Department fleet technician. Tom is responsible for maintenance and administration of 58 town vehicles, including marked and unmarked cruisers, police motorcycles, and specialized vehicles such as prisoner transport, animal control, and Special Operations vehicles, and trailers. Many of our marked emergency vehicles operate 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The severe service they endure requires constant maintenance, and repair. He is also responsible for fleet specifications, design, supply, and warranty management. Respectfully Submitted, Chief Steven Carl Animal Control 50 Western Avenue Framingham, MA 01702 508 -n2- 58701508 - 620- 4872(lax) animal .control@franiinghaninia.gov Although Animal Control is a small department the staff responded to more than 4,000 calls in 2007. The Framingham Animal Control Department is staffed by 2 full -time and 2 part - time Animal Control Officers. The Public Safety & Health 85 Town of Framingham Officers provide service to the residents of Framingham and care for the animals held by the department 7 days a week 365 days a year. The Officers also respond to off -hour emergencies as needed. Officers participated in annual firearms training and qualification as well as Oleoresin re- certification. The Animal Control Officers respond to calls regarding dogs, there are more than 3,600 licensed dogs in the Town of Framingham, cats, livestock and wildlife. There are 29 different locations that keep livestock and foul. The annual livestock census is also taken by the members of this department. One of the livestock calls involved a Longhorn bull that had gotten loose and traveled more than a mile to another farm where he created a nuisance until he was finally captured and returned to his owner. The department fields many calls regarding wildlife. The Officers offer educational materials and information that is obtained through the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife. The department also provides a low cost Rabies vaccination and micro -chip identification clinic to the public. More than 80 pets participated in the 2007 clinic. Activity statistics for 2007 Approximately 1064 wildlife calls were fielded. 120 calls regarding dead wildlife 129 PAC referrals 113 raccoon complaints 130 coyote complaints 32 opossum complaint 174 complaints of injured birds 28 complaints of injured deer 6 hit by car deer DOA 65 sick skunks 71 squirrel complaint 1 hawk issue 1 muskrat complaint 60 fox complaints 28 bat complaints 2 bats tested positive for Rabies 2007 Annual Report 23 woodchuck complaints 11 turkey complaints 19 duck complaints 3 bee complaints 3 dogs attacked by coyotes 2 dogs killed by coyotes 19 rabbit complaints 1 human bitten by a raccoon 23 turtle complaints Approximately 1510 canine calls were fielded. 233 reports of lost dogs 712 complaints of loose dogs 239 complaints of barking dogs 38 dog adoption inquiries 111 owners reported recovering their dogs 28 surrender inquiries 17 hit by car dog (9 deceased) 13 dog v. dog 29 dog bites 87 wellbeing checks 1 dog v rabid raccoon Approximately 422 feline calls were fielded. 65 stray cat complaints 85 hit by car cats (deceased) 163 lost cats reported 40 adoption inquiries 23 surrender inquiries 31 complaints of feral cats 6 cat bites 5 wellbeing checks 1 cat tested for rabies, tested negative 2 cat in tree calls Other 264 compliance checks 186 animal quarantines (issued and released) 717 administrative calls 29 livestock inspections 7 loose horse complaints 1 injured horse complaint 1 loose Longhorn bull 26 Police assists 2 Board of Health assists 3 MSPCA assists 4 hearings Respectfully Submitted, Katherine J. MacKenzie, Director Public Safety & Health 86 Town of Framingham Framingham Auxiliary Police One William Welch Watt Framingham, MA 01702 I am pleased to report to you on the activities of the Framingham Auxiliary Police for the year ended December 31, 2007. As you know the Framingham Auxiliary Police is committed to making Framingham a better and safer place to live and work, and is dedicated to excellence in public service. Our commitment to Framingham has been part of the fabric of this organization for the past 65 years. The year 2007 was another active period of volunteer community service for the men and women of the Framingham Auxiliary Police. Personnel There has been an expected turnover of personnel. We started 2007 with 23 active and ended the year with 22 active officers, one recruit officer, and one officer on a Leave of Absence. This year we are very proud that our turnover was a result of the Framingham Police Department hiring Joseph Godino for a police officer position. Liesa Healy- Miller is on an extended leave of absence (maternity) and is expected back in the spring of 2008. In order to achieve excellence we start with a selection process that helps choose only the finest recruit officers. We again administered a law enforcement entry -level examination to candidates, and expanded our independent testing by including the Inwald Personality Index (IPI) and the Johnson and Roberts Personal History Questionnaire (PHQ). Our goal is that any officer that we accept should be of the same caliber as you would hire for the Framingham Police. Candidates who successfully pass the entry -level test (to date approximately 50% of candidates are passing the examination) are then subject to a background investigations and are interviewed by a board of auxiliary officers, and our FPD 2007 Annual Report liaison officer. Our recruiting process helps us select quality volunteers for our organization to continue achievement our goal of excellence and professionalism. During 2007 we held several open houses to attract more volunteers. We had 6 citizens attend the open house we held in October, of which 4 continued through our selection process, and we selected one of the individuals, Bryan Finley, who is scheduled to start the reserve academy in January 2008. We held a second open house in December, following the Law and Justice Seminar series. We had 2 citizens attend the open house, and further processing is scheduled to begin in January 2008. Our recruiting efforts will continue in 2008, as our target is to have 25 trained auxiliary officers ready to assist the department. We are pleased that in addition to several FPD officers hired from the auxiliary police ranks over the past several years, two of our auxiliary officers are currently employed as Framingham Police dispatchers. It's nice when our recruiting efforts also pay off with great candidates for the department. Training One of our primary missions, as part of Emergency Management, is to be trained in the event of natural or civil disaster. The Framingham Auxiliary Police receive the finest training available to auxiliary police units in Massachusetts. Our training has us to a level of professionalism that makes us proud. All recruit officers graduate from the Massachusetts Municipal Police Training Committee Reserve Intermittent Academy (120 hours), and receive first responder and CPR /AED training before receiving their uniforms. Classroom and practical training on use of force, Oleoresin Capsicum (pepper) spray, ASP baton and firearms begins after completion of the Academy, and officers do not carry the related equipment until FPD training officers certify them. After the classroom, practical training ensures that our officers will be ready to assist in an Public Safety & Health 87 Town of Framingham emergency. Our Field Training program has been operating on Friday and Saturday nights, when two auxiliary officers patrol the Town, and the ride along program, where an auxiliary officer rides on patrol with a Framingham officer, both of these providing hands on training experiences that the classroom does not bring. Medical and range training are on going during the year to maintain our certification and proficiency. Our monthly meetings also have a training component. In 2007, in conjunction with the department we have continued to use the "In the Line of Duty" video in- service training program. At each monthly training meeting we either have a guest speaker or learn from one of the training videos. In addition our officers are now trained in the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command System (ICS). During January through February of 2007 we completed an 8 class in- service training series coordinated in part with the Massachusetts Municipal Police Training Committee. This year's program included the following topics: Communication for Law Enforcement and Life, OC re- certification, Defensive Tactics, Patrol Procedures, Officer Survival, Legal update, Gang Intelligence, and Domestic Terrorism Counter Intelligence. We are grateful to Sgt. Kathy Esposito, Officer Phil Martinez, Officer Denis Avila and Attorney Brian Simoneau who instructed several of our in- service classes. During the year Officer Burman provided us with our medical re- certification training, and the firearms unit provided us our firearms re- certification. Community Commitment The Framingham Auxiliary Police is committed to a community policing philosophy. In fact our very existence is community policing in action. We demonstrate our commitment by contributing actively to the quality of life in Framingham through our role as auxiliary police officers by providing our volunteer services for many 2007 Annual Report community activities and events. It is through these efforts that we help support the Framingham Police in its community policing strategy. There are several on -going activities that we provide services for regularly. During the summer we are proud to provide traffic assistance at the Concerts on the Green and every year during our Craft Fair we also hold a child safety - fingerprinting event. This year we assisted the department and distributed level 3 sex offender notifications to impacted neighborhoods. We also distributed winter parking notifications prior to the annual winter parking restrictions. In addition to these on -going activities, this year we provided assistance with 26 separate community, charitable and safety events in Framingham. Without our assistance some of these events would be difficult to conduct safely, or the resources of the Framingham Police would have needed to be stripped from patrol to service the following events: 0 Temple Beth Am — Fingerprinting 0 Boston Marathon 0 Art Doyle Road Race 0 MOMM Road Race (Framingham High) 0 Memorial Day Services 0 MetroWest Medical Safety Day 0 Walsh Middle School Road Race 0 McAuliffe Library "Truck Day" 0 OI (Brittle Bones) Fingerprinting and Walkathon 0 Flag Day Festival 0 3 Day Breast Cancer Walk • Jimmy Fund Walk • Circle of Friends Pre - school Fingerprinting • Cabbage Night Patrol • Halloween Night Patrol • Veterans Day Services • Turkey Classic Road Race • Santa's Visit to Framingham • Band of Liberty Concert Public Safety & Health 88 Town of Framingham • FPA — Pancreatic Cancer Road Race • Israeli Jazz Concert • Paramount Harley Davidson — Fingerprinting 0 Run /Walk for Domestic Violence Framingham Coop Bike Rodeo — Fingerprinting 0 Framingham Schools — Early Childhood fair — Fingerprinting 0 National Guard welcome home from Iraq ceremony We also assisted at several other events during 2007. This year we were also able to assist our neighbor Holliston with resources for their annual Holliston Day Parade. This mutual aid benefits us by gaining experience working with other communities, as may be the case in a disaster. We were able to help out the Special Operations unit this year by provided role players for a training class sponsored by the department, and provided site security and role players for a training exercise. In October 2007, several of our officers participated as "victims" in a mass casualty training exercise "Operation Ready 2007" at Logan airport. And in November 2007 the auxiliary police was part of the Framingham LEPC table top exercise. In December 2007 we assisted in the search for a missing elderly woman with Alzheimer's. As you can see during 2007, the men and women of the Framingham Auxiliary Police put forth another superior effort in making Framingham a better place to live and work. We do not have the volunteer hours tallied yet for 2007, but as you know we generally collectively average approximately 4,000 hours of community service to Framingham each year. Homeland Security 2007 Annual Report The Civil Defense Acts of 1950, that auxiliary police units are organized under, still has significant relevance in our efforts to support homeland security. The Acts create the Emergency Management infrastructure that is needed to assist with civil or natural disasters. In May 2002 the Citizen Corps' Volunteers in Police Service (YIPS) initiative was created. The VIPS program is a response to President George W. Bush's call to all Americans to dedicate time to serving our communities and our nation. VIPS is one of several opportunities emerging through the new Citizen Corps initiative to enhance local homeland security efforts and make emergency preparedness a part of our daily lives. The Framingham Auxiliary Police is registered with, and is part of the VIPS initiative. You can find our organization listed with about 1 other similar programs around the nation at www.policevolunteers.org Long before homeland security became a household term, the officers of the Framingham Auxiliary Police made a commitment to community service. Our mission remains the same - to be prepared to assist Framingham in case of an emergency, however our mission now has a renewed focus. During our field training patrols we check critical infrastructure identified by the department. In 2007 we applied for a Homeland Security Grant for the Framingham LEPC Citizen Corps Council. We received notification that we were awarded part of what we applied for, and it will provide some equipment to both the auxiliary police and the Framingham Medical Reserve Corps. Our auxiliary officers are proud to be part of a homeland security organization that is trained and prepared to respond to local emergencies. Each of our auxiliary officers has worked diligently to make our unit a professional auxiliary police organization. Public Safety & Health 89 Town of Framingham Emergency Management Support We would like to thank the Director of Emergency Management, Deputy Chief Steven Trask, and the Assistant Director of Emergency Management, Assistant Fire Chief John Magri, for the ongoing support and assistance that we receive from Framingham Emergency Management. The auxiliary police unit understands its role during an emergency and continues its dedication and training in the event we are needed to assist. Framingham Police Support I want to personally thank you and each and every officer of the Framingham Police for all the support we received during the past year. We strive to keep an excellent working relationship with all Framingham officers. Without a supportive environment, an outstanding program like ours could not exist. We especially would like to extend an extra special thank you to Deputy Chief Steven Trask for all his help and support to the Framingham Auxiliary Police as our liaison officer. Deputy Chief Trask does an excellent job in representing the Department, providing Fire Department Fire Administration 10 Loring Drive Framingham, MA 01702 The Framingham Fire Department is an organization of dedicated professionals who are committed to protecting the citizens of Framingham from loss of life and property caused by the ravages of fire, and to respond in a quick and efficient manner to medical emergencies. Through fire prevention education, our mission is to prevent disastrous incidents from occurring and to minimize damage to life, property, and the environment. In addition to fire suppression duties, this Department responds to medical emergencies, hazardous material incidents, water problems, and other calls for assistance. 2007 Annual Report training, keeping us motivated and feeling a part of the Framingham Police organization. I want to thank you for all of your support of the Framingham Auxiliary Police. You have continued to set a positive tone at the top of the organization towards the auxiliary police that, along with our dedication and professionalism has allowed a very positive relationship to exist between regular and auxiliary officers. In summary, the men and women of the Framingham Auxiliary Police provided another outstanding year of professional community service to the Town of Framingham. It is a combined effort of all of these officers that make the Framingham Auxiliary Police the fine organization that it is. Please feel free to give me a call at any time to discuss our activities. The Framingham Auxiliary Police is dedicated to excellence in public service. Respectfully Submitted, Captain Marc Spigel, Commanding Officer 508 - 552 -5950 508 - 620 -4946 (fax) odg@franiinghaninia.gov The Fire Prevention Division provides safety education, code enforcement, plan review, and inspections. We are committed to delivering these services through proper staffing strategically placed through the community and to do so in a cost effective manner. The annual report of the Framingham Fire Department for the year ending December 31, 2007 is as follows: Public Safety & Health 90 Town of Framingham Personnel /155 This Department experienced several changes in 2007 caused by the retirement of two (2) members, three (3) new hires and three (3) active military deployments. Retirements Firefighter Joseph Mastrofillippo retired after 28 years and Firefighter Lawrence Podolske retired after 32 years of faithful and dedicated service. Military Deployments Firefighter Robert Morrison served 38 months with the U.S. Army Firefighter Wilfred Gingras served 17 months in the U.S. Army Firefighter Julio Feliciano served 13 months with the U.S. Marine Corps New Hires Firefighter James Madden Firefighter Suzanne Crippen Pamela Hache in Administration Total Alarms The Framingham Fire Department responded to a total of 9,460 emergency calls in 2007 and 9,063 non - emergency calls for a total of 18,523 responses. Administration The Framingham Fire Department continues to restructure the administrative staff in an effort to comply with many new federal and state mandates including Chapter 304 of the Acts of 2004, an Act Relative to Fire Safety in the Commonwealth. Many sweeping provision were included in these acts with the most important being the identification and enforcement of mandatory sprinkler installation in specific venues. A considerable amount of administration's time was spent overseeing this mandate and we continue to monitor and enforce this requirement. The restructuring of the staff has also proven to be extremely effective in allowing the department to develop and take advantage of 2007 Annual Report Chief 1 Assistant Chiefs 2 Deputies 4 Fire Marshal 1 Assistant Fire Marshal 1 Training Officer 1 Captains 8 Lieutenants 24 Firefighters 106 Civilians 7 new advances in the Fire Service. During 2007 the Framingham Fire Department upgraded its Firehouse reporting software, initiated a pre -fire inspection program, installed new digital recording devices, merged into the Town's voice over internet phone system and installed new Self Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) on all apparatus. The fire service has faced many dramatic changes over the past several years and leadership of Framingham Fire Department has recognized this and continually establishes reasonable and valuable guidelines to meet organizational objectives and federal mandates. A total of $ 199,522.19 was collected in revenue and deposited in the general fund in 2007. $103,900 was collected in non - permit fees. such as master box annual fees and site inspections. $95,622.19 wa s collected in permit fees. Public Safety & Health 91 Town Manager ji&an Suso and Fire Chief 011ie Gadson Town of Framingham Incident Type 2007 Annual Report (ftamin .Q/tain Bite c Depattinent FFD Incident Type Report (SummaryJCM) Alarm Date Between {01/01/2007} And {12/31/2007} Count % of Inc Total Est Loss % of Loss 1 Fire 111 Building fire 45 0.48% $1,667,400 86.10% 112 Fires in structure other than in a building 1 0.01% $200 0.01% 113 Cooking fire, confined to container 245 2.59% $3,066 0.15% 114 Chimney or flue fire, confined to chimney or flue 4 0.04% $600 0.03% 116 Fuel burner /boiler malfunction, fire confined 17 0.18% $0 0.00% 117 Commercial Compactor fire, confined to rubbish 2 0.02% $500 0.02% 118 Trash or rubbish fire, contained 6 0.06% $0 0.00% 131 Passenger vehicle fire 36 0.38% $159,450 8.23% 132 Road freight or transport vehicle fire 1 0.01% $100,000 5.16% 140 Natural vegetation fire, Other 33 0.35% $400 0.02% 141 Forest, woods or wildland fire 1 0.01% $0 0.00% 142 Brush or brush - and -grass mixture fire 59 0.62% $1,310 0.06% 150 Outside rubbish fire, Other 3 0.03% $0 0.00% 151 Outside rubbish, trash or waste fire 11 0.12% $1,000 0.05% 154 Dumpster or other outside trash receptacle fire 6 0.06% $0 0.00% 160 Special outside fire, Other 5 0.05% $550 0.02% 162 Outside equipment fire 2 0.02% $650 0.03% 173 Cultivated trees or nursery stock fire 1 0.01% $0 0.00% Total 1 Fire 478 5.05 0 /0 $1,935,126 99.92 2 Overpressure Rupture, Explosion, Overheat(no fire) 200 Overpressure rupture, explosion, overheat other 1 0.01% $0 0.00% Total 2 Overpressure Rupture, Explosion, Overheat(no fire) 1 0.01 0 / 0 $0 0.00 0 /0 3 Rescue & Emergency Medical Service Incident 300 Rescue, EMS incident, other 8 0.08% $0 0.00% 311 Medical assist, assist EMS crew 136 1.44% $0 0.00% 321 EMS call, excluding vehicle accident with injury 5,101 53.90% $0 0.00% 322 Motor vehicle accident with injuries 301 3.18% $0 0.00% 323 Motor vehicle /pedestrian accident (MV Ped) 47 0.50% $0 0.00% 324 Motor Vehicle Accident with no injuries 173 1.83% $0 0.00% 331 Lock -in (if lock out , use 511) 24 0.25% $0 0.00% 340 Search for lost person, other 1 0.01% $0 0.00% 341 Search for person on land 2 0.02% $0 0.00% 350 Extrication, rescue, Other 1 0.01% $0 0.00% 351 Extrication of victim(s) from building /structure 1 0.01% $0 0.00% 352 Extrication of victim(s) from vehicle 2 0.02% $0 0.00% 353 Removal of victim(s) from stalled elevator 25 0.26% $0 0.00% 357 Extrication of victim(s) from machinery 1 0.01% $0 0.00% 360 Water & ice - related rescue, other 1 0.01% $0 0.00% 361 Swimming /recreational water areas rescue 1 0.01% $0 0.00% 381 Rescue or EMS standby 1 0.01% $0 0.00% Total 3 Rescue & Emergency Medical Service Incident 5,826 61.57% $0 0.00 0 /0 4 Hazardous Condition (No Fire) 400 Hazardous condition, Other 3 0.03% $0 0.00% 410 Combustible /flammable gas /liquid condition, other 1 0.01 $0 0.00 Public Safety & Health 92 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report (ficamin Lam Bite .Department ON . FFD Incident Type Report (SummaryJCM) Alarm Date Between {01/01/2007} And {12/31/2007} Incident Type Count % of Inc Total Est Loss % of Loss 4 Hazardous Condition (No Fire) 412 Gas leak (natural gas or LPG) 61 0.64% $0 0.00% 413 Oil or other combustible liquid spill 7 0.07% $0 0.00% 422 Chemical spill or leak 2 0.02% $0 0.00% 423 Refrigeration leak 1 0.01% $0 0.00% 424 Carbon monoxide incident 44 0.46% $0 0.00% 440 Electrical wiring /equipment problem, Other 37 0.39% $0 0.00% 441 Heat from short circuit (wiring), defective /worn 14 0.15% $0 0.00% 442 Overheated motor 17 0.18% $400 0.02% 443 Breakdown of light ballast 6 0.06% $0 0.00% 444 Power line down 34 0.36% $0 0.00% 445 Arcing, shorted electrical equipment 29 0.31% $500 0.02% 460 Accident, potential accident, Other 1 0.01% $0 0.00% 462 Aircraft standby 18 0.19% $0 0.00% 463 Vehicle accident, general cleanup 2 0.02% $0 0.00% 480 Attempted burning, illegal action, Other 1 0.01% $0 0.00% Total 4 Hazardous Condition (No Fire) 297 3.14 0 /0 $900 0.04 0 /0 5 Service Call 500 Service Call, other 45 0.48% $0 0.00% 510 Person in distress, Other 7 0.07% $0 0.00% 511 Lock -out 79 0.83% $0 0.00% 520 Water problem, Other 98 1.04% $1 0.00% 521 Water evacuation 1 0.01% $0 0.00% 522 Water or steam leak 31 0.33% $0 0.00% 531 Smoke or odor removal 7 0.07% $0 0.00% 540 Animal problem, Other 2 0.02% $0 0.00% 541 Animal problem 1 0.01% $0 0.00% 542 Animal rescue 1 0.01% $0 0.00% 550 Public service assistance, Other 50 0.53% $0 0.00% 551 Assist police or other governmental agency 33 0.35% $0 0.00% 552 Police matter 105 1.11% $0 0.00% 553 Public service 154 1.63% $0 0.00% 554 Assist invalid 250 2.64% $0 0.00% 555 Defective elevator, no occupants 3 0.03% $0 0.00% 561 Unauthorized burning 33 0.35% $0 0.00% 571 Cover assignment, standby, moveup 18 0.19% $0 0.00% Total 5 Service Call 918 9.70% $1 0.00 0 /0 6 Good Intent Call 600 Good intent call, Other 175 1.85% $0 0.00% 611 Dispatched & cancelled en route 122 1.29% $0 0.00% 621 Wrong location 30 0.32% $0 0.00% 631 Authorized controlled burning 7 0.07% $0 0.00% 632 Prescribed fire 2 0.02% $0 0.00% 650 Steam, Other gas mistaken for smoke, Other 7 0.07% $0 0.00% 651 Smoke scare, odor of smoke 141 1.49% $0 0.00% Public Safety & Health 93 Town of Framingham V 2007 Annual Report (ftarncz .q /kam evte Dena -ttmeat FFD Incident Type Report (SummaryJCM) 00-m- Alarm Date Between {01/01/2007} And {12/31/2007} Incident Type Count % of Inc Total Est Loss % of Loss 6 Good Intent Call 653 Smoke from barbecue, tar kettle 7 0.07% $500 0.02% 661 EMS call, party transported by non -fire agency 1 0.01% $0 0.00% 671 HazMat release investigation w /no HazMat 1 0.01% $0 0.00% Total 6 Good Intent Call 519 5.48 0 /0 $500 0.02 0 /0 7 False Alarm & False Call 700 False alarm or false call, Other 70 0.74% $0 0.00% 710 Malicious, mischievous false call, Other 155 1.64% $0 0.00% 712 Direct tie to FD, malicious false alarm 5 0.05% $0 0.00% 713 Telephone, malicious false alarm 1 0.01% $0 0.00% 714 Central station, malicious false alarm 14 0.15% $0 0.00% 715 Local alarm system, malicious false alarm 2 0.02% $0 0.00% 721 Bomb scare - no bomb 2 0.02% $0 0.00% 730 System malfunction, Other 106 1.12% $0 0.00% 731 Sprinkler activation due to malfunction 29 0.31% $0 0.00% 732 Extinguishing system activation due to malfunction 7 0.07% $0 0.00% 733 Smoke detector activation due to malfunction 182 1.92% $0 0.00% 734 Heat detector activation due to malfunction 18 0.19% $0 0.00% 735 Alarm system sounded due to malfunction 100 1.06% $0 0.00% 736 CO detector activation due to malfunction 54 0.57% $0 0.00% 740 Unintentional transmission of alarm, Other 98 1.04% $0 0.00% 741 Sprinkler activation, no fire - unintentional 27 0.29% $0 0.00% 742 Extinguishing system activation 2 0.02% $0 0.00% 743 Smoke detector activation, no fire - unintentional 310 3.28% $0 0.00% 744 Detector activation, no fire - unintentional 79 0.83% $0 0.00% 745 Alarm system activation, no fire - unintentional 109 1.15% $0 0.00% 746 Carbon monoxide detector activation, no CO 49 0.52% $0 0.00% Total 7 False Alarm & False Call 1,419 15.00 $0 0.00 0 /0 8 Severe Weather & Natural Disaster 814 Lightning strike (no fire) 1 0.01% $0 0.00% Total 8 Severe Weather & Natural Disaster 1 0.01 0 /0 $0 0.00 0 /0 9 Special Incident Type 900 Special type of incident, Other 3 0.03% $0 0.00% 90OF Fire Drill 1 0.01% $0 0.00% Total 9 Special Incident Type 4 0.04 0 /0 $0 0.00 0 /0 Total Incident Count: 9463 Total Est Loss: $1,936,527 Public Safety & Health 94 Town of Framingham Fire Prevention Division The Division of Fire Prevention is comprised of one Fire Marshal, Assistant Fire Marshal and two Inspectors that have the following responsibilities: The Fire Marshal is responsible for the day - to -day operation of the fire prevention office. He is also responsible for conducting fire investigations and coordinating activities between the Framingham Police Department and the State Fire Marshal's office. Other responsibilities of the Marshal include giving safety talks for Framingham's schools, citizens groups, group residences, and setting up tours of the fire stations. The Marshal also meets on a regular basis with other town departments to assist in the planning of the town's future. The Assistant Fire Marshal is responsible for reviewing the construction plans that are submitted to the Fire Department. He also meets with contractors regarding fire alarm and sprinkler systems, as well as conducting meetings with contractors, engineers and property owners for up- coming projects and any problems that arise during construction. He coordinates with other Town Departments on important issues such as overcrowding, boarding and lodging house issues. The Inspectors are responsible for issuing permits and conduct the inspections required by state and local codes. They also inspect and test all new homes, new and remodeled commercial buildings as well as renovation projects. The Inspectors investigate and work in conjunction with other town departments to handle complaints by citizens and town departments to assure the safety of Framingham's residents, their guests, and the ever - increasing Framingham business community. The Fire Prevention Office performed the above - mentioned duties with pride and professionalism. However we are concerned that with the growth of the town and the 2007 Annual Report addition of new buildings in the technology park along with the abundance of remodeling taking place, there is a considerable need to increase the size of this Division if we are going to continue to meet the community's requirements. With the growth of the technology park consumed a considerable amount of time on a weekly basis but was time well spent to expedite the plan review without compromising public safety. The Fire Prevention office reviewed a total of 267 sets of plans in 2007. Fire permits issued increased (16.5 %) since 2002 and the number of inspections increased over 32% from 2002. This increase has pushed the Fire Prevention Division beyond its maximum working capacity, and although the quality of the division's performance remained at a professional level, the time earmarked for public education was unavoidably sacrificed. The goal of the Framingham Fire Department is to establish a fire and safety education program that will be delivered to preschool, day care, grades K -6, Boy and Girl Scout troops as well as church and community groups. By visiting these groups on an annual basis, the safety message that they receive will become part of their lives and each child as they grow will always be aware of fire safety. They will also be bringing this message home to their families, which ultimately, would prevent fire related accidents in their lives and the lives of their family and friends. As Framingham has such an ethnically and demographically diverse community, it is important for us to be able to develop and deliver our fire prevention message to our diverse population. Without proactive preplanning many of the people who need this type of education the most would be unable to understand the message. To date, bilingual firefighters have been trained in the S.A.F.E. Program and are available to help deliver this curriculum to our community. Public Safety & Health 95 Town of Framingham The S.A.F.E. Program is designed to educate boys and girls from preschool up to the sixth grade. This program includes lectures, presentations and videos on, Lighters and Matches, Stop Drop and Roll, "EDITH" along with Smoke Detectors Saves Lives. The Elderly Program is designed to be given to Housing Units for the Elderly, which includes lectures, presentations and videos on Smoking Safely, Cooking Safely, "EDITH" and Get Out Alive. The Fire Safety House is a mobile travel trailer that is a scaled down kid -sized house. The Fire Safety House Permits Issued: Certificate of compliance MGL sec 26F Certificate of compliance MGL sec 26.5 F Ansul systems Back flow prevention devices Black powder Blasting Commercial sprinkler systems Commercial fire alarm systems Flammable fluids Above /Underground storage Installation LPG (propane) Maintain above and underground storage Miscellaneous permits Oil, repairs and installation of oil burners 2007 Annual Report enables you to walk through a kitchen, living room and bedroom and spot fire hazards. The Fire Safety House is designed to demonstrate fire safety and prevention techniques to all members of a community. The Fire Department is committed to providing a fire safe future for our community. We would consider our programs a success when the citizens of Framingham are learning our safety and health messages and bringing them home to share with their families on a regular basis. 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 1184 1410 1304 983 769 0 0 0 721 750 24 24 26 25 21 3 5 3 0 2 6 5 3 4 5 14 6 3 3 1 288 392 257 287 276 606 673 650 552 560 38 58 74 73 82 6 31 2 3 5 44 61 46 48 45 25 30 51 65 51 6 10 8 82 97 180 238 235 258 225 Public Safety & Health 96 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Overnight parking for flammable liquids 11 46 16 50 22 Fire alarm systems & smoke detectors 117 219 243 147 118 Residential sprinklers 11 7 4 5 6 Tank transport /Tank pulls 42 54 51 31 22 Vapor recovery 0 1 0 0 1 Waste oil tanks 1 5 6 2 8 Welding and cutting 78 52 55 59 67 Install CO system n/a n/a n/a n/a 9 Total permits 2,684 3,327 3,037 3398 3142 Inspection Completed: 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 21 E site assessments 61 29 5 1 6 Above and underground tanks 15 44 51 81 7 Blasting 4 8 0 3 0 Code violation notice - legal n/a n/a n/a n/a 4 Commercial testing & inspections 382 467 586 623 583 Complaints 48 36 31 55 68 Fire alarm meetings 14 15 15 12 62 Fire drills 228 146 166 76 103 Fire investigations 20 18 14 19 7 Flammable liquids and LPG 11 71 98 93 66 Hazardous waste inspections 3 1 73 765 814 Public Safety & Health 97 Town of Framingham License renewal inspections Meetings with departments Construction plan review Oil burner inspections Public life safety classes Quarterly inspections Residential fire alarm 2613, E, C, F Residential sprinklers School & seminars attended Tank removal & inspection Tank truck inspections Total Inspections: Avon Street Fire As always, the Training Division strives to ensure all training is based on accepted standards and documented accordingly. The Framingham Fire Department logged thousands of hours in Fire Rescue and EMS training. EMT and CPR recertification, hazardous materials and decontamination operations, emergency vehicle operations, self Public Safety & Health 98 Framingham Fire Rescue 2007 Annual Report 331 321 332 351 619 201 324 340 241 91 488 525 521 345 250 150 256 393 277 52 96 57 25 17 36 118 133 263 154 149 183 160 276 244 118 7 21 31 4 6 9 18 47 21 16 6 104 32 62 91 11 46 13 42 20 2386 2800 3312 3486 3168 thousands of hours in Fire Rescue and EMS training. EMT and CPR recertification, hazardous materials and decontamination operations, emergency vehicle operations, self Public Safety & Health 98 Framingham Fire Rescue Town of Framingham contained breathing apparatus proficiency, technical rescue operations, pump operations, and ladder operations are some of the annual training programs conducted. In addition, major department -wide training programs focused on critical areas of fire service operations and overall firefighter safety. Professional firefighters know that the job is training intensive - the safety of the public and that of the firefighters depends on it. To help address fire fighter safety a comprehensive Rapid Intervention Team (RIT) training program was developed for the Department. National consensus standards endorse standardized RIT training and RIT operations to reduce firefighter death and injuries. Unfortunately, much of the content of the RIT training program is based on "lessons learned" from the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) firefighter fatality reports. Those reports often find a deviation from standard procedure or a lack of basic training as a cause of the fatality. The Framingham Fire Department RIT training program focuses on basic fire ground skills and knowledge. All members of the Department completed individual skill proficiency training modules and company evolutions. To ensure consistency, standard operating guidelines for RIT operations and emergency procedures where implemented. New equipment, such as the recently acquired "state of the art" self contained breathing apparatus also plays an integral role in firefighter safety. In summary, the ultimate goal of any training division is to support effective operations in a safe and efficient manner. Proficient basics, sound strategies and tactics, and a proactive and progressive philosophy are the guiding principles in developing all training programs within the Framingham Fire Department. Fire Alarm The Fire Alarm Division is responsible for the general maintenance of traffic signals, 2007 Annual Report controls, the municipal fire alarm system, master boxes, street boxes and underground and aerial cable. Twenty -Two new master boxes were added in 2007. We now have a total of 886 boxes in service in strategic locations throughout Framingham. Of the 886 boxes, 525 are master boxes that protect individual properties, and 361 are street boxes. In addition to the regular duties of maintaining and installing the fire alarm and communication system, the Fire Alarm Division was also responsible for maintaining and repairing forty -two (42) traffic signals, six (6) 4 -way flashing signals, twenty -eight (28) school zone signals and two (2) 30mph `S' curve signals. The following is a breakdown of traffic signal repairs: 47 calls for traffic signals not working; 12 calls for signal heads turned; 29 calls for re- lamping traffic signals; 124 calls for changing of time, checking preemption, Opticom, repair broken pedestrian buttons, repair knock downs, meetings with contractors digging up roads to mark underground pipes, meetings with contractors doing traffic signal improvements, preventive maintenance and investigations. 10 traffic signals knocked -down in motor vehicle accidents: 3 were reported to the Police Department, 7 were hit and run. 125 calls for school zone signals not working properly that required time adjustments, new lamps and new clock installations. This also included time adjustments made at the beginning and the end of the school year. The Division installed approximately 4,140 feet of new fire alarm cable for new master boxes and replacement of deteriorated cable. 25 pole transfers for Verizon were completed. Public Safety & Health 99 Town of Framingham The Fire Alarm Division worked jointly with Fire Prevention in reviewing all fire alarm plans submitted to the Department. In addition, the Division attended meetings with contractors for new interior fire alarm installations and master box locations. Both Fire Alarm and Fire Prevention worked together to perform interior fire alarm system inspections in new and existing buildings. Total of 73 meetings Total of 223 plan reviews Total of 148 fire alarm inspections The following new master boxes were added in 2007: Stations Loring Drive Station /Headquarters (1994): This station is in good condition. Replacement of life limited components is ongoing, including replacement of HVAC 2007 Annual Report components, carpeting, furniture and flooring. The slate roof is in need of general repair. Worcester Road Station /Engine 1 (1968): This station is in good condition; however, this station is in need of interior maintenance and exterior finishes including fascia and paint. Concord Street Station /Engine 5 (1961): This station is in fair condition, replacement of life limited components is ongoing. Asbestos flooring tiles are disintegrating and need to be recovered. Watson Place Station /Engine 2 (Approximately 1890): This station has begun initial upgrades. The Hose Tower at this station was condemned and is no longer in use. The basement has been quarantined due to an asbestos problem and the windows throughout the building are in poor condition and in need of replacement. The roof has been replaced and remodeling is needed on the second floor. Replacement of overhead doors and windows is needed. Water Street Station /Engine 7 (1961): This station is in good condition. Asbestos flooring tiles are disintegrating and need to be recovered. The parking lot will need to be repaved soon. Signal Division Building 1055 Worcester Road (1974): This building is in good condition. The exterior siding and fascia has been repaired and upgrades are ongoing. Apparatus Engine 1: 2000 Pierce Quantum; 1,250 G.P.M. two stage pump, equipped with all wheel steer. Engine 1 is in good condition. This apparatus is located at the Worcester Road Station. Engine 2: 2007 Pierce; is a 1,500 G.P.M. pump equipped with Class "A" foam system and is in new condition. Replacement of Engine 2 was approved at Fiscal Year 2006 Town Meeting and delivered earlier last Public Safety & Health 100 Location Box # 588 4 Bishop Street 827 1701 Worcester Road 266 500 Old Connecticut Path 694 2 Oran Road 757 501 Cochituate Road 826 16 Gates Street 199 78 D New York Avenue 146 49 New York Avenue 592 147 Cochituate Road 594 598 Worcester Road 755 254 Cochituate Road 1588 95 Clinton Street 3318 430 Franklin Street 2622 749 Worcester Road 3319 1124 Worcester Road 3315 55 Park Street 3316 450 Union Avenue 3317 11 Fountain Street 3341 624 Waverly Street 2621 252 Edgell Road 3342 67 South Street 5215 39 Clark Street Stations Loring Drive Station /Headquarters (1994): This station is in good condition. Replacement of life limited components is ongoing, including replacement of HVAC 2007 Annual Report components, carpeting, furniture and flooring. The slate roof is in need of general repair. Worcester Road Station /Engine 1 (1968): This station is in good condition; however, this station is in need of interior maintenance and exterior finishes including fascia and paint. Concord Street Station /Engine 5 (1961): This station is in fair condition, replacement of life limited components is ongoing. Asbestos flooring tiles are disintegrating and need to be recovered. Watson Place Station /Engine 2 (Approximately 1890): This station has begun initial upgrades. The Hose Tower at this station was condemned and is no longer in use. The basement has been quarantined due to an asbestos problem and the windows throughout the building are in poor condition and in need of replacement. The roof has been replaced and remodeling is needed on the second floor. Replacement of overhead doors and windows is needed. Water Street Station /Engine 7 (1961): This station is in good condition. Asbestos flooring tiles are disintegrating and need to be recovered. The parking lot will need to be repaved soon. Signal Division Building 1055 Worcester Road (1974): This building is in good condition. The exterior siding and fascia has been repaired and upgrades are ongoing. Apparatus Engine 1: 2000 Pierce Quantum; 1,250 G.P.M. two stage pump, equipped with all wheel steer. Engine 1 is in good condition. This apparatus is located at the Worcester Road Station. Engine 2: 2007 Pierce; is a 1,500 G.P.M. pump equipped with Class "A" foam system and is in new condition. Replacement of Engine 2 was approved at Fiscal Year 2006 Town Meeting and delivered earlier last Public Safety & Health 100 Town of Framingham spring. This apparatus is located at the Watson Place Station. Engine 3: 1993 Pierce; 1,250 G.P.M. two stage pump is in fair condition. This truck fits in all stations and would be a viable spare in the future. This apparatus is located at the Loring Drive Station. Engine 4: 2006 Ford F -350 Forestry Truck with a water tank, class "A" foam system and a twenty horsepower portable fire pump, used for brush fires. This apparatus is used extensively during details and as a fire watch. This apparatus is located at the Watson Place Station. Engine 5: 2006 American LaFrance; 1,500 G.P.M. two stage pump, equipped with a dual agent compressed air foam application unit, which is in excellent condition. This apparatus is located at the Concord Street Station. Engine 6 /Spare: (Formerly Engine 5) 1989 Pierce 1,250 G.P.M. two stage pump with class `B" foam. This apparatus is in poor condition and needs major upgrades to comply with NFPA 1901 Standards. Engine 7: 2001 Pierce Quantum; 1,500 G.P.M. two stage pump with a compressed air foam system, all wheel steer, is in good condition. This apparatus is located at the Water Street Station. Engine 8 /Spare: 1986 Pierce, 1250 G.P.M., dual stage pump. This apparatus is in poor condition and is need of replacement. The open cab design does not meet current NFPA standards, although this piece is being used as a reserve piece when first line apparatus is under repair. Rescue 1: 1991 Salsbury Heavy Rescue. This apparatus is in poor condition and is equipped with a 15,000 watt generator, 2,036 cubic feet of breathing air, Jaws of Life, air bags, cold water rescue suits and various rescue tools. In 2006 this rescue received an engine 2007 Annual Report replacement. This apparatus is in need of replacement. Platform 1: 2005 American LaFrance 100 foot platform, 2,000 G.P.M. single stage pump with an 8,000 watt generator. This piece of apparatus is in excellent condition and located at the Worcester Road Station. Platform 2 /Spare: (Formerly Platform 1) 1987 Pierce 100 foot Aerial Platform with a 1500 G.P.M. two -stage pump. This aerial is in fair condition and under went repair to its hydraulic system and aerial stabilization. The reconditioning of this apparatus will allow us to meet ISO recommendations. Ladder 3: 1998 Pierce Quantum, all -wheel steer; 105 foot aerial ladder with a 300 gallon polypropylene water tank. The aerial ladder is pre -piped with a 1000 G.P.M. flow and a 500 lb. tip load. It has a 7,500 watt diesel generator and a 1,500 G.P.M. pump with 800 feet of 4 inch hose. This piece of apparatus is in good condition and is located at the Loring Drive Station. Mobile Command Post: 1990 National RV Corp /Chevrolet, Motor Coach equipped with all band radio interoperability (8 radios supported by ACU 1000), 10kw generator and numerous other emergency management pieces of equipment. This vehicle is in good condition and is located at the Loring Drive Station. Department Vehicles Fire Chiefs Car (Car 1): 2005 Ford Explorer is in excellent condition. This vehicle is located at the Loring Drive Station. Deputy Chiefs Car (C -2): 2004 Ford Explorer is in moderate condition and used by the shift deputy. It is in use 24 hours per day, 365 days a week and accrues many miles. This vehicle is located at the Concord Street Station. Assistant Fire Chiefs Car (C -3): 2004 Ford Explorer is in excellent condition. This vehicle used by the Assistant Fire Chief of Public Safety & Health 101 Town of Framingham Administration, is located at the Loring Drive Station. Assistant Fire Chief's Car (C -4): 2001 Ford Expedition is in fair condition and is used by the Assistant Fire Chief of Operations. This vehicle is located at the Loring Drive Station. Fire Marshal's Car (FP -1): 2004 Ford Taurus is in excellent condition. This vehicle is located at the Loring Drive Station. Assistant Fire Marshal's Car (FP -2): 2000 Ford Crown Victoria is in good condition. This vehicle used by the Assistant Fire Marshal, is located at the Loring Drive Station. Fire Inspector's Car (FP -3): 1995 Ford Crown Victoria is in fair condition. This vehicle is located at the Loring Drive Station. Fire Inspector's Car (FP -4): 1996 Ford Crown Victoria is in poor condition. It is located at the Loring Drive Station. Training Officers Truck (H -1): 1997 Ford F350 used by the Training Officer. It is in good condition and is located at the Loring Drive Station. Pick Up Truck (S -1): 1999 Ford F250 is used by the Fire Alarm Division for equipment transportation. It is in fair condition and is located at the Worcester Road Station. Fire Alarm Service Truck (S -2): 1995 International 400SER Diesel Bucket Truck for fire alarm and traffic light repair, maintenance, and installation. This apparatus is in good condition and is located at the Worcester Road Station. Facilities Manager's Truck (C -5): 1997 Dodge Pick -up 2500 is equipped with a snow plow for use in station maintenance. It is in good condition and is located at the Loring Drive 2007 Annual Report Station. This truck required its transmission replaced in 2005. Mechanic's Truck (C -6): 2008 Ford F -450 Utility Truck, which is used by the mechanics. This vehicle is new and equipped with mobile repair equipment. It is located at the Loring Drive Station. Dive Rescue Vehicle (DR -1): A 2001 Workhorse Van is in excellent condition and is located at the Loring Drive Station. Fire Safety House: 2005 Mobile Trailer. This Fire Prevention training tool will enable fire safety education to all age groups. Training Division Vehicle (C -8): A 1996 Ford Bronco which was funded through the MWTZA Tunnel Project is utilized by the Training Division. This vehicle is in fair condition and is located at the Loring Drive Station. Emergency Medical Services American Medical Response (AMR) continues to provide Emergency Medical Services (EMS) to the Town of Framingham. Currently AMR is contracted to provide two Advanced Life Support (ALS) Paramedic level ambulances. Framingham has experienced a steady rise in medical calls as we responded to 5,676 calls for medical assistance in 2007. Increased demands on Emergency Medical Services have forced the administration to reevaluate our EMS operations. During this restructuring we have negotiated a third AMR non - dedicated ambulance which is stationed within our borders and have also initiated new Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs). These upgrades have assisted us to better supervise our current operation. Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Detectors Save Lives Respectfully Submitted, Chief 011ie D. Gadson Public Safety & Health 102 _: .. ti' 4 p' ' .�.... �, :� ., �R �. i. 1 I- L \.- p -... -: .w, -t ■ Y. C i ���� � �� '� i �.. i� i �II� i -� r � �. I �' �� I li � _. c.<, III F ;:�� 1 I II ■ ; 1( ` R21 ■ ■■ _. � Town of Framingham Inspectional Services 150 Concord Street, Room 205 Framingham, NIA 01702 In 2007, the Department of Building Inspection underwent some significant changes in appearance, organization and focus. In late August of 2006 the Building Department and Weights and Measures relocated to the 2 " floor of the Memorial Building. The new space provides a publicly accessible customer service area in a brighter, cleaner larger environment and a less confining inspector area. With the departure of Joe Mikielian, Director of Inspectional Services, in September of 2006, the division underwent a re- organization. The responsibilities of the Director, no longer included oversight of the Board of Health. This provided opportunity to maintain focus on customer service needs and consumer protection with Weights and Measures. The focus of the Department continues to be the pursuit of the highest quality of public service by responding to concerns as they arise, to follow up on previous concerns, maintain a record of property activities reviewed by inspectors and investigators and be responsive to consumer protection. The departments' primary purpose is Public Safety through enforcement of the State Building Code, Zoning By -Law, General By- Law and Accessibility Regulations and Standards. In 2007 the town also hired Robert Crandall, to fill the Local Inspectors position vacated when Mark Brodeur accepted the position of Building Commissioner for the town of West Boylston. Bob, a resident of the town, is a 2007 Annual Report 508 - 552 -5500 508 - 628 -1562 (fax) building.dept@framinghamma.gov certified local inspector and plans examiner. He has excellent field inspection experience having worked in this capacity for many years in other communities and previously here for the town. The Mass State Building Code provided its' first new Code in 10 years. The present Code or 6` edition of the Building Code which includes the Base Code and 1 and 2 Family Code is from 1997 and is based on the 1993 BOCA Code. The new Code is a 2 part Code. The 1 and 2 Family Code had been delivered to all Building Inspectors across the State of Massachusetts in /or around September 2007 for effective date of October 2007. Due to proposed changes in the 1 and 2 family Code, the effective date had been suspended until January 1, 2008. The Base Code is anticipated to be in print and available for the spring of 2008 with an effective date shortly after availability. Where the country, region and world are experiencing severe climatic changes, environmental concerns and increase focus on energy consumption. The New Code is attentive to these areas in many ways. Evident changes include higher construction standards for areas in severe wind zones, use of environmentally materials, additional inspections for improved building energy efficiency and additional licensing requirements for trades people not previously required. The Town of Framingham thru Town Meeting adopted many new By -Laws in 2007. The New Sign By -Law, Lodging House By- Law, Land Clearing By -Law and Changes to the Zoning By -Law. Public Safety & Health 104 Town of Framingham The New Sign By -Law incorporates many of the same requirements of the Sign By -Law of 1996 and many changes to address Non - Conforming Signs, including definitions, compliance requirements, modification and relief. The Board of Selectmen in their capacity as the licensing authority issue licenses to Lodging Houses/ Boarding house consistent with the towns lodging house policy. In response to the Report from the Overcrowding Committee where the Committee did not determine there to be an overcrowding situation within the residential housing stock in town, but a need to increase enforcement on how properties where being used. The Committee's report highlighted that people are renting rooms to too many people who are unrelated to each other and therefore creating Lodging Houses. The Board also wanted to address a fire which destroyed a 2 family house where 17 unrelated people where documented as living together and paying rent to a non - resident owner. The town had no mechanism in which to assess fines or citations for this type of activity. The Board of Selectmen proposed the Lodging House By -law to town meeting in the spring of 2007 and received approval by the Attorney Generals Office. Town Meeting also approved Article 22 the Land Disturbance By -Law which combined other existing by -laws i.e., Erosion Control and Land Clearing. The new by -law is more effective and provides clarity for efficient enforcement. In 2007 the Department changed its methods and manners of Code Enforcement, as part of the reorganization of the Department, a discussion of the roles each of the inspectors play to provide excellent service occurred amongst the staff. It was during these discussions that there appeared to be a level 2007 Annual Report of frustration with the inspectors and the inability to provide effective attention to Code Enforcement without focused resources. Code Enforcement is a daily activity for the inspectors whether it be, signs, building, zoning or nuisance. The inspectors primarily, react to situations and conditions where enforcement actions are required. The hiring of the Assistant Sign Officer in 2006 and maintaining the Nuisance Officer, illustrated that resources in specialized fields are effective. Re- assigning a Local Building Inspector to focus on Code Enforcement provided the office with more continuity. The re- classifying of the Assistant Director position, proved to be the correct direction in hiring the right candidate. Michael Tusino served as the Building Commissioner for the Town of Groton for 10 plus years. Mike and his family are from the Framingham area. He possesses over 20 years of hands on construction experience in residential and commercial construction and has vast technical knowledge in code related matters. Mike's primary duty is the oversight of the Code Enforcement Inspectors, which also includes the Nuisance and Sign By -Laws. One of his first tasks involved the interviewing and hiring of the Off Hour Code Enforcement Inspectors. Where he would be directly supervising their activities, it was important that the selection of these new team members and he, be able to work together. The Off Hour Code Enforcement Inspectors, who work Tuesday — Friday Noon -9:00 PM and Saturday 9:00 AM -5:00 PM are not typically found in communities outside Metro Boston. The selection and hiring of the inspectors required specific qualifications to address the needs of the department. The town has a diverse population consisting of a large Brazilian and Spanish speaking business and residential community and the ability to Public Safety & Health 105 Town of Framingham communicate and reach out and work with these community members was a priority. The town hired Saulo Depaula, a native of Brazil who received his American Citizenship in the 1990's. Saulo resided, owned and operated a contracting business, and became an active member of the Framingham community prior to relocating to Marlborough. Michael McCarthy was also selected and hired as a Code Enforcement Inspector for the off hour inspections. Mike is a former resident of the town, a recent graduate of St. Anselm, possesses formal knowledge of construction practices and speaks fluent Spanish. The third new team member is Tracy Quintanilla. Although being part time she provides the critical administrative support to the Code Inspectors. Tracy is also a resident of the town and speaks fluent Spanish and Portuguese. The changes and additions to the staff of the Building Department are proving to be successful. The number of responses to activities has increased, the ability to access 2007 Annual Report and track information is occurring and effective proactive enforcement is providing results. In May of 2007 the Town Manager, Julian Suso appointed Michael Foley as the Building Commissioner. A CDBG Block Grant was approved for the department as a supplement to the budget for Code Enforcement and the Department acquired 2 newer used vehicles for Code Enforcement. I would like to recognize the inspectors, admin staff and Weights & Measures (Jack Walsh & Ed Gentile) for their cooperation and assistance this past year. Their individual and combined team efforts have and will continue to improve the quality and safety of the Town. Respectfully Submitted, Michael F. Foley, CBO Building Commissioner The following is a list permit activities for the calendar year of 2007 with a Five Year Activity Summary: Public Safety & Health 106 Town of Framingham Five Year Record of Building Activity in Framingham 2007 Annual Report Number of Permits Issued 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Single Family Dwellings 28 46 124 31 23 Two Family Dwellings 3 2 2 4 3 New Buildings 2 5 5 8 3 Alterations & Additions 695 698 826 744 743 Miscellaneous 1,007 1,748 1,118 1,161 1,108 Total Building Permits 1,735 2,499 2,075 1,948 1,880 Valuation on Permits 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 New Residential 6,527,771 9,739,630 21,301,613 6,786,081 4,713,224 New Commercial 1,779,112 475,030 19,312,194 11,042,878 2,577,797 All Others 39,139,590 53,911,916 47,045,339 59,986,288 79,024,574 Total Valuations 47,446,473 64,126,576 87,659,146 77,815,247 86,315,595 Fees Received and Turned Over to General Fund 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Building Permits 556,933 643,989 1,069,996 827,916 1,076,722 Wire Permits 86,840 108,299 208,731 152,931 156,649 Plumb.& Gas Permits 100,606 109,658 171,626 132,320 171,729 Occupancy Permits 6,840 5,050 6,725 3,450 5,325 Certificates 19,943 22,614 21,377 28,547 14,523 Miscellaneous 1,630 13,216 14 40 Sign License Fees 15,344 1,185 172 38,729 3,728 Total Fees 788,136 904,011 weights & Measures 150 Concord Street, Room 203 Framingham, NIA 01702 508 -n2- 54801508- 626- 8991(lax) weights.nieas ores @f raniinghaninia.gov In compliance with Section 34, Chapter 98, General Laws of the Commonwealth, I submit my annual report of the Department of Weights and Measures for the year ended December 31, 2007. 1,478,641 1,183,933 1,428,676 The Weights and Measures Department is required by state statute to inspect all weighing and measuring devices in the town of Framingham each calendar year. In 2007, the Department inspected 1266 weighing and measures devices, including scanning audits. These included: retail scales, heavy capacity scales, gasoline dispensing meters, fuel oil meters, weights, fabric and cordage measuring devices, yardsticks, timing devices, and reverse vending machines. In addition, besides enforcing the regulations in regard to scanning, item pricing, unit pricing, and the motor fuel sales act, the Department continued to check random weight packages in stores, price signs at gasoline service Public Safety & Health 107 Town of Framingham stations, taxicabs, and spot check fuel oil deliveries. The Department also checked adjusted, sealed or condemned scales in all of the Framingham schools to ensure that the weights of Framingham children are accurate. Once again, our experienced part -time inspector, Ed Gentili, was a critical asset to the Department in conducting additional inspection work. The Department collected $ 37,320.00 in inspection and sealing fees during 2007. This is the most revenue ever collected by this Department. The Department issued 54 civil citations in calendar year 2007 for the following: unsealed meters, unsealed devices, fuel oil delivery ticket violation, non - conforming devices, pricing errors (scanning), item pricing, price misrepresentation, no motor fuel license, unit pricing, and missing consumer notice. The total fine amount was $ 17,892.50 for calendar year 2007. The average non- criminal fine was $ 331.34 per violation. Revenues resulting from the issuance of civil penalties belong to the issuing city / town but must be used to enhance weights and measures enforcement in that community. The Department also issued 89 violation warning letters for weights and measures violations. The Department had one criminal case in Framingham District Court involving a retail gasoline station overcharging consumers on the price of gasoline. The Department will continue to vigorously enforce the weights and measures regulations in order to protect the businesses and consumers in the community and "keep the playing field level ". The Department during 2007 saved consumers and businesses in Framingham well into the hundreds of thousands of dollars by conducting both mandated and spot inspections. This is in addition to the fees and fines collected for the town. Errors were found and corrected which resulted in sufficient savings to consumers. These savings are often overlooked by the community, but they are real. For example: when an error is found by the Weights and Measures inspector concerning a delivery of 2007 Annual Report gasoline into your car, an adjustment to that meter is made by either the Weights and Measures inspector or a service company. The consumer, or in some cases the business, benefited immediately from that adjustment. Every fuel dispenser was inspected last year in Framingham. Last year the department made 69 such adjustments to fuel dispensing meters. The Department checked 3,880 items in local retail stores to ensure that they scanned correctly. The Department found that 97.06 % were correct, 1.55 % were under priced, and 1.39 % were over priced. This was an improvement over last year but this number is still below the 98% accuracy (correct) rate required by National Institute of Standards and Technology. During the year, Weights and Measures Department personnel met with corporate individuals from several national corporations to rectify pricing issues and problems. These corporations found these meeting / training sessions very useful and planned to implement changes in all their Massachusetts stores based on these training sessions. The Department continues its scanning education program with merchants. During educational inspections each retail store was given a copy of the statute, copies of the official notice, information on the new regulations, telephone numbers to call with questions, and the inspector answered any questions the retail store manager or owner had concerning these new regulations or any other weights and measures regulation. We continue to provide this service as new retail stores open each year in our community. The Director of Weights and Measures and the Inspector of Weights and Measures have both been trained in electronic pricing inspections (scanning) by the United States Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology, and have taken numerous other weights and measures courses which are mandated under "The Consumer & Merchant Protection Act State Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulations ". Public Safety & Health 108 Town of Framingham The Department received a grant for $ 7,500.00 from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulations, to conduct "item pricing" inspections. The town hired Jack Mercer, an experienced item pricing inspector and town resident, to conduct these very worthwhile inspections. Complaints from the public included the following areas: adulterated fuel, water in fuel, incorrect pricing at retail stores, short measure, short weight, price sign violations, cash register visibility, item pricing, electronic pricing systems (scanning), unit pricing, and Board of Health 150 Concord Street, Room 221 Framingham, NIA 01702 After 33 years of dedicated service to the Town of Framingham, Robert T. Cooper retired from his position as Public Health Administrator for the Board of Health in August 2007. Since his departure, Lise N. Mespelli, MPH, RS has been serving as the Acting Director of Public Health. Ms. Mespelli has worked for the Board of Health since 1992 in the Environmental Health Division and has served as the Chief Sanitarian since 2006. As a result of both Mr. Cooper's retirement and Ms. Mespelli moving from her position as Sanitarian to Acting Director, it has left the Environmental Health Division with only three Sanitarians /Inspectors to carry out the workload of four. Nonetheless, with much commitment, the other three Sanitarians have been carrying out the inspectional responsibilities of the Board of Health and are continuing to respond to all complaints and conduct routine inspections. Framingham is extremely fortunate to have Sanitarians /Inspectors who are all not only very well trained but extraordinarily dedicated. 2007 Annual Report octane posting. Also, we referred numerous people to state and federal consumer protection agencies for issues that needed to be resolved at that particular level. I want to thank Mike Foley, the Director of Inspectional Services, the town's part -time Weights and Measures Inspector, Ed Gentili, and our part -time Administrative Support Person, Mary Tiziani, for their help and assistance during the past year. Respectfully Submitted, Jack Walsh, Sealer of Weights and Measures 508 - 532 -5470 508 - 620 -4855 (fax) health@framinghamma.gov Especially during this interim time period while the Environmental Health Division is operating at less than full strength, the knowledge level and capability of the environmental health staff is to be recognized and commended and serves the Town very well in addressing and continuing to meet the environmental health concerns of its residents. All of the Sanitarians /Inspectors are Certified Soil Evaluators, capable of not only performing the preliminary soil tests but also of reviewing plans and monitoring the installation of septic systems. As increasingly complicated and a greater volume of septic plans are being received by the Board of Health office, the Environmental Health Division staff is continuing to carry out the review of these septic plans and maintain oversight of septic system installations, and septic repairs throughout Framingham The Board of Health investigated 383 housing complaints in 2007. Recreational camps, public beaches, swimming pools, tanning, and Public Safety & Health 109 Town of Framingham body piercing establishments are also routinely inspected by Board of Health Sanitarians. Over the past year, the Environmental Health Division has continued to see an increasing workload generated from both food establishments changing owners and new establishments being created. Bringing a new food establishment "on line" is a very labor - intensive process, but it is one that is nonetheless extremely crucial so as to ensure the proper and safe provision of food service to the public. Homeland Security has continued to place a great emphasis on local Boards of Health as the first line of defense in a bio- terrorist attack. Additionally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also has local Boards of Health preparing for a flu pandemic. Both State and Federal officials have provided Board of Health staff with training and expertise in order to be better prepared in the event of a wide - spread flu pandemic. In 2007, our staff has continued to participate in trainings and thereby plan and prepare for an incident that could require mass vaccinations or drug distributions to the citizens of Framingham. The Town is a member of Emergency Preparedness Region 4A, along with 33 area towns—ranging from Wilmington to Wrentham. Region 4A has been formed to share resources and planning expertise in order to better serve the citizens in our respective areas and the entire region. Our planning includes working closely with the certified L.E.P.C. (Local Emergency Planning Committee). In the event of an emergency, Framingham's L.E.P.C. would step in to address terrorism, flu pandemics, as well as natural disasters that may occur. The L.E.P.C. can provide tremendous resources and expertise to address these types of events should they happen in Framingham. 2007 Annual Report By providing the community with literature, seminars, and other educational tools, the Board of Health is continuing to keep the citizens of Framingham knowledgeable and vigilant in their daily lives, not only to terrorist events but to communicable diseases which also have the potential of being threats to one's health. Surveillance of communicable diseases within the community is a major responsibility of the Board of Health. The Public Health Nursing Division staff follows and tracks all diseases that the Massachusetts Department of Public Health considers to be dangerous to the public health. This allows us to see and evaluate trends in disease within the community, with the goal of preventing its spread from the source of infection. This activity is especially important in this new age of bio- terrorism. We can detect trends in infection in the community so that we can address them in their earliest stages. The Public Health Nurses continue to offer immunizations to children and adults during nurse office hours. Immunization clinics for high -risk groups are conducted throughout the year to provide services for residents in need. Tuberculosis surveillance and prevention remain a very high priority at the Board of Health. Additionally, we offer a cardiovascular clinic, as well as numerous other educational programs. [SEE Public Health Nursing section forfurther details.[ The Board continues to seek grants to maintain enforcement of the Tobacco Control Program. In 2007, we were able to secure grant monies which allowed us to continue to conduct "Youth Access" compliance checks. We vigorously enforce the regulations relative to sales of tobacco to minors. Some retailers continue to sell to minors, and during our "sting operations ", retailers are fined for such behavior. The business community continues to be very cooperative in complying with the smoke -free workplace law. The Board is very committed to enforcing youth access Public Safety & Health 110 Town of Framingham regulations and the workplace smoking ban. [SEE Tobacco Control Program section for further details.] Respectfully Submitted, Nelson Goldin, Chairman Tammy C. Harris, MD, Secretary Michael R. Hugo, Esq. Environmental Health The mission of the Environmental Health Division of the Board of Health remains consistent. The staff works to protect the community from any chemical, physical, or biological agent that could adversely affect the health of the citizens of Framingham. The major sub - divisions of this division include inspection of food establishments, bathing areas (public beaches, semi - public and public swimming pools, and whirlpools), and inspection of residential housing units within the Town. The main focus of the food - related inspections is the prevention of food - borne and water -borne diseases. These diseases are easily and commonly acquired through the introduction of contamination into food and water. Inspection and education of food service and bathing area personnel are the main strategic tools used as part of our prevention efforts. Inspections related to food and water sanitation account for approximately 60% of the man -hours available in this division. In addition to routine inspections and follow -up re- inspections, the staff investigated a total of 121 food establishment related complaints in 2007, 20 of which were food -borne illness complaints. Under Chapter II of the State Sanitary Code, Environmental Health Division staff must investigate all housing complaints received by the Board of Health. These complaints must be closely followed until compliance is attained. In 2007, the Board received 383 housing complaints, 74% of which required re- inspections in order to gain compliance 2007 Annual Report with the Code. Lead paint determinations are also required in units where children under the age of six reside. Trash, most especially that which is improperly put out for collection and that includes large and restricted items, resulted in 195 housing - related trash complaints filed with the Board of Health in 2007. As a result of a previously - developed trash education and enforcement program established by Solid Waste Division of the Framingham Department of Public Works, targeted problem areas are continuing to show great success. As previously mentioned, the Title V regulations governing subsurface sewage disposal have resulted in a greater number of and more complicated plans being submitted to our office. Therefore more detailed reviews of both the septic plans and the system installations and repairs are required Furthermore, as more rural areas of Town continue to become developed, the Board of Health will see not only more septic work but also the installation of more private water supplies. Other miscellaneous complaints, including those relating to strewn garbage and rubbish, air and water pollution, as well as noise and odor, also add to the total number of inspections carried out and accomplished by the Environmental Health Division. Tobacco Control Program The Framingham Board of Health Tobacco Control Program (the "Program ") is funded by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) through the Health Protection Fund, which was established upon passage of voter referendum Question 1 in November 1992. Partial funding is also provided by the Master Settlement Agreement, an agreement between the Attorneys General of most states and the tobacco industry. Public Safety & Health 111 Town of Framingham The Program enforces the Framingham Board of Health "Rules and Regulations Relative to the Sale, Vending and Distribution and Use of Tobacco within the Town of Framingham" and the state -wide smoking ban for all workplaces in Massachusetts. Compliance checks in all licensed tobacco sales establishments are conducted in order to gain compliance with our youth access regulation. East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project The East Middlesex Mosquito Control Project conducts a program in Framingham consisting of mosquito surveillance, larval and adult mosquito control, ditch maintenance, and public education. The risk of mosquito -borne disease remained a concern as 5 residents in eastern and central Massachusetts contracted West Nile Virus. Due to dry conditions during the summer, the risk of EEE was low. The area experienced moderate mosquito populations from late spring through the end of June and low populations for the remainder of the season. The adult mosquito surveillance program used traps to collect mosquitoes from as many as 4 Framingham locations per night. Between May and September, information was used from 21 mosquito trap collections from 8 different nights. Selected trap collections were tested for EEE and West Nile Virus by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. The larval mosquito control program relies on the larvicides Bacillus thuriugieusis var. israeleusis (Bti) and Bacillus sphaeracus, which are classified by the EPA as relatively non - toxic. An April helicopter application of Bti controlled mosquito larvae at 29.5 wetland acres. Field crews using portable sprayers applied Bti in the spring and the summer to 40 wetland acres when high densities of mosquito larvae were found breeding in stagnant water. During the summer, Project personnel applied Bacillus sphaeracus to control Culex mosquito larvae at 5,568 roadside catchbasins. 2007 Annual Report To control adult mosquitoes, Sumithrin was applied to 1,533 acres at night by truck - mounted aerosol sprayers when survey traps indicated high populations of mosquitoes. Advance notification of the spray program was done through notices on both the Town and Project web sites and via a recorded telephone message at 781- 893 -5759. The Project used an excavator to remove sand and sediment from 910 linear feet of ditch adjacent to Butterworth Park and Bishop Street and another 865 linear feet adjacent to the Burbank Circle Playground. The Project's public education program is designed to develop awareness within the public and the private sectors as to their roles in mosquito control. The Project serves as a resource to residents, municipal officials, and the local media on controlling mosquitoes, breeding sites, and mosquito -borne diseases. A web page www.town.sudbury .ma.us /services /health /emmcp provides residents with information on mosquitoes, control programs, and related topics. Respectfully Submitted, David M. Henley, Superintendent Public Health Nursing In 2007, the public health nurses (PHN's) remain committed to assuring that the Framingham community is a safer and healthier place to live. We develop programs that attempt to address the health concerns in the community, offer vital services that may be lacking or difficult for residents to acquire, and assure that our hours of operation are convenient and well - publicized. In an effort to assure the safety of Framingham residents, we reviewed the Emergency Preparedness efforts of this department, better organized our Medical Reserve Corps (a group of local volunteers Public Safety & Health 112 Town of Framingham who help the town with emergency preparedness), and worked to further expand its membership. Nursing Services Nursing Services are provided free by this office to Framingham residents during twelve hours of nurse's clinic that we hold weekly. Our services consist o£ • Free Immunizations • Lead Screening • Blood Pressure Monitoring • Tuberculosis Skin - Testing • Cholesterol Screening • Facial Sun Damage Screening Screenings are by appointment only. Nurse's Clinic Hours: Monday- Friday: 8:30- 9:30am, 4- 4:45pm Monday Evening: 6 -8pm. Our extensive clinic hours and our clinic's easy access stand out compared to services provided by other towns in the metro -west area. This year, we provided 724 immunizations to the public in our office clinic. This figure does not include flu shots or vaccines given: off -site at employee clinics, at shelters targeting the guests, or at specialty clinics for people at high risk or in an outbreak situation. Communicable Disease Although the Massachusetts Department of Public Health has taken over the reporting and investigation of Lyme disease, the public health nurses are responsible for surveillance of communicable disease in this community. We monitor illness, manage outbreak investigations, and record statistical data. We often strategize with the State Department of Public Health to determine etiology of disease and work to prevent the spread of infection. We had 148 communicable disease investigations this past year, with a cluster of Pertussis cases (whooping cough) in late 2007. 2007 Annual Report Most food -borne illness and much communicable illness can be prevented by good hand washing and knowing and practicing other preventive measures. The public health nurses offer such preventive advice in programs held at sites throughout the community, such as the shelters and public housing facilities. Tuberculosis Tuberculosis is a communicable disease that is a high priority for all boards of health. This office offers TB skin tests for Framingham residents who are at high risk, and for residents who need a test for school /work (for a fee). A positive TB test will result in a referral to one of the free State TB clinics where, through more testing, active disease can be diagnosed or ruled out. This office is notified of any case of active TB in this community that is confirmed or suspect. Through consultation with the State TB program, the provider /clinic and, after speaking with the case, the PHN's prepare a plan of care where DOT (directly observed therapy) is scheduled. The nurses visit all active cases, assure that medication is being taken as ordered, and perform an investigation of all potential contacts of the case. TB tests are given to those who have been exposed and are at possible risk for disease. Flu Flu season is always a challenge. We educate the public about the importance of protection from the flu, acquire sufficient vaccine in a timely manner (we receive over 2000 doses each year from DPH), and hold clinics at different times of the day and into the winter months to provide ample opportunities for all ages to obtain a flu shot. This year we have held 9 clinics at different sites. In February, we hold a week of mini - clinics at different local businesses as part of our extended outreach to non - English speaking populations in the Framingham community. In our nurses' clinic, we continue to offer flu shots through March. Public Safety & Health 113 Town of Framingham Emergency Preparedness In 2007, this office continued to work on emergency preparedness by assessing our ability to respond to a major crisis or health threat in Framingham. In our emergency plan: Specific locations in town have been identified as possible Emergency Dispensing Sites (EDS). 0 Framingham has developed a Medical Reserve Corp made up of volunteers upon whom the town would call for support in the event of a public health threat. These volunteers staff clinics and maintain a presence in the community, assisting in educating the public about emergency preparedness and the MRC. (The objective is to have a trained group of dedicated people with experience in staffing flu and emergency clinics, and the knowledge and confidence to help their fellow neighbors if /when called upon in an emergency event.) 0 We practice with the emergency tools we have developed. All of our flu clinics this year have been run as emergency dispensing sites and were staffed by MRC members. During our last flu clinic, BOH staff and MRC volunteers worked together on a well —run practice drill that received very positive feedback from the Department of Public Health. 0 Training is a critical component for volunteers and staff. All BOH staff and MRC members participate in training programs and attend conferences throughout the year. Trainings include: The Incident Command System(ICS), Family Preparedness, and First Aid /CPR. In the future, we will continue to work closely with Framingham's LEPC (Local Emergency Planning Committee). Our emergency sites will be reviewed in 2008, to verify compliance with state and federal guidelines. We will work to increase recruitment of MRC volunteers and assure that they continue to receive 2007 Annual Report proper training. We will continue to test our ability to run our emergency sites in an efficient manner. This coming year, in cooperation with other town departments, we will conduct a town —wide drill that will be officially reviewed by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. Public Health Nurses The public health nurses of the Framingham Board of Health are members and officers of their professional organizations: the Massachusetts Association of Public Health Nurses and the local Central MetroWest Chapter of MAPHN. Both nurses have been recognized for their work on behalf of the Town of Framingham. Nursing Programs A forum on cardiovascular health is an annual program presented by the PHN's. This interactive event provides the opportunity to learn more about your heart health from the experts. Over a dozen local agencies participated in this event in 2007, and we are grateful to them and to Dr. Young, our keynote speaker. Cholesterol Screening This office has screened over 500 individuals this past year, in our office and at off -site locations about the community. Our screenings help to identify people who are "at risk" and offer comprehensive information on physical conditioning, nutrition, and cholesterol. National Immunization Week Activities In 2007, annual activities to promote immunizations included joint efforts with Natick and Marlboro to provide immunization information to the public at two malls, the Framingham Cinema, and public libraries during National Immunization Month. Vaccine updates were offered to parents and day care and preschool providers. Immunization clinics were offered to Fire and Police. Public Safety & Health 114 Town of Framingham Ban the Burn Program The public health nurses received training from the Melanoma Foundation as part of "Ban the Burn ", our fun in the sun safety program. We offer facial analysis with complimentary sunscreen and sun safety education. By increasing melanoma awareness, we promote safe sun behaviors. From May- October 2007, the UV Daily Index was listed on our town's website. Dermatology Clinic We had such a great turnout for our Dermatology Clinic this year! We provided melanoma education, the use of our facial scanner, and a skin cancer screening by Dr. Asvadi, to about 40 people during the evening clinic. Deaf Awareness Week Information and hands -on activities about Deaf Awareness were provided to the public. Demonstrations included the use of equipment such as head sets for television viewing, alarm clocks, light flashers, and sign language games. A hearing dog "Emily" in her vested attire was available for a "meet and greet" service animal session. The TTY located in the Board of Health has a dedicated line and can be reached by calling 508 -532- 5479 from any telephone. Walking Program The nurses of the Framingham Board of Health promote the heart healthy exercise of walking, utilizing state and local agencies as resources for equipment, such as pedometers and water bottles, and educational materials such as log books. This year, we introduced "walking groups" into our Walking Program. These groups are organized with team leaders who lead their group on one, two, or three mile walks around town. Each group walks a different course. The program had a kick -off meeting at the Callahan Senior Center and will continue this spring. Team leaders are needed. Look for the team list to be posted at the Senior Center in May. 2007 Annual Report Other Presentations This year we offered programs on Bedbugs, Lice, Scabies, Lyme Disease, and other tick and mosquito -borne illness, vaccine - preventable disease, and childhood obesity. The Board of Health maintains a health kiosk at the Framingham Public Library. Grants Financial support was received for the following activities in 2007: Cholesterol and Melanoma Screening, Pandemic Planning, Immunization, and Education programs. Total program support of $77,851 from the MetroWest Community Health Care Foundation, Sanofi Pasteur, and Blue Cross Catalyst Funding enabled the development of new health initiatives and screenings to continue throughout the fiscal year. We remain very grateful to receive such funding that allows us to offer a wide variety of health programs to Framingham residents. Acknowledgments The public health nurses and the entire Board of Health would like to acknowledge the help and support of local agencies, such as American Medical Response, who transports our needy clients to out -of -town clinics and Framingham Rotary who has funded our programs in the past. We continue our long time association with the Callahan Senior Center and offer our thanks to them and the Retired Teacher Association for their help during the flu season. We would like to acknowledge Dr. Ralph Sherman and Dr. Shahla Asvadi for generously donating their time and expertise to the nursing division. We want to recognize the volunteers of the Medical Reserve Corps for their energy and commitment of time to Framingham's emergency planning. The Board of Health also would also like to express its utmost appreciation to the entire Board of Health staff for their dedication and commitment to providing excellent health services to the citizens of Framingham. Public Safety & Health 115 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report 2007 COMMUNICABLE INVESTIGATIONS DISEASE (Framingham, MA) Jan Feb Mar A r Ma Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Amebiasis 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 Babesiosis 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 Bites 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 1 1 0 1 9 Campylobacter 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 7 Chicken Pox (Varicella) 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 6 Cryptosporidosis 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 Dengue fever 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 E.Coli 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Encephalitis 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Ehrilichiosis 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 1 Giardia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 4 Guillian-Barre Syndrome 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 01 Hepatitis A 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Hepatitis B 2 2 0 2 3 3 1 3 4 2 0 0 22 Hepatitis C 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Influenza 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Legionella 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Listeria 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Lyme Disease 1 3 1 1 1 2 1 12 6 0 3 0 31 Malaria 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 Meningitis (Viral) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 2 3 1 0 11 Meningitis (Bacterial) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Mumps 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Salmonella 1 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 0 1 0 0 Shigella 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Strep (Group A)(Group B) 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 2 1 0 2 10 Strep Pneumonia 2 1 1 1 2 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 12 Toxic Shock Syndrome 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Toxoplasmosis 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Tuberculosis 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 4 Typhoid Fever 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vibrio 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Whooping Cough (Pertussis) 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 2 1 6 12 Totals 10 9 4 6 11 8 8 27 22 16 16 137 148 Public Safety & Health 116 'b ti Food Service Inspections Jan. 40 39 5 Feb. 19 26 11 Mar. 36 43 6 Apr. 57 63 3 May 43 34 4 Jun. 38 32 2 Jul. 34 25 4 Aug. 24 38 10 Sept. 23 15 2 Oct. 34 38 3 Nov. 31 22 2 Dec. Totals 26 405 17 392 5 57 Food Service Re- Inspections Food Service Complaints Food Service FBI Complaints Food Service Disposal Complaints Retail Food Inspections 4 6 5 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 3 20 1 0 0 21 0 01 01 01 01 0 01 0 3 10 34 0 27 31 17 30 11 13 43 421 9 15 18 2 46 32 14 20 16 1 20 17 34 19 20 5 23 22 18 13 9 5 25 221 20 16 6 4 29 19 10 9 3 5 57 27 15 4 5 1 57 11 9 13 8 4 19 27 16 13 3 1 13 18 12 12 174 8 141 3 44 24 383 15 283 21 195 Retail Food Re- Inspections Retail Food Complaints Housing Inspections Housing Re- Inspections Housing Trash & Rubbish Complaints Other (lodging, group home etc.) Lead Paint Determinations Title V Inspections Soil Evaluation Appointments # of Deep Test Holes & Pere Tests Routine Swimming Pool Inspections Annual Swimming Pool Inspections Bathing Beaches Recreational Camps Mobile Truck Inspections 3 1 5 20 5 6 2 0 0 1 6 13 62 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 4 0 1 1 0 4 8 4 13 5 7 2 0 45 01 01 01 01 11 0 01 8 01 01 0 0 9 0 0 14 0 2 0 0 12 1 0 12 0 5 7 34 0 46 11 4 54 7 23 63 0 0 20 0 0 13 0 0 14 0 0 32 10 267 0 53 0 0 0 0 0 3 15 8 0 0 0 0 26 0 0 0 3 0 6 3 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 8 Vending Machine Inspections Tanning /Massage /Body Piercing 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 2 0 1 8 Nuisance Complaints (odors etc.) Smoking Complaints Miscellaneous 8 1 5 3[ 4 5 6 6 2 2 1 43 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 61 2 11 0 0 20 3 1 51 2 51 13 2 31 8 21 4 2 50 0 0 crc N 0 0 w 0 Town of Framingham Licensing 150 Concord Street, Room 121 Framingham, NIA 01702 The Licensing Office issued with the Board of Selectmen and /or Town Manager's approval the following categories of licenses and permits. Liquor License for Restaurants, Hotels, Clubs and Retail Stores — 94 One -day Liquor License for events held at the various function halls throughout town — 48 Common Victualer Restaurant License — 163 Innholder's License - 8 Lodging House License - 13 Class I, II, III Auto Dealers License New /Used /Junk Car Dealers Class I —12 Class II — 33 Class III - 3 Junk /Old Metals /Second Hand License — 17 2007 Annual Report 508 - 552 -5402 508 - 620 -5910 (fa-) licenses.perniits @ franiinghaninia.gov Entertainment License (Yearly) — 34 Entertainment License (One -day) — 8 Sunday Entertainment License - 19 Coin - Operated Machine License - 26 Auctioneer's License — 2 Hawker's and Peddler's License - 11 Taxi Cab Permit — 2 Taxi Cab License - 33 Livery License — 4 Carnival License - 2 Bingo Permit - 1 Respectfully Submitted, Maryellen Rupp, Licensing Administrator Public Safety & Health 118 Town of Framingham Department of Public Works Administrative Office 150 Concord Street, Room 215 Framingham, MA 01702 En6ineerin8 & Transportation 100 Western Avenue Framingham, MA 01702 508-n2-60101508-424-5428 (fax) engineering@franiinghaninia.gov The Engineering and Transportation Division is responsible for the planning, design and construction of capital roadway and utility infrastructure projects, maintaining compliance with various State & Federal programs such as NPDES Phase II stormwater, managing the Town's Street Opening Permit program, reviewing development and redevelopment plans to ensure roadway and utility changes conform to the Town's construction standards, and inspecting modifications and expansions to the roadway, water, sewer and stormwater networks. The Division also provides technical expertise to the operational divisions of the Public Works Department, other Town Departments, and various Boards and Commissions, maintains an extensive Geographical Information System (GIS) and is the custodian of a large collection of irreplaceable paper plans and documents. The Division is organized into five major program areas: Traffic & Transportation, Water & Wastewater, Stormwater & Environmental, GIS & Asset Management, and Development and Permitting. The Town is embarking on a major infrastructure improvement program. In order to keep pace with the significant increase in the number of projects requiring bidding, the Public Works Department, under 2007 Annual Report 508 - 552 -5600 508 - 872 -5616 (fax) piiblic .works@franiinghaninia.gov direction of the Chief Procurement Officer, will be assuming responsibility for their own procurement. During the last quarter of 2007, the Engineering Division began making preparations for the transfer of these functions from the Town's Procurement Office. Traffic & Transportation Projects Edge]] Road /Main Street. • This project, located at the intersections of Edgell Road at Pleasant Street and Main Street at High Street, included roadway widening, traffic signal reconstruction, sidewalk reconstruction, pavement markings and signage, drainage improvements and streetlights. The project is substantially complete and features an attractive stonewall and ornamental traffic signals and streetlights. Concord Street (Route 126)1 Waverley Street (Route 135): The Department has continued to work to improve the operation of this intersection. During 2007, the lane configurations were modified to allow two thru lanes of traffic along Concord Street. The Department's traffic consultant has identified additional short -term improvements that the Massachusetts Highway Department has agreed to implement in the early part of 2008. These will include modifications to the pedestrian signal operations and the installation of a new traffic controller to better coordinate the traffic signals at the Concord Street /Waverley Street and Concord Street /Howard Street intersections. Cochituate Road (Route 30): Several improvements were made to the traffic signals along the Cochituate Road corridor from Public Works 119 Town of Framingham Concord Street to Speen Street. These included traffic controller upgrades, emergency vehicle pre -empt enhancements, coordinating the operation of all the intersections, and adding a dedicated left turn movement from Concord Street southbound to Cochituate Road eastbound. Franklin Street. • This project runs along Franklin Street from Main Street to Howard Street and includes geometric improvements, roadway widening, pavement reconstruction, traffic signal reconstruction and installation, sidewalk construction /reconstruction, drainage improvements, new pavement markings and signage, and streetscape improvements (brick paver accent strips and crosswalks, and street trees). The Massachusetts Highway Department will oversee the construction of this project. The construction that was originally scheduled to begin in the spring of 2007 is now expected to begin in the spring of 2008. Other Traffic & Transportation Projects: The Division fast tracked repairs to the School Street Bridge after a hole was discovered in the bridge deck. Following evaluations by the Massachusetts Highway Department and a structural engineer hired by the Town, repairs were designed, permitted, and completed before the 2007 construction season ended. The Division worked closely with the Highway Division on a number of projects including geometric improvements to the South Street /Irving Street intersection, sidewalk and curbing improvements along Hardy Street, and repaving work on Edmands Road and Grove Street. Other projects initiated in 2007 included the designs for new traffic signals at the Elm Street /Potter Road intersection, accessibility improvements on State Street and Maynard Road, and major roadway and traffic improvements along Concord Street (Route 126) from Worcester Road (Route 9) to Clinton Street. Administrative and technical support was also provided to the Traffic and 2007 Annual Report Roadway Safety Committee (TRSC) in its review of traffic issues. These concerns or requests can range from adding or removing signage, signage placement, pavement markings, sight distance concerns, speeding, traffic calming measures, street light additions, and adding crosswalks and pedestrian curb ramps. Water & Wastewater Projects Water Street Sewer Replacement and Gregory Road Sewer Relief Project. • This project involves replacing the sewer main on Water Street and installing a new sewer main on Hemenway Road. The sewer main on Water Street is significantly undersized and the upgrade will eliminate sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) which occur periodically. The Gregory Road Relief sewer project involves a new sewer on Hemenway Road which will divert sewer flows off of Gregory Road. This will also eliminate SSOs in that area. In 2007 the design was completed and funding was obtained under the State Revolving Fund (SRF) administered by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). The construction in 2007 included the installation of approximately 4,000 feet of new sewer main on Water Street. This section began immediately west of the MWRA aqueduct and progressed west to Potter Road. The entire section of new sewer on Hemenway Road was also installed. This section is approximately 2,000 feet long and 27 feet at the deepest point. Work will continue in 2008. Fenwick Pump Station and Force Main Replacement. • The Fenwick pump station is located at the intersection of Central Street, Fenwick Street and Hayes Road. The pump station discharges to a force main which runs approximately 2,500 feet west on Central Street. The pump station and force main are beyond their functional life and need to be replaced. In 2007 the design was completed and SRF funding obtained. The construction began in August and the entire length of force main was installed in Central Street. Also, the Public Works 120 Town of Framingham contractor installed new water services for the residences along the length of force main. The project is temporarily shut down for the winter. The contractor will remobilize to install the pump station in the spring. Inflow and Infiltration Inspections: The Department inspected approximately 400 properties for inflow and infiltration (I &I). These properties are located with the sub basins for the Vater Street Sewer Replacement and Gregory Road Sewer Relief and the Fenwick Pump Station and Force Main Replacement projects. The inspections aid in eliminating I &I in the Town of Framingham, which cost the town in excess of $1.5 million per year. Fay, Cove and Waverly Water Main Replacement. • This project includes replacing the water mains on Waverley Street, Fay Road and the Cove Avenue area. These areas are plagued with low fire flows due to aged and tuberculated pipes. The design for this project was completed in 2007 and the construction will begin as soon as the road work is allowed in early spring 2008. Birch Road Well Reactivation: Work progressed on the multiple year program of re- activating the Birch Road well field. Once on -line, this well field will supply a significant portion of the Town's daily water demand and result in a considerable cost savings to the Town. The data collected in 2006 during the long -term pumping test and the treatment technology pilot test were used in 2007 to fulfill DEP reporting requirements. Specifically, the Final Source Report and the Process Evaluation and Technology Report were completed. These reports include numerical computer model output which will allow us to predict the groundwater flow regime under pumping conditions. DEP's acceptance of these documents is the next critical step in permitting the reactivation of this water supply. In addition, the town completed a request for qualifications (RFQ) process to select an Owner's Project Manager (OPM) as 2007 Annual Report per Massachusetts requirements for vertical construction. Cove Avenue Sewer. • Infiltration of groundwater is a problem with sewer mains in the Cove Avenue area. This project includes lining the sewer mains in the Cove Avenue area and installing limited sections. The design for this work began in 2007 and will be completed in 2008. Construction will also begin in 2008 and will be coordinated with the water main replacement in the same neighborhood. Hemenway Pump Station Replacement.• This project involved the replacement of the pump station which did not have adequate capacity to meet anticipated sewer needs in the area and the replacement of approximately 3,600 feet of asbestos - cement force main which was susceptible to sulfide corrosion. This project is now substantially complete. William J. Heights Water Station Upgrade: This pump station provides a domestic water supply to approximately 50 homes. The station can not supply adequate fire flow to the hydrants in the area and has no redundancy. The design of the proposed improvements is complete and currently under review by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection. Construction is anticipated in 2008. Herbert Street Sewer Replacement. • An old, undersized section of sewer main is suspended from the Herbert Street Bridge. In addition to being an existing sewerage bottleneck, this section of pipe limits the amount of wastewater that the Town of Ashland can convey to the MWRA's Arthur Street pumping station. This project will include both the replacement of the sewer main and the existing bridge. Approximately 75% of the cost of the project will be paid by the Town of Ashland. This project is currently in design with construction expected in 2008. Public Works 121 Town of Framingham Concord Street /School Street Sewer Replacement. • This project, currently in the design phase, involves the replacement of approximately 2,000 feet of old, undersized sewer main. An existing single barrel siphon under the Sudbury River will also be replaced with a double barrel siphon to improve reliability and allow for routine maintenance. This project will be subject to significant permitting requirements by the Framingham Conservation Commission and the Army Corps of Engineers. Grove Street Pump Station Rehabilitation: This pump station is undersized relative to current water system demands. The project will include the replacement of all internal components within the pump station. This project is currently in design. Goodnow Water Tank Rehabilitation: This project, currently in the design phase, will include the cleaning and coating of the interior and exterior surfaces of the tank to protect the integrity of the tank and to maintain adequate water pressure and supply to the portions of the Town serviced by this tank. Michaud Drive, Ransom Road, and Cypress Street Wastewater Pumping Station Replacements: These three pump stations are beyond their useful life and are vulnerable to failure. This project will replace the existing stations with modern, efficient ones. This project is currently in design with construction anticipated in late 2008. Stormwater and Environmental Projects NPDES Phase IL This is the last year of the first five year permit for the Phase II program, which regulates discharges from municipalities' stormwater /drainage systems. It requires actions relative to public education and outreach, illicit discharge control, construction and post - construction stormwater management and good housekeeping procedures. Activities completed in 2007 included the following: 2007 Annual Report 0 Public education and outreach in the form of presentations for residents (coordinated with Conservation Commission and the Recycling program), conducting a stenciling session with the High School Environmental Club, managing the stormwater booth at the High School's April 28 Earth Day celebrations, individual meetings with residents who have drainage problems, providing assistance to the Rainbarrel program, and mailing stormwater management educational flyers to 25% of businesses in town. 0 Requested and received $350 grant from Wild and Scenic Small Grants program for one extra Storm Drain Marking kit. Funds to be used in spring 2008. Draft bylaws and regulations for managing illicit discharges and illicit connections were reviewed with managers from the participating departments, including the Board of Health, the Department of Conservation, and Inspectional Services. Draft illicit discharge detection and elimination work plan for monitoring outfalls to be implemented in conjunction with the bylaw and regulations. Beaver Dam Brook /Farm Pond Stormwater Management Plan: The planning study for the two most impaired sub - basins in the Town, Beaver Dam Brook and Farm Pond, was conducted in 2007, with a report expected in spring 2008. Activities included the following: 0 A review of the historical drainage tiles was performed, with coded entry into the VUEWorks asset management system as well as scanning in the tiles themselves (much like the historical sewer plans and profiles). A field survey of the major drainage structures in the two sub - basins, including accurate GPS location, type and condition of the structures and associated piping, and rim and invert elevations. On a separate but related project, the Town is participating in a 319 grant for Ashland to improve water quality at Public Works 122 Town of Framingham Waushakum Pond. The DPW committed $20,000 as matching funds for this effort. Identification, GPS location, and water quality sampling of 24 major outfalls in the two sub - basins. 0 Development of a riverine hydraulic analysis for the Beaver Dam Brook, to include the Ashland and Natick portions based on the 1927 Massachusetts law whereby Framingham has the responsibility for maintaining the entire length of the brook. Learned Pond.• In 2006, the Parks and Recreation Department asked the Division to manage a project to improve water quality at Learned Pond. The goals of the project are to decrease the number of times the beach is closed and to improve water quality in the roadway drainage system that outfalls at the end of Shawmut Terrace. The Division used in -house staff to prepare the design plans and specifications, manage the bidding, and oversee the construction. Post construction sampling has shown that the improvements have reduced the bacteria loading from this outfall by an average of 72 %. Saxonville Levee Certification: FEMA notified all U.S. levee owners that the levees will need to be certified by August 2009 as meeting the requirements of protection of structures for a 100 -year (1 %) flood. Activities completed included the preparation and submittal of a letter to FEMA asserting that the Town meets the Provisionally Accredited Levee (PAL) requirements, worked with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (who constructed the levee in 1972 — 1979) to identify certification requirements, and determined requirements and cost estimate for certification. Hazard Mitigation Plan Working Group The support the Division provided to this group included: 0 FEMA Flood Management Assistance Grant. This grant for Backflow Preventers at 3 locations in Town was submitted and 2007 Annual Report approved by FEMA. Up to three backflow preventers will be placed, 2 at outfalls to the Sudbury River at Auburn Street and Auburn Street Extension, and one at a culvert for Sucker Brook at Main Street. Construction is planned for 2008. 0 Preparation of draft brochure for Flood Facts for Framingham residents in the floodplain. This brochure is planned to be distributed in 2008. 0 Preparation of draft summary of impact of changes to the floodplain as part of a FEMA Remapping program. The new flood maps will be made official by FEMA some time in 2008. The Division worked closely with the Conservation Commission and other DPW divisions on a number of projects including: 0 Completion of restoration of Course Brook as part of a mosquito control project; 0 Tank removal at the Edgell Road Pumping Station; Coordinated initial environmental response of release on Mellen Street with Conservation Commission; • Loring Drive fire hydrant replacements; • Siting for Western Avenue parking and snow storage and Arthur Street snow storage; 0 Response actions completed for DEP Notification of Responsibility for Arthur Street site, including investigation and submittal of a Response Action Outcome Statement. The site was determined to be at or below background levels for contaminants, and therefore future use by the DPW is unrestricted; 0 Prepared GIS -based map of DEP active disposal sites for the Board of Selectmen; Identified and mapped vernal pools and rare wildlife habitat, and analyzed the impact of nearby Town drainage. Only 2 of 16 vernal pools in Town might be impacted by construction or cleaning of drainage system components. The 2 rare wildlife habitats might be impacted by work in 6 small locations in northern Framingham. Public Works 123 Town of Framingham 0 Two mosquito control projects, determining that approval was not required by Conservation Commission or US Army Corps of Engineers; and 0 Removal of trees inside the 15 -foot toe of the Saxonville Levee, to meet US Army Corps of Engineers requirements. Other stormwater projects completed in 2007 included designing stormwater conveyance for Sewell Street, preliminary designs for drainage improvements for outfalls on Johnson Street and Carter Drive, updating the stormwater construction standards, and providing technical assistance to the Planning Board relative to the Master Plan and numerous development and redevelopment projects. GIS & Asset Management Projects The Geographical Information System (GIS) is a critical component of infrastructure management. The Town's system includes numerous data layers such as parcels, roadways, the water, sewer and drainage infrastructure, utility easements, water resources, floodplains, topography, and several other natural features and Town owned assets. Maintaining this extensive collection of data is the major focus of the GIS staff. Specific GIS projects completed in 2007 included: 0 Received and installed aerial flyover imagery. These aerial photographs have a much greater resolution than previously available imagery and have allowed for improved research, planning and mapping by all Town Departments. 0 Relocated GIS data to its own secure network repository, freeing up network space for departmental data. 0 Took delivery of VUEWorks Asset Management System server and took over administration of system hardware, software and user profiles. 0 Received GIS deliverables for water and sewer systems from contractors as part of their Master Plans. Began comprehensive QA /QC of the data to town standards prior 2007 Annual Report to integration within the Asset Management System. 0 Completed development of street pull box and master alarm box GIS layers and delivered to Fire Department. Supported and assisted Police Department in mapping of Level 3 sex - offender registry for public web display. 0 Coordinated with Highway Department to purchase updated GIS layers, software and videos as part of a town -wide survey and evaluation of roadway pavement condition. Development & Permitting Plan Review. The Division, in collaboration with staff from the Water, Sewer and Highway Divisions, devotes significant resources to reviewing plans for compliance with site plan review and subdivision control requirements; Approval Not Required (ANR) provisions; State and Federal regulations relative to environmental protection, traffic signalization and signage, and accessibility for those with disabilities; and Department and industry construction standards. In 2007, the Division reviewed over 220 separate submittals. These ranged from single family homes to commercial development /redevelopment projects and subdivisions. Examples of specific projects included the Danforth Green Planned Unit Development (PUD) subdivision in Saxonville, multiple Genzyme projects on New York Avenue, JCHE elderly housing project on Edmands Road, YMCA expansion on Old Connecticut Path, and new Framingham Country Club pro shop on Gates Street. Street Opening Permits: Significant enhancements were made to the Town's Street Opening Permit (SOP) program in 2007. Management of this program was moved from the Licensing Office to the Public Works Department. The Division finalized, and the Board of Selectmen unanimously approved, a new SOP policy in August. This policy has created a very much needed formal program to better manage and Public Works 124 Town of Framingham track excavation so that we can better protect our sidewalk and road infrastructure. Further, new processing procedures has made the permitting process for the applicant easier by providing access to permit information via the Web as well as providing a commitment to process all permits in less than 5 Business Days. The permit routing was modified to adopt the use of e -mail circulation of the vital application info for review and approving. This change made the approval tracking more open and timelier. The most significant advancement within the new SOP program and process was the leveraging of existing Town resources such as Permit Plus and the Web Internet to create tools that now make it possible for anyone in the Town (employee, applicant or resident) to see the status and the scope coverage of any permit. All of these very important enhancements made it possible to process 30% more permits than were handled in 2006 with a 2007 year end total of 436 SOP permits issued. In November 2007, the Commonwealth promulgated new regulations requiring each municipality to issue permits for all trench excavations on both public and private property (MGL c82A Excavating and Trench Safety 520 CMR 14.00). Compliance with this new unfunded mandate must begin by January 2009. Developing and funding the administrative and inspectional components to this new program will be a significant challenge in 2008. Survey. Numerous property line determinations are performed each year for the Public Works Department and other departments such as Park & Recreation and Conservation. These are done to determine whether land, trees, fences, walls, and other features are located on town or private property. The Division also conducts surveys and prepares easement plans and property descriptions as may be needed to support town projects or Town Meeting zoning changes. 2007 Annual Report Highwaij Division 100 Western Avenue Framingham, MA 01702 508 -n2 -6050 pgs@franzinghanznza.gov The Highway Division is responsible for the maintenance and repair of the Town's roadway and sidewalk infrastructure including; pavement markings, granite and bituminous curbing, street and regulatory signage, storm water utilities, traffic islands, and street trees. Storm Water Management The Storm Water Management System consists of more than 200 miles of surface and subsurface drainage systems, 12,200 catch basin and manhole structures, and more than 600 drainage outfalls. In order to maintain compliance with the EPA Storm Water Phase II Permit, the Highway Division made a vigorous yearlong effort to visit and clean as many of the drainage structures as possible and, with use of contract services, removed silt, sand, and debris from approximately 8,600 catch basins. The storm drain cleaning program has continued to produce a significant repair list as the inspection process proceeds. The Beaver Dam Brook continues to be a significant operational challenge for the Division as even modest rain events may cause the brook to surcharge at the many culvert headwalls in South Framingham. The deficiencies in the stormwater systems throughout the Town are a major cause of unscheduled overtime in the Department. In order to minimize the intrusion of sand from entering, and further diminishing the capacity of the system, the Division has implemented strict control practices for the use of deicing materials during the winter months. In addition to that practice, a rapid and comprehensive post winter street cleaning program has been maintained to remove as Public Works 125 Town of Framingham much sand from the streets and thereby minimize the opportunity for deposition. The Division also performed the routine overnight sweeping of the streets and sidewalks of the commercial areas to minimize the entry of materials into the drainage system and to provide a cleaner environment in the downtown area. The removal of sand and debris from the Town's catch basins and manholes remains an operation priority each year The Division completed its annual inspection by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) which oversee the Town's operation of the Saxonville Flood Control Station. The Department is required to maintain this facility with its large gates and hydraulic pump systems and routinely performs maintenance to the equipment located therein. The inspection of the Levee system by the USACE, for the first time in decades, revealed the need to remove a large swath of mature trees that had grown inside the levee area on deposits of silt and sand. The Department contracted with a forestry management company, and together with its own crews, removed the vegetation as was required. The USACE also met with the Department to discuss the need to re- certify the entire Sudbury River Levee in order to maintain its flood control certification and the resultant Federal Flood Insurance exemption for many properties in the area. Pavement Management The funding of newer upgraded mechanized equipment by Town Meeting and the Administration, along with the intensive training of field personnel, yielded great benefit to the maintenance of the Town's infrastructure this year. The extensive use of this equipment, operated by skilled staff, provided the means by which the Department could extend the limited resources available for roadway reconstruction and maintenance. In 2007, the pavement re- surfacing was performed by both Division employees and 2007 Annual Report contractors, working in concert for the Town, on approximately 22 miles of Framingham's public roads. This coordinated approach to the rehabilitation of roads had started in 2006, but came to full fruition in 2007, and allowed the Department to more than double its work output during the relatively brief construction season. The pavement surfaces of Edmands Road and a large section of Grove Street were significantly improved by this rehabilitation process that involved personnel from all Divisions of the Public Works Department. The work included significant drainage repair work and street casting replacements which was primarily performed by the Department using its work force and mechanized equipment. These road sections were milled to remove fractured surface pavements, followed by an application of rubberized stone seal to bridge gaps and structural cracks, followed by the final surface wear course application and traffic markings. Reflective delineators were placed in the paved surface at intersecting roads and special delineators were placed at fire hydrant locations. In addition, the Department completed the pre - paving and the final surface treatment of Mountain Road inside of the Technology Park, which was in a very deteriorated condition. Despite the significant amount of resurfacing and surface treatment work completed this year, the overall conditions of the Town's roadway network remains a major challenge and it is still in a state of steady decline. The funding for the reconstruction of many large sections of roadway, some of it consisting of multiple lanes, remains out of funding range. Streets such as Cochituate Road (RT30), Western Avenue, Edgell Road, Winter Street, Central Street, and many others, will by themselves each cost multiple millions of dollars to reconstruct. The level of funding needed to address these roads remains elusive as the clock maintains its steady countdown to full depreciation, and as other roads in the network, begin to also fall into that classification. Public Works 126 Town of Framingham Sidewalk ADA ramps were installed at the intersecting roads along Lincoln Street in the Hospital area and at the intersecting roads along Hardy Street, as well as at other locations in the Town. The 2007 Construction projects included the replacement or upgrade of roadway elements and appurtenances so that both regulatory guidelines, and directives, were adhered to and visual enhancements could be made. New pavement markings, street signs, sidewalks, granite and bituminous curbing, wheelchair ramps and curb -cut control measures were addressed during the construction. Winter Storm Management The Highway Division is responsible for the provision of a safe automotive and pedestrian environment both during and after winter storm events. This effort involves the plowing and treating of 550 lane miles of public roadway, 22 municipal parking facilities, and 115 miles of sidewalks and public pathways. The Division has integrated the Town's Geographical Information System (GIS) with an Incident Command Structure to manage each event. The purpose of this strategic effort is to provide a high level of accountability while applying the minimum amount of resources to each storm event. In 2007, courtesy of a State Chapter 90 grant, the Department replaced the 30 year old wooden salt shed that had fallen into disrepair with a new prefabricated salt shed that provides more than a 50% increase in capacity and together with the site work at the facility, will greatly increase out operational effectiveness. The 2006 -2007 winter season was extremely mild and the Department responded to three winter weather related events that required a significant level of remediation by Department and /or contract personnel and equipment. Tree Warden & Forestry Management The Highway Division is responsible for the maintenance management of the Town's 2007 Annual Report estimated 12,000 public street trees and for the development of a Public Shade Tree program for the community. The purpose of this program is to promote, preserve, and enhance the shade tree environment of the community through the application of best management practices and public education campaigns. The Highway Division also oversees the Town's roadside vegetation management program that is permitted annually by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection. This program allows the Department to apply best management practices for the control of curbside vegetation that otherwise would grow uncontrollably and require the commitment of substantial and sustained labor to control growth. A primary and recurring function of this operating group is the statutory requirement to maintain the 14' -6" height clearance over the 550 lane mile roadway network. The Town's shade trees, while providing a great Public amenity to the Town, also require constant maintenance management so that they do not also become a public liability to the Town. The Tree warden conducts frequent hazardous tree assessments, prescribes treatment, oversees removals, and participates in public hearings on issues related to trees within scenic ways. The Department routinely responded to citizen inquiries and requests for service, and Forestry Section personnel removed several dead or diseased street trees in 2007. The tree crews performed tree pruning and up- limbing for road and sidewalk clearance on several streets included in the 2007 Annual Road Resurfacing Plan. The Department and specialized temporary staff began a town wide tree survey to identify tree hazards and diseases so that we may provide and promote tree health and support and an overall accounting of street trees, which may benefit the Town of Framingham in federal and state grant applications. Public Works 127 Town of Framingham Traffic Systems Management The Traffic Systems section of the Highway Division manages the maintenance, fabrication, and placement of the Town's regulatory and street signage, steel beam safety guardrail, installation of new and annual refreshing of pavement markings, and the work zone safety program for Division operations. This section is responsible for the advance planning of the traffic management coordination for the roadway construction program, as well as, for the implementation of the street by street "no parking" posting required to efficiently advance the street sweeping program. The pre - planning for the traffic management coordination during the construction season maximizes the efficient execution of the work, and also secures a safe environment for the motorists and the work crews alike. In 2007, the Traffic Systems section was in the fourth year of its ten year program to replace the older green street signs with a new high visibility blue street signs that comply with the current Federal Highway Administration Standards. The new signs have a higher level of reflectivity and larger lettering to enhance readability in periods of minimal luminescence. The Traffic Systems section managed the contract and divisional painting of 86 miles of yellow centerline, 92 miles of white edge line, and over 600 crosswalks throughout the Town. In addition, the Division installed and or replaced hundreds of regulatory signs and advisory signs either by direction of the Board of Selectmen or as required through routine maintenance practices. Solid Waste Management 100 Western Avenue Framingham, MA 01702 508 -n2 -6001 nitl@franiinghaninia.gov 2007 Annual Report The Solid Waste Management Program is responsible for the management and oversight of the Town's Solid Waste and Recycling Programs. Materials are collected by means of curbside and containerized collection programs, the leaf and yard waste drop -off area and the operation of a recycling center located at Mt. Wayte Ave. The Division collects refuse and recycling from 18,462 dwelling units weekly, averaging more than 3,300 stops and 142,000 pounds per day collected. In 2007, the Department and the Town Manager's Office exercised the option to extend the solid waste disposal contract for an additional five years as authorized by Town Meeting. The original terms of the agreement were renegotiated as a condition of this extension. These amended terms are estimated to save the Town $800,000 over the remaining contract duration. During the last six months of 2007 a savings of $56,263 has already been attained. In addition, the new terms also allow the Town the option to dispose of municipal waste at the Marlborough Transfer Station or the Wheelabrator Waste -to- Energy Plant located in Millbury. This will allow the Division to explore additional options for future savings. The Department's request for a second Household Hazardous Waste Day was approved. Two events were held this year; one in May and the second in October. A new vendor was chosen this year to provide more efficient service. Residents were invited to bring their hazardous waste to the drop off site where technicians greeted them in two lines to minimize wait time, evaluated the items and took the materials for disposal. The items were then containerized, hauled away, and disposed of at EPA & DEP approved disposal sites. This year's fall event also included the option to dispose of items containing mercury. Mercury thermometers were exchanged for a more environmentally friendly alternative; florescent lamps were Public Works 128 Town of Framingham accepted as well as elemental mercury in bulk. Two full pails of mercury and mercury containing items were collected, an equivalent of 20 pounds of elemental mercury removed from the community in a safe and proper manner. In 2007, the Division's town wide comprehensive recycling initiative continued. This initiative was undertaken to address the poor compliance with the State Waste Bans and our resulting decreased town wide recycling rates. An increase in the Town's overall recycling rate will have a corresponding decrease in the overall solid waste program cost.. The recycling initiative has encompassed four major parts: 1. School and Municipal participation; Last year's efforts to increase school recycling have met with immediate success. A comprehensive recycling program has been initiated at the high school. Not counting corrugated cardboard, from last February to June alone the school recycled over 37,000 pounds of recycling; up from zero the year before. The focus of 2008 will be to expand the program to our middle schools. Two out of three of our middle schools have already enthusiastically embraced the idea. 2. Public Education; knowledge is one of the keys to increased participation. The Division has continued to reach out to various stakeholder groups such as the League of Women Voters, The FDR Committee, PTO President's Meeting and the START Framingham partnership. The division now also sends out informational packets to all new homeowners explaining the program and services offered. Several composting workshops were offered to residents at the Recycling Center. Educational tours have been conducted at our Recycling Center for youth groups from our schools and the Boys and Girl Scouts. Future tours are already in the planning stages as this has become a popular and enjoyable event with the kids. 3. Enhancements and Initiatives; we have also been focusing on increasing opportunities 2007 Annual Report to make recycling easier. Single stream recycling has been met with initial success. The Division is now encouraging the use of larger bins or containers for curbside collection. The 18 gallon blue bins have been replaced with 35 gallon barrels and are now available for purchase from the division. Free stickers continue to be available to label barrels or any other container for recycling. Both our Recycling Center and curbside program has seen recycling tonnage increase 10% over last year. 4. Compliance programs; In 2007, the Division issued over 3,295 non - collection and non - compliance notices out of the 800,000 plus collection points visited during the typical year. This represents a 3% decrease in notices issued in the previous year. These notices were issued for various reasons such as, excessive recyclables or yard waste intended for curbside disposal (violates State Waste Bans), fees required and hazardous wastes. The three trash barrel limit enforcement program has met with initial success. In addition to the increased recycling, our overall curbside tonnage collected has decreased by 7% over last year. The Recycling Center located on Mount Wayte Ave, has continued to improve and provided the opportunity to expand upon the services offered. Last year the Division issued 6,471 permits to residents providing them access to the solid waste services offered at the facility. In most instances the average wait time for a resident was ten minutes or less; with typically no waiting for recycling drop - offs. The program also expanded upon the list of items that may be dropped off for recycling to include; textiles, shoes, books (both hard and soft cover), DVDs, CDs, and VCR tapes. The proceeds realized from the recycling of these materials are being dedicated to environmental scholarships at the high school and the first awards will be made this spring. In 2007, the Division also reorganized the layout of the yard waste drop -off area. Use of Public Works 129 Town of Framingham this facility has been increasing exponentially. This fall we averaged between 1,000 and 1,500 resident utilizing the facility each day. The previous format created traffic patterns that were not safe to our employees or the public. In addition, space limitations prevented us from composting last year on -site and forced us to pay for disposal of all materials collected. The new layout has created defined traffic patterns for safety and allows us to compost materials on -site again. Next year we hope to be able to distribute free compost to our residents completing the recycling cycle. The upsurge in use of the drop off facilities has required the placement of additional staff on site in order to meet the service demand and has also required the frequent hiring of Police Details to help handle the traffic flow. The Division collected, disposed of, or recycled, the following quantities of solid waste materials in 2007: 2007 Annual Report Metal (cans aluminum) 3.32 Scrap metal 271.2 Tires* 1,538 Textiles 11.6 Lead acid batteries 9.41 Rechargeable Batteries 256 Ibs cathode ray tubes (TV's & monitors)* 1793 Freon units* 1125 Waste oil 3,658 gal Used antifreeze 100 gal Florescent bulbs 8,629 feet Propane tanks* 428 Yard waste fall (curbside collection) 858 Yard waste spring (curbside collection) 176.9 Brush fall (curbside collection) 75.75 Brush spring (curbside collection) 29.76 'number of total units (not weight) Water & Wastewater Management 100 Western Avenue Framingham, MA 01702 508 -n2 -6060 (sewer), 508 - 532 -6050 (water) pgh@franzinghamma.gov The Water and Sewer Program is responsible for the provision of a drinking water supply, a fire suppression service, and a sewer collection service to the 70,000 residents of the community that it serves. The Water Department is responsible for the distribution of a public potable water supply Public Works 130 Town of Framingham and for the provision of fire suppression service to the 17,000 residential and commercial accounts within the Community. The average daily water demand of nearly eight million gallons per day (mgd) is purchased from the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) and is subsequently distributed throughout the Town by means of a complicated system of pumps, pipes, valves, and reservoirs. The Water Department program provides for the maintenance and repair to the water distribution infrastructure that includes; 250 miles of pipe, 17,000 service connections, 2,000 hydrants, 4,800 gate valves, 22,000 meters, four pumping stations, three booster stations, and six above ground water tanks having a storage capacity of nearly nine million gallons. The Sewer Department is responsible for the collection and transport of 10 million gallons of sewage each day, a significant portion of which is infiltration and inflow (I /I) from sources such as leaking pipes and sump pump discharges during wet weather. Sewage is conveyed from Town systems to the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) which is charged with the transport and treatment of sewerage from its forty -three member communities. The Town's collection system consists of 226 miles of gravity mains, 18 miles of force mains, 50 pump stations, 6,600 manholes, and over 40 miles of cross - country sewer -line easements. The Division's capital improvement programs have been substantially under funded in recent decades and, as a consequence, the critical infrastructure is experiencing ever increasing incidents of failure. The system continued to grow and expand over time, but the funding for the aging and expanding infrastructure did not keep pace with capital needs. As a consequence, the Division was historically engaged solely in performing unscheduled maintenance and was unable to devote resources to perform critical maintenance to the system. This is 2007 Annual Report underscored by the issuance of an Administrative Consent Order (ACO) and Notice of Noncompliance by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MA DEP) during March 2007. The ACO requires the Town to undertake major sewer construction and rehabilitation projects over several years with the primary focus of alleviating reoccurring sanitary sewer overflows, a violation of State and Federal law. The ACO has several other requirements including increased staffing levels, major equipment purchases, implementation of a SCADA system to remotely monitor and control pumping stations and strict reporting requirements. Failure to comply with the conditions of the ACO can result in administrative civil or criminal action. The Department also faces the continuing challenges of managing another Administrative Order originally issued by the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority in 2003. The MWRA Settlement Agreement limits the level of sulfide that the Town is authorized to discharge to the MWRA system through operational efforts. Sulfide generation can cause odor and corrosion problems in sewers which sometimes can be catastrophic. Activities which the Sewer Department performs to mitigate the generation of sulfide include chemical dosing at selected wastewater pumping stations, targeted collection system cleaning and inspection, and enforcement of grease interceptor requirements at food establishments. A major cause of sulfide is the wastewater detention time associated with the 50 pumping stations and 19 miles of related sewer force main sewer. The Department plans on eliminating up to eight wastewater pumping stations and related force mains over the next several years as part of its Capital program. Recent operating budgets have provided for a reorganization of the Division to train and upgrade staff and to also establish aggressive maintenance programs. The focus now is to address the need to provide the necessary Public Works 131 Town of Framingham level of critical resources needed to maintain developed maintenance programs and to establish additional programs which will further improve the Town's systems. These programs are reflected in all aspects of the Division including the optimal use of personnel, materials, and capital equipment. During 2007, the Water Department conducted a water leak detection survey of the entire water distribution system. This effort resulted in the detection of 28 leaks from building service connections, hydrants and gate valves. The combined annual water leakage discovered and subsequently eliminated though in -house repairs is approximately 7.74 million gallons resulting in an annual savings of about $205,000 per year. The Water Department continued the development and implementation of its unidirectional flushing program during 2007. Unidirectional flushing systematically removes deposits and stagnant water from the distribution system and increases disinfection while allowing for the evaluation of hydrants and valves operated during the process. Nearly 1.5 million gallons of water was flushed from 15 miles of water main utilizing 60 hydrants. Flushing also provides the Department with an opportunity to exercise gate valves in the flushing area and through this effort 400 valves were operated. Department efforts led to the in -house repair of 29 water main breaks, 70 building service repairs, 101 hydrants either replaced or rebuilt, 1,509 water meter replacements, and 3,565 backflow- device tests as well as several thousand pump station inspections and associated repairs. During 2007 the Town entered into a new Intermunicipal Agreement (IMA) with the Town of Ashland for the transport of sewage from Ashland, through the Framingham sewer system, which eventually discharges to the MWRA system. The new IMA replaces the original 1963 agreement and provides for 2007 Annual Report a more equitable reimbursement to Framingham for providing this service. It also provides a mechanism whereby Ashland will pay its share of capital improvements to Framingham's sewer system for projects which benefit that community. The Department is currently in discussions with Southborough officials to develop an IMA with that Town. We intend to continue working with neighboring communities which Framingham supplies water and /or sewer service to with the goal of ultimately developing IMAs with all of them. The Department completed a multi -year effort in developing a Comprehensive Wastewater Management Plan (CWMP) for the "spine" of the sewer system. The CWMP focused on inspecting and analyzing the major sewers, developing a multi -year Capital Improvement Plan and populating data into the VUEWorks Asset Management Tool. Based on the findings of the CWMP, the Department identified sub -areas of the wastewater infrastructure with the greatest risk of failure and overall consequence to the Town. A list of sub -areas was created to prioritize the next areas to focus on in its Sewer System Evaluation Survey (SSES) work. Phase 1 of the SSES work was conducted during 2007 with tasks performed including 200 building inspections to determine if private inflow sources were discharging to the sanitary sewer, 400 manhole inspections, closed circuit camera TV inspection of 7 miles of sewer, flow metering, mapping updates based on actual field conditions and recommendations for repair and rehabilitation. A draft report of the SSES study was presented to the MADEP at the end of 2007 and we are awaiting their approval as a condition of the ACC). Phase 2 of the work is scheduled for 2008. During 2007 the Sewer Department continued with aggressive preventive maintenance measures to provide scheduled cleaning of known problematic sewer pipes. Staff takes a proactive approach to system Public Works 132 Town of Framingham maintenance and customer service. The Department's programs worked towards maintaining and improving system assets including the systematic renewal of the electronic controls and pump components at many of the sewer pump stations. To mitigate the impact of sulfide generation and associated corrosion, a chemical feed system was installed at the new Hemenway Pump Station. Department efforts led to the completion 92 easement maintenance tasks, 17 miles of sewer inspections, and 110 monthly scheduled preventive maintenance assignments yielding 29 miles of cleaned sewer pipes. The Division's future operational efforts will be guided by its Water Master Plan and Comprehensive Wastewater Management Plan prioritization criteria. Focus will be directed toward specific Town water and sewer respective assets including tanks, hydrants, valves, metering systems siphons, pump stations, force mains and areas known to display problems associated with the production of sulfide and grease. Fleet, Facilities, & Communications 100 Western Avenue Framingham, MA 01702 508 - 532 -5073 fid@franzinghamma.gov The Fleet, Facilities and Communications program provides a critical support service to the other public works programs and provides vehicle and equipment maintenance support to other agencies within the Town. The Program is accountable for; the development and implementation of professional fleet management standards and practices, the design and procurement of all public works vehicles and equipment, and for providing standardized maintenance management practices for all Public Works facilities including Water and Sewer Pumping Stations. The Division is also charged with the 2007 Annual Report technical management of the telecommunications network and thereby provides a critical service component to the Department's Emergency Management response plan. The Fleet, Facility, and Communications Division's role is to provide logistical support to the Department through the provision of fully operational equipment, facilities, and telecommunications that together, ensure the effective and efficient delivery of essential services to the residents of the Community. These vital services include the provision of public safety, public works, and public utility functions for the residents of Framingham. It is the mission of the Fleet Management Program to support the operational programs that provide these critical services through the efficient management of Public Works facilities and fleet equipment so that it effectively meets or exceeds its anticipated service life. Fleet Management In 2007 the Division prepared specifications for the procurement of the following specialized equipment: Two 8,800 GVW four wheel drive pickups w /plows, 15,000 GVW rack body truck w /plow, three 40,000 GVW cab & chassis w /dump bodies, sanders and plows, 70,000 GVW dump truck w /plow, 75 foot aerial lift truck, 3.5 cubic yard loader w /plow, tracked sidewalk tractor w /snow attachments, 68,000 GVW Refuse packer, five four wheel drive utility body trucks w /plows, 70,000 GVW cab & chassis w/15 cubic yard Vactor unit. The Department's inventory of mechanized equipment has a replacement value well in excess of 20 million dollars, and as such, it is a major public asset requiring effective maintenance management in order to preserve its value and effectiveness. In addition to the maintenance of the mechanical components of the equipment, the control of corrosion within the fleet continues as a major element of the scheduled maintenance program. Public Works 133 Town of Framingham Elements of that effort include the periodic sandblasting of chassis, bodies and frames, the application of rust inhibitors, and the repainting of vehicle components. The fleet works in a very corrosive environment during the winter months, and despite the aggressive washing schedule, corrosion and metal fatigue are an ongoing challenge. Without this parallel effort, a vehicle will deteriorate well in advance of its mechanical components, and will likely cause premature depreciation. The Division takes great effort in its vehicle procurement practices to standardize components in the fleet. This practice allows the Department to stock a minimal level of on hand parts such as tires, wheel rims, plow components, headlights, batteries, axles, etc. In 2007, this practice continued as the Department carefully crafted procurement specifications with the mission of carefully balancing component standardization with operating requirements. In 2007, the Fleet Service Division completed 2,492 repair orders, performed 444 scheduled preventative maintenance services, and performed 133 Commonwealth of Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles Enhanced Emissions State Inspections. The Division also managed the acquisition, distribution, and accounting of more than 260,000 gallons of gasoline & diesel fuel in 2007. Facility Maintenance The incremental minor improvements to the Department's facilities at Henry Street and at Mt Wayte continued this year. The failed lower building that was attached to the main structure was remediated and demolished in 2007, and the area repaved. The Department retrieved its records and plans from storage in the damp basement of the Danforth Building, as well as, from several other locations in the Town, and relocated them all to new shelving in the second floor of the Henry Street Facility. The Administration and Finance Division and the Engineering Division, are in 2007 Annual Report the process of organizing them for perpetual storage or disposal based upon a review of statutory and historic relevance. Funding provided by state had provided the opportunity to replace older windows and doors and provide a measure of heating efficiency to this valuable space. The facility currently houses the Traffic Systems and Construction Trades Sections of the Highway Division operation. A small office area on the ground floor will also serve as a field office during the 3 -4 year long reconstruction of Franklin Street. A new stockade fence was installed at the rear of the building to help with security and minimize the chronic vandalism that had been occurring there. In 2007, the long abandoned original incinerator building at the Mt Wayte site which was falling down, was remediated and demolished with a Town Meeting appropriation. In order to accommodate the DEP ACO working group that will manage the 120 million dollar infrastructure improvement program, a section of the Western Avenue facility was vacated and the area remodeled as additional office space. The displaced function was re- located to an exterior modular structure until such time as the facility expansion might accommodate it again. Due to a recall, the fire suppression sprinkler heads at the Western Avenue Facility were replaced and upgraded. In order to accomplish the minor maintenance during a winter weather event, such as tightening plow bolts, replacing plow blades, replacing windshield wipers, etc, a temporary shelter was set up at the King School to help protect the Technicians who are assigned to be on the north side of Town. Previously this work was done in an open parking lot and the Fleet Technicians were forced to operate under unsafe conditions. The ability to perform this work in that area allows a vehicle to avoid the time consuming trip to the extreme south side of Town for Public Works 134 Town of Framingham minor maintenance and thereby provides greater operational efficiency during extreme weather. In order to comply with State and Federal regulations, the Division annually performs a DEP Stage II Vapor Recovery Certification audit at the Western Avenue Facility. In addition, the oil & water separators at Western Avenue and at the Transfer Station are inspected quarterly, pumped out in accordance with DEP regulations, and the manifests generated are retained as required. The Division conducts quarterly full load testing on the emergency generators at both the Western Avenue and the Henry Street facilities to insure proper maintenance and operation. The Division conducts a monthly inspection of the Army Corps of Engineers Flood Station at Watson Place and performs scheduled maintenance as needed to insure reliability. In 2007, the flood gates had been successfully repaired during an operational test and the facility was restored to full functional readiness. Telecommunications Systems In 2007, the Department began the migration to digital radio communications by acquiring P25 compliant digital radios for supervisor's vehicles. The Department of Public Works, the Police Department, and the Fire Department all operate on an interoperable communications platform and as the technology migrates to the digital format, it is critical that all three agencies maintain the systems in parallel. A Nextel communications system repeater was installed at the Western Avenue facility in order to overcome the lack of service in the southern portion of the Town. The Division continued to develop the inter - departmental telephone systems in coordination with Technical Services and introduced VOIP phones at the Mt Wayte and Henry Street facilities, as well as, at several of the major Water and Sewer Pumping Stations. The use of the VOIP 2007 Annual Report phones allows for the elimination of multiple Verizon single service lines and the associated recurring costs. In 2007, the Division continued to further reduce the recurring costs for the provision of cellular communications to the Department by streamlining equipment and negotiating new agreements with cellular service providers. Respectfully Submitted, Peter Sellers, DPW Director BARD OF PUBLIC WORDS During the year, the Board of Public Works (BPW) generally met at least once a month (except July, August and October) and worked with Mr. Peter Sellers, Executive Director of Public Works, and his staff on a number of matters, the primary item being the adoption of a new Water and Sewer rate structure. The new five tier structure was adopted by the Board of Selectmen, with slight modifications, on July 12, 2007. In June 2007, the Board of Selectmen reappointed Wolf (Bill) Haberman to a three year term on the BPW, and at the first meeting thereafter, he was re- elected as Chair by the Board. Jim Hansen was elected as Clerk and appointee to the Water and Sewer Utility Abatement Board. Ralph Funk was the appointee to the Real Property Committee. There were a number of critical areas addressed by the BPW /DPW during the year. These included planning for and the beginning of reconstruction of those portions of our highway, sewer, and water infrastructure that have deteriorated over time, based on studies completed by DPW consultants. We also continued the planning for and the conducting of testing for the reuse of the Town wells located off Birch Road in Saxonville, including a review of water pumping test results. Modifications to the Western Avenue DPW facilities to accommodate the Engineering Division and improve operations, and the Public Works 135 Town of Framingham opening of a new recycling area at the Mt. Wayte facility were completed. Policies and regulations for Street Openings and Excavations prepared by DPW staff were completed and approved by the Board of Selectmen. The BPW also reviewed the proposed operating and capital budgets for FY 2007 and financial trends. The BPW continues to look into policies that, over time, would enable all of our utility lines and cables to be placed underground as roads are reconstructed, based on a state statute authorizing funding for this purpose. Several of the more time consuming activities, including completion of revisions to the water and sewer construction standards, regulations 2007 Annual Report and operating policies; revisions to current policies for solid waste disposal and recycling; etc. were still in process by the Department of Public Works (DPW) at the end of the year. The BPW will continue to concern itself with DPW operations by working together with the Executive Director and his staff to achieve many significant improvements and provide better services to the citizens of Framingham or equivalent services at a reduced cost and to complete new policies and regulations to implement those improvements. Respectfully Submitted, Wolf Haberman, Chair Public Works 136 'b ti 0 Utility Abatement Board Calendar 2007 Annual Report Hearing Abatement Decision Date Applicant Address Amount Date Decision Official Making Abatement 1/4/2007 36 CONCORD REALTY TRUST 46 CONCORD ST $4,758.60 1/4/2007 Reallocate 1545 units of water and sewer from Tier 2 to Tier 1 FY06 rates Utility Abatement Board Reallocate 44 units of water and sewer from 1/4/2007 GAYTRI KACHROO 162 EDGELL RD $1,946.71 1/4/2007 Tier 2 to Tier1 FY06 rates, and reallocate 292 units of water and sewer from Tier 2 FY06 rates to MWRA FY06 rates. Utilitv Abatement Board Utilitv Abatement Board The Board denied the request for abatement. 6/27/2007 JOSEPH ZANCHI 102 STONYBROOK RD $0.00 6/27/2007 The Board determined that the increased usage was consistent with previous years w J Utility Abatement Board 0 0 N 0 0 w CD C 0 Reallocate 12 units of water and sewer from 1/4/2007 PAUL KELLY 141 FRANKLIN ST $1,072.81 1/4/2007 Tier 2 to Tier 1 FY06 rates, and reallocate 167 units of water and sewer from Tier 2 FY06 rates to MWRA FY06 rates Utility Abatement Board Reallocate 129 units of water and sewer from Tier 2 FY06 rates to MWRA FY06 rates, and 4/5/2007 SAS RESTAURANT CORP 510 UNION AVE $984.95 4/5/2007 reallocate 60 units of water and sewer at Tier 2 to Tier 1 FY06 rates. Utility Abatement Board Reallocate 74 units of water and sewer from Tier 1 FY07 rates to MWRA FY07 rates. The 4/5/2007 SHAVZAB LADHA 622 BELKNAP RD $244.94 4/5/2007 April 2007 bill should be calculated at Tier 1 rates instead of Tier 2. Utility Abatement Board Based on the irrigation usage went through FIRST PARISH CHURCH OF the main meter - reallocate 513 units of water 4/5/2007 24 VERNON ST $2,626.56 4/5/2007 FRAMINGHAM and sewer from Tier 2 FY06 rates to water irrigation FY06 rates. Utility Abatement Board Reallocate all bills from 7 -2000 to 7 -2006 using average daily usage using the 4/12/2007 JAMES & LINDA LACKEY 730 EDGELL RD $4,588.31 4/12/2007 appropriate Fiscal Year rates, all charged at Tier 1 rates. Utility Abatement Board The Board denied the request for abatement. 6/27/2007 FRANCIS HIGGINS 19 BELLMORE RD $0.00 6/27/2007 The Board determined that the increased usage was consistent with previous years Utilitv Abatement Board The Board denied the request for abatement. 6/27/2007 JOSEPH ZANCHI 102 STONYBROOK RD $0.00 6/27/2007 The Board determined that the increased usage was consistent with previous years w J Utility Abatement Board 0 0 N 0 0 w CD C 0 � O n � O Hearing Abatement Decision A Date Applicant Address Amount Date Decision Official Making Abatement The Board denied the request for abatement. LOUIS CALLAHAN 6/27/2007 MR. & MRS. ANGEL RODAS 12 HAMILTON ST $0.00 6/27/2007 The Board explained annualized billing JOSEPH RD procedures, and the reason for the charges in 9/28/2007 the next tier on their bill. Utility Abatement Board 9/25/2007 MARCEY CHARDO 97 CHERRY ST $55.50 9/28/2007 Reallocate 25 units water from FY08 irrigation rate to Tier 1 FY08 water rate. Utility Abatement Board Utility Board denied request. The bill reflects 9/25/2007 RITA GUREVICH 49 CARTER DR $0.00 9/28/2007 usage not billed previously due to lack of a Utility Abatement Board touchpad that has since been installed on o April 12, 2007. Utility Abatement Board 9/25/2007 KRISTINE DIEDERICH 13 CHURCH ST $488.05 9/28/2007 Reallocate 138 units from FY08 rates and charge 28 units to FY03, FY04, FY05 rates. 27 units to FY06 and FY07 rates. Utility Abatement Board 9/25/2007 LOUIS CALLAHAN 58 JOSEPH RD $0.00 9/28/2007 Utility Board denied request. Pool adjustment Reallocate 62 units of water and sewer charges from Tier 2 FY07rates to 5 units at 11/29/2007 PETER VASERMAN 26 CIDER MILL RD $198.50 11/29/2007 policy states seasonal refilling is excluded. Utility Abatement Board FY06 rates. Utility Abatement Board o PERRY Utility Board denied request. Usage is 9/25/2007 DAVID YOUNGSMAN 64 HENDERSON DR $0.00 9/28/2007 consistent, and there is no irrigation meter CD J w o that could be used for watering lawn. Utility Abatement Board 9/25/2007 ELIAS MEIRELES 31 WINTER LN $0.00 9/28/2007 Utility Board denied request. Application was not filed within 60 days of bill date. Utility Abatement Board 9/25/2007 FRAMINGHAM - 150 REALTY ATTN: 150 WORCESTER RD $113.73 9/28/2007 Reallocate 17 units from Tier 1 FY07 rates to BRIAN VILLANOVA MWRA FY07 rates. Utility Abatement Board 11/29/2007 RITACHUMBANIS 25 ROSE LN $328.40 11/29/2007 Reallocate 102 units of water and sewer at FY08 rates to MWRA FY08 rates. Utility Abatement Board 11/29/2007 RAYMOND EDDY JR 108 INDIAN HEAD RD $322.70 11/29/2007 Reallocate 57 of water and sewer at FY08 rates to MWRA FY08 rates. Utility Abatement Board Reallocate 77 units of water and sewer 11/29/2007 GENNADIY VIGDORCHIK 11 ARLINE DR $16.94 11/29/2007 charges from Tier 1 FY07 rates to Tier 1 FY06 rates. Utility Abatement Board Reallocate 62 units of water and sewer charges from Tier 2 FY07rates to 5 units at 11/29/2007 PETER VASERMAN 26 CIDER MILL RD $198.50 11/29/2007 Tier 2 FY06 rates, and 57 units at Tier 1 FY06 rates. Utility Abatement Board o w C CD J w o 'b ti 0 Hearing Abatement Decision Date Applicant Address Amount Date Decision Official Making Abatement Reallocate 34 units of water and sewer 11/29/2007 PHILIP MOSKOWITZ 42 EISENHOWER RD $42.78 11/29/2007 charges from Tier 3 and 4 FY08 rates to 17 units Tier 1 FY07 rates, and 17 units to Tier 1 FY06 rates. Utilitv Abatement Board Reallocate 971 units of irrigation usage between FY04 and FY08: 233 units at FY04 11/29/2007 NARAYANAN PALISSERY 5 CAPRI DR $754.70 11/29/2007 rates, 219 units at FY05 rates, 202 units at FY06 rates, 208 units at FY07 rates, and 109 units at FY08 rates. Utility Abatement Board Pro -rate 328 units of water and sewer at 11/29/2007 ROMILTON DELIMA 44 LARRABEE AVE $461.86 11/29/2007 FY08 rates and charge at appropriate Fiscal Year rates from FY05 to FY08. Utility Abatement Board 11/29/2007 CORBIT LARSON 16 WINTER LANE $0.00 11/29/2007 Utility Board motioned to continue hearing until January 3, 2008. Utility Abatement Board Utility Board motioned to deny request for abatement. The irrigation system is fed 11/29/2007 MICHAEL MALIESWSKI 50 OAKVALE RD $0.00 11/29/2007 through the main meter, and the owner does have the option to have a separate meter register outdoor usage without incurring sewer charges. Utility Abatement Board Utility Board motioned to deny request for abatement. The irrigation system and pool is 11/29/2007 BRIAN SEAVEY 59 CROYDON RD $0.00 11/29/2007 fed through the main meter, and the owner does have the option to have a separate meter register outdoor usage without incurring sewer charges. Utility Abatement Board Utility Board motioned to deny request for abatement. The request was based on a 11/29/2007 MIRIAM YORKS 7 MAGNOLIA ST $0.00 11/29/2007 toilet leak, but the domestic usage is consistent. The high usage billed was on the irrigation meter, and the owner should have the problem addressed next vear. Utilitv Abatement Board w 0 0 crc N 0 0 w CD C 0 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Community & Economic Development 150 Concord Street, Room B2 Framingham, NIA 01702 The Division of Community and Economic Development is comprised of the Community and Economic Development Department, Conservation Department, Zoning Board of Appeals, Community Development Block Grant Department and the Housing Rehabilitation Office. For the period January to June 30, 2007 the Department also managed the LIFT Public Transit System. The C &ED Division was formerly named the Planning and Economic Development Department. The Division was renamed in August. The Division experienced a number of personnel changes in 2007. In August 2007, the Director, Kathleen Bartolini, retired. The Assistant Director, Bryan Taberner left in November 2007 to pursue other endeavors as did Planners Lily Pollans in July and Kimbra Wellock in April 2007. Erika Oliver Jerram was hired as a Planner in August 2007. In April 2007, Karen Hayes, the C &ED Department Administrative Assistant left to pursue other endeavors and was replaced by Mikaele Neves. C &ED manages an intern program to carry out previously planned community projects, and develop plans for the community's future. During the 2007 calendar year interns provided countless hours of unpaid work, resulting in a substantial amount of work being completed that would not have been done otherwise. Interns assist senior staff with a variety of planning issues, including public transportation, economic development, downtown merchant outreach, open space planning, urban design, and affordable housing. 508 - 552 -5455 508- n2- 5461(lax) planning.departnient @ franiinghaninia.gov For the third year in a row the LIFT office received funding for part -time customer service representatives enabling some interns to apply for these paid part -time positions. For the period January to June 2007 the LIFT Office duties were divided amongst three part -time customer service representatives and schedules are designed to ensure there is adequate coverage throughout the week. Customer Service Representatives handle a variety of duties, including reports, billing and handling the high volume of telephone inquiries and issues regarding the LIFT service as well as assisting the customers who come to the C &ED Department and LIFT Office for information. New Division Website The Division updated its Website in 2007 after a substantial overhaul was completed in 2006. Our new and improved site contains detailed information on all Division programs, including business assistance, housing assistance programs and links to affiliated boards and commissions such as the Economic Development and Industrial Planning and Community & Economic Development 140 Town of Framingham Corporation, Framingham Downtown Renaissance, Conservation Commission and the START Partnership. Town planning documents and maps can be accessed from the new site, as can links to useful planning - related resources and websites. To visit the site, go to: www.framinghamma.gov /.planning dept / In addition to the changes reported above, we are pleased to report the following progress within the Division. Downtown Revitalization Revitalization of downtown Framingham continues to be a key focus of the Board of Selectmen and the Division of Community and Economic Development. Downtown planning and economic development activities are guided by the Downtown Framingham Economic Development Strategic Plan and the Community Development Plan. Our goal is to establish Downtown Framingham as a center of business and cultural activity that is functionally vibrant and active, and perceived to be an attractive regional destination. Descriptions of key projects are provided below. Downtown Streetscape Improvements: C &ED regards improvements to public infrastructure in Downtown Framingham as much needed investments that will soon make a major difference in the appearance and economic viability of South Framingham. Over the next several years capital projects in downtown will improve pedestrian circulation, safety, handicapped accessibility, and the overall appearance of the Downtown area. The improvements are crucial to project a positive image of the Downtown area, and will play a major role in the Town's economic development and Downtown revitalization efforts. During 2007 the Division worked with Framingham DPW to move forward the Period Streetlight Installation Project. Five of the existing cobra -head light fixtures and concrete light poles were replaced with six new period light posts and light fixtures on 2007 Annual Report Hollis and Irving Streets in December. In addition, C &ED also kicked -off of the Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Pedestrian Improvement Plan which will conclude in June 2008 with a design for landscape and streetscape improvements in the area around the publicly -owned Pearl Street Garage and the streets connecting it to the MBTA Commuter Rail station and the MetroWest Regional Transit Authority (MWRTA, formerly "LIFT ") bus hub at the Downtown Common. For more information see below under "Grants." Mixed Use Development. • In 2000, Town Meeting adopted Mixed Use zoning regulations for the Central Business District which allows for the redevelopment of downtown properties to include residential and commercial uses in one area. Mixed use development will aid in the Town's long -term revitalization efforts by establishing a vibrant business climate that provides tax revenues. Residential use will bring much needed vitality and consumer demands that require a better market mix than is currently seen in our Downtown. Three mixed -use projects are currently underway downtown Framingham. Dennison Triangle: This project is also known as 4 Bishop Street. It is being done in 2 phases. The first is 76 condos in Building 2 and the second is 84 condos in Building 1 fronting on Howard Street. In 2007, Phase 1 saw the completion of the 3 story garage and 76 condominium units. By the end of the year, Rosewood Development, the project developer, had received occupancy certificates for 35 units. Arcade: This mixed use, historic preservation project has been in the planning and design stage for several years. It received both its special permit from the Planning Board in late March 2004 and a variance from the ZBA in 2005. This almost 5 acre site is directly across from Town Hall on Concord Street and also fronts Frederick and Kendall Streets. As proposed there would be 290 apartments (1 -2 Planning and Community & Economic Development 141 Town of Framingham bedrooms), 50,000 sq. ft of retail/ commercial space, a 6- story, a 580 space garage, plus courtyard, roof top garden, swimming pool, and other amenities. Its special permit was renewed most recently in September 2007 for 6 months and will expire again in late March 2008. While the special permit is good for 2 years when first issued, a variance is only good for one year unless construction commences. A variance may only be extended once, so in September 2006, the Zoning Board of Appeals issued a new variance for the Arcade project. In September 2007, the Zoning Board extended the variance permit until March 2008. More importantly MassHousing voted in September 2006 conditional approval for the Arcade project as designed. In order for MassHousing to offer a final financing agreement to the developers, Framingham Acquisition, LLC, the developers must complete final architectural drawings, get Planning Board okay for that design and calculate total cost to construct the project as approved. In 2007 several meetings took place to review project status and tenant relocation issues. Kendall Budding. • In 2006, the first floor commercial space (8500 sq. ft) and 25 upper story condos were completed. This leaves only the required exterior, historic facade work to be done, as well as, minor streetscape improvements. Land Use and Environmental Planning Project Review. • Division staff provides regular technical support to the Planning Board and the Zoning Board of Appeals. In carrying out this support function the staff conducts compliance reviews of development plans looking specifically at off - street parking, subdivision design, and other issues. Staff also reviews applications for variances and special permit requests and comment on proposed zoning amendments. Community and Economic Development staff continues 2007 Annual Report to provide planning assistance to Town Committees, Boards, and residents for land use and growth management activities in the Town. Agricultural Advisory Committee: C &ED staff worked with several local residents to establish a new Agricultural Commission in town. The Commission was established by vote at Annual Town Meeting and is designated the Agricultural Advisory Committee. The Committee's charge is to: 1) Represent the Town's farming and forestry community; 2) Encourage, promote, and support the pursuit of farming and forestry in the Town both as a business and a community resource; and 3) Promote the protection, preservation and economic use of farmland and foresdand within the Town. Seven members were appointed by the Board of Selectmen in October and the Committee held its first meeting on November 20, 2007. A Right -to- Farm bylaw was also adopted at Town Meeting. This bylaw declares Framingham's support for farming in our community. For more information, please see the report on the Agricultural Advisory Committee. Environmental Impact Analysis: C &ED is responsible for reviewing Environmental Impact Reports, Environmental Notification Forms, and other plans and documents for projects under the Massachusetts Environmental Protection Act (MEPA), the Executive Office of Environmental Affairs, and other state agencies, for their environmental impacts to the Town. Open Space Preservation and Greenway and Trail Development. • C &ED coordinates Town resources with regional, State and Federal resources in order to protect Framingham's remaining open spaces and develop new local and regional outdoor recreational opportunities and open spaces for ecological health. Planning and Community & Economic Development 142 Town of Framingham Greenway development is a focused approach to open space protection, and is a key strategy for C &ED. Greenways contain sprawl, generate recreational opportunities, and enhance community character. They also support tourism and the development of small businesses, and provide an alternative transportation option. Overall, greenways and trails support economic development and translate to increased tax revenues, jobs, and a healthier community. Eventually, Framingham will have a greenway and trail system linking Town open spaces, state and regional open spaces, neighborhoods, employment centers, schools, and other amenities. Open Space Planning. • On July 24, 2007, the Board of Selectmen voted to re- establish the Open Space and Recreation Plan Committee (OSRP); an ad hoc working group with responsibility to update Framingham's Open Space and Recreation Plan. The group will outline a vision and action plan for future conservation and recreation opportunities and ultimately prepare a written plan and map for Town and State review. This plan is a "Chapter" of the Town's Master Plan and will require collaboration with Planning Board members. Planning Board member Tom Mahoney chairs the OSRP Committee. The Town of Framingham published its fourth version of the Open Space and Recreation Plan in 2003. Earlier plans were published in 1981, 1990, and 1996. To keep Framingham's Open Space and Recreation Plan relevant and to assure the Town continues to be eligible for state and federal recreation and open space preservation grants, the plan must be updated. This next version should be completed by August 2008. As in previous years, Community and Economic Development planning and conservation staff will put a substantial amount of time into the plan rewrite, including attending committee meetings, assisting in the public outreach process, and heading up development of various drafts of the document. 2007 Annual Report Cochituate Rail Trail. The proposed Cochituate Rail Trail is one of the first multi- functional trail developments for Framingham. The project is a 3.9 -mile corridor stretching along an abandoned railroad right -of -way from Saxonville to Natick Center, with spurs connecting to the Natick Mall. The trail will provide commuting opportunities for Saxonville residents and employees at the several major businesses along the right -of -way, and will also provide recreational opportunities for all nearby residents and employees. C &ED provides support to the Framingham Cochituate Rail Trail Committee ( FCRTC), the group charged with implementing the creation of the Trail. In 2006, C &ED staff helped to hire a legal consultant and then coordinated the activities of the consultant with the Committee; this included overseeing negotiations for securing trail right -of -way for use as a trail, and negotiating easements with various private entities that abut or use trail right -of -way. In 2006, Division staff applied for grant funding to conduct a species inventory of the trail right -of -way, and began working with Natick town staff to get the entire length of the Cochituate Rail Trail into the queue for state transportation funding. The FCRTC is currently working on designing the trail - they have the necessary funding and are developing an RFQ to hire a designer to do 25% design for the whole trail. If possible, C &ED will assist with developing the RFQ. In 2007, the CRT was added to Framingham's list of required transportation projects for the first time. The Cochituate Rail Trail will be funded through Transportation Enhancement Funding, rather than regular highway transportation funding. This means that it needs to go through two separate review processes; one through MassHighway and the other through MAPC. Both have been initiated. Bruce Freeman Rail Trail (BFRT): This project would establish a 25 mile trail from Planning and Community & Economic Development 143 Town of Framingham Lowell to Route 9 in Framingham. Construction has begun in Lowell and Westford but it is controversial in Framingham. Privacy is the biggest issue. The railroad ROW is adjacent to roughly 200 single family homes. Some residents have organized their opposition by formation of CART (Citizens against Rail Trails). A Town committee researched the BFRT and developed a report, and more recently CTPS did a feasibility study in 2006. C &ED attended the first of a series of quarterly meetings in October 2007. These meetings bring all communities together under the sponsorship of MassHighway to discuss and coordinate the progress of the BFRT project. This project needs to be monitored and made part of any CSX /Town agreements. Hazard Mitigation Planning. • Division staff worked with other Multiple Hazard Mitigation Working Group members to implement the proposed mitigation actions outlined in the Town's Multiple Hazard Mitigation Plan. In 2006 the MHMP Working Group was formed to assure priority measures outlined in Section 11.2 of the MHMP were implemented. C &ED staff is assigned to the Working Group. The Working Group holds monthly meetings and is currently working on outreach materials designed to educate home owners /residents in floodplains. Earlier this year C &ED and DPW /Engineering produced two grant applications for flood mitigation capital improvements. One of the applications was successful, and the resulting grant is being managed by Katy Weeks in DPW /Engineering. Regional Planning MetroWest 495 Corridor Partnership: Since its inception, the primary focus of the I- 495 Initiative has been the creation and maintenance of a "regional forum where regular dialogues occur between and among municipalities, and between the public and private sectors along the highway Corridor. Until the creation of this Corridor, no entity 2007 Annual Report provided an opportunity for regular, open dialogue across all sectors that have a stake in the preservation of the quality of life in this region. Serving the region, this Partnership branded the area as the Arc of Innovation and mobilized task forces comprised of public and private sector stakeholders to find shared solutions to several critical areas of concern: water supply and water quality; development; permitting; economic development; housing; and transportation. In 2002, the four Chambers of Commerce with member communities along I -495 decided that it was time for the 495 Initiative to come of age. The MetroWest Regional Chamber of Commerce, the Greater Marlboro Chamber of Commerce, the Corridor Nine Area Chamber, and the United Franklin Area Chamber of Commerce worked diligently with MAPC (Metropolitan Area Planning Council), NAIOP (the National Association of Industrial and Office Properties), the Mass Technology Collaborative and all the 495 municipalities (defined as communities through which the interstate highway passes and all communities abutting those host communities from Littleton in the north to Foxborough to the south) to officially incorporate the MetroWest 495 Corridor Partnership. By -laws were developed; a Board of Directors was established equally representing corridor business corporations, municipalities and regional and environmental interests; and, an Executive Steering Committee was elected that also maintained that tripartite partnership. Thirty -two communities comprise the region with a population of 538,926 residents, and the 4 chambers have over 2500 member businesses. In 2004, the Milford Chamber of Commerce petitioned the Partnership to be brought on as a member and this was voted adding more business clout. The Partnership has branded itself the "Arc of Innovation" since the segment of I -495 within the region arcs out around these MetroWest communities and is fast becoming the center Planning and Community & Economic Development 144 Town of Framingham of technological innovation for the Commonwealth. The members share three strategic goals: 1.) establish a Regional Identity and Political Impact that is known throughout the State and the nation; 2.) help retain, expand and recruit businesses to the area; and 3.) develop plans to enable economic growth while sustaining our environment. Framingham's former Community and Economic Development Director, Kathleen Bartolini, was a member of the Partnership. Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, Dennis Giombetti, was elected to his first term on the Board of Directors in December 2006. Framingham's Community and Economic Development Director was co -chair of the Partnership's Transportation Task Force with Robert Nagi of VHB Associates. The Partnership did a lot of work to help pass legislation that enabled MetroWest communities to form their own Regional Transit Agency, and then created a marketing program which was taken to the chief elected officials of potential member communities. The MetroWest Regional Transit Authority (MWRTA) took over operation of Framingham's "LIFT" bus service on July 1, 2007 and had its official launch in Framingham on December 6, 2007. Community Development Program Since 1975 Framingham has received over $19,189,366 through the Federal Community Development Block Grant Program (CDBG) and has recently begun to be eligible to receive Home Investment Partnership Act (HOME) funds as part of a consortium of communities. The programs are designed to achieve the following objectives: ■ To arrest deterioration in the existing housing stock and to stabilize neighborhoods through ongoing financial and technical housing rehabilitation assistance to property owners. 2007 Annual Report ■ To develop programs to preserve, and expand affordable housing for low and moderate income residents. ■ To facilitate economic empowerment and increased employment opportunities for low and very low income residents and those businesses which serve low and very low income people. ■ To eliminate architectural barriers which prevent access to public and private facilities. ■ To improve Town owned facilities and public infrastructure to prolong their useful life and contribute to neighborhood stabilization. ■ To improve the quality of life for low and very low income residents through provision of public services. ■ To administer the programs effectively and equitably and to ensure that all members of the community can participate in or benefit from program activities. Each year the Department is responsible for preparing the grant application and an environmental review of all projects prior to receipt of funds. Staff also provided technical assistance to individuals, organizations, and agencies who, in 2007, undertook the broad range of programs described below. Public Facilities Improvements: The Hollis Street Revitalization Project work included installation of six (6) new period streetlights at Burkis Square and was completed in December 2007. Further funding remains available to be added to previously earmarked funds to implement phases of the Downtown Streetlight Improvement Project. Funds will be used to perform needed engineering install streetlights, restore sidewalks, and install accessible ramps in areas adjacent to the streetlights. Block Grant funds were used in August 2007 to remove existing playground structures at the Arlington Street Playground and replace them with new handicapped accessible and safely code complaint play equipment. Planning and Community & Economic Development 145 Town of Framingham Architectural Barriers Removal. As part of an ADA Upgrade (Public Schools) project, installation of a new entrance and sidewalks at Brophy School was completed in August, 2007. A final phase of the Memorial Building Accessibility Improvements Program was carried out with funds set -aside to install life safety emergency alarm boxes in accessible locations in May, 2007. A new earmark of funds was provided to further address additional accessibility needs within the Memorial Building. Funds have been provided to study, design and eventually construct an accessible entrance to the Village Hall. Funds remained budgeted to cover that part of the cost of constructing and installing an access ramp, and other access improvements to the parish hall for St. George Church. Assistance is to be provided, proportionate only to its CDBG eligible public use, as now permitted under U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development regulations and guidelines pertaining to faith -based organizations CDBG funds have also been allocated to install two sets of automatic sliding doors at the Lexington Street and Pearl Street entrances to the Public Library. Athenaeum Hall Renovation: Handicapped Bathroom Access Funds remained available to cover part of the cost of building a handicapped accessible bathroom on the first floor of the Athenaeum Hall. Restrooms will assist in the restoration of the building to active use by the community and permit it to be eligible for funds for historical restoration. In addition to CDBG funding, the Town received a special earmarking in 2007 of $75,000 in State funds (FY'2006 Supplemental Budget) to improve the building. The sponsors, the Friends of Saxonville sought the assistance of Community Development staff to utilize part of the State funds to secure a 2007 Annual Report certified preservation architectural firm to prepare an assessment of all building systems, and to develop a plan where best to locate restrooms to meet accessibility and building use and occupancy guidelines. The firm developed a use plan and prepared detailed plans and specifications for the construction of a first floor accessible restroom. Concurrence with plans was sought from the Massachusetts Historical Commission. A public bid will be conducted to procure a contractor. It is hoped that work can begin in the spring of 2008. With the receipt of the State Grant (non - CDBG), in addition to developing a plan and approach to locating key accessibility components to the structure, the Town and the Friends of Saxonville expect to receive a detailed, phased, preservation plan for the entire building as well as needed repairs and painting of the exterior of the building in a manner conforming to the Secretary of the Interior's Preservation Guidelines for Historic Buildings. The preservation plan, which will outline a phased approach to reclaiming and re- opening the building for public use, can be used by the Friends of Saxonville and the Town to secure private and public resources necessary to realizing the vision of broad community use for the neighborhood facility. Public Services: The following initiatives were undertaken with CDBG funds to serve youth: a summer employment and counseling program (Community Connections Summer Work Program); a special counseling, tracking and mentoring program for high school students who faced issues that have impeded their abilities to learn and achieve (Resiliency for Life); a program to provide resources to youth to gain them job training and employment (Career Resources for Youth); and partial support for an outreach activity to identify the needs and make referrals for services for limited English speaking new comer individuals and families. Adult programs included: literacy training (Literacy Unlimited); English -as -a- Second Language Planning and Community & Economic Development 146 Town of Framingham training adults (Framingham Adult ESL Plus); and limited financial assistance to prevent individuals and families from becoming homeless (Homeless Prevention Program). Fair Housing. • The Town developed a Fair Housing Plan and established a Fair Housing Committee (FHC) that is representative of a broad range of community interests. The FHC met frequently to formulate a strategy for highlighting community -wide housing needs and promoting open housing opportunities. In 2007 the FHC continued production of videos on landlord- tenant relations and other housing issues of importance to moderate income tenants and homeowners. Collaborating with our Media Services Department, the Committee hopes to develop programs in English, Spanish, and Portuguese and make them available through community outlets. A program was put together in April, 2007 for prospective homebuyers that dealt with all the elements of assuming ownership, featuring information provided by professionals in law, real estate, and finance. The Homebuyer Fair was organized with the following objectives in mind: ■ Provide basic information to first time buyer aimed at those with little to moderate sophistication. ■ Provide in a mode that engages and is useful to prospective buyers at level of first exploration as well as more advanced. ■ Provide information on how and where to access additional information and resources. ■ Provide service and basic information for households for those who have English and for those whose primary language is not English (Spanish and Portuguese). ■ Capture information via video tape for re- broadcast in the community. Intense, coordinated, community outreach touched many segments of the community, resulting in a significant turnout of would be first time homebuyers, who received valuable, 2007 Annual Report practical advice and assistance on entering the homebuyer market Housing Planning and Assistance: As noted above, Framingham has participated in the CDBG program since 1975. Over that period, the Town's predominant investment was close to $8.0 million dollars in housing assistance. The Department has administered a host of housing projects over 32 years resulting in the rehabilitation of over 1,370 housing units throughout the Town. Up to 30 households receive housing rehabilitation assistance each year, involving the commitment of approximately $150,000 in grants and loans in CDBG funds and $120,000 in HOME funds. Typically, assistance is given to both owner- and renter - occupied units. Rehabilitation funds have helped low income homeowners to replace heating systems, install energy efficient windows, rebuild porches and upgrade bathrooms. Low and moderate income homeowners throughout Framingham have improved their homes using an array of rehabilitation programs offered by and through the Department which include the following. With a CDBG grant, the Framingham Fire Department purchased combination smoke /carbon monoxide detectors of carbon monoxide detectors with batteries, for installation in the homes of Framingham residents of low income and the elderly residents. One hundred thirty three (133) detectors with batteries were purchased. Two distributions were made to the Callahan Senior Center for installation in residences. Homeownership Opportunities Program: The Department under -took efforts to combine CDBG and HOME funds with other public grants, and funding from private lenders, to create homeownership opportunities for low and moderate- income households. Programs were provided in neighborhoods that would benefit from the special kind of investment that ownership Planning and Community & Economic Development 147 Town of Framingham brings. Eligible residents continue to have the opportunity to participate in the Department of Housing and Community Development /Massachusetts Housing Partnership Soft Second Loan Program and other carefully designed, prudent, first time buyer initiatives, and may receive CDBG and HOME homeownership assistance (partial down payment and closing costs assistance from CDBG and principal Buydown assistance from the HOME Program). With the receipt of additional funds through the Federal Home Investment Partnership Program (HOME), beginning in July, 2006, staff has designed an enhanced homeownership opportunity program that features a substantial principal buydown subsidy (reducing the amount needing to be borrowed) plus closing cost and down payment assistance. Intense promotion and outreach to make households aware of this resource to purchase a home affordably in Framingham will continue. The Soft Second Program works to provide "soft second" loans to first -time home buyers to reduce their first mortgage amounts and to lower their initial monthly costs so that they might qualify for bank financing to purchase a home. Those households with annual income at 80% of median or below for the Greater Boston area can receive help with closing and down payment costs. Households with income between 81% and 100% of median, can receive just "soft second" loan financing help. Since the beginning of overall Town CDBG staff administered affordable homeownership efforts in 1995, Seventy (70) total purchases have been assisted through these funds, thirty eight (38) have been by racial or ethnic minority households: 31 Latino American, 5 African American, 2 Asian American. In this sense, the Homeownership Assistance Program has been strongly inclusive of the segments of Framingham's population. 2007 Annual Report The capacity provided by the program, helped twelve (12) households with income levels of 81% to 100% of median achieve homeownership by participating in the Soft Second Loan Program in the last two years. Of the twelve (12) households served, five (5) have been racial or ethnic minorities. Homeownership Assistance has proven to be a resource for increasing ownership and upgrading housing in downtown neighborhoods. There continues to be great interest in and need for the program. Housing Rehabilitation Assistance Program (HRAP): This program provides technical and financial assistance for the rehabilitation of housing units. A total of thirty two (32) living units were helped or are in the process of being helped through the HRAP assistance and related services in 2007. A sum of $284,329.57 in CDBG funds was expended related to the provision of grants and loans to property owners who were of low or moderate income or the majority of whose tenants were of low or moderate income. Staff has helped owners' secure additional resources to undertake repairs and improvements such as through MassHousing Get the Lead Out grants. Joining the Westmetro HOME Consortium: Community Development staff filed an application and the Town was again accepted as a member of the twelve- community Newton based, MetroWest HOME Consortium. The Town continues to be qualified to receive HOME funds. The Town will be eligible to receive on a continuous annual (entitlement) basis, federal Home Investment Partnership Act (HOME) funds (an estimated $395,000 in FY '09). These funds, often seen as a companion piece to Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) moneys, could be used to support a broad range of housing activity for moderate and low income households. Planning and Community & Economic Development 148 Town of Framingham Among other activities, HOME funds could be used for the following housing activities: Provide financing assistance to low- income homeowners and new homebuyers for home purchase or rehabilitation; Rehabilitate rental or owner - occupied housing; Acquire property; Construct new housing for rent or homeownership; Improve sites for HOME assisted development or demolish dilapidated housing on such sites; Pay relocation costs for households displaced by HOME activities; Provide tenant -based rental assistance or help with security deposits to low- income renters; and meet HOME program planning and administration expenses. The Town's emphasis in the early years of funding will be on the provision of additional homeowner assistance to low and moderate income first time buyers and the provision of grants and low interest loans to low and moderate homeowners to undertake qualified, comprehensive building and health code related repairs and improvements. Code Enforcement. • An agreement was developed with the Building Department to conduct code related inspections to properties located in 11 Census Block Groups, with a majority population that is of low or moderate income. Two code enforcement inspectional staff (with the equivalent of one full time position made possible by CDBG funds) and one administrative staff person were hired: A Bilingual Portuguese- English speaking Brazilian native inspector, one English and Spanish speaking inspector and an administrator who speaks English and Spanish, and understands Portuguese. Significant caseload activity has been reported in the first half of the year. The Building Department is maintaining a data base on inspectional findings to better map where problems are occurring. CDBG Supported Economic Development Initiatives: A Microenterprise Lending program was operated in 2007 with CDBG funds to promote and support small 2007 Annual Report business development as a job creation /self- help strategy, to revitalize the Framingham area, and provide economic opportunity to the area's low -to- moderate income residents. The ACCION USA Framingham Outreach and Lending Initiative was aimed at providing entrepreneurs access to capital routinely unavailable from traditional financial sources. The fund provided low -to- moderate income residents and businesses access to capital to start new or bolster existing businesses. Three (3) loans were made by these programs in 2007. This lending initiative remains a tool for use by the Town to encourage and support business development in the Downtown in particular. Facade and Sign Improvement Program: This project is funded through the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) and offers assistance to business and property owners, as well as merchants, located in and around the Framingham Central Business Zoning District and surrounding commercial core, to undertake facade, signage, and storefront improvements. (Through the efforts of the Community Development Program, the Facade and Sign Improvement program was operated throughout 2007). Three (3) sign improvements and one (1) facade improvement project were undertaken in 2007 with $17,456.98 in CDBG assistance. Commitments to provide additional grant assistance were in the process of being finalized for two (2) additional sign projects. Applications continue to be received. If all commitments are met, at this point in time, the sign and faQade initiatives combined with their separate and differing leveraging ratios and related mixes of private to public funds can result in an aggregate total of new investment in the downtown of over $1.055 million, with over $829,000 thousand of the investment in private funds planned. Since the inception of the program nine years ago, over $225,000 in CDBG funds will have been Planning and Community & Economic Development 149 Town of Framingham directly committed in grants to assist in the improvement of seventy -two (72) signs and sixteen (16) facades. Great interest has been shown in the program. Downtown Management. • Senior C &ED staff has been working to sustain current Downtown initiatives and implement the "Downtown Framingham Economic Development Strategic Plan ". Position responsibilities have included implementing and managing existing programs (Facade, Microenterprise Loan and Business Assistance), technical assistance and capacity building (Downtown Solutions, FDIC, FDR), Strategic Plan execution and assistance with compiling and presenting the Framingham Housing Plan, adopted at 2007 Annual Town Meeting. Senior C &ED staff has been working on a follow up and implementation stage to the Plan. An annual Holiday Tree Lighting event in December was sponsored by: Downtown Solutions along with the Community and Economic Development Department staff, Jim Egan, Director of Building Services and his entire staff, the Framingham Rotary Club, the Framingham Coalition, and Metro West Medical Center. Three radio stations MIX, WROR and Oldies 103.3 appeared to add to the festive atmosphere. Held for the 16`'' year, the Holiday Tree Lighting was a great success. The event was held December 7, 2007. Everyone young and old from the neighborhoods of the downtown gathered to celebrate the winter holiday period through traditional tree lighting. Over 2,500 people attended. Nevins Hall was transformed into a winter wonderland, and musical entertainment was provided by the Town's own Elementary schools, Hemenway, Charlotte Dunning, Miriam McCarthy, and Woodrow Wilson, under the direction of Bob Mangan. A group of seventy -five (75) Framingham Girl Scouts sang holiday music. Scott Gibbons was the master of ceremonies outside the building (introducing Santa and Mrs. Claus) and Valerie Mulvey was the master of ceremonies 2007 Annual Report during the evening along with Tom Caron of NESN. Santa (Charlie Sisitsky) and Mrs. Claus (Beverly Kaplan) arrived in style via fire truck complements of the Framingham Fire Department. Polaroid photos with Santa were offered for $1.00 apiece. Coloring tables and face painting were provided by the Resiliency for Life Program. Hot chocolate and cookies (baked by Keefe Tech), and candy canes were provided. Ron Rego from Media Services filmed the entire evening. Carly Premo from the Technical Services department put flyers on the Web /TV cable in English, Spanish and Portuguese. Outreach to the community for volunteers and donations resulted in participation by Starbucks, Dunkin Donuts (from Concord Street, Framingham), and the aforementioned radio stations WROR, MIX 98.5, and Oldies 103.3 as well as Framingham.com, the MetroWest Daily News and the TAB. It was the largest holiday tree lighting celebration to date. Housing Planning Framingham Housing Plan: At the direction of the October 2004 Town Meeting a four person Housing Policy Liaison Committee (HPLC) was established including representatives from the Framingham Board of Selectmen and Planning Board. The HPLC's role was to prepare a comprehensive, town wide, housing plan for Framingham. The HPLC met regularly during 2006 and early in 2007 to complete the plan. To assist the HPLC a Citizens Advisory Committee on Housing (CAC) was created to provide input and feedback. The HPLC was assisted in this effort by Judi Barrett from the consulting firm Community Opportunities Group (COG) and Community and Economic Development staff. The comprehensive, town -wide housing plan was completed in December 2006. The plan was reviewed and approved by the Board of Selectmen and the Planning Board at a joint meeting in April prior to being adopted in May at the 2007 Annual Town Meeting. Planning and Community & Economic Development 150 Town of Framingham Plan Implementation: The implementation phase of the plan was initiated in 2007. Recommendations regarding code enforcement have been integrated into the CDBG program and a housing summit process is ongoing. The housing summit committee has been reviewing ways to increase homeownership in Framingham and ways to attract new homeowners. C &ED also worked on expiring use issues and monitored the town's affordable housing inventory. Land use and zoning recommendations contained in the Housing Plan are being reviewed and will be made part of the Planning Board's master plan process. Grants Commonwealth Capital Grant. • The State Commonwealth Capital Grant Program endorses planning and zoning measures that are consistent with the Commonwealth's sustainable development (also called "smart growth ") principles and encourages municipalities to implement them by using state funding as an incentive. The Program inspires better communication and cooperation between local boards and commissions and provides a specific list of Commonwealth endorsed measures that municipalities can undertake to realize smart growth. It is a measure of a community's achievements with regard to planning efforts. The scores are used as part of the competitive grant review process employed by the Commonwealth when it distributes funds for local programs such as infrastructure improvements or open space acquisition. C &ED filed Framingham's grant application in August 2007. We were notified in October that Framingham received a score of 112 points (out of a possible 140 points) in our FY08 Commonwealth Capital Grant Application. Based on information posted on the Commonwealth Capital website, this places Framingham 4th out of the 77 communities whose scores have been recorded to date. By comparison, 2007 Annual Report Framingham's FY06 score of 92 points placed us 45th out of 257 communities. Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Grant. • The goal of the project is to develop 25% design plans for pedestrian improvements surrounding the downtown commuter rail station, bus hub and primary public garage. These plans are intended to be taken to 100% design, and then construction, as soon as other funding sources are identified. The purpose of the project is to increase the visibility of the downtown train station and to better connect it to the downtown by making it easy and comfortable to walk to and from various points in the downtown including bus stops, the town hall, and the Town's garage on Pearl Street. Framingham was awarded a Massachusetts Transit Oriented Development Bond Program grant that provides $50,000 to fund the 25% design work. The Town has hired a consultant, the Cecil Group, to be the designers on the project. FDR will assist with the public outreach portion of the project. The portion of the project currently funded (25% complete design) is set to conclude by May 2008. The consultant has started the first phase of work, collecting data and understanding the site. The project's first public outreach meetings are scheduled for January 2008. In 2008 the town should apply through the TOD Bond Program for funding for final design and construction. The State may fund the construction, but may not fund 100% design, so gap funding is a big priority. EPA Brownfields Grant Program: In October 2007, the Town applied for a $200,000 EPA Brownfields Assessment Grant. This is our second attempt at this grant and we will know by March 2008 whether we are successful. These grants are intended to "provide funding for recipients to inventory, characterize, assess, and conduct cleanup and redevelopment planning and community involvement related to brownfield sites." The Town's proposal asks for a "community- wide" as opposed to a "site- Planning and Community & Economic Development 151 Town of Framingham specific" grant, allowing us to investigate and assess a number of Brownfields sites in the Downtown and Southeast Framingham. The bulk of the funding will pay for a state - approved Licensed Site Professional (LSP) to prepare a comprehensive inventory of Brownfields sites in the study area and to perform more detailed assessments on a series of sites chosen based on their potential for redevelopment and re -use. The grant provides for a targeted public outreach campaign that includes multi - lingual education and opportunities for community feedback on both Brownfields and redevelopment issues. If funded, this project can have far - reaching effects including mitigating environmental impacts, stimulating economic development, and the engagement of under - served and minority populations. See the Brownfields section below under Economic Development for more information. Economic Development Framingham is an important center for business and employment in MetroWest. Framingham's economy has transitioned from a manufacturing based economy to develop a diverse base of businesses, including health care, retail, information technology and corporate headquarters. With almost 45,000 jobs, Framingham ranks sixth among Greater Boston communities in employment. Framingham is home to the headquarters of three large companies, Bose Corporation, Staples, and TJX. Other major employers include Lifeline, Natural Microsystems, Perini, Genzyme, ADESA, and the MetroWest Medical Center. Framingham is home to hundreds of small businesses as well, an important contributor to the local economy. In 2007, Economic Development staff supported a variety of initiatives and participated in the efforts of many local groups including the Framingham Economic Development and Industrial Corporation (FDIC), Framingham Downtown Renaissance (FDR), the START Framingham Partnership, MetroWest /495 Corridor 2007 Annual Report Partnership, MetroWest Growth Management Committee, and the MetroWest Chamber of Commerce to promote economic activity throughout Framingham. A summary of key economic development initiatives follows. EDIC The purpose of the Framingham Economic Development and Industrial Corporation (FDIC) is to create a pro - active capacity within the Town of Framingham's governmental structure to plan for and carry out economic development where it is most critically needed. The EDIC assists the Town in its efforts to broaden the tax base, enhance long -term economic vitality, improve the quality of life of residents, and improve the business climate by encouraging investment that will create employment and economic opportunity, and attract other private investment and improvements. FDIC Membership: The EDIC is comprised of seven members appointed by the Board of Selectmen. In accordance with state law, the EDIC's members have expertise in industrial development, finance, real estate, and municipal government, with two members appointed from the community at large. The Board of Selectmen appointed three new members to the EDIC in 2007, Laurie Lee, Edwin Stoll and Kevin Looby. Martin Mulvey was appointed to chair the committee. Martin Mulvey, Chair — Finance John Steacie, Vice Chair — At Large Edwin Stoll — Industrial Development Kevin Looby — Manufacturing Andrew J. Rogers Jr. — Real Estate Phaldie Taliep — Government Laurie Lee — At Large FDIC Planning. • EDIC develops an annual work plan to identify projects to carry out with the assistance of Community and Economic Development Division (C &ED) staff. The annual work plan is a combination Planning and Community & Economic Development 152 Town of Framingham of ongoing, long term, and short term action strategies based on the following goals: • Continue to implement projects and programs that will bring to life the following vision for Downtown Framingham. • Establish Downtown Framingham as a center of business and cultural activity that is functionally vibrant and active, and perceived to be an attractive destination visited by residents throughout Framingham and surrounding communities. • Work to develop (or redevelop) vacant or underutilized properties. • Work to retain and expand current Framingham businesses by identifying technical and financial resources that can be made available to further their development. • Provide a forum for discussion of town -wide economic development issues and the formulation of goals, objectives, and action plans. The EDIC met monthly in 2007 to discuss implementation of its FY07 Plan, review the status of ongoing projects and programs, assign tasks to members, discuss current economic development priorities and issues, and assist C &ED Division staff with implementation of various economic development programs and projects. FDIC Projects: In accordance with its annual work plan, the EDIC achieved the following accomplishments in 2007: - Met with MetroWest Medical Center leadership to begin discussions about ways EDIC and the Town can partner with the hospital to help them grow in Framingham and in Downtown in particular. - Worked with C &ED staff to prepare the Town's response to the Northeastern University Moving to Massachusetts survey; a comprehensive analysis of economic competitiveness. The results of this study are 2007 Annual Report available online and may help EDIC going forward to identify areas of weakness in their economic development recruiting efforts. - Worked with C &ED Division staff to continue to identify potential sites for the ongoing Brownfields redevelopment program. Assisted in the preparation of an EPA Brownfields Assessment Grant application, submitted in October 2007 for a brownfields inventory and detailed assessments on targeted parcels in Downtown and Southeast Framingham. - Developed a marketing approach targeting a few selected groups within the commercial and residential segments within Framingham. The approach includes the development of fact sheets which can be cross utilized between the segments. These sheets can be used in mailings, left as handouts for realtors, small businesses, or corporate prospects and can be posted on the Town's website to allow others access of this content to create their own targeted information packets. - Continued working with property owners to determine redevelopment plans for priority redevelopments areas identified by the EDIC in 2005 and 2006. EDIC members also identified key nodes for economic development and continued the business outreach program established in 2005. A Portuguese- speaking intern, hired by C &ED was able to visit Downtown Businesses door to door and talk to them about their issues as well as distribute information about business improvement programs offered by the Town and others. In particular, we wanted to distribute more information about the Sign and Facade Improvement Program and the New Market Loan Program. The Sign and FaQade Program provides rebates to business and property owners to defray a portion of the cost of a new sign or faQade rehabilitation project. The New Markets Loan Fund offers low fixed -rate and longer term loans to support small businesses and non - profit organizations Planning and Community & Economic Development 153 Town of Framingham seeking to grow and create jobs in federally designated census tracts. Framingham's New Markets Loan eligibility area is census tracts 3831, 3833, and 3834 in southeast Framingham. - Provided recommendations to the Planning Board on economic development issues that should be addressed in the Master Plan update. EDIC also met with the Planning Board several times to provide input on the first phase of the Master Plan process. As the Master Plan progresses, the EDIC will continue to meet with the Planning Board as needed to ensure that the Master Plan reflects economic development priorities. - Continued to update the EDIC website to ensure constant communication with Town residents about the work of the FDIC: http: / /www.framinVhamma.org /planning de pt /FDIC main.htm Framingham Downtown Renaissance Framingham Downtown Renaissance (FDR) is a broad -based coalition of community groups with the mandate to strengthen economic development in downtown Framingham. The mission of FDR is: To promote, communicate and facilitate downtown revitalization, through a collaboration of business owners, residents and community activists representing organizations supporting a shared vision for Downtown Framingham. In 2007, its fourth year, FDR secured two $50,000 grants from the State which will be used for a variety of Downtown activities. FDR will use the funds to commission a downtown market study, continue urban design and streetscape improvement plans create a plan for attracting investment into downtown, secure legal services to assist FDR to institutionalize its structure and operations, and to develop a strategy to expand FDR's membership base. Implementation of this project will begin in 2008. 2007 Annual Report In 2007, FDR also prepared the Downtown Visualization Project report which built on the analysis of downtown priority redevelopment areas, urban design, and pedestrian mobility issues completed in 2006. FDR distributed this information to various departments and committees, including the BETA Group consultants working with the Downtown Railroad Crossing Task Force and Taintor Associates, working on the Master Plan for Framingham to help inform the Downtown design component of these plans. This report will continue to serve as a guide for Downtown projects as they arise. FDR continued the Restaurant Discount Program, which provides discounts to downtown restaurants to patrons of START Partnership's cultural festivals. The Restaurant Discount Program is designed to capture economic development benefits from the Town's cultural activities. This year, the Restaurant Discount Program was offered during the HeART of Winter, Spring Into Arts, and Harvest the Arts festivals. FDR wrote an RFP for a consultant to conduct a market analysis to determine the Planning and Community & Economic Development 154 Town of Framingham market potential for cultural activities in downtown Framingham. The market analysis will enable the Town to design a rehabilitation plan around the Hall's potential end use. FDR will continue to seek funding for this study in 2008. Continued maintenance of the FDR web page launched in 2006: http: / /www.framinghamma.org /planning de of /FDR main.htm FDR supported C &ED grant writing activities by providing technical assistance and letters of support. Brownfields Redevelopment Program: A brownfield is a property on which real or perceived environmental contamination inhibits its redevelopment. In 2006 the Community and Economic Development Division established the Brownfields Redevelopment Program to facilitate the redevelopment of Brownfields sites in the Town of Framingham. The Division is working with a number of organizations on Brownfields redevelopment including the FDIC, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP), MassDevelopment, and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The clean up and redevelopment of Framingham's brownfield sites offers an opportunity to put land back into productive use, thus serving as a catalyst for economic development. However, Brownfields redevelopment is a complex process that can present substantial barriers to owners and developers. The Division began conducting outreach to owners of a subset of properties listed on MassDEP's Waste Site Inventory to begin to understand owners' plans for clean up, reuse, or redevelopment of the sites. The Waste Site Inventory is a database of sites where contamination must be reported in accordance with the Massachusetts Waste Site 2007 Annual Report Clean -up Program, which was created under Massachusetts General Law Chapter 21E. This was an important first step toward beginning dialogue between the Town and property owners regarding the Brownfields issue, and to educate property owners about their options and opportunities for their property. In December 2006, the Division applied for a $200,000 grant from the US EPA Brownfields Assessment Grant Program. The grant was denied for FY07 funding, but resubmitted in October 2007 for FY08. This grant will enable the Division to hire an environmental consultant to conduct inventory work to fully document the extent of the brownfield issue in Framingham, and to conduct Phase I and Phase II site assessments on contaminated properties. A Phase I assessment is historical research on past land uses. A Phase II assessment involves soil testing, and is done on those sites where the Phase I results indicate possible contamination. The EPA will announce grant winners in March of 2008. Tax Increment Financing (TIF): The Town is part of the Framingham - Marlborough Regional Economic Target Area which allows Framingham to use state and local tax incentives to attract new businesses, expand existing businesses, and stimulate job growth in Framingham. Framingham has established eight Economic Opportunity Areas (EOAs) and entered into tax increment finance agreements with Adesa, Computer Associates, Triangle Realty Trust, Staples, Inc., Natural Microsystems, Lifeline, and Framingham Acquisition, LLC. Framingham's earliest TIF agreements with Adesa, Computer Associates, and Triangle Realty Trust have now expired. The Urban Center Housing Tax Increment Financing Program (UCH -TIF) was established in 2003 under M.G.L. Chapter 40, Section 16 to encourage increased residential growth, affordable housing and commercial growth in urban and commercial centers. The Planning and Community & Economic Development 155 Town of Framingham UCH -TIF Program gives the Town of Framingham the ability to offer tax increment financing to promote residential and commercial development in commercial centers. In 2005, the Town of Framingham designated the Central Business District (Downtown) as its first housing tax increment financing district and authorized the first Urban Center Housing TIF agreement with Framingham Acquisition, LLC to redevelop the Arcade Building at 111 Concord Street. In 2006, final project documents were submitted to the Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD). The DHCD tentatively approved the project and the Town is awaiting word from Framingham Acquisition that the project is moving forward. Transit Oriented Development. • Transit oriented development (TOD) is a compact, mixed -use, walkable development planned around public transit. Because TOD does not typically generate the same level of traffic and congestion associated with conventional development, it allows for growth in already built -out areas. As a result of this principle, TOD is the cornerstone of Framingham's efforts to revitalize its downtown. The central location of the MBTA commuter rail station and hub of the MWRTA (formerly, Framingham's "LIFT" Public Transit System), the mixed -use character of downtown, and the increasing viability of downtown as a residential as well as commercial district combine to provide an unparalleled opportunity for revitalization. In 2006, C &ED Staff successfully applied for a $50,000 TOD planning and design grant from the Office of Commonwealth Development. The grant will fund the creation of preliminary design plans for pedestrian enhancements between transit and the housing and services located in the Downtown. Specifically, the preliminary design plan will identify how the Town can create safe, comfortable, attractive and identifiable pedestrian linkages along public 2007 Annual Report right -of -ways between the MBTA Commuter Rail Station, the MWRTA bus hub at the Downtown Common, and downtown's mixed use developments. When the design has been completed, Department staff will seek funding (up to $2 million is available from the same source) for project implementation. When the project has been completed, it will make downtown's transit resources more visible and accessible to pedestrians, bicyclists, residents, employees, and visitors. The consultant began work in December 2007 and the first public meetings will be held in January 2008 with a completion date of May 2008. Downtown Railroad Crossing Task Force: The Downtown Railroad Crossing Task Force continued its work in 2007 to identify the optimal solution to the congestion caused by the grade crossing at the intersection of Routes 126 and 135 in downtown Framingham. The project was expanded in 2006 to include work on the downtown design and economic development components of the traffic solution. This ongoing work is being undertaken by a consultant group headed by BETA Engineering and including the Cecil Group for urban design and FXM Associates to address market implications. The consultants, known collectively as the BETA Group, produced a comprehensive three -part Existing Planning and Community & Economic Development 156 Town of Framingham Conditions report in August 2007. The Task Force expects to continue working with the BETA Group in 2008 to explore the traffic, transit, and urban design and economic development implications of the four key alternative rail crossing solutions that remain under consideration. START Framingham Partnership The year 2007 has been a year of substantial change for the START Framingham Partnership as it has seen the departure of several important members of the past few years and a change in the structure of the organization as the year comes to a close. Elizabeth Roop who was until June 2007 Chairperson of the Steering Committee resigned in the summer of 2007 and Kathy Bartolini, formerly head of the Department of Community & Economic Development for Framingham and a founding member of START retired in August. As 2007 ends, Carla Fink, Director for the past three years, is also planning to leave the position. At the same time, two of START's downtown partners, the Performing Arts Center of Metrowest and the Framingham Civic League, each acquired a new Executive Director in mid -2007 — Sherry Anderson and Ellen Sturgis, respectively — filling out some significant gaps in the community and in START's membership. Two new Co- Chairs were elected in the fall of 2007 - Katherine French of the Danforth Museum of Art and Gwen Stauffer of the New England Wildflower Society /Garden in the Woods — and in the process new structures and directions for START were initiated which will produce results in succeeding years. Funding. • START's major funding sources for 2007 were fiscal year '07 and fiscal year '08 grants from the Massachusetts state budget administered by the Massachusetts Office of Travel & Tourism (MOTT). In addition, a grant applied for in 2004 from the 2007 Annual Report Massachusetts Turnpike Authority (MTA) was awarded and the contract signed in 2007. These, together with remaining funds from the Carlisle Foundation and prior state grants, personal and corporate donations and a small appropriation from the Town of Framingham for 2008, form the basis for START's operating budget. Activities: Based on the work plan created in the previous year, START's 2007 budget was largely committed to three exercises in marketing designed to reach arts attendees beyond the borders of the town. These projects were a broadcast marketing campaign during Spring Into Arts, an upgrade of the Framingham Cultural Directory, and a project to design streetlight banners to highlight the events and organizations in Framingham's downtown Cultural Triangle. As in previous years, Spring Into Arts was a compilation of over 40 events produced by local organizations, performers and presenters occurring between April 16, 2007 (Patriot's Day) and May 20, 2007 that START promoted through a variety of media. Since START's funds fall under the mandate of the Massachusetts Office of Travel and Tourism, part of the effort this year was to try to attract out- of- towners and attendees who might not otherwise have been aware of the Framingham cultural scene. At the close of 2006, START was still awaiting word on receipt of these funds due to a veto by the previous out -going Governor, so that implementing the projects had to be delayed until the funds were guaranteed in the spring of 2007. The balance of the funds, however, - for a total of $50,000 — was received during spring 2007, and just in time to focus on the promotion of Spring Into Arts. Broadcast Marketing Campaign: The broadcast marketing trial was conducted via purchasing underwriting spots on WBUR (90.9 FM) during the weeks of April 15 and Planning and Community & Economic Development 157 Town of Framingham April 30, 2007 and through advertising on WBZ (CBS Radio 1030AM) from April 21 through April 27, 2007. The short spots publicized the community nature of the festival - "the START Framingham Partnership's third annual Spring Into Arts festival" — along with succinct information about dates and where to find specific listings. WBZ also provided a week -long series of ticket giveaways that allowed individual events during the festival period to be highlighted and new attendees to be captured. Survey. During this time, Spring Into Arts committee members conducted a paper and pencil survey at eight different events designed to learn what attendees thought of the individual events, the venues themselves and to determine which media were most effective at drawing in audiences. Survey results: A total of 201 attendees responded to the survey. 0 47% of the 201 respondents were from Framingham, but a majority - 53% - came from other communities. 0 The non - resident respondents came from 36 different Massachusetts communities plus Maine and Rhode Island. Natick and Ashland accounted for 10% of the attendees. 0 26% learned about events through friends 0 14% learned about the events through print media 0 13% learned about events through local promotions (such as posters, school flyers, street banner) 12% learned about events through their connections to specific presenting organizations. 0 Although most attendees (61 %) were not aware of Spring Into Arts as a month -long program, 19% said they had attended other Spring Into Arts programs and all agreed that they would recommend Spring Into Arts to friends. 0 78% of attendees identified themselves as white or Caucasian. 2007 Annual Report 0 83% of respondents were aged 40 and above. Most of the results reflected these trends, with the exception of Family Day at the Framingham Historical Society & Museum. These attendees were more likely to have heard about the event through START promotions, were more aware of Spring Into Arts as a festival, and were Framingham residents. There was also a bit more diversity reflected in these survey responses. 0 Although no survey respondent acknowledged learning about Spring Into Arts through radio advertising, there was a good deal of anecdotal positive feedback by those already aware of START. These data should help to refine and better target promotional efforts and dollars in the future. [Many thanks to START's temporary Administrative Assistant, Laura Katz, for compiling the survey results.] Cultural Directory Upgrade: Upgrading the Framingham Cultural Directory, one of START's original, signature projects, began with a review of the website by several interested Board members back in May of 2006. They had found it to be an "exciting and important tool to carry out the mission and goals of START," but felt that certain potentially useful items, such as Categories of Events and links to artist or event images had not been adequately established and that entering events and finding events or artists was not sufficiently user - friendly. Once funds were received in the spring of 2007, an RFP for a consultant to do the work was created with the assistance of Alan Holt of the Framingham Technical Services Department and in May 2007, START contracted with Rob Bushkoff and Alice Wellington of Nut Meadow Technologies to handle the technical update. Mr. Bushkoff was able to address the critical elements noted by the START Board members a year previously and create the Planning and Community & Economic Development 158 Town of Framingham capability of Full Text Search for artists, organizations and events. In addition, the "submission of events" aspect of the Directory has provided space for fuller detailed descriptions and links to images and was made more accessible. Other specific improvements have also been made and as of the end of 2007, the Directory is in its second testing phase, with the expectation that once minor problems are fixed, it can "go live" to the community once again. In addition to the work that Nut Meadow Technologies contracted for, the consultants also agreed to help START address an issue that we learned would be coming up for all Internet applications, namely achieving accessibility compliance with the American's with Disabilities Act (ADA). In consultation with Mr. Holt of the Technology Services Department, Mr. Bushkoff donated approximately a week of his time to re -code the previously -written static pages of the Directory, making it compatible with the future needs of the Town's web presence. Streetlight Banners: START's Streetlight Banner initiative got off to an exciting start in the summer of 2007 by convening members of the Downtown Cultural Triangle, the group with the primary interest in promoting downtown as a cultural destination. These organizations include the Danforth Museum of Art, the Performing Arts Center of MetroWest, the Framingham Civic League, the Framingham Public Library and representatives of the Memorial Building's Nevins Hall and the Framingham Downtown Renaissance group as well as other town personnel and interested parties. With the agreement and consensus of this group, START allocated some funds for a consultant to help the Cultural Triangle partners determine the message the banners would convey and some of the design features that would make them interesting. Once these meetings were held and design features agreed upon, Mr. John Colan was hired to 2007 Annual Report produce the art, having come highly recommended by the Danforth Museum. Over the course of the past few months, however, some differences of opinion among stakeholders have postponed the artistic decision - making for the banner design. Funds have been allocated and encumbered for the fabrication of the banners and await a renewed consensus for the project and its message. Harvest the Arts and heART of Winter: START's Fall and Winter festivals which, as part of a cultural/ economic development initiative are focused on bringing people downtown for cultural experiences, continued in 2007. Both the fall and winter periods expanded programming in 2007 and the Discount Dining Program, with its coupon containing a map of the downtown venues and restaurants, added a new, high -end dining location during 2007. In addition, meetings were attended with downtown merchants to discuss broadening the base of collaboration beyond restaurants during the festivals in 2008. Retreat and its follow -up: As in previous years, START held a Steering Committee Retreat in the summer of 2007 to review the previous year and create priorities for the year to come. This year's Retreat was scheduled to occur before the departures of Chairperson Elizabeth Roop and C &ED Department head Kathy Bartolini. It was attended by most of Planning and Community & Economic Development 159 Town of Framingham the Steering Committee members and took place at the Summerville Assisted Living Facility in Framingham. Retreat outcomes: At the Retreat, the Steering Committee re- confirmed START's core mission: ...to strengthen community life in Framingham and contribute to the economic vitality of the town by broadening, deepening and diversifying participation in the arts and cultural activities. and took a very close look at how it had been functioning and whether the structure was supporting its goals. There was discussion about the relationship between the Steering Committee and the broader members of the Partnership, many of whom had fallen away in the last several years, and about the role of the Director, C &ED Department and position of START within the community. Along with the many significant accomplishments of the previous year, the Steering Committee also noted that START did not present a sufficiently clear identity to the community and even at times to its members. These questions led them to ask the questions: Who benefits from START? Who are the Customers and Stakeholders? And how do we know whether we are being responsive to their needs? The Steering Committee emerged from the Retreat with the understanding that START's Customers are the residents of Framingham and MetroWest. The Stakeholders are the artists and cultural institutions that START seeks to represent. The Committee realized that the next step was a systematic assessment of START's Stakeholders' needs. Stakeholders meetings: Following the Retreat, a series of Stakeholders' meetings were scheduled for September of 2007. These sessions were held at the Danforth Museum of Art and were facilitated by two of the 2007 Annual Report START Steering Committee members, Pat Steuert and Dena Knop. Twenty -four people from nineteen different Framingham organizations attended these meetings at which the following questions were posed: How can START add value to what your organization is already doing? • How can we partner in beneficial ways? • What type of partnership would you like to see in place? 0 What should START keep in mind when working with you and your organization? 0 How would you rate the ideas that START has generated? 0 What is not working for your organization in terms of START? 0 What is not working about the cultural calendar? Some of the results of these meetings were put in place rather quickly as two new Co- Chairs of START were elected and its previous structure - that of being a Selectman - appointed Committee of the Town - changed to a looser relationship with the intention of providing more flexibility in meeting times and recruitment of support. At the close of 2007 the rich material gleaned from the Stakeholders' meetings has not yet been fully mined for the most common and compelling themes that would meet the needs of the Stakeholders and those of the Customers (i.e., the community.) With the Steering Committee still in the process of re- organization, START's future direction and a fuller understanding of its identity will likely become clearer in 2008. START ends 2007 a different organization with different leadership than it was at the beginning of the year. Nevertheless, throughout its changes, START's mission, defined in 2002, is unchanged and continues to animate its activities and its most committed participants. Planning and Community & Economic Development 160 Town of Framingham Transportation Planning Strategic and long -range transportation planning and project implementation are key functions of the C &ED. During 2007, Department Staff participated in regional transportation planning activities as a member of the Regional Transportation Advisory Council (Boston MPO Advisory Board), the MetroWest Growth Management Committee Transportation Task Force, and the MetroWest 495 Corridor Partnership. In additional to advocating for Framingham in regional transportation planning, the department manages several ongoing projects in Framingham. Downtown Railroad Crossing Task Force: The traffic snarl in Downtown Framingham, long associated with the at -grade railroad crossing at the intersection of Routes 126 and 135, was cast into the spotlight in 2005 when the Mayor of Worcester's vocal advocacy for increased Commuter Rail service on the Framingham- Worcester line began to gain traction with MBTA. While increased service will provide much needed relief on the already over - crowded commuter rail, the impact of new train crossings on Downtown Framingham could impede downtown redevelopment efforts by creating constant gridlock. In 2005, recognizing the leveraging opportunity the circumstances could provide, the Board of Selectmen established the Downtown Railroad Crossing Task Force to identify the optimal solution to the congestion caused by the grade crossing. The Task Force consists of 35 voting members and six ex- officio members. The first of the Task Forces' monthly meetings was held in November 2005. A seven member Steering Committee develops the agenda for the Task Force and serves as the contact point for Task Force consultants. Both the Task Force and the Steering Committee are staffed by the Community and Economic Development Department. As part of the first phase of work in late 2005, C &ED secured a $40,000 grant from the 2007 Annual Report Executive Office of Transportation to fund an update of the 1997 "Route 126 Corridor Study," completed by Rizzo Associates. The original study examined the highly congested area around the intersection of Route 126, Route 135 and the Commuter Rail and freight tracks in Downtown Framingham and discussed several possible solutions. In 2006, Rizzo was contracted to perform the update, and made substantial progress on the project. Most importantly, they provided the Task Force with updated traffic counts for downtown. Using Rizzo's data and research and information gathered by the C &ED Department, the Task Force began to evaluate options for downtown. The Task Force started with the twelve alternative solutions proposed in the original 1997 Rizzo Report; through member, staff, and public input, four additional alternatives were developed. The alternatives range from an underpass on Route 126, to an underpass on Route 135, to bypasses to the east and west of downtown to help siphon through- traffic out of the central business district. As the scope and magnitude of the potential impacts of their decision emerged through extensive discussion, the Task Force decided to hire consultants to provide expert input into the design and economic development components of the downtown traffic solution. C &ED staff helped DPW to initiate an RFQ process. The Task Force, with input from the Board of Selectmen, ultimately chose an engineering team headed by BETA Engineering that also included the Cecil Group, an urban design firm, and FXM Associates, an economic development consulting firm. The consultant group, referred to as "The BETA Group," began work in early 2007. After an extensive process of data collection, they presented their three -part "Existing Conditions Report" in August 2007. Planning and Community & Economic Development 161 Town of Framingham The above map shows the remaining four alternatives under consideration by the Task Force. The existing conditions were the basis for a Strategy Session held in October 2007 with the BETA Group and the Steering Committee. The feedback that the BETA Group got from that session will be used to inform alternative urban design and transportation scenarios going forward. The next step in the process is for the BETA Group to develop the alternative scenarios and then work with the Task Force to choose the best options for Downtown. Transportation Improvement Program (TIP): Each year, the Federal and State Governments appropriate tax dollars for transportation projects. These dollars are prioritized annually by regional planning authorities based on project characteristics such as need for the project, impacts of the project, and project readiness. Framingham is located in the Boston Region, so Framingham's TIP dollars are allocated by the Boston Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO). In the past, Town staff has gathered annually to determine which local roadway projects to seek funding for, and then the C &ED Department, with input from Engineering and DPW, has compiled TIP applications. New State Highway Design Guidelines disseminated in 2005, however, demand significantly more up -front planning and public input than in the past. In order to best 2007 Annual Report address the Guideline's requirements, and to foster a higher level of inter - departmental coordination, in 2006, Framingham staff and elected officials formed an informal TIP Committee that meets monthly to assess and inform progress on transportation projects that will require TIP funding in the future. Committee members include staff from C &ED, Engineering, DPW, and the Planning Board, as well as two members of the Board of Selectmen. The Committee is staffed by the C &ED Department. While the C &ED Department will still manage the TIP application process, it is our hope that the open, interdisciplinary communication fostered by the TIP Committee forum will strengthen Framingham's applications, and help the Town to compete with larger, wealthier communities for the limited TIP funds. The TIP Committee has already begun to identify which projects will be included for consideration for the March 2008 application cycle. Projects include the solution to the Route 126/135 grade crossing, Union Street upgrades and the Cochituate Rail Trail Corridor Design. Public Transit Services: On July 1, 2007, the MetroWest Regional Transit Authority (MWRTA) assumed management of the LIFT bus system. Since 1984, C &ED Department had managed the "LIFT" (Local Intra- Framingham Transit) Public Transit System, which served Framingham and portions of surrounding communities. The LIFT System, now MWRTA, is an affordable source of public transportation for many residents of the Metro West area accommodating a wide range of passenger and transportation needs. The LIFT Public Transit System operated LIFT's 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, and 9. All LIFT buses, including backup vehicles, are ADA accessible and have wheelchair lifts. During the last eight fiscal years (FY00- FY07), over 1.2 million passengers have ridden the LIFT Public Transit System services. This has supported Planning and Community & Economic Development 162 Town of Framingham many who do not own their own vehicle, as well as reduced traffic congestion, noise and air pollution, and dependence on fossil fuels. The Department managed the LIFT service until June 30, 2007. On December 19, 2006 the Framingham Board of Selectmen voted to form a Regional Transit Authority and so notified the Massachusetts Secretary of Transportation, John Cogliano. Mr. Ed Carr was hired as the Executive Director of the newly formed MWRTA. During 2007 a number of communities, including Ashland, Holliston, Hopkinton, Wayland, Natick, Sherborn, Sudbury and Weston elected to join the Regional Transit Authority. MWRTA officially assumed management of the LIFT system on July 1, 2007. MWRTA has continued the LIFT bus routes and is pursuing further transit enhancements to the system. The MWRTA located their offices and main bus terminal at 160 Waverly Street, just east of Downtown Framingham. In December 2007, they officially launched their new buses with the MWRTA logo. MWRTA information is available by phone (508 935- 2222) or on their website (www.mwrta.com). Throughout 2007, the Department worked to coordinate the transition from the LIFT system to the MWRTA and assisted the MWRTA in securing zoning approvals for its Waverly Street location. 2007 Annual Report System and Infrastructure Improvements: In 2006, LIFT staff designed and purchased equipment for bicycle lockers across the street from the MBTA Commuter Rail Station in downtown Framingham. The LIFT also purchased bicycle racks that will be installed throughout downtown, to make bike - transit transfer convenient and safe for commuters. Installation of this equipment is being coordinated with MWRTA and will be installed in the spring of 2008. In 2007, the C &ED Department's effort to secure state funding for ten new buses and related communication equipment was realized. By owning its own buses, as opposed to using a contractor's buses, the LIFT set the stage for the creation of the independent Regional Transit Authority. These new buses were delivered to the MWRTA's Waverly Street location in November and December 2007 and have become the principal vehicles for the new regional transit system. These buses are all handicapped accessible and include racks for transporting bicycles. Regional Transit. • The MetroWest region is in continuing need of alternative means of transportation. The level of service on local and regional roadways is poor, especially during peak morning and evening commute hours. Although the RTA will go a long way to improving the reliability of funding and bus service, investments in alternative transportation infrastructure will be of increased importance as the region continues to expand and grow. Planning and Community & Economic Development 163 Town of Framingham As part of our efforts to stay connected to transit planning in the region, the Department staff attends meetings of the MetroWest /495 Transportation Management Association (TMA) where contact is made with Framingham firms such as Staples, Bose, TJX, EMC, Computer Associates, Genzyme, National Development, Fidelity, Raytheon, Natural Microsystems, and Boston Scientific. These contacts prove helpful for economic development issues as well as transportation. The TMA works with us to accept mitigation monies for promotions and similar work, then implements the work on our behalf. TMA corporations are supportive of our E.O. 418 work to link transportation with jobs, housing, and economic development. Respectfully Submitted, Kathleen B. Bartolini, Community and Economic Development Director (until 8/07) Timothy Goddard, Assistant Town Manager and Interim Director of Community and Economic Development (since 9/07) Dorothy Barroso Rita Collins Carla Fink Bill Hallissey Erika Oliver Jerram Beverly Kaplan Eugene Kennedy Mikaele Neves Katherine O'Brien Lily Pollans (until July 2007) Sam Swisher Bryan Taberner (until November 2007) Kimbra Wellock (until April 2007) Catherine Wiggins 2007 Annual Report Zoning Board of Appeals 150 Concord Street, Room B2 Framingham, MA 01702 508 - 532 -5456 1 508 - 532- 5461(lax) ZBA@franiinghaninia.gov The Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA) is the Permit Granting Authority and the Special Permit Granting Authority for those projects not meeting the requirements of the Framingham Zoning and Sign Bylaws. The ZBA's function is to approve or deny requests for variances and special permits, and issue findings through the public hearing process by determining if the required criteria, as stated in the Zoning Bylaw, has been met. In addition, the ZBA administers the Comprehensive Permit process for affordable housing as set forth under M.G.L. Chapter 40B. The Zoning Board of Appeals is a three - member Board, appointed by the Selectmen. In 2007, Full Members of the Board were Philip R. Ottaviani, Jr., Chair, Attorney Susan S. Craighead, Vice Chair and Stephen E. Meltzer, Clerk. Christine Long and Karl Thober continued to serve as Associate Members. David Norton and Thomas Levenson were appointed as Associate Members in August 2007. Eugene Kennedy continued his duties as Senior Planner and ZBA Administrator. Mr. Kennedy prepared the legal decisions and advised the Board on procedural and other issues. Katherine O'Brien began her duties as full -time Administrative Assistant to support the Zoning Board of Appeals in March 2006. Town Counsel continued to advise the Board as required. Sixty -seven (67) petitions were filed with the Zoning Board of Appeals office in 2007. Fifteen (15) petitions that were filed in 2006 were decided in 2007. Ten (10) petitions that were filed in 2007 will be decided in 2008. This total of eighty -two (82) cases is less than Planning and Community & Economic Development 164 Town of Framingham the total of ninety -three (93) cases processed in 2006. Primary reasons for the continued high level of ZBA filings are as follows: The Town has reached build -out, with little vacant, buildable land available. Due to past rezoning, 80% of lots are now non - conforming, requiring variances and special permits to meet the more restrictive setbacks, and; due to low interest rates more homeowners are choosing home - improvement projects to increase and enhance their living space over the purchasing or building of new homes. Of the 63 cases heard in 2007, 22 were requests for Variances, 1 Comprehensive Permit, 21 for Special Permits, 10 for Findings, 2 for Finding & Special Permits, 2 for Variance & Special Permits and 5 Appeals of the Decision of the Building Commissioner. Variance and special permit requests included those for relief from dimensional requirements for construction of, and additions to, single family homes; for placement of sheds on residential properties, for construction of two- family residences, for automotive and restaurant uses and for changes of use for local business owners. Some of these filings were the outcome of changes in zoning districts in past years resulting in non - conforming lots. Several unique projects were decided by the Board. The Board began 2007 by considering and approving height variance requests for eight buildings at the Danforth Green Planned Unit Development project off of Old Connecticut Path. As 2007 came to an end a proposed wind turbine at the Staples corporate headquarters was pending before the Board. In between, the Board continued several meetings to modify its 2004 Comprehensive Permit and to review revised plans for the Jewish Community Housing for the Elderly OCHE) property at Edmands Road. The revised plans were approved in September. 2007 Annual Report The Zoning Board continued the cost saving measures that were initiated in 2005. Postcards, instead of envelopes are now used for hearing and decision notices. The 20 year database of ZBA decisions that was loaded into Permits Plus in 2005 continued to be updated and maintained during 2007. Recent staff research has included summaries of zoning permits issued with term limits and two family properties approved by the Board. Approximately $20,000 in application fees were deposited in the General Fund. Karl Thober, Associate Board member attended the Annual Conference at Holy Cross College and Eugene Kennedy, ZBA Administrator attended the Regional Planning Conference in October. The new Sign By -Law has been approved by the Attorney General and will now require approval from the Planning Board. The Board meets on the second and fourth Tuesdays of every month at 7:00 P.M. in the Public Hearing Room of the Memorial Building. Decisions and discussion items are scheduled on the second Tuesday of the month and new hearings are scheduled for the fourth Tuesday of the month. Members of the public are welcome and encouraged to attend Zoning Board of Appeals meetings. Respectfully Submitted, Philip R. Ottaviani, Jr., Chair Eugene Kennedy, Appeals Administrator Conservation Commission 150 Concord Street, Room 211 Framingham, MA 01702 508 - 532 -5460 conservation. coniniission @franiinghaninia.gov Overview The Conservation Commissions is responsible for administering the Wetlands Protection Act, Rivers Protection Act, and Framingham Planning and Community & Economic Development 165 Town of Framingham Wetlands Bylaw, i.e., issuing permits for work within 125 feet of wetlands or 200 feet of perennial streams. Commission Members and Staff In May 2007, Sampath Bade joined the Conservation Commission, after Vickie Staples moved out of State. As a Stormwater Engineer, Mr. Bade brings tremendous knowledge and expertise to the Commission. Wetland Regulation Implementation Commission members spend most of their time implementing local, state and federal wetland regulations (attending site visits, reviewing plans, conducting public hearings). Permit Review and Issuance: In 2007, the Commission: reviewed over 250 Building permits, 56 ZBA permits, and 37 Planning Board permits; held 26 Public meetings to discuss project applications, and land management and public education efforts; reviewed and permitted 36 Notices of Intent applications; reviewed and permitted 18 Request for Determination applications; 2007 Annual Report performed over 84 inspections to gain first- hand information on site conditions and verify wetland delineations; and issued 6 Emergency Certifications. The Commission continued to oversee active projects from prior years. It issued: 3 Amended Orders of Conditions for project changes; 5 Permit Extensions; and 27 Certificates of Compliance. Enforcement of Wetland Regulations: Wetland violations continue to be an on -going problem. The Commission: investigated 43 new violations; issued 19 Enforcement Orders; wrote 18 tickets; issued $12,075 in fines; and monitored several enforcement actions from previous years. Selected Large Projects: Several large projects were addressed in 2007: • Danforth Green, Pulte Homes (construction of approximately 525 residential units consisting of townhouses and condominiums): Discussions continue regarding this 130 -acre site, located at the former New England Sand and Gravel site, off Riverpath Drive in Saxonville. The project involves work within Riverfront Area of the Sudbury River, wetland buffer zones, and several vernal pools. Mitigation being considered includes wetland restoration, open space and trail creation, and interpretative environmental signage. • Genzyme: The Commission reviewed and approved the following projects: Planning and Community & Economic Development 166 Garter Snake Unpermitted filling of flood zone Commissioners and engineer on a site visit Town of Framingham 74 New York Ave.: Renovation of existing building and creation of new parking spaces in areas of building removal. 31 New York Ave.: Construction of a small addition on an existing building; replacement of a generator pad, and construction of a steam line to the building. 57 New York Ave.: Conversion of an existing parking lot into a parking garage. Municipal Projects: The Commission reviewed and approved many DPW projects this year: • Repair of School Street Bridge • Replacement of waterline along Nipmuc Rd., Dow St., Lake Ave., and Fay Rd. • Replacement of Fenwick Pump Station and sewer line along Central St. • Replacement of sewer line and pump station on Hemenway Rd. • Replacement of sewer line along Water St., Simpson Dr., Concord St., and Watson Place. • Management of vegetation along roadsides and the Saxonville Levee • Installation of check valve or backflow preventers in 2 existing culverts under Auburn St. Ext. and Auburn St. Land and Water Management Municipal Pond Stewardship: The Commission continued (through its contract with Aquatic Control Technology, Inc.) its pond management program of testing and treating Waushakum, Norton, Learned, Gleason, Mohawk, and Farm Ponds to: control the spread of exotic (non - native) vegetation, improve fish and wildlife habitat, slow eutrophication ( "fertilizing ") accelerated by development, and maintain access to public beaches and boating areas. Standard summer treatments were applied. In 2007, Norton Pond was afflicted with an overabundance of Watermeal, an invasive free - floating plant that covered the pond surface for much of the summer. This prevented sunlight from reaching the pond 2007 Annual Report bottom and reduced the pond oxygen levels. This lack of oxygen resulted in a significant fish kill in late July, impacting over 500 sunfish. The Waushakum Pond Association, with representatives from the towns of Ashland and Framingham, continues to push for water quality improvements. The Association obtained a 319 State NPS Grant for water quality improvements in 2007. DPW, with financial assistance from Park and Recreation Dept. received a permit to conduct water quality improvements to a drainage system outfall adjacent to Learned Pond Town Beach. Bacteria levels at the outfall have been reduced by an average of 72% since the improvements were made. Municipal Land Stewardship: The Commission owns and manages over 405 acres of open space. The largest parcels include: Wittenborg Woods (87 acres); Macomber Cons. Land (58 acres); Cochituate Brook Reservation (24 acres); Mohawk Dr. /Edmands Rd (24 acres); and Morency Woods (14.5 acres). *Boundary Marking: The Conservation Commission completed the boundary marking of priority parcels. • Forest Management: The Commission sponsored a Forest Management Plan for Macomber Reservation, and is taking steps to address the spread of invasive wisteria vines. • Deer Management: In an effort to stave off explosive growth of the white - tailed deer population and the environmental damage that large populations can cause, the Commission promulgated bow - hunting regulations and opened Macomber Reservation and Wittenborg Woods to licensed bow deer hunters. A total of 15 hunters received permits to bow hunt at Wittenborg Woods or Macomber Woods. 3 deer were taken from Wittenborg. *Encroachments onto Conservation Land: The Commission began to address some of Planning and Community & Economic Development 167 Town of Framingham the numerous encroachments identified during the delineation effort. *Volunteer Land Steward Program: This spring, a Volunteer Land Steward Program was established, designating two Land Stewards for each of our 6 major parcels of land with trails. Stewards monitored these properties, and along with many other volunteers, conducted 5 work days (removing trash, clearing trails, building water bars, and removing invasive plants) on 5 different parcels of conservation land in Framingham. Land Protection Efforts Water Street Tax Title Parcels. The Commission sponsored an article at Special Town Meeting (Oct.) requesting transfer of 3 contiguous tax -tide parcels (746 Water Street RR, 235 Brook Street RR, and 410 Water Street RR) to the care and control of the Commission for preservation as Open Space for conservation purposes pursuant to G.L. c. 40, sec. 8C. The vote was not successful, but significant support for the transfer of two parcels was voiced. The Commission will pursue protection of these properties in 2008. Brimstone Estates: The Commission continues to work with Pasquale Franchi, applicant for the Brimstone Estates Subdivision, to permanently protect 21 acres of woodland off Brimstone Lane abutting Wittenborg Woods, through a Commission - held Conservation Restriction (CR). The Commission anticipates submitting the CR application to the state in 2008. 2007 Annual Report Public Education/ Engagement Eagle Scout Projects. The Commission sponsored two Eagle Scout projects. Sean Longden's resulted in the rehabilitation of trails and construction of a new pedestrian bridge at Morency Woods; Ben Bradley's involved the construction and installation, at Cushing Memorial Park, of a kiosk and interpretive materials regarding wetland functions and values. Public Education: The Commission sponsored 11 environmental programs (including family spring and fall scavenger hunts, RiverFest nature trips, and several environmental workshops). Roughly 140 residents attended these programs. The Conservation Office continued to expand and improve its web site. The Commission produced a flyer that was sent to all pond abutters alerting them to the potential impacts they can have on pond health. Landscapers were sent information Planning and Community & Economic Development 168 Volunteer removing trash from Cedar Swamp New bridge at Morency Woods Sudbury River Paddle duringRiverfest Town of Framingham about wetland laws and proper disposal of leaves, grass, and brush. The Commission continued to collaborate with local organizations such as Sudbury Valley Trustees, New England Wildflower Society, Bay Circuit Trail Alliance, SuAsCo Wild and Scenic River Stewardship Council, and MA Dept. of Conservation and Recreation to protect the Town's wetland resource areas and open space. Additional Commission Activities Professional Development. • Commission members and staff attended several workshops and classes. Committee Representation: Commission members and staff participated in the following local committees: Waushakum Lake Assoc., Community Planning Team, Farm Pond Task Force, Local Emergency Planning Comm., Real Property Comm., SuAsCo Watershed Council's Steering Comm., Greater Callahan Open Space Comm., Housing Policy Liaison Comm., Framingham's Natural Hazard Mitigation Community Planning Team, and Mass. Society of Conservation Professionals. Appreciation for Assistance Many people have donated time and effort on behalf of the Commission. Without this assistance, we could never accomplish all that we have. Interns: Theresa Portante and Stephanie McNulty, students at Framingham State College, participated in our intern program, donating countless hours to office and field assistance, and special outreach and education projects. GIS mapping was provided by Jill Kern. Volunteers: Trail maintenance and land stewardship assistance were provided by our Land Stewards: Pat Carr, Brian Clew, Missy Cohen, Donald Crookes, Bill Fadden, Renate 2007 Annual Report Hanauer, Ginnie Hatch, Pam Helinek, David Longdon, Tom Lynch, Susan McArthur, Bob Moore, Josh Mulready, and Maria Muszynski. Office assistance was provided by George Dixon and Ginnie Hatch. Students: Students from the Learning Center for the Deaf volunteered along with Scott Boudrot of Boudrot Builders to remove several hundred feet of perimeter fencing at Wittenborg Woods. Municipal Employees: The Commission recognizes and thanks the Parks and Recreation Dept. and the DPW for their help in maintaining the Town's Conservation properties. DPW staff graciously assisted in the disposal of the trash collected during the work days. We also greatly appreciate the Engineering Department's continuing assistance and support in many of the Commission's efforts. Respectfully Submitted, Michele Grzenda, Conservation Administrator Planning and Community & Economic Development 169 Volunteers at the Cedar Swamp clean -up DPW assisting with trash removal Town of Framingham Planning Board 150 Concord Street, Room B57 Framingham, NIA 01702 The Planning Board strives to work with both project proponents and the public to shape projects that minimize impacts to the community while accommodating new growth. Such growth provides excellent employment opportunities and a growing tax base to the Town. Framingham continues to be an attractive market for significant new development, as well as reuse of existing sites. Highlights of the year and of the range of projects before the Planning Board in 2007 are provided below: The Board On April 5, 2007, Andrea Carr -Evans and Susan Bernstein were re- elected to the Planning Board. Following the election, the five (5) member Board reorganized and Ann V. Welles was re- elected to the position of Chairperson, Thomas F. Mahoney was re- elected to serve as Vice - Chairman, and Carol J. Spack was re- elected as Clerk to the Board. Kathy Vassar was jointly appointed by the Board of Selectmen and the Planning Board to serve as the Associate Planning Board Member. The Planning Board Office is staffed with three employees. John W. Grande served as Planning Board Director. John M. Charbonneau served as Senior Planner and Mary Ruth Reynolds served as Administrative Assistant. The Planning Board regularly met on Thursday evenings at 7:30 p.m. in the Memorial Building. In calendar year 2007, the Board held 43 regular meetings and 10 additional meetings (working sessions, site visits or joint meetings with other Boards or Committees). The Planning Board held 11 public hearings to consider applications for 2007 Annual Report 508 - 552 -5450 508 - 872 -0525 (fax) planning.hoard@framinghamma.gov site plan review, off - street parking plans, special permits for use, special permits for parking relief, subdivision review, scenic ways, public way access permits, as well as public hearings for zoning amendments. The type and the number of projects and hearings reviewed in the year 2007 are provided in the following table: PROJECT TYPE >NUMBER' Site Plan Review 14 Special Permit for Use 7 Special Permit for Reduction Required # of Parking Spaces 6 Special Permit for Dimension Relief in Parking 3 Special Permit for Bonus Project 1 Subdivision 2 Drive- Through Banking Windows 1 Zoning Amendment 2 Public Way Access Permit 11 Erosion Control 1 PUD (Definitive) 1 Modification to a Scenic Way 1 Approval Not Required 23 TOTAL 73 Project Reviews A summary of projects approved by the Planning Board are as follows: Planning and Community & Economic Development 169 Town of Framingham One Hamilton Street The proposal is to expand Walgreens from its existing gross floor area of 9,320 square feet to approximately 15,139 square feet. A drive - thru pharmacy window would be added onto the back side of the building. The site plans also provide for the re- alignment of the parking lot, landscaped areas along School and Hamilton Streets and within the parking lot, closure of two existing curb cuts on School Street, new lighting and drainage improvements. At the Board's request, the Applicant made additional improvements to on -site traffic circulation by relocating and consolidating rear loading facilities and dumpsters and providing for a continuous and dedicated one -way circulation lane and drive - through window lane that is unimpeded by adjacent parking or loading activity and provision for pedestrian walkways, bicycle racks, benches and a designated area for children to wait for school buses adjacent to School Street. Substantial modifications are also proposed to the exterior building elevations and signage. 517 Winter Street The Property had previously been operated as The Framingham Nursing Home. The proposed use of the Property is for the Sage House Program intended to house up to fifteen (15) families to provide a structured and comprehensive rehabilitative environment. The existing building with a footprint of approximately 5,834 square feet would remain in its current configuration and that the only site changes were reconfiguration of the parking lot, improved site landscaping, removal of two wooden storage sheds, and re- fencing of a children's playground located at the southwest corner of the project building. The project locus consists of 89,826 square feet of land with 870.82 feet of frontage along Winter Street. The Board requested that the Applicant configure a seventeen (17) space parking lot with four (4) of the spaces to be land banked. The two driveway entrances were modified to 2007 Annual Report provide curb cut radii to allow egress for the Fire Department's largest vehicle. 280 Old Connecticut Path The proposal is to renovate and expand the existing YMCA facility, and make other improvements to the property. Specifically, the Project includes the following: One -story additions are proposed to the south and west of the building and an additional one -story addition is proposed to the middle of the building on the east side, adjacent to the existing indoor pool area. The proposed additions comprise approximately 9,969 square feet of new building. Revisions to the Site Plans submitted during the hearings increased the new addition to approximately 11,064 square feet. Additionally, the Applicant proposed to add a 40 space expansion to the parking lot, to the east of the existing building along Concord Street. This number was reduced to 39 new parking spaces. Significant improvements will be made to site drainage and landscaping will be enhanced. Architectural elements of the building will be upgraded in a manner consistent with the existing building architecture and to modernize the building consistent with the retail landscape along Old Connecticut Path immediately adjacent to the Project Site. At the Board's request, the Applicant replaced lighting along Concord Street to reduce lighting impacts on nearby residences. The proposed expansion is intended to improve internal program functions for YMCA members. The Project expansion will also significantly improve handicap access to the building and to the educational and recreational programs offered to YMCA members. 31 -45 New York Ave The proposal is to construct a two -story expansion to the rear of 31 New York Avenue which is part of the Master Development Plan for Genzyme Corporation. The total gross floor area of the expansion is approximately 3,700 square feet. Planning and Community & Economic Development 171 Town of Framingham 78New YorkAvenue The proposal is to add a mezzanine consisting of approximately 6,500 square feet to the property known as 78 New York Avenue, which is part of the Master Development Plan for Genzyme Corporation. The Applicant explained that in October of 2000, it received Site Plan Approval and a Special Permit for Reduction in the Required Number of Parking Spaces to allow a 15,000 square feet mezzanine expansion and to install underground tanks. Subsequently, in 2006 the Applicant received Site Plan Approval to expand the parking facility from 263 to 324 parking spaces. The Applicant now seeks to construct 6,500 square feet. of mezzanine space in the building known as 78 New York Avenue. 1283 Old Worcester Road The Board received applications to extend its approvals for this project. The proposal is to modify the existing parking lot and driveways, including the closing of the driveway curb cut on Temple Street and construction of a new driveway curb cut on Old Worcester Road. The Board determined that the Applicant had shown good cause for the requested extension of approvals and extended the Decision until June 7, 2008 Interchange 12 The Board received applications to extend its approvals for this project. The proposal is for Boston Properties Limited Partnership to develop vacant land within Interchange 12 of the Turnpike layout for an office and hotel complex. The land proposed for the entire development consists of two separate parcels. The larger parcel known as the "Interchange Parcel" has an area of approximately 945,237 square feet or 21.7 acres and is abutted by the Turnpike and ramps, the toll plaza and Worcester Road. The plans provide for the construction of two, five (5) story office /research and development buildings on this parcel. The total gross floor area of these buildings will be approximately 302,000 2007 Annual Report square feet. The floor area ratio is approximately 0.32 and open space will constitute approximately 439,852 square feet. 1,203 off - street parking spaces are shown on the plans. The smaller parcel, know as the "Loop Ramp Parcel ", has an area of approximately 250,185 square feet or 5.74 acres and is surrounded by the Turnpike and ramps. The plans provide for the construction of a six (6) story hotel containing 150 rooms and a gross floor area of approximately 80,000 square feet. The floor area ratio is 0.32 and open space will constitute approximately 143,935 square feet. 175 off - street parking spaces will be provided. Access to the hotel and office buildings will be provided by construction of a new access road from Route 9 opposite California Avenue. This road will be constructed through the Park and Ride lot owned by the Massachusetts Turnpike Authority and will bridge the ramps and turnpike for access into the parcels. An emergency access to the office buildings will also be provided directly from Route 9. The Park and Ride lot will be reconfigured by the MTA and will have an entrance off the new access road. The Rugg Gates house, which is situated on the Park and Ride lot, has been relocated to the northwest from its existing location. The Applicant will modify the Route 9 California Avenue intersection to provide for dual westbound left -turn lanes and signal retiming. The Applicant is also proposing extensive mitigation to the Route 9 /Temple Street intersection and the Edgell Road /Main Street /High Street /Route 9 interchange as detailed in the Traffic Impact Report and Memoranda submitted by VHB and as set forth in the conditions of Approval in this Decision. The Board determined that the Applicant had shown good cause for the requested extension of approvals and extended the Decision until June 7, 2008 225 Crossing Boulevard The proposal is to develop a snow storage area for the existing Staples Headquarters Facility located at 225 Crossing Boulevard. Planning and Community & Economic Development 172 Town of Framingham With severe winter conditions there is not sufficient area on the Staples Drive Headquarters' Property for the storage of snow from the parking lot. During the last winter, the Conservation Commission observed snow storage areas in proximity to wetland areas and requested that Staples file a Notice of Intent for the storage of snow from the existing parking lot. In October of 2006, a Notice of Intent for snow storage area of approximately four (4) acres was filed with the Conservation Commission. During the review process with the Conservation Commission, the area of the snow storage was reduced. The plan was also modified to provide for only one (1) access road to the snow storage area and drainage improvements were made to the plan so that there is no drainage flow to the adjacent undeveloped property on which exist a wetland area. On December 7, 2006, the Conservation Commission issued the Order of Conditions for the Land Clearing Project. In response to the Board's request, the Applicant further reduced the area of clearance. The Applicant also proposed to create a park area for seasonal use and make a monetary payment to the Town. The purpose of the monetary payment is for the purchasing of trees that can be planted elsewhere in the Town to offset the significant loss of trees at 225 Crossing Boulevard. 518 Pleasant Street The proposal is to construct a new group retirement home containing eighteen (18) bedrooms and to construct seven (7) additional parking spaces on the premises located at 518 Pleasant Street. 234 Union Avenue The proposal is the conversion of the former Friendly Ice Cream Restaurant to use as a place of worship, a mosque. the Board decided to maximize the parking onsite, and ask the Applicant to provide additional sources of off - street parking to cover the overflow. The Applicant responded by locating an additional twelve (12) spaces from 2007 Annual Report neighboring businesses which would be available for weekly services, and also suggested a carpooling arrangement to and from Municipal Parking facilities, some 400 yards away. 1 Clark's Hill The proposal is to amend the Planning Board Decision for Site Plan Review Approval on the Application of Howard Fafard dated April 11, 1990. The Applicant proposes to modify the lot area shown on the approved site plan. The revised lot area is to include Parcel 67 as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Framingham, Massachusetts, Prepared for: Parsons Commercial Group, Date: August 23, 2006" which plan was endorsed by the Planning Board, and also Lots 2 and 59. Said lots have a combined area of 569,807 square feet or 13.08 acres. The Applicant is considering residential development of Parcel 68 747 Water Street The proposal is to construct an addition containing ten (10) assisted living units, expanded dining room and common areas and to construct six (6) additional parking spaces on the premises located at 747 Water Street. The premises contain a lot area of 291,989 square feet or 6.7 acres and contain an assisted living community. The existing, three -story building contains eighty -eight (88) assisted living units and various common facilities and amenities and has a gross floor area of approximately 65,615 square feet. The existing parking lot contains thirty -five (35) spaces and has a single curb cut onto Water Street. 36 -40 Pearl Street The proposal is for light assembly, research, development and testing and continued retail use for Forte's Parts Connection. 76 Salem End Road The proposal is to use the premises for charitable and religious use. No changes to Planning and Community & Economic Development 173 Town of Framingham the building or parking field were proposed by the Applicant. Plimpton Field The proposal is to remove a portion of an existing stone wall on a designated Scenic Way for the purpose of constructing a new sixteen (16) foot wide driveway to provide agricultural access to the field. 266 -300 Waverly Street The proposal is to use the existing drive -thru at 266 -300 Waverly Street Framingham, which is a retail property of approximately three (3) acres with a 32,861 square foot building occupied by a Harley Davidson retail store and a 1,546 square foot free - standing building now operated as a retail pharmacy. The Special Permit for drive -thru use is in connection with the operation of the pharmacy at the Property. Zoning The following Zoning Amendments were adopted at Town Meeting and approved by the Attorney General during the 2007 calendar year. These Amendments were all adopted at the April 24, 2007 Annual Town Meeting: gV.111 "Land Disturbance" Delete the existing �IV.H.2. "Earth Removal ", �IV.H.3. "Erosion Control ", and �IV.H.4. "Land Clearing" and replace with �IV.H.2. "Land Disturbance ". §IV.I.4.b. and §IV.I.S. Site Plan Review submission requirements Amend �IV.I.4.b. by striking the words "ten (10) copies of and adding the words "and as specified on the application" at the end of the sentence. Amend �IV.L5., second paragraph, by including the words "or 2.d," after the words "or 2.c ". §IV.I.7. Site Plan Review Expiration Amend �IV.I.7. by adding a new subsection d., as follows: "d. Expiration if a site plan review approval granted under this section 2007 Annual Report shall lapse within two (2) years, not including such time required to pursue or await the determination of an appeal as referred to in MGL, Chapter 40A �17, from the grant thereof, if a substantial use thereof has not sooner commenced except for good cause, or in the case of a permit for construction, if construction was not begun by such date except for good cause. §I.E.L "Municipal Services" Amend �LE.L by adding the following definition: Municipal Services: Public services and infrastructure furnished by the Town, including but not limited to, police, fire, schools, public works, inspectional services, finance, water systems, sanitary sewerage systems, storm drainage systems, communication services, and fire alarm systems." §IV.E.5. Expiration ofSpecial Permit Amend �IV.E. to insert a new subsection, as follows: "Expiration of Special Permit Pursuant to MGL, Chapter 40A �9, a special permit granted under this section shall lapse within two (2) years, not including such time required to pursue or await the determination of an appeal as referred to in MGL, Chapter 40A �17, from the grant thereof, if a substantial use thereof has not sooner commenced except for good cause, or in the case of a permit for construction, if construction was not begun by such date except for good cause." §IV.L5.10., Site Plan Review Contents and Scope of Application, §I.E. Definitions and §IV.B.3.f. Lighting in Off - Street Parking Design Standards Amend �IV.I.5.10. by deleting the existing text and replacing with the approved text. Amend I.E. by adding new terms for "glare ", "light trespass" and "luminaire ". Amend �IV.B.3.f. by deleting the existing text and replacing with the approved text. §I. b. "Purpose" Planning and Community & Economic Development 174 Town of Framingham Amend �I.b. by adding the following as a third paragraph: Any new Housing Plan /Policy or change to an existing Plan /Policy, shall be submitted to the Town Meeting for approval by a two- thirds vote of Town Meeting." Sign Bylaw In 2007 Town Meeting and the State Attorney General approved a new Sign By -Law for the Town of Framingham. Incorporated into the Zoning By -Law as an appendix, it will have a significant impact on the Planning Board's review process going forward. In addition to considering signs during the Site Plan Review process and its continuing jurisdiction over sign changes at the Shopper's World on Route 9, any sign proposal or change to an existing sign that varies from the Sign By -Law will be subject to Planning Board approval. Master Plan In relation to preparation of a Master Plan, M.G.L, Chapter 41 �81D states, "A planning board established in a city or town or such part or parts thereof as said board may deem advisable and from time to time may extend or perfect such plan ". In 2007, the Planning Board began the development of Framingham's first comprehensive Master Plan since 1988. A public forum was held in April at the Callahan Senior Center, at which residents worked in focus groups to identify the Town's most pressing issues. Using the comments received, a Vision Statement was created that presents the residents' vision of the Town into the future. For the remainder of the calendar year, the Master Plan consultant, the Planning Board and its staff and various Town departments and boards worked jointly on the first phase of the Master Plan, the Existing Conditions Report. This is a stand -alone document that summarizes the present state of Framingham in all facets such as land use, transportation, housing, open space and recreation and economic development, among others. It also serves as a transition to discussion of future 2007 Annual Report goals and policies for each facet. Drafts of the sections were distributed to the appropriate Town departments, boards and committee for feedback and several "cluster" meetings were held that were attended by the consultants. The Board completed the housing portion of the report. It was decided that, that it would be more appropriate to develop master plans of components in need of addressing that are considered a priority for the Town. In 2008 the Board will complete the economic development and land use portions of the Existing Conditions Report for the purpose of completing an Economic Development Master Plan and a Land Use Master Plan for the Town. It is possible that a Transportation Master Plan may also be completed as funding becomes available. In 2007 Town Meeting adopted a Housing Plan and a new Open Space and Recreation Plan is currently being developed. Administration The Planning Board has continued to work with the Town Treasurer's Office to require prospective developers to obtain certification from the Town's Treasurer /Tax Collector that no local taxes, fees, assessments or other municipal charges are outstanding prior to submission of an application. As a result of this process, many applicants have been obligated to bring unsettled accounts up to date before the Board would consider their development proposals. Since first employed in May of 1993, this noteworthy process has been a source of substantial uncollected taxes for the Town. By the end of calendar year 2007, $1,899,460.34 had been collected to date. The Planning Board continued improving the webpage this year to increase availability of information to the public. The Zoning By- Law was updated in both its paper copy as well as online, and now contains amendments through Annual Town Meeting 2007. Weekly agendas and approved minutes can be Planning and Community & Economic Development 175 Town of Framingham accessed directly from the Planning Board website. The "Projects" page has changed substantially, with a list of development projects included. Submissions for larger projects review such as Danforth Green PUD are available on the Board's website. A Master Plan webpage is also available, which provides citizens the ability to keep updated on the status of the Plan, find out where and when public participation sessions will occur and be able to provide comments or questions from this page. In calendar year 2007, the Planning Board reviewed 73 different development applications. In the course of the year, the Board collected a total of $23,446.19 n associated project review fees and sale of Zoning By -Laws, Zoning Maps, Subdivision Rules and Regulations, and minor miscellaneous revenues and $410,425.11 in mitigation payments. In addition to these contributions to the General Fund, the Planning Board obtains 2007 Annual Report significant Town -wide amenities through the process of negotiated mitigation. In the course of its review the Planning Board requires applicants to provide improvements such as roadway widening and reconstruction, signalization, enhancements for public transportation and landscaping to offset adverse project impacts. Upcoming Year Calendar year 2008 promises to be another challenging year for the Planning Board. The single largest project that is anticipated for the Board's agenda is the ongoing review of the Danforth Green PUD. The Board anticipates completing their review of this project. The Planning Board will also continue to implement changes in the Zoning By -Law and to the Zoning Map to achieve the Policies of the existing Master Plan. Respectfully Submitted, Ann V. Welles, Chairperson Metrowest Growth Management Committee 160 Waverlij Street Franiinghani, NIA 01702 508 - 620 -6677 508 - 620 -6676 (fax) diacobs@nzapc.org Formed in 1985, MetroWest Growth Management Committee ( MWGMC) includes leaders from Ashland, Framingham, Holliston, Marlborough, Natick, Southborough, Wayland, Weston and Wellesley. The organization helps local elected officials and planning staff meet growth management challenges by facilitating inter -local collaborative planning and problem solving to enhance the quality of life and economic competitiveness of the MetroWest region. In addition, MWGMC is the oldest of the eight subregions of the regional planning agency, Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC). One selectman and one planning board member represent each member community. Natick's representatives to the Committee are Selectman John Stasik and Planning Board Member Carole Spack. MWGMC is funded by member assessments, grants and contracts. MWGMC maintains an office in Natick and employs a staff of two to deliver core services to member communities. Technical Assistance - In FY07, the Technical Assistance to our member communities continued to expand. Stormwater - MWGMC developed Stormwater regulations to implement the Stormwater Bylaw developed last year. The Planning and Community & Economic Development 176 Town of Framingham regulations are available at ( www. m etrowe s tgrowth. o rg . Housing - MWGMC is working with the Town of Weston to ensure that the Town government structure is effectively and efficiently structured to accomplish affordable and moderate housing goals. MWGMC provided significant technical assistance under contract to the Town of Ashland by developing a Housing Plan, Inclusionary Bylaw, and Planned Production Strategy. The Ashland Housing Plan is available on our website ( www.metrowestarowth.org ). In addition, MWGMC assisted with the development of rules and regulations for Holliston's Inclusionary Housing bylaw. Regional Pre - Disaster Mitigation - MAPC and MetroWest staff continue to work with communities to identify areas within each community that are at risk of damage from natural hazards, evaluate existing protection measures, and develop a multiple- hazard mitigations strategy to reduce future damages. MWGMC is providing an in -kind match rather than asking each community to provide the $3,000 local match. The local plans will be drafted in early 2008; the regional plan will be completed by mid -2008, and will make each community eligible to receive federal disaster Mitigation. Legislative Breakfasts - We continued our practice of holding two legislative breakfasts in FY07. Our legislative breakfasts provide an opportunity for municipal leaders and legislators to discuss issues of local, regional, and state importance that may have an impact on MetroWest. Each municipal leader is invited to explore strategies to accomplish mutual shared goals. Legislators are invited to speak about issues on which they'd like local feedback or assistance. Planners Roundtable - Our Planners' Roundtables for local planners and planning board members provide staff and officials with technical information and training on planning and growth issues. It also provides 2007 Annual Report planners with the opportunity to share expertise, experience, and questions with their colleagues. Regional Impact Review (RIR) - One of the core services MetroWest Growth Management provides to its members is the Regional Impact Review (RIR). Regional Impact Reviews provide local leaders an opportunity to comment on the impacts of proposed commercial, industrial, and residential development projects, and provides administrative services to citizen advisory boards. This allows for regional development impacts to be considered early in the development project. NYANZA - MWGMC voted to establish a Nyanza Task Force to develop strategies to further study and mitigate the plume that has affected the Sudbury River. MWGMC is hoping to obtain a grant so that a consultant can be hired to: 1) Hire a scientist to conduct a public health risk assessment on the plume flowing downstream in the Sudbury River from Nyanza. Use the completed Public Health Risk Assessment to develop strategies to protected residents of MetroWest towns, and submit it to the EPA for inclusion in their proposed cleanup plan to be released in winter 2008. 2) Conduct multi -media and multilingual Public Awareness Campaign about the Nyanza Superfund Site, the cleanup of the site and the environmental and public health issues. 3) Communicate with medical community about public health risks associated with consumption of contaminated fish. "Main Street MetroWest" - MWGMC and MAPC will begin a study of the Route 9 corridor from I -95 to the Worcester city line, "Main Street MetroWest" in early 2008. All of the major roads feeding into Route 9 will be included in the study. In addition, MAPC Planning and Community & Economic Development 177 Town of Framingham and MetroWest, together with the Central Mass Planning Commission are developing a scope of work to study the interchanges of I- 495 /Route 9,1-90/1-495, and I -495/I -290. MetroWest Matters - MWGMC held a very successful event, MetroWest Matters, at The MathWorks in Natick. The event was co- sponsored by The MathWorks, the MetroWest Daily News, MAPC, Leadership MetroWest, the MA Smart Growth Alliance, the Marlborough Transportation Committee, and the entire MetroWest legislative delegation. The event focused on the fact that MetroWest is a dense, diverse, congested, and highly successful hub of economic activity. This economic activity generates jobs, demands for housing, pressure to develop open space and lots of traffic. In 2001, the state reported that there were 19,000 acres of developable land in the MWGMC subregion. If developed, that would add 239 miles of new roads, 50,000 more people, almost 50 million additional square feet of commercial /industrial building space, and 19,000 more units of housing. Roughly translated, that would be 320,000 additional vehicle trips. At the event, we heard about how we've grown, how we could grow, the issues associated with our growing pains, and most importantly, some opportunities to help us in the future. The next event is scheduled for June 6` at 7:45 AM at Framingham State College. MWGMC Transportation Task Force - The Transportation Task Force (TTF) focuses on analyzing and advocating for MWGMC communities on transportation matters. 2007 Annual Report Chaired by John Stasik, the TTF advocates for improved transportation services to the region, and strategies to influence transport- ation planning and decision - making by the Boston Metropolitan Planning Organization. This past year the TTF focused much of its time and effort on the MetroWest RTA, and hopes to present a draft strategic plan for consideration by the MWRTA Board in early 2008. RTA Efforts - The newly formed MetroWest Regional Transit Authority (MWRTA) was a major success of FY07. The MWRTA hired Ed Carr of Natick, former Director of Transit for the MA Exec. Office of Transportation as its Administrator. For the first five months, the MWRTA shared space with MWGMC at our office in Natick. The MWRTA is now located at 160 Waverly Street, Framingham, but MWGMC continues to work very closely with Ed Carr to develop a comprehensive public transportation system for MetroWest. Economic Development - MWGMC and the Mass. Office of Business Development (MOBD) hosted a special training workshop for area planning boards and other permit granting authorities on Chapter 43D, Expedited Permitting. Because 43D applies to all permit granting, from project submission to building permit, we hope to follow this workshop with another workshop tailored for municipal staff involved in issuing permits such as building commissioners, public safety inspection personnel, DPW for water & sewer connection permits, etc. Respectfully Submitted, Donna Jacobs, Director Metropolitan Area Planning Council 60 Temple Place Boston, MA 02111 Created in 1963, the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) promotes inter- 617 - 451 -2770 617 - 482 -7185 (fax) mdraisen@mapc.org institutions, and community -based organizations in the 101 cities and towns of Planning and Community & Economic Development 178 Town of Framingham Metropolitan Boston. MAPC strives to provide leadership on emerging issues of regional significance by conducting research, building coalitions, and acting as a regional forum for action. MAPC provides technical assistance and specialized services in land use planning, water resources management, transportation, housing, environmental protection, economic development, public safety, geographic information systems (GIS), collective purchasing, data analysis and research, legislative and regulatory policy, and the facilitation and support of inter -local partnerships. More information is available at www.mal2L.org MAPC is governed by 101 municipal government appointees, 21 gubernatorial appointees, and 13 appointees of state and City of Boston agencies. An Executive Committee comprising 25 elected members oversees agency operations. The agency employs approximately 40 professional staff under the leadership of an executive director. Funding for MAPC activities is derived from governmental contracts and foundation grants, and a per- capita assessment on member municipalities. To better serve the people who live and work in Metro Boston, MAPC has divided the region into eight subregions. Each subregion is overseen by a council of local leaders and stakeholders, and a staff coordinator provides organizational and technical staff support. Advancing Smart Growth MAPC's Metro Future: Making a Greater Boston Region initiative is planning for Metro Boston's growth and development through 2030. In 2007, the project involved nearly 1,000 people (on top of the 4,000 who participated in previous years). MAPC presented the MetroFuture plan at a May 1 Boston College Citizen Seminar, where participants overwhelmingly voted to ratify it and work for its implementation. MAPC is 2007 Annual Report now developing an implementation strategy, addressing public policy, public funding priorities, and changes in practice within the private sector. By mid -2008, Metro Future will transition from a planning initiative to an advocacy program, uniting the efforts of MAPC, partner organizations, and the thousands of "plan- builders" in an effort to alter regional priorities and growth patterns consistent with the new plan. As a member of the Massachusetts Smart Growth Alliance, MAPC helped form the Transportation Investment Coalition. This group of business, environmental, public interest, and planning organizations is pressing for savings, efficiencies, and new revenues to address the state transportation finance deficit. The Alliance joined with others to advocate successfully for an increase in the Commonwealth's Bond Cap, increasing the resources available to address the state's capital needs. Through the Alliance, MAPC is also working to reform the state's arcane zoning laws through a new and diverse commission, chaired by Undersecretary for Economic Development Gregory Bialecki. MAPC provides planning assistance and expertise to communities on a wide range of issues, helping them envision the future and evaluate alternatives within a smart - growth framework. Residents of Malden are taking a long -range look at their city through the Malden Vision Project, which kicked off last year with a city -wide visioning workshop attended by 250 participants. MAPC helped the town of Arlington deal with housing and economic development issues with a visioning workshop and resident survey, and helped develop new bylaws and other strategies. MAPC also assisted Walpole and Norfolk in developing and analyzing alternative growth scenarios along a shared stretch of Route 1A. Working with the 495 /MetroWest Corridor Partnership, MAPC produced a WaterSmart Indicators report that details trends in water supply, wastewater, and stormwater for each Planning and Community & Economic Development 179 Town of Framingham city and town in the study area. MAPC also completed water resource strategies for three towns in the Assabet Watershed to evaluate the environmental impacts of alternative growth patterns, relying in part on hydrologic modeling conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey. Collaboration for Excellence in Local Government Through its Metro Mayors Coalition, MAPC helped 21 communities secure over $2 million in Shannon Grant funding over the past two years to implement multi - jurisdictional, multi- disciplinary strategies to combat youth violence, gang violence, and substance abuse. In 2007, Gov. Deval Patrick and more than 240 mayors, police chiefs, safety officials and violence prevention workers participated in the coalition's third annual Community Safety Summit to advance strategies to curb youth violence. Through its newly created North Shore Coalition, MAPC is facilitating discussions to develop a regional, comprehensive mutual aid system. Cities and towns now have the option of joining the Massachusetts Group Insurance Commission (GIC) with a new law drafted by MAPC and the Municipal Health Insurance Working Group. This option will help communities save millions of dollars each year by taking advantage of lower insurance rates available through the GIC. MAPC facilitated the Working Group and helped to build consensus for the proposal. We are now providing technical support to cities, towns, and regional entities who are interested in joining the GIC. MAPC has convened Boston, Chelsea, Everett, Malden, Medford and Somerville to develop a shared strategy for the Mystic River corridor. The river, which runs through dense urban communities, has long been an underutilized asset. The communities will develop a comprehensive picture of activities along the river and will seek to build a shared 2007 Annual Report strategy for future development and use of the waterway. MAPC collaborated with the Commonwealth's 12 other regional planning agencies, municipal officials and other local leaders to help produce "A Best Practices Model for Streamlined Local Permitting." The result of dozens of focus groups and a statewide permitting survey, the document provides an array of recommendations that municipalities can consider to create a more clear, efficient and predictable permitting process without compromising local standards of development review. The guide is available at www.mass.gov /mpro Collaboration for Public Safety MAPC performs fiduciary, planning, and project management duties for the Northeast Homeland Security Regional Advisory Council (NERAC), a network of 85 cities and towns north and west of Boston. In 2007, MAPC helped to develop the School Threat Assessment Response System (STARS), an emergency planning toolkit for each school district in the region. With the assistance of MAPC, NERAC provided portable radios programmed for the Boston Area Police Emergency Radio Network, enabling real -time radio communications among police, fire, and other first responders during major emergencies. In the past year, NERAC established an online information clearinghouse for police and fire departments, and began planning for emergency evacuations from a regional perspective. MAPC also helped NERAC to set up three regional crime mapping centers that use GIS to visualize crime data through maps. MAPC completed Pre - Disaster Mitigation (PDM) plans for nine communities in 2007, on top of the 20 completed in recent years. Each plan includes an inventory of critical facilities and infrastructure, a vulnerability analysis, and a mitigation strategy with recommended actions. MAPC will continue working with 46 cities and towns in 2008. Planning and Community & Economic Development 180 Town of Framingham Collaboration for Municipal Savings MAPC's Regional Purchasing Consortia administered six procurements for 42 cities and towns, saving communities up to 20% on purchases such as office supplies, paving services, and road maintenance. Similar savings were realized by the 300 agencies that participate in the Greater Boston Police Council (GBPC), which is administered by MAPC. In fiscal year 2007, MAPC conducted seven procurements for various types of vehicles, including police cruisers and heavy - duty trucks. Overall, 187 municipalities purchased 329 vehicles at an estimated cost of over $20 million. Reliable Data, Available to All Since its official launch in February, MAPC's MetroBoston Data Common online data and mapping tool has been used by dozens of constituents to create customized maps for developing grant applications, analyzing development proposals, or improving services. You can create maps, charts, and graphs on the Data Common by accessing www.metrobostondatacommon.or . In addition to supporting this online tool, the Metro Data Center at MAPC responds to data requests from member communities, non- profit organizations, businesses, residents, students and other state agencies. In the past year, MAPC used visualization tools that combine GIS technology, photography and graphic design to help increase community awareness about proposed zoning bylaws in Bellingham and Dedham, and to illustrate what different parts of the region would look like under MetroFuture. Charting a Course to Regional Prosperity MAPC developed its annual Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS) for the region, in partnership with the US Economic Development Administration. The report contains an analysis of trends and conditions in the regional economy, 2007 Annual Report highlighting challenges and opportunities. The economic analysis in the CEDS is targeted to front -line economic development staff working in the public and community -based sectors. Working for 12 contiguous urban communities in the Metro Mayors Coalition, MAPC is developing an inventory of potential development sites near municipal boundaries to support coordinated planning. MAPC also developed the Smart Workplace Project, a GIS map of smart - growth friendly sites for commercial and industrial development throughout the region. In collaboration with the University of Massachusetts Boston, MAPC is taking a regional look at the space needs of the life sciences industry. Working with the Immigrant Learning Center and the Commonwealth Corporation, MAPC convened academic, institutional and non- profit researchers to develop an immigration research agenda. Getting Around the Region MAPC produced a Regional Bicycle Plan, assessing current conditions and identifying the improvements necessary to create a more comprehensive regional bicycle transportation system. The plan establishes updated goals based on previous plans, and identifies key strategies and priority projects. Under its new Regional Bike Parking Program, MAPC negotiated discount group purchasing contracts with three leading vendors of bicycle parking equipment. This allows MAPC municipalities and other public entities to purchase discounted equipment and, in some cases, to receive state or federal reimbursement for the cost. Communities around the region have used the program to put new racks at schools, libraries, parks, and shopping areas. The program will continue in 2008. In 2007 MAPC also began work on the Regional Pedestrian Plan. This plan will Planning and Community & Economic Development 181 Town of Framingham identify policies to make walking a convenient, safe, and practical form of transportation throughout the region. Proposed solutions will include best practices for local jurisdictions as well as steps that could be taken by the state or by the Metropolitan Planning Organization. MAPC has developed a web -based Parking Toolkit that addresses common parking issues. Cities and towns can learn how to do a parking study, how to reduce parking demand and manage supply, how to make use of existing parking, and how to finance parking improvements. The Parking Toolkit is the first in a series of Sustainable Transportation Toolkit products that MAPC will develop over the coming years. Visit http: / /tmnstoolkit.mapc.org to access these tools. Large portions of Massachusetts Avenue and Route 2A from Arlington to Concord are now a Massachusetts Scenic Byway, due to the efforts of MAPC, the Minuteman National Historic Park, and the towns of Arlington, Lexington, Lincoln, and Concord. MAPC is now preparing a Scenic Byway Corridor Management Plan, the first step in protecting the historic, scenic, and cultural qualities of the byway. In 2007, MAPC worked with developers and communities to evaluate the transportation impacts of dozens of projects, including the South Weymouth Naval Air Station redevelopment (SouthField), Westwood Station, and Harvard University's new Allston campus. On Beacon Hill 0 Municipal Health Insurance: MAPC and the Municipal Health Insurance Working Group built consensus and drafted the new law allowing cities and towns to save millions of dollars each year by joining the Group Insurance Commission. 0 Shannon Community Safety Initiative: 2007 Annual Report Over the last two years, MAPC's advocacy and grant development services have helped nearly two dozen communities to secure over $2 million in funding for interdisciplinary programs that focus on youth violence, drugs, and enforcement against gangs. 0 Statewide Population Estimates Program: A $600,000 line item in the 2008 budget will provide the State Estimates Program with more resources to prepare for the 2010 Census. This program will help correct the deficiencies of recent population estimates and to prevent similar deficiencies from occurring in 2010. 0 Surplus Land.• MAPC continues to advocate for passage of a new policy on the disposition of surplus state land. Specifically, we continue to build support for our proposal that encourages smart growth development on surplus land while giving municipalities a meaningful role throughout the disposition process. 0 Community Preservation Act.• In 2007, the Metropolitan Mayors Coalition and Community Preservation Coalition reached consensus around legislation to help more communities participate in the Community Preservation Act (CPA). The legislation, filed by Senator Cynthia Creem (D- Newton), would also secure adequate funding over the long term for the state's CPA matching fund. � Zoning Reform: The new zoning reform commission, initiated by the Massachusetts Smart Growth Alliance and chaired by Undersecretary for Economic Development Greg Bialecki, is now working to draft legislation dealing with such matters as "approval not required," grandfathering, consistency between master plans and zoning, and incentives to expand housing production. Respectfully Submitted, Marc D. Draisen, Executive Director Planning and Community & Economic Development 182 Town of Framingham (7 2007 Annual Report MetroWest Re8ional Transit Authority 160 Waverlij Street Franiin8hani,NIA 01702 Forward Funding of the MBTA precipitated a new category of cities and towns called "other served communities" into the assessment formula of the authority. There are 110 municipalities that fall into this category. Before this expansion in the 2000 legislative change to Ch. 161A, there were 78 communities, including Framingham, that made up the MBTA district. These were divided into two parts: 14 "inner core" communities and 64 "outer core" communities. When the expansion took place the MBTA district became larger (175 communities) and was divided into three parts: 14 "inner core" communities, 51 "outer core" communities, and 110 "other served communities." The 14 "inner core" communities remained the same. The "outer core," which included Framingham, was changed from 64 to 51. The 110 "other served communities" include some of the original 78 MBTA district municipalities. They are: Duxbury, Pembroke, Hanover, Rockland, Norwell, Scituate, Marshfield, Millis, Sherborn, Ashland, Wayland, Sudbury, and North Reading. During the implementation process of the amendment to Chapter 161A, legalizing forward funding, and the changing and expanding the MBTA District, several municipalities opted to join a regional transit authority under the Chapter 161B statute. Both Secretary Kevin Sullivan and Secretary James Scanlan allowed some communities to join. On June 17, 2002, Secretary James H. Scanlan received a legal opinion and analysis of Ch161A and Ch161B from William F. Kennedy (Nutter, McClennen & Fish) regarding the impact of communities seeking 508 - 955 -2222 508 - 955 -2225 (fa.) to join regional transit authorities on the other communities in the MBTA District. On June 20, 2002, Secretary Scanlan sent letters to appropriate officials of Franklin, Upton, Northbridge, and Wrentham informing them that based on further review of the statutes (161A, 161B); those municipalities were not eligible to become members of an RTA. However, included in the decision by Secretary Scanlan, was a suggestion to the affected communities that they were eligible to contract for paratransit service and receive a 50% offset in the cost of the contracted service from the MBTA. Several communities, through their elected officials, then expressed an interest in determining what the financial impacts of allowing cities and towns, which belong to the MBTA District and do not receive bus service, to join or form their own RTAs. Massachusetts Secretary of Transportation Grabauskas was asked to look at the "need and feasibility" of allowing a municipality belonging to the MBTA District (as defined in MGL Chapter 161A) to join or create an RTA (as defined in MGL Chapter 161B). The Secretary and his staff had numerous meetings with many constituencies from the cities and towns which fell into the category of belonging to the MBTA District, had no fixed route bus service, and were not members of an RTA. The fact that 57% of the population in MetroWest also works there, became the driving force behind a more comprehensive and inclusive public transportation system. The Secretary personally traveled to Councils on Aging throughout the subject area and made it a priority of his tenure as Secretary to Planning and Community & Economic Development 183 Town of Framingham address not only the needs of seniors today, but also the anticipated needs as the population ages and citizens are forced out of their vehicles and into dependence on public transportation. The need for a feeder system for the trains is obvious in the MetroWest area, given that 12% of the population commutes to Boston. The success of the commuter rail has exacerbated other commuter problems that are associated with increased ridership. Primarily, the problem has been parking or the lack of parking. For the cities and towns with a commuter rail station located in the downtown area, the demand for commuter parking has choked the supply of conveniently accessed parking for those doing daily business in downtowns. This has created not only hardship for business people but sometimes safety issues, when commuters park in restricted as well as neighborhood areas. Although these needs are the most obvious, youths in the area would benefit from an increase in public transportation for "other than school." Of importance for the Commonwealth and particularly for MetroWest, is the need to connect the systems. Most of the cities and towns requesting to join or create an RTA were doing so because the MBTA had not been able to provide the transportation needed to get citizens out of their cars and moving throughout these communities. The one exception is the provision of commuter rail, which connects with the Boston metropolitan area and its many mass transit options. But only 12% of the area's population is in need of commuting to /from Boston. By empowering the cities and towns to work within MGL Chapter 161B, creating transportation options specific to their needs, the inevitable connection to the MBTA system would result in increased ridership to the MBTA. 2007 Annual Report Secretary Cogliano, in an effort to work with the I/495 Arc of Innovation and the MetroWest Caucus assigned the EOT Programs Unit to provide information as well as technical assistance in order to facilitate the legislation needed to remedy the effects of the MBTA's forward funding and the inability of MetroWest communities to access the services that they sought. Finally, sections 70, 71, 72 of Chapter 123 of the Acts of 2006, the Economic Stimulus Bill, Sections, authored by Senator Karen Spilka, allowed a community without MBTA fixed route bus service to create or join an RTA. The Town of Framingham requested and received technical assistance from EOT as to the process for creating and developing an RTA. The Programs Unit retained Attorney Charles Stevenson to provide the communities with the technical assistance needed to move forward with this initiative. The MetroWest Growth Management Committee, a subdivision of MAPC, the MetroWest Chamber of Commerce, and the I/495 Arc of Innovation are spearheading a group, which is called the Regional Transit Authority Alliance who provide municipalities information regarding the law change. The Alliance has been and continues to make presentations at Selectman's meetings as to the many options available to member communities. On December 19, 2006, the Framingham Board of Selectmen voted to "create a regional transit authority." On January 21, 2007 the Town of Ashland voted to join Framingham in the creation of the MetroWest Regional Transit Authority (METROWEST RTA). On March 26, 2007 the town of Holliston joined. Natick became a member on April 23, 2007 and Wayland followed on May 8, 2007. The following week, Hopkinton joined. On June 26, 2007 the Town of Weston joined. As expected, Sudbury and Sherborn have become members. The City of Marlborough and the Town of Southborough have both expressed interest in joining, as Planning and Community & Economic Development 184 Town of Framingham they are both members of the Boston MPO for planning purposes, but currently belong to and receive services from the Worcester Regional Transit Authority. By July 1, 2008 they are both expected to be members. The short term mission of MetroWest RTA has been to take over an existing fixed route system called the Local Intra Framingham Transit (LIFT), as well as the Natick Neighborhood Bus System, amalgamate the two systems into a cohesive system which pulses at the newly located maintenance and operations facility on Waverley Street as well as at the Natick Mall area near the Natick /Framingham line. Then through a system of demand response and deviated fixed route bring in riders from the surrounding communities of MetroWest to access the system. These hubs would also 2007 Annual Report serve as a major transfer place for riders of the RIDE as well as other providers of ADA complementary paratransit within the area. The RIDE provides ADA complementary paratransit in the Natick /Framingham area and METROWEST has entered into a contract with the MBTA to continue this service THROUGH June 30, 2009. METROWEST will contract with other providers of ADA complementary paratransit service for fixed routes in (Milford) Hopkinton, Holliston, and Ashland. In addition to the RIDE service, MetroWest would provide 3 /4 mile ADA "corridor" service along the fixed routes, except in Natick and Framingham, allowing the passengers to make connections at the hubs. Respectfully Submitted, Ed Carr, Executive Director Planning and Community & Economic Development 185 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Parks, recreation & Cultural Affairs 475 Union Avenue Framingham, MA 01702 Park and Recreation Commission Joan Rastani served as chairman with other members Robert Brown, Barry Bograd, Dan Jones and Kevin Salvi. A reorganization in October named Barry Bograd as chairman. The Annual Town Meeting voted an annual operating budget of $1,957,750 for Parks Administration, Park Maintenance and Recreation which restored our service level to 2003. Thanks to the support from the Capital Budget Committee and Town Meeting, the fleet was upgraded with 2 new dump trucks and 1 new pickup truck. Capital improvements included the demolition of Winch Grandstands, the resurfacing of Longs Basketball Courts, and the Learneds Storm Drain Improvement that was overseen by the DPW and Engineering Departments. Other park improvements included the Arlington Street Playground, made possible through funding of a Community Development Block Grant. 508 - 552 -5960 508 - 872- 2591(fax) parks.recreation @ franiinghaninia.gov A third successful grant application to the Urban Self Help Program secured a $250,000 grant. This reimbursable grant will offset a significant portion of Tercentennial Park Phase III construction costs. A contract for Phase III was awarded to J.H. Lynch and Sons from Millbury MA. The project began in September 2007 and completion is scheduled for early spring 2008. The renovated Academy Building, located in the park, is now on line and will be marketed as a Conference Center next year. After much deliberation, the Commission voted to change the name of Tercentennial Park to Cushing Memorial Park. The Bowditch Master Plan was an ongoing project throughout the year. The Commission worked with the Division Director and the Bowditch Advisory Committee, a 17 member committee consisting of a broad spectrum of well respected community leaders, to evaluate the current Master Plan, and bring forward a revised plan for reconsideration during the next Annual Town Meeting. This past year the Commission revisited and adjusted all user fees to reflect the current economy. The Commission endorsed two dedications this year. A bench at Farm Pond was dedicated to Ray Swanecamp, a former Park Commissioner. In October a plaque was dedicated at Long's Athletic Field to Connie Sullivan, a co- founder of Pop Warner Football in Framingham Recreation & Cultural Affairs 186 Town of Framingham We would like to thank Town Meeting, the many Town boards, committees, and departments for supporting our services. We would also like to thank the hundreds of user organizations for their continued support. Respectfully Submitted, Barry Bograd, Chair Recreation Division 2007 was the beginning of the reorganization of the division. A new Recreation Supervisor started working in January restoring the administration staff to three. This allowed additional quality control and an increase in program offerings including smart soccer, smart basketball, hiking trips, snowshoeing, kayaking, taekwon -do, wrestling for grades K- 4, and the Princess Tea Party. In addition, we were able to assist with Green -Up Day, a Town wide beautification project and other special events. The division focused on pursuing the Youth at Risk Intitiatve. Members of the Gang Violence Roundtable partnered to apply for three grants to address Youth at Risk: The Byrne Grant, The Shannon Grant & a grant through the Metro West Community Health Care Foundation. The Recreation Department benefited from these initiatives 2007 Annual Report and hours of programming were increased significantly throughout the year. Another positive step will be to collaborate with the Boys and Girls Club. They have signed a lease for the Danforth Building and are currently doing Capital Improvements for occupancy in March 2008. After surveying surrounding Towns, it was decided to increase the price of daily beach passes from two to three dollars for residents and three to five for non - residents. Attendance was not impacted by this increase. The new storm drain system at Learneds was an improvement to the overall water quality. The new Academy Building located in Cushing Park (formerly Tercentennial) has been used for Park and Recreation related activities such as program registrations and program offerings such as CPR. It is the goal of the Department to market the building for corporate seminar use in the future. Once again, the Sudbury River Tennis Club donated monies to defer the cost of lessons for youths to participate in our Tennis Program. Due to their generosity, we continue to see a significant increase in numbers in this very popular program. Thanks to the Framingham Grants Panel of the MetroWest Community Health Care Foundation, the division was able to implement Kid Fit at the Suburban Athletic Club. The program designed for ages 7 -18 registered over 100 participants that benefited by lowering their Body Mass Index and changed attitudes towards living a positive healthy lifestyle. The Recreation Department, assisted by the Friends of Framingham Recreation, sponsored several special events throughout the year including the Fiesta Shows Festival, the Flag Day Celebration, the Sixth Anniversary 9/11 Ceremony, the Volunteer Recognition Party, Pumpkins in the Park, the Recreation & Cultural Affairs 187 Town of Framingham Ray Swanecamp Dedication and the Connie Sullivan Dedication. Many thanks to Town Meeting members, all town staff, and numerous volunteers for their continued support. Without your help we could not deliver programs of the same quality to the residents of Framingham. Respectfully Submitted, Trisha Powell, Superintendent Recreation Robert L. Merusi, Director Parks & Recreation Parks Maintenance We continue our efforts to provide well maintained and safe facilities for all our user groups. This is consistently a main focus of our Parks Maintenance Department. The quality and condition of our recreational sites is a major source of pride that this department strives to uphold. Through daily site visits, and periodic safety inspections, our staff is capable of maintaining a vast inventory of recreational sites. This includes both active and passive areas throughout the Town. Sports turf maintenance and improvement is an area that remains at the forefront of our departmental goals. A pro active approach to an aggressive turf maintenance program has enabled us to keep our high use turf areas in great condition. This program consists of some of the latest sports turf industry 2007 Annual Report practices related to aeration, fertilization, over - seeding, proper irrigation, and mowing. We are still inundated with demands for practice and game field facilities. The increased demand for field space has resulted in overuse and declining conditions at some of our facilities. Our field rotation strategy has had some success on a short term basis, but additional long term solutions are needed. Our maintenance department continues to provide support to the athletic programs of three high schools, Framingham High, Marian High and Keefe Vocational High School, as well as the Framingham Middle School athletic programs. Other schools that rely on our department for a portion of their athletic program needs are Framingham State College and Mass. Bay Community College. In addition to School Athletics, the Department provides scheduling and facilities for hundreds of other user groups from the Framingham Community. We have continued our collaborative effort with Keefe Technical School on some small projects. This past year, with assistance form Keefe, the department has accomplished electrical rehabilitation for the Winch Park basketball /irrigation, fixed electrical lighting problems at the Little League complex and performed metal fabrication and repair to Bowditch Baseball grandstands. Phase III of Tercentennial Park is currently in progress. The anticipated completion of this phase is spring 2008. A new entrance along Winter St. is one of the most visible components of this project. In addition, we have installed new walking corridors, tree plantings, removed the overhead electrical service, and significantly reduced impervious pavement. Through our Capital Budget program the Parks and Recreation Department has: Recreation & Cultural Affairs 188 Town of Framingham ■ Completed the renovation of the Longs Field Basketball Courts. This renovation included new asphalt, seal - coating, lining, perimeter fencing, and basketball standards and back boards. ■ Completed Phase I of the Winch Park Grandstands including complete demolition and removal of the failing concrete structure. Phase II of this project is slated for completion by the end of May 20087. Phase II will include the installation of a new permanent handicap accessible structure that will seat up to 100 people. ■ Completed significant work on the design of Phase I, part II, of the Beach Storm Water Improvement Project. This portion of the project will include drainage improvements to the beach parking lot and surrounding area. Completion of this project will bring Framingham closer to compliance with several local, state, and federal policies associated with storm water management. ■ Replaced three vehicles from our existing fleet. Through the CDBG grant program we were able to make some necessary improvements to the Arlington St. playground. These improvements included new play structures, safer ground cover material, and new basketball rims and backboards. The department provided all of the labor for installation of these components, in addition to refurbishing the benches at this location. We have started a much needed tree maintenance program throughout our park system. As trees on our sites age, maintenance and upkeep requirements increase dramatically. This program includes pruning and removal of dead wood in addition to removal of hazard trees that pose potential danger to park patrons. I would like to thank all the volunteers, and volunteer groups, that supplied us with help 2007 Annual Report on projects this past year. Their support was tremendous. We continue to give support and resources to other Town departments including the School Dept., Building Services, the Department of Public Works, and Conservation. We would like to thank all of the Town departments for the cooperation they have provided throughout the year. It would be very difficult for us to achieve the success we have without their help. Respectfully Submitted, Chris McGinty, Superintendent Parks Maintenance Robert L. Merusi, Director Parks & Recreation Council on A.6ina/Callahan Center The Raymond J. Callahan Center is a multi- purpose, multi- functional Senior Center located at 535 Union Avenue. The Callahan Center maintains paid staff, the Council on Aging, the Friends of Callahan and numerous volunteers. The advisory board (the Council on Aging) includes 11 appointed members who are responsible to the Framingham Recreation & Cultural Affairs 189 535 Union Avenue Framingham, MA 01702 508-n2-59801508-620-4890 (fax) council.on.aging @ framinghamma.gov Town of Framingham Board of Selectmen. The principal function of the Council is to act in the best interest of all older citizens. Council meetings are held on the second Tuesday of the month, eleven months a year, at the Callahan Center and are open to the public. Staffing Staffing at the Callahan Center includes under municipal funding: the Director of Elder Services, an Office Manager, a Customer Service Manager, a Supervisor of the Outreach /Social Service Department, and a Bi- Lingual Outreach Aide. Through various State and Federal Grants and private foundations, there are several part -time positions filled which include, but are not limited to, Office Aides, Computer Center Coordinator, a Specialized Population Coordinator and the Assistant Director of the Metrowest Regional SHINE Program. Funded through private grants are coordinators for the Bereavement, Caregivers, Chronic Illness Disease Management and Grandparent Support Groups, a SHINE Outreach Worker, and a Minor Home Repair Coordinator and Service Providers. Volunteer Staff Volunteers assist in providing tours, answering questions, assist with the Flu Clinic as well as collating, mailing and distributing the monthly Callahan Courier newsletter. Volunteers manage and work in the Friend's consignment shop (Heritage Gallery.) Volunteers provide ongoing instructions in bocce, bowling, computers, card activities, golf, table tennis, income tax assistance, and assist in other venues of activities. The Center receives from its volunteers a yearly in -kind value. Changes in Services and Programs We added four new support groups this year to include Autism, Caregivers, Chronic Illness Disease Management and Diabetes Support Groups. We added new programs to include Drawing and Painting Classes, Sign Language Classes, a Men's Latino Group and 2007 Annual Report Citizenship classes for the Asian and Latino Seniors. We added two new housing units through a partnership with Jewish Family Services to provide activities for those "aging in place ". Growth at New Center Younger retirees are seeking to be part of this Center and as a result more requests are made to us for additional daytime and evening programs. Framingham State College Lifelong Learners Programs continue to be requested by the senior community. We had 5,500 seniors utilize our check -in system this year, the Friends' Membership has increased to 1,850 and 1,750 seniors traveled on both day and overnight trips through the Callahan Center. Space Management With the completion of the second floor and the Jack & Shelley Blais Function Room expected in 2008, we will then be at full capacity. Operations Our role as an "aging agency" must be continually reviewed and updated. We address issues raised by ethnic diversity, an increasing population of 85 plus and those "aging in place ". We anticipate a developing "boomer population" and we know that we have a growing multi - lingual, multi - cultural population who want to be integrated into the programs and services of the Center. Once again, we invited those ninety and older to come and re- acquaint themselves with the Center. We utilized our local technical school (Keefe Technical High School) to partner with us on this special event. This wonderful event honors those who have contributed so much in building this community. The Center operates with a Town of Framingham budget of $273,282 with Federal, State, and private foundation grants to provide numerous programs and services. Recreation & Cultural Affairs 190 Town of Framingham Friends of Callahan /The Non - Profit Part of the Center The Friends of Callahan raise money to donate to the Center each year. They purchase much needed equipment for the Center and subsidize the Framingham State Lifelong Learners Programs. The Friends donate items to local shelters, nursing homes, child care centers and needy seniors as well as raise funds for Veterans serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. The Friend's rally their members to donate items for our local veteran's hospitals. They donate money to several local shelters, to assist residents with other personal necessities not provided by the state or federal government. Information There is no fee to join the Center but there are minimal charges for some day and evening programs. The Center is open Monday through Friday from 8:30 A.M to 4:30 PM. The Center welcomes all residents 59 plus to join in the many activities and services it offers. We are now finding out that some younger residents are interested in attending our programs. The staff provides information about all services and programs we provide. The Callahan Center's monthly newsletter (the Callahan Courier) the Metro West Newspaper's Sunday edition, the TAB (a weekly newspaper) the Framingham.com and the Town of Framingham web site announce programs, services and events. Transportation Busy Bee, is a contracted service paid by the Town that provides rides to medical appointments and shopping trips. Services of Busy Bee Transportation can be obtained by calling 508 - 881 -2120 between the hours of 9:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. To access rides to and from the Center, seniors can call the Center at 2007 Annual Report 508 - 532 -5980 for information - this service is limited. Community, State, and National Involvement Based at the Center is a state program called SHINE (Serving the Health Information Needs of Elders) which offers information regarding health coverage. The Center is also connected to numerous outside organizations and schools, the Framingham Garden Club, The MA Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Framingham Union Hospital, Keefe Technical High School, Framingham State College and local and state veteran's associations. In addition, we participate in special projects of the USO, the AIDS Baby Blankets, Preemie Hats, Hats & Mittens for school children, personal items for Foster Children, lap robes for Veterans and Pennies for the Homeless. Programs and Class Options Educational Programs, Fitness Programs, Computer Learning Programs, Recreational Activities, Travel and Cultural Classes. For more information, please call the Center and ask that a sample copy of the Callahan Courier be mailed to you. Services The Outreach /Social Service Department is an important component of the Center. It provides Advocacy to seniors and their families regarding many issues. The Outreach Recreation & Cultural Affairs 191 Town of Framingham Department operates a loan closet for free medical equipment for Framingham residents. Health Screening — Massage, podiatry, and blood pressure clinics are available weekly and monthly. Other health clinics are held annually in cooperation with Framingham Union Hospital and other health providers. The Wellness Clinic offers weekly blood pressure services as well as other specialized health clinics. Support Groups - Peer support groups meet weekly, bi- monthly or monthly. Clubs - The Center hosts the Friends of Callahan and AARP (American Association of Retired Persons). Intergenerational Programs are ongoing with the schools in Framingham. Friends of Callahan The Friends of Callahan, as described previously, is a non - profit organization. They raise funds and provide the Center with much needed items. They do most of their fundraising by sponsoring Heritage Gallery, a consignment shop, which they manage with the assistance of an all- volunteer staff. Center's Staff and Volunteers' Role in the Community The Callahan Staff and Volunteers know they play an essential role in this community. They serve one of the largest and fastest growing populations. We invite all residents to come and familiarize themselves with the services and programs of the Center. We believe that they will be very pleased to see the realization of their efforts to fund the Center. Respectfully Submitted, Mary Parcher, Director Elder Services Tom Pedulla, Chair Council on Aging 2007 Annual Report Fountain Street Framingham, NIA 01702 508 - 552 -5951 rcd01ranzin8hanznza.8ov This is the 45` year of operations for Loring Arena. In addition to our normal services, we are continuing to create a user - friendly atmosphere. The Loring Arena Committee members are appointed as an advisory board. The members appointed by the Board of Selectmen this past year were co- chairs Joe Tersom and David Friday, John Hart, Jack Jagher, Bob Brown, Richard Callahan, and Joan Rastani. This summer we installed new dasher boards and seamless glass system in the Arena. The new dasher boards replace the original boards installed in 1963. The new seamless tempered glass replaces the Plexiglas that was installed in the 70's. The demolition was done by the Arena staff in partnership with staffing from Park and Recreation. The installation was completed by Athletica, with the Arena staff overseeing the installation. The Arena was taken out of the enterprise fund, as voted by town meeting, in the spring. Recreation & Cultural Affairs 192 Loring Skating Arena Town of Framingham The arena is a department within the Park and Recreation Division and will be handled through the operating budget. The following figures are financial information relating to business conducted through the fiscal year ending June 30, 2007: Total net income as of June 30, 2007 416,792.25* Total Rink Operational Expenditures $438,803 ** *Less 42,428.75 of unpaid High School Rental Revenue as approved by Town Meeting * *Does not include health insurance and debt service Respectfully Submitted, Joe Tersom and David Friday Loring Arena Co- Chairs Robert Drake, Arena Director Robert L. Merusi, Director Parks & Recreation Cemetery Commission The Cemetery Commissioners met on June 6` 2007. This report is filed by the 2007 Annual Report Maintenance Superintendent on behalf of the Cemetery Commission. The current grounds maintenance contract for Edwards Cemetery, Main St. Cemetery, and Old South Cemetery, is with TruGreen LandCare. The Commission originally awarded TruGreen LandCare the contract in 2005 with an option to renew on an annual basis. TruGreen provided quality grounds maintenance service during the 2005 and 2006 contract period, and the Commission renewed the annual option for 2007. We contracted for the removal of two dead trees, and will be performing some much needed pruning in the earl spring. Grave stone repairs will continue to be made as needed. The Parks Maintenance staff continues to perform grave openings with occasional assistance from the DPW. In the past few years there has been a decline in burial activities. This decline is in part due to the moratorium placed on lot sales. There are limited lots remaining. Fee schedules for associated cemetery activities are up to date, and on par with surrounding communities. Over the past few years there has been a noticeable increase in requests for historical records associated with cemetery activities. The Department is currently reviewing the extent of historical information contained in Library records, in an attempt to provide more complete information to inquiries. The Department administrative staff has undertaken the project of transferring all manual cemetery records to electronic format. This will also aid in the retrieval of accurate and more complete information for inquiries. The Cemetery Commission consists of a three member board appointed by the Board of Selectmen. Recreation & Cultural Affairs 193 Town of Framingham Report submitted on behalf of the Cemetery Commission by: Christopher A. McGinty, Superintendent Parks & Recreation Ed6ell Grove Cemetery 55 Grove Street Framingham, MA 01701 The Trustees of Edgell Grove Cemetery submit, herewith, their annual report for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2007. In April 2007, the Board of Trustees reorganized, electing Stanton Fitts as Chairman, Barbara Ford as Vice Chairman, William F. Welch as Treasurer, and John Silva as Secretary. During the year 2007, Edgell Grove Cemetery had 105 interments, 15 family lots were sold, 12 single graves were sold, as well as 5 cremation graves. There were 6 entombments in the mausoleum along with 7 niche sales and 2 crypts. 2007 Annual Report Cemetery Commissioners Robert Brown - Chairman Barry Bograd Vacant 508 - 872 -5801 During 2007 a major re- roofing project was completed on the cemetery chapel which had been suffering some major leaks. Extensive painting and carpentry work was completed on the mausoleum. A major overhaul of the 100 - year -old cemetery watering system was completed, consisting of new water lines and uptake faucets throughout much of the cemetery. More work may be scheduled later as funds permit. Major tree work is scheduled for 2008 and an inventory of possible tree removals had already been completed. Respectfully Submitted, Stanton T. Fitts, Chair Recreation & Cultural Affairs 194 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Human Services Policy & Pro8ram Coordinator 150 Concord Street, Room 151 Framingham, NIA 01702 January 2008, marked my one year of service as the Human Service Policy and Program Coordinator for the Town of Framingham. During the past year, I have developed working relationships with town departments, residents, boards and committees, state legislators, local human service agencies, state agencies, local and statewide coalitions, task forces, and advocacy groups. As the Human Service Coordinator, my position includes being an advocate on behalf of Framingham in the state's human service delivery system. I represent the town regarding current and prospective human service programs in Framingham and serve as a liaison among the town, the state, and the human service agencies that are located in Framingham. I conduct research on issues related to human services, which include community needs and impacts, health initiatives, state and federal legislation and funding, best practice models, and program statistics. On a regular basis, I attend a number of meetings with coalitions, task forces comprised of human service providers, as well as local and state officials. These meetings include: Local Official Human Service Coordinators / MMA (LOHSC); Framingham Community Partnerships (FCP); Violence Prevention Round Table (VPRT); MetroWest Healthcare Coalition; MetroWest Mental Health and Substance Abuse Coalition (MHSA); and Stand Together Act Responsibly (STAR). In addition, I have been involved in other related activities, including ongoing 508 - 552 -5408 508 - 620 -5910 (fax) asilver@framinghamma.gov Framingham Host Community meetings, monthly meetings with Framingham State Representatives, and monthly meetings with human service leaders. During the spring 2007, I organized and chaired the planning committee, which held a Framingham Brazilian American Community Wide Dialogue on June 18, 2007. The planning committee was composed of representation from the U.S. Department of Justice, the Framingham Police Department, the Framingham Human Relations Commission, Framingham Adult ESL, Brazilian business leaders, the MetroWest Chamber of Commerce, and residents of the Framingham community. The Dialogue attracted a very large turnout from the Brazilian community, which identified a number of significant issues. In November, in response to the Dialogue, the Framingham Police Department initiated a four - session Law and Justice Seminar, which focused on the issues raised. In June 2007, I organized the first Framingham Host Community meeting. The objectives of the meeting were to discuss: state reimbursement to local municipalities for state contracted human services sited in their community; 0 development of communication between state and local government; 0 collaboration with human service agencies; siting, notification and the impact on neighborhoods; Human Services 195 Town of Framingham • oversight of high risk populations; and • aftercare planning During the month of September 2007, I attended, in addition to my regular work hours, a 36 -hour course "Basic Training in Mediation and Conflict Resolution ", provided by Framingham Court Mediation Services Inc. The course emphasized facilitative mediation as a desirable method of alternative dispute resolution for court and non -court related matters, as well as family issues and business /workplace disputes. I received a certificate for course completion and am now eligible for an apprenticeship in mediation. On October 18, 2007, I helped organize a Social Service Forum - Listen, Learn and Understand - for the Town of Framingham. The Forum was the result of a petition brought to the Selectmen by Town Meeting 2007 Annual Report members and provided the citizens and taxpayers of Framingham an opportunity to express their views and make recommendations concerning social service agencies in Framingham. Framingham Court Mediation Services Inc. facilitated the forum. I submitted a final report to the Town Manager. I have also conducted additional research, including such areas as: MetroWest Healthcare Foundation grants; Community Development Block Grant funding; 40B & Section 8 housing; the Dover Amendment, and payment in lieu of taxes. Respectfully Submitted, Alexis J. Silver, MSW, LICSW Human Service Policy and Program Coordinator Human Relations Commission 150 Concord Street Framingham, MA 01702 The purpose of the Commission is to deal with the causes of inter -group disunity which underlie the urban crisis, including, but not limited to, the elimination of conditions of bias discrimination and prejudice against minority groups, and to establish affirmative action programs to insure equal enforcement of law, and equal protection of law, for all groups regardless of race, color, religious creed, sex, age, handicap, national origin or ancestry. The members of the Commission are: Robert Anspach (Chair), Mahmood Akhtar (Vice Chair), Timothy Lee (Clerk), Jim Bauchmann, Arlene Bernstein, Laura Medrano, and John Schaefer. Our Advisors are William Robinson and Ralph Woodward. 508 - 552 -5540 In keeping with our goals set for this past year, the Commission did add two new members to our thirteen available positions, and we have another application awaiting approval from the Board of Selectmen. We will continue to encourage members of our community to seek positions on the Commission in the forthcoming year. Continuing the legacy of prior Commissioners, we worked toward self - development by involving ourselves with the Massachusetts Commission of Human Relations Commissions. Through this contact we are able to explore ways in which we can better serve our own community. Our Advisor, Bill Robinson, worked on the review of the Town's Affirmative Action Human Services 196 Town of Framingham Policy which was a Human Relations Commission initiative set forth many years ago. The revision was approved. The Commission participated in the educational forum conducted by the Massachusetts Immigration and Refugee Advocacy (MIRA) Coalition held at Summerville. At this forum elected and appointed Officials of the Town learned about immigration law, and the plight of the undocumented immigrant. The Commission held its second immigration forum with Marcia Drew Hohn, Director of Public Education at The Immigrant Learning Center, and Kirk Carter, immigration attorney of Fletcher, Tilton and Whipple, as keynote speakers. PowerPoint presentations were made covering the contributions of immigrants within the community, and the laws governing immigration. The Commission worked with Josephine Carabello from the Community Relations Service of the Department of Justice, along with the Framingham Police Department, and many other departments and individuals within our community, in the planning of a town wide Brazilian dialogue, which was tremendously successful. The Officers of the Commission, for a second time, attended and participated in the discussion on immigration, offered by the Human Rights Commission in Newton. These forums have provided our Commission with many useful contacts, as well as opportunities to explore concerns within our own community. The Commission attended the Social Service Dialogue which was developed by Alexis 2007 Annual Report Silver, the Town's Human Services Coordinator. During the year we also met with the Town Manager, Julian Suso, and the Human Services Coordinator, Alexis Silver, to discuss ways in which we could assist each other in developing a better understanding of the Town's specific needs in the area of human services. As a result of these dialogues, and in keeping with our mission, the Commission has set forth an agenda for this current year. We will begin by holding a forum on homelessness in our community. It is our hope that this will be a spring board for future forums on human services within the Town. The Commission also participated in the Law and Justice Seminar conducted by the Framingham Police Department. This four week program covered numerous topics directly related to our community and its concerns. (The summary may be found in the Framingham Police Department's Annual Report.) Another objective for the Commission is to work with the Town in finding a way to restore the position of an Administrator for the Commission. Our history will show that the availability of an Administrator helps to handle the daily encounters which are directly related to the Commissions mission, and are faced by members of our community. If anyone would like to find out more about the Commission, you are invited to attend its meeting held the second Thursday of each month, in the Memorial Building, or by contacting the Chair at bobanspach&aol.com Respectfully Submitted, Bob Anspach, Chair Human Services 197 Town of Framingham Framingham Housing Authoritig One John J. Brady Drive Framingham, MA 01702 Beyond Bricks & Mortar Although many who pass the Framingham Housing Authority family developments on the historical former muster field site may see rows of townhouses, a closer look reveals the FHA is about more than bricks and mortar -- it is about working daily to provide improved quality of life for each of its family, elderly and handicapped residents. Formed in 1946, the Framingham Housing Authority is led by a dedicated five - member Board of Commissioners. Together with Executive Director Kevin Bumpus and a supportive staff of 30, the FHA maintains over 1000 units of public housing and administers rent subsidies for over 800 units of private housing, in cooperation with federal, state and local authorities. "Our aim this past year, as always, has been to enhance the life - quality of our residents, and in doing so, to better the lives of all who live and work in the Greater Framingham community," notes Bumpus, who joined the FHA in 2007 after 15 years of public housing leadership in Somerville and Boston. With that as an agency goal, two key developments have marked FY2007 at the Framingham Housing Authority — state funding for a two -phase $50 million comprehensive modernization of the Pearl Harbor and St. Lo family developments, and renewed emphasis on services for FHA residents. Pearl Harbor /St. Lo's Makeover In 2007, funding was secured from the Massachusetts Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) for 2007 Annual Report 508 - 879 -7562 508 - 626 -0252 (fax) kbumpus@framha.org complete modernization of 110 townhouse units of the Pearl Harbor Development. Located along Concord, Normandy and Anzio Streets, the Pearl Harbor units were last refurbished in 1989. Rich in local history, the area was once home to the state's first muster field for volunteer militia (in 1872) where predecessors to the National Guard gathered for training during the Spanish- American War (1898), the Mexican Border Campaign (1916) and World Wars II and I. Before the Framingham Housing Authority established 50 units to provide housing for veterans in the late 1940s, the site also served as an airport for northeast airmail delivery (1920 - 1929). Now, the Pearl Harbor apartments are slated for interior renovations including new kitchens and baths, replacement of windows and shutters, new heating and security systems, and redesigned landscaping (including new walkways, steps and play areas). Improvements will also focus on enhancing curb appeal along Route 126. With design phase completed, bids for construction are slated for award in July 2008. The St. Lo upgrades, the second phase of renewal, will encompass complete interior and exterior renovations and landscape improvements also focusing on curb appeal, and creation of ten handicapped apartments, homeownership units and possible location of six additional family units. Resident Services — Renewing Opportunity In 2007, the FHA -- strengthened by community partnerships -- continued to expand programs designed to maximize Human Services 198 Town of Framingham independence, create opportunities, and enhance residents' lives. At a new weekly on -site Wellness Clinic sponsored by FHA Tenant Associations, visiting nurses provide senior and disabled FHA residents with blood pressure and glucose screenings, weight consults, and feedback on a variety of health issues. Support groups for seniors from Asian or Spanish communities, led by volunteers from the Framingham Council on Aging, continue to help residents make transitions to American culture. Programs to improve fitness and provide social opportunities for seniors and disabled residents continue to be offered by Jewish Family Services — a longtime FHA community partner. And collaborations with Bay Path Elders and other social services continue to ensure senior and disabled residents access to in -home resources that prevent nursing home placement. In addition, FHA's quarterly Resident Services newsletter helps guide readers to activities such as walking clubs, movie nights, flower plantings, a yard sale, bingo, barbecues, day trips and holiday parties. A monthly cable television program further informs seniors on issues of health and well being central to their lives. 2007 Annual Report Leading to Self- Sufficiency For FHA families, the Family Self- Sufficiency (FSS) program provides Section 8 Rental Assistance recipients the chance to improve lives through job training, financial counseling, and educational and home ownership opportunities. A voluntary five -year program, FSS provides residents with motivating guidance that enables them to move out of subsidized housing and into economic self- sufficiency. Working closely with the FHA FSS Coordinator, participants chart career goals, overcome barriers, and develop action plans. Families set and pursue goals related to continuing education, job training, money management, childcare and transportation. Key to the FSS program is an interest - earning savings account that accumulates dollars as earned income increases. FSS families are able to use their escrow to purchase homes, pay off debts and help finance higher education. "The FSS program has been amazing," notes one program participant, who adds, "The staff provides great support... It (FSS) has definitely helped change my life and my family's future!" In 2007, 31 FSS participants were enrolled, with three successfully graduating and two moving on to homeownership. To date, the FHA has assisted 13 families to achieve homeownership. In 2008, the FHA seeks to extend benefits of the FSS Program to public housing residents with a grant for a new coordinator. Also for FHA residents in 2007, the annual National Night Out barbecue in July brought FHA families and seniors alike onto the muster field for an evening of free barbecue (served by FHA staff), music, and tours of Framingham Fire Department engines and Framingham Police Department squad cars -- all topped with free ice cream. Human Services 199 Senior FHAresidentsgatheron the musterSeld to savor summer evening and barbecue served by FHA staff Town of Framingham FHA families enjoyed visits from the Framingham Fire and Police Departments as part of the annual National Night Out barbecue in July. With food donated weekly by Whole Foods Supermarkets and a generous grant from BJ's Wholesale Club, the FHA also has an onsite Food Pantry that offers emergency food supplies to residents who need them. Home cooked Thanksgiving meals from the Curtis family and Christmas meals provided by the Framingham Police Department continued to bring holiday joy to homebound FHA seniors in 2007. State Funded Housing The Framingham Housing Authority administers 249 units of state -aided family housing (185 units under Chapter 200 -C Family Housing; 76 units under Chapter 705 - C Family Housing) at Oran Road, Concord Street, Anzio Road, Corrigidor Road, Guadalcanal Road, Normandy Road, Pearl Harbor Road, Arsenal Road, St. Lo Road, Hollis Street, Beaver Park Road, Marian Road, Taralli Terrace and Second Street.. State - funded senior housing — 536 units (under Chapter 667C Elderly Housing, Chapter 667 -2, 667 -8 Elderly Housing) — is located on Everitt Avenue, John Gallagher Drive, Grant Street, Rose Kennedy Lane, Normandy Road, Arsenal Road, Guadalcanal Road, Cochichuate Road and Hollis Street. 2007 Annual Report Twenty -four units of state - subsidized handicapped housing (under Chapters 689, 689 -1 and 689 -2 Handicapped Housing) are situated on Temple Place, Alexander Street and Underwood Avenue. Rental Assistance through the Mass. Rental Voucher Program (MRVP) includes 62 units - - 12 units on Gordon Street, 21 units (SRO - DMH) on Gordon Street and Union Avenue, 15 units (SRO-DPI-1) on Evergreen Street, five units on Prospect Street (SRO -DMH), six units on Wellington Avenue (SRO -DMH) and three on scattered sites. Federally Funded Housing Federally aided family housing administered by the FHA includes 125 units (under MA028 -001 Family Housing) at Beaver Street, Carlson Road and Pusan Road. Senior units (under MA0028 -002 Elderly Housing) include 110 apartments on John J. Brady Drive. The FHA also administers 792 federal Section 8 Rental Assistance vouchers for apartments in privately owned properties located throughout Framingham and surrounding towns. Respectfully Submitted, Kevin P. Bumpus, Executive Director Commissioners: Stephen Starr Mark Galante Phyllis May Edward Convery Robert Merusi Human Services 200 Town of Framingham Technology Services 150 Concord Street, Room B25 Framingham, NIA 01702 The Technology Services mission is to: • Develop and maintain efficient, cost - effective information, telephony and network communications systems for the Town of Framingham; • Assure their successful utilization and enhance productivity by providing the necessary up -time and support services to its customer base; • Uphold the Town by -law as it relates to Technology (Section 17); and • Provide excellence in Public Service consistent with the Town's Customer Service Policy. Technology Services had its first staffing increase this year since 2001 adding 1 fulltime equivalent (Technical Services Coordinator) for a department total of 8 FTE including the Director. The added staff has enable the department to reorganize and take on new projects related to the implementation and ongoing support of a voice over the Internet (VOIP) phone system throughout town and the makeover of the Town's official website www. FraminghamMA.gov Expectations among internal users continue to grow by leaps and bounds as an increasingly computer savvy user base sees opportunities in implementing new department- specific applications and productivity enhancements. In addition, the external user base, non - existent a few years ago, sees benefit in a virtual town hall capable of providing both information and services via the town website on a twenty four hour, seven day a week basis. The number of requests for postings continues to escalate 2007 Annual Report 508 - 552 -5829 508 - 620 -4867 (fax) technologic.services @ framinghamma.gov particularly at Town Meeting time with the dissemination of background materials via the web. Over the years, the Technology Services budget as a % of the general fund budget has held steadily at 1% until two years ago when it shrunk to .6% and again this year when it dropped to .55% of which .05% is related to DPW water and sewer projects for which the general fund is reimbursed by the enterprise funds. The Division supports 391 users (119 in Town Hall and 272 across 32 other municipal locations) and an additional 172 School financial users along with 315 PCs and 90 laptops and a diversity of applications and requirements. Response time and customer service goals demand quick turnaround that is increasingly difficult to deliver and painfully frustrating for dedicated staff. In 2007, efforts were made to better document service delivery including turnaround times through new Help Desk software; to evaluate outsourcing through a few specific projects and to take advantage of volunteer services to rollout an XP operating system upgrade to replace substandard PCs (less than 1GHZ) and reduce end -user support calls related to performance and reliability. Analyses of six months of Help Desk data against a 2007 study by Computer Economics cited a median ratio of about 188 users to 1 FTE as an acceptable level of Help Desk support. The Technology Services department has .5 FTE supporting 391 users and 415 desktops with the other 50% spent on systems administration, town meeting Technology 201 Town of Framingham support, new user training and projects such as the XP upgrade and Virus protection. In the survey, 375 users per 1 FTE fell into the 75` percentile and equated to decreasing levels of user productivity. The study also noted a paradigm shift in which increasing numbers of employees are being issued both a desktop and a field laptop or a laptop with docking station that can be used as a desktop or taken in to the field. This trend is also seen in Framingham where field access to applications continues to grow as a way to increase both productivity and customer service. Over 90 users in areas such as DPW, Police, Fire, Engineering and the Health Department are taking laptops into the field and expecting wireless access to the office desktop to access data, permits and infrastructure maps needed to expedite resolution of a problem or to document an inspection or schedule a follow -up at the job site. Teleworking is another paradigm shift in progress as more and more workers see not only the advantages to working from home including off -hours support but also in being prepared for emergency operations. At the annual MA e- government conference in December, a tabletop exercise revolved around pandemic planning and the ability to telework during a sustained crisis was considered essential to protect employees and at the same time maintain services. The Technology Services division is organized by program and budget into 7 service areas. The reports for each of the service are provided below. Application Services Scott, jung, Manager Application Services is responsible for the ongoing support of the Town's financial and management information systems supporting both School and Town. Supported systems include: Accounting, Budgeting, General Ledger, Requisitions and Purchase Orders, 2007 Annual Report Accounts Payables, Human Resources Payroll and Personnel, Tax and Utility Billing and Collections. There are a total of 172 users of the Munis system: 75 Town and 97 School users. Some accomplishments within Applications Services during 2007 include the installation of a higher capacity server with network accessible storage to support growth to the Town's financial systems; conversion to a more robust, open source Linux operating system; and an upgrade to the latest version (6.2e) of the application software provided by MUNIS, our municipal software vendor. The enhanced functionality provides improved management reporting capabilities particularly for the School Department's grants and revolving funds and end of year reporting. The new version also contains enhancements to system security, utility and tax billing, accounting and budgeting and a new client upgrade. A customization in progress will streamline and automate the production of the Town Meeting operating budget book saving many hours of time and effort. Since the upgrade there has been no downtime on the server. Prior to the upgrade, the old server crashed or malfunctioned due to hardware or operating system problems 6 times during the year. The new hardware also supports four new Munis applications to be rolled out starting in the Spring of 2008. They include: Content Management, Applicant Tracking, Employee On -ine and General Department Billing. The Content Management System will enhance the archiving and retention of MUNIS output consistent with retention requirements outlined by the state's Public Records law as well as the integration of paper and electronic documents. Applicant Tracking and MUNIS Employee On -line are web -based applications that enable applicants to apply for positions via the web and employees to access and update their personal data; check accrual balances and submit leave requests or enroll in benefit programs during open enrollment Technology 202 Town of Framingham periods from home. The first general billing application will be Human Resource billing for non - contributory health insurance. The hardware upgrade enables the recycling of the old hardware to the Town "hot site" backup location in the Main Library and the reconfiguration of the old server with identical operating system and software to the new so that in the event of a hardware malfunction, the old system is capable of immediately taking over and running the production environment until the "live" system is repaired and operational again. Significant effort was also spent in 2007 working with Human Resources and the Police Department to automate and implement in Munis the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) for overtime for the Police Patrolman's union, including retroactive calculations. New ad -hoc reporting software, Crystal Reports VII, has also been loaded with new features ready to be tested that enhance security and make the distribution of developed reports easier to save so that end - users can run them themselves with user - defined parameters and specified timeframes. This will especially help principals and School responsibility centers to run their own reports as needed and to manage their budgets without having to call the School Business Office. The MUNIS User conference was held in Boston this year and provided an opportunity to meet with the vendors that partner with MUNIS as well as other users from cities and towns across the country to learn what new initiatives are taking place. Over the two days of the well- attended conference, numerous seminars and roundtables were offered to learn about new features and to offer suggestions for future development. Database Services Alan D. Holt, Manager 2007 Annual Report Database Services is responsible for the programming and development of on -line databases and applications of a corporate nature. Most notable are the property database that includes permits, licenses and inspections and the extension of that database for web inquiry. I I new Permits and License types were created in 2007 in support of the Building Department, Zoning Board, Fire Department and Public Works. A new Certificate of Occupancy was created for the Building Department; a 26'/2 -F Carbon Monoxide certificate for the Fire Department and a Zoning Board (Amendment). Working with the Public Works department, 8 different types of Street Opening, Public Way Obstruction, and Sidewalk Repair permits were developed to enhance these permitting operations. Assistance was provided to the upgrade of the MUNIS system including the integration of a SAN 1SCSI storage solution into the new server to improve performance and reliability, lower hardware costs and support an offsite data mirror for the municipal database. Also implemented were new disk -to -disk and disk - to -tape backup and archive solutions that have decreased backup times and improved the time to restore the database if necessary. A major version upgrade (from v6 to v7) of the Town's Laserfiche Document Archive was completed with the new software installed on all client PC's and the website. SAN - accessible disk space was configured as the medium for long term archival storage of streaming video media files, providing a cost effective solution for expanding the storage limits. A new software enhancement to the web interface is also in progress to streamline the search and browse capabilities for the on- line public archive as well as to display the most recent postings. Several updates were made to the Town Website at the request of users including automating the posting of department and Moderator maintained directories for Town Technology 203 Town of Framingham Meeting Members, Boards and Commissions, Elected and Appointed Officials, and Standing Committees. Database Services participated in the evaluation and vendor selection of a Web Content Management System in 2007 to replace the static methods for web page design and maintenance of the Town's current website as well as in the selection, installation, and configuration of a network -wide web - based Help Desk system that incorporates asset and user inventories and project tracking. Extensive customizations were completed including the integration of users with Windows active directory. Assets were imported from the legacy system and the first major version upgrade performed. A Board of Health Field Inspections application was completed and rolled out in 2007. The application is a combination wireless /wired /stand -alone application for tracking Food Service inspections. All inspectors now have access to the entire history of inspections as well as the Board of Health permit history from the field. An archival solution for 6 years (1995 — 2001) of general, revenue and expenditure ledgers; vendor payment and payroll check histories and payroll distribution data was developed and data from the retired Pentamation System was archived to the Laserfiche document management system. The financial data is fully indexed for searching across years and the Human Resource data can report by employee and year. The completion of this project enables the obsolescence and retirement of the legacy hardware system. Network Services James V. Schiavone, Network Mgr. Network Services plans, configures and maintains all Town of Framingham hardware along with the institutional network that connects all town buildings. The most important ongoing responsibility is to make all systems accessible to all users during all work 2007 Annual Report hours. This mandate includes public safety and emergency operations with its 24 hour per day 7 day per week requirements. This year was again a stellar year for achieving that goal as outlined by the following statistics particularly since this is the responsibility of a one person operation. Network Statistics 2007 A 5 9's reliability performance goal was met for all 30 networked building on the fiber network again this year. The only down time was during an after hours operating system upgrade on the core switch, a Cisco Catalyst 6500 located at Town Hall. 99.5% uptime was provided on all network servers and the network remained virus free in 2007, despite many attempts to infiltrate. During the year, an off -hours upgrade to the latest version of Cisco's Inter - network Operating System JOS) software was completed along with upgrades of two 8 port fiber blades to two 16 port fiber blades for added capacity. Two new locations were added to the fiber network: the branch Library in Saxonville and the Doeskin water station. An underground point to point fiber connection from Town Hall to Police HQ was also added with the help of DPW to provide redundancy between these two critical areas. 5 new IP cameras and 5 new wireless Access Points were installed for Public Safety purposes and enable the Patrol Division to write and submit reports from their cruisers. 9 new and 6 replacement servers were installed. Of the 9 new servers installed in 2007, 4 are virtual servers. The Domain Name Server (DNS) and the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) servers were moved to new servers and a back -up Active Directory Global catalog was set up that is also serving as a DHCP and DNS server for the domain to provide redundancy. Technology 204 Town of Framingham All users and their mail were migrated over to a new Exchange 2003 mail server. A Verisign security certificate was also installed for the Outlook web access portal. All networking equipment at 11 off -site locations was replaced for the Cisco IP phone install. IP telephones have been installed at 20 of the 30 live locations in the Town. 75% of all the data that was stored on aging file servers was migrated this year to our Network Appliance storage area network (SAN). Along with the data migration, network shares were created to isolate all GIS data and user logon scripts had to be changed to utilize third party shareware to map users drive and printers. The remaining 25% will be migrated in 2008. Network Services has attended many meetings with DPW, wireless vendors and Internet Service Providers in an ongoing planning and evaluation study for field wireless access to town systems developing detailed maps of all Town of Framingham assets and arranging site visits to evaluate backhaul to town buildings. The Framingham Police department received a grant in conjunction with Lowell and Lynn for a multi- location criminal analysis system and the assistance of Network Services was requested to setup the hardware which included a server and stand alone backup unit for Framingham. The grant replaced three PCs used in the third floor intelligence unit and supplied the roll call room with a projector and Smartboard. Public Safety Kenneth L. Harper, Public Safety Systems Administrator The Public Safety Systems Administrator provides technical support and end -user training for all Public Safety systems (Police and Fire) in the Town of Framingham and the Emergency Operations Center when open. 2007 Annual Report A major hardware and software upgrade for Police and Fire Dispatch and Police Records was funded by a Town Meeting capital appropriation replacing 14 year old DEC Alpha servers with HP Servers running Linux operating systems. The upgrade which included the latest release of public safety software provided by Keystone commenced in July and was completed in August significantly increasing performance. Not only were there no major problems with this upgrade but due to careful testing and planning, Police dispatch was down for only 30 minutes during the cutover while Fire dispatch was down for 10. The redundancy built into the system enabled Police to dispatch off the Fire system and vice versa during the cutovers. The new software gives the departments greater reporting and file management than before along with new functionality. A new content management system enhances productivity by integrating the attachment of digital files such as accident reconstruction diagrams and crime scene photographs to reports. Along with new laptops, the new system provides faster inquiry and enhanced reporting from the cruisers by providing the capability to write and submit reports from strategically placed wireless access points. The Police Department also requested a complete change in their Booking process in 2007 that included the addition of 7 new forms along with a new setup for outside agencies that print without the Framingham Police Department logos. A new E911 system was also configured, installed and tested. The Fire Department uses software called Firehouse for their reporting system that includes electronic submission of reports to the state Fire Marshall's office for MFIRS compliance. A new Firehouse upgrade to Release 7 was installed, tested and put into Technology 205 Town of Framingham production. The release incorporates a new alarm billing system and required a completely new interface that has been written and is ready for testing by the Fire Department in January. All PCs in all fire stations were upgraded and installed with all necessary software. The stations can now do their reports and updates to Firehouse in half the time it used to take. The voice recording hardware at Fire Dispatch was replaced with new equipment and software from Nice, the company that bought the Dictaphone voice recording division. This is the same equipment used by the state for their E911 installations. User Services Susan Joyce Roy Manager User Services provides end -user Help Desk support, set -up and training, email, Internet, Windows and applications' systems administration; peripheral troubleshooting, hardware and software inventory maintenance, policy and licensed software audits. User Services is also responsible for PC, printer and software upgrades, daily backups; Town Meeting equipment and presentation assistance. In 2007, this one person division supported 315 PCs and 90 laptops with 391 users, including 55 new users. New Help Desk software was evaluated, selected and implemented in 2007 that provides better management, escalation, reporting and benchmarking of Help Desk calls. The software, installed in July, also enables users to log and track their own service calls and has already streamlined our Help Desk operation and improved our ability to respond and close requests. The new software in conjunction with remote access software facilitates resolution by saving the time it takes to make a trip to the desktop and has facilitated our ability to work on a town - wide XP operating system upgrade. The management reporting capability is facilitating not only reporting but the identification of 2007 Annual Report opportunities for further refinement, staffing and improvement. The Technology Services Help Desk answered 1370 Help Desk calls of which 766 were resolved on the same day (215 were resolved remotely using Dameware). However, the number of calls resolved the same day decreased from 2006, the result of a major project to upgrade all PC operating systems to Windows XP which required onsite, manual, individual installation /upgrade of each unit. User Services also provides support for Town Meeting by assisting with Powerpoint presentations, training presenters in the use of equipment and staying through the start of each meeting to ensure equipment readiness. In addition to attendance at the annual Town Meeting, User Services assisted with 104 town meeting presentations over a total of 23 nights during the course of the year. Technology Services raised the PC standard for minimum processor speed as a result of performance testing during the XP upgrade from the previous minimum standard of 500 MHZ to at least 1 GHZ. (92 PCs were swapped /replaced including 67 sub - standard PCs) in conjunction with the change in standard. In addition, 216 PCs were configured and installed of which 57 were new PCs. Irene Dunne volunteered her services through December to Technology Services and was extremely helpful in assisting with the XP upgrade as well as other user services tasks. In addition, an outside vendor was hired to assist in the XP upgrade for some off -site locations such as DPW. This added the responsibility and time to oversee and supervise the project to the workload, including coordination, scheduling and installation of equipment delivery, the actual installations and supervision of staff. As of December 67% of the Town's PCs had been upgraded, a daunting task with or without the Technology 206 Town of Framingham extra help. A special thank you goes to all who assisted and continue to assist to ensure a successful outcome of this project. Voice, Web and Office Services Carly Premo, Manager Voice, Web and Office Services is responsible for the Technology Services department's administration and finance including budget and payroll as well as Voice and Web services. In late Fall 2007, Nancy Lomas transferred to the department from the Library in the new position of Technical Services Coordinator. Nancy's technical and accounting background and experiences enabled her to quickly and efficiently take over the administration and finance of the department completing the FY 2009 capital and operating budgets; assisting departments with quotes and order requests; posting web materials and thereby enabling two major initiatives to move forward that of the completion phase of the multi -year Town IP phone installation and the selection of a new web Content Management System. Voice Services In 2007, Voice Services continued the implementation of the town -wide Voice over the Internet (VOIP) phone system in conjunction with the Network Manager. The system provides cost benefit by using the Town's fiber institutional network for "no charge" calls between departments even if at different locations in Town; enabling the cancellation of 52 Centrex phone lines to date; providing enhanced voice mail and auto - attendant features and more cost - effective state contract rates for outside network, local and long distance services. IP telephony was installed at 4 Police locations: Police Headquarters; Animal Control; the Pelham Police Housing office and the Muster field Police housing office; 5 Fire locations: Fire Headquarters; Concord Street Fire; Fire Dispatch and the Fire Stations at Water Street and Watson Place; the McAuliffe branch Library in Saxonville and 6 DPW pumping stations on the 2007 Annual Report network. Only the Main Library and two DPW locations: the Henry St. garage and the Mt. Wayte Recycling Center remain to be done in the first quarter of 2008. To complete the 2007 phase, users were interviewed on the station design and 244 VOIP telephones were set up and installed along with 186 users and voicemail boxes. Department auto - attendants were set up and recorded and end user training provided. Web Services After developing a request for proposal, going out to bid and evaluating multiple vendors, including software by Novus and the open - source Joomla, CivicPlus was chosen as our web Content Management vendor and a makeover of the Town's website initiated. The funding for the content management system (CMS) and the conversion of the existing site was appropriated by Town Meeting in April. The re- design phase is currently underway with an ambitious "go- live" goal of April, 2008. CivicPlus was chosen for its understanding of the municipal marketplace and its commitment to ongoing development of applicable new modules and features. Founded 12 years ago, CivicPlus currently has over 340 cities, towns, schools and county governments. The new web -based application is intended to promote better design, navigation and search capabilities to make it easier to find content on our over- expanding site as well as to make it easier for department webmasters to create and post materials, news, alerts and frequently asked questions (FAQS) as well as maintain multiple calendars of meetings and events. The following statistics are testament to the value of the Town of Framingham website. In 2007 there were 544,114 page views from 145,329 visitors from 116 countries. In preparation for conversion to the new system, subwebs were created for the Town Technology 207 Town of Framingham Clerk, Planning Board, Planning Department, Human Resources and Media Services to enable the departments to post their own information including backup materials for town meeting. In addition 709 postings of new materials /updates were made to the website by Web Services, a decrease directly related to the increase in departments that are set up to post their own information to the web. Ongoing support and development also included the development of a new front -end to the Laserfiche document archive to be rolled out in 2008 that will provide easier browse and search capabilities to web users of the public archive for minutes and town meeting materials; the creation of folders and posted or converted minutes for 36 boards, commissions and committees; the continued use of the Town list -serve for email notification to Town residents and subscribers; training of additional departments (Selectmen and Planning Board) to send out notices on their own; and the installation of new software to more accurately track web statistics for the upcoming year. (A dramatic increase in page views was noted when this software was installed due to the fact that our previous web tracking software did not include permit and property inquiries in its statistics count.) In closing, I extend congratulations to Ken Harper who received a Customer Service Award at the Employee Recognition dinner in October for his support of Public Safety (Police, Fire and the Emergency Operations Center) over the years and in particular for his planning and expertise that minimized down- time when these systems were upgraded in August. I would also like to welcome Nancy Lomas who joined the department as Technical Services Coordinator in November and give a special thank you to Irene Dunne who volunteered in the department from July through December and was instrumental in our ability to make progress toward upgrading all PCs in town to the Windows XP operating 2007 Annual Report system. Her assistance minimized the cost of the upgrade by enabling the project to be done in- house; minimizes ongoing support costs through uniformity and maximizes productivity of our financial users with an improved user interface. Last but not least, I would like to thank each member of the staff for their contributions again this year. The accomplishments of this small but incredibly talented and dedicated staff continue to place the Town of Framingham in the forefront as a technology leader among Massachusetts communities. Respectfully Submitted, Kathleen F. McCarthy, Director TECHNOLOGIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE As stated in the Town Bylaws, the purpose of the Technology Advisory Committee is to provide technical advice to the Town Meeting Standing Committees, the Finance Committee, and the Capital Budget Committee relating to the acquisition by the Town of technology. The committee worked on several projects with multiple Town departments, boards and committees throughout the past year. The committee continued it's work on identifying available technologies for electronic voting for Town Meeting, working extensively with the Standing Committee on Rules on available technologies for electronic voting for Town Meeting. This work culminated into a demonstration to the Standing Committee on a recommended platform. The Technology Advisory Committee continued to work extensively with the Town's Director of Technology Services, Kathleen McCarthy, as well as continued meetings with representatives from the School Department in an effort to find areas where the committee, which is made up of individuals with varied and extensive technology backgrounds, can be of assistance. Technology 208 Town of Framingham The committee would like to thank both former Member Brian Sullivan and former Chair Peggy Groppo for their hard work and insight that they provided since day one of the committee's existence. Respectfully Submitted, Bob Berman, Chair Scott Wadland, Vice -Chair Adam Levensohn, Clerk Terri Banerjee Andy Limeri Ken Scwhartz 2007 Annual Report Technology 209 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report "ramingham School Department >uperintendent of Schools 508 - 626 -9117 4 Vernon Street 508 - 626 -9119 (fax) 'ranzinghanz, MA 01701 ethaijer@framin8ham.kl2.ma.us SCHOOL COMMITTEE Budget In 2007, the Framingham Public Schools faced a substantial mid -year budget deficit. In large part, the deficit resulted when state Special Education Circuit Breaker reimbursement to Framingham was less than projected. At the same time, there were an unanticipated number of newly enrolled students requiring special education services. To address increased special education needs, the district expanded pre - school classes for students with autism and hired new staff including aides and assistant teachers. The fiscal dilemma was compounded when Governor Romney cut anticipated state grants to support school programming. In March, the district considered potential mid -year staff reductions including elementary music teachers, a school librarian, library aides, custodians /maintenance workers, and gifted and talented teachers. Students, staff and parents advocated to preserve district programs and avoid employee cuts. On April 4, 2007, the School Committee met in joint session with the Board of Selectmen and the Finance Committee. At the meeting, the School Department identified areas for additional budget savings, and the Town identified areas of the Town budget that could be applied to address the remaining FY07 budget gap ($1.4 to $1.5 million). The School Committee began the FY08 budget development process with the goal of maintaining a level - service budget. However, given projected revenues, the level of state and federal funding, as well as increased expenses, a level service budget was not feasible. The School Committee implemented a combination of expense reduction measures including the elimination of five elementary teaching positions; two high school teaching positions; one world language teacher; a .5 Title I Director; and one technology specialist; and instituted a custodial position freeze and a freeze of one secretarial position. There were also reductions in the district textbook budget and curriculum department budget; and some schools were closed over the summer to reduce energy costs. In addition, the Committee reluctantly voted to increase the bus fee, high school interscholastic athletic fee, and full -day kindergarten fee. The high school interscholastic athletic fee increase was subsequently reduced when the district received a generous donation from the Louis Merloni Foundation to offset the fee increase. In May, the School Committee voted an FY08 budget request of $82,952,631, an increase of 6.06% over FY07 and voted to support favorable action on Warrant Article 43 to offset the FY07 budget deficit with available Education 210 Front row from left. Cesar Monzon, Philip Dinsky, David Miles. Secondrowfrom left. Superintendent Gene Thayer, Beverly Hugo, Adam Blumer, AndyLimeri, Diane Throop, and FHS Student Representatives Leah Damesek and Joshua Roll Town of Framingham funds identified by the Town CFO. Town Meeting approved both. Superintendent of Schools In April, after a four -year tenure as Superintendent, Chris Martes resigned to accept the Superintendency of the Foxborough Public Schools. Later that same month, the School Committee announced the appointment of Eugene F. Thayer as interim Superintendent. Dr. Thayer previously served as Framingham Public Schools Superintendent from 1987 to 1996. He brings a wealth of experience, exceptional leadership skills and depth of knowledge of the district to the position. In November, the School Committee unanimously voted to extend Dr. Thayer's contract through the 2008/2009 school year in order to provide a second year to address the district's fiscal and restructuring needs and to provide stability to the district. The School Committee plans to begin its search for a permanent superintendent in Spring 2008. The Committee In March, Richard Weader retired from the School Committee after 12 years of service. In April, Adam Blumer was elected to a three - year term, and School Committee member Cesar Monzon was re- elected to a second term. Beverly Hugo was elected to a two -year term to fulfill the term vacated by State Representative Pam Richardson. The School Committee elected Philip Dinsky as Chair, David Miles as Vice Chair, and Cesar Monzon as Secretary. District Goals At the School Committee's annual planning retreat in September, the Superintendent and the School Committee identified 2007/2008 district goals including (1) development of a budget system including reporting formats, checks and balances, and financial policies relating to the process and procedures; and creation of an FY09 budget; (2) establishment of a superintendent search process; (3) review and revision of the 2007 Annual Report organizational chart to reflect the complexities, size and mission of the Framingham Public Schools; (4) Review and revision, if necessary, of the district's student assignment and housing plan to include review of transportation systems; (5) enter and complete collective bargaining process with various School Department unions and associations; (6) study, develop and implement a system wide energy conservation plan; (7) review and update the district's technology plan to include instructional, administrative and data development/ analysis to enable more effective and better - informed decision - making. We would like to express our sincere appreciation to the staff of the Framingham Public Schools for their superb work on behalf of our students. Finally, the School Committee would like to thank the citizens of Framingham for their strong support of the Framingham Public Schools. Respectfully Submitted, Philip A. Dinsky, Chair David F. Miles, Vice Chair Cesar Monzon, Secretary Adam Blumer Beverly Hugo Andy Limeri Diane M. Throop SUPERINTENDENT In my role as Interim Superintendent I am pleased to present this report to the Town. 2007 was another busy and successful year for Framingham Public Schools. The variety of programs and the pace of activities is clear in the School Committee and Departmental reports. The hallmark of good schools is student achievement and the interaction of the teachers with those students. It pleases me to report that the performance of our students in 2007 was outstanding. An important result of standardized testing over the past year was Education 211 Town of Framingham the impressive number (97 %) of Grade 10 students passing the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) test. The Class of 2011, sophomore class, in their first attempt at the 10` grade exam, scored higher than any other previous class on the MCAS exam. The Town should be proud of these students achievement and is a tribute to the collective experience and expertise of all of the teachers at all grade levels who contributed to their success. The College Board's Advance Placement Program (AP) offers students the opportunity to take challenging, college -level courses while still in high school and to receive college credit, advanced placement, or both for successful performance on the AP Exams. Since 2002, the number of students taking the AP exams has doubled with three hundred and fifty six participating in 740 Advanced Placement Exams, in twenty subjects, in 2007. 83% of the exams were passed and eligible for college credit. This compares with three hundred fifteen who took the exam in eighteen subjects in 2006. Through continuing aggressive efforts of the FHS Guidance Department, 89% of the junior class and 94% of the sophomore class took the Preliminary Scholastic Assessment Test (PSAT). These numbers are impressive compared to the fact that 65% of the junior class and 46% of the sophomore class took the test in 2004. 93% of the graduating class participated in the SAT. Framingham students averaged 510 on the Critical Reading portion, 545 in the Mathematics portion, and 509 on the Writing Component, which is above the national averages of 502, 515 and 494 respectively. The community should be proud that so many students take and pass a wide variety of these college -level exams, and that they do so well. One result of the high student achievement is acceptance at a college or university to continue education. In keeping with past years, more than 87% of the 2007 Annual Report graduates in the Class of 2007 continued their education at an impressive variety of institutions of higher learning, including some of the most selective colleges in the country. Framingham High School hosted a decennial evaluation visit from the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc. (NEASC) in the fall of 2006. Accreditation relies on a twelve to eighteen month self -study process undertaken by schools and colleges in regular review cycles. The process does not rank institutions but rather, establishes a level of acceptable quality for all accredited institutions. The Commission standards are high and focus on virtually every aspect of a school or higher education institution's operation. A visiting team spent several days monitoring classes, meeting with district administration, school staff, parents and students, reviewing curricula, technology and the physical structure. The team was impressed with the renovation of the facility, specifically with the science wing and the library and multi -media facilities. In the spring of 2007 we were informed that Framingham High School received accreditation once again. Student support programs are critical and the district is proud of those serving our high school population. The Academic Development Center (ADC) is a peer - tutoring center in which approximately one hundred and twenty -five juniors and seniors tutor struggling freshmen and sophomores. The Resiliency for Life Program, in its ninth year, continues to provide support for academically challenged students with potential who need a smaller school - within -a- school approach. The mentoring programs provided by the Mazie Foundation and the Step Up To Excellence Program are some of the other exciting support opportunities available for our students. Framingham High School Drama Company went to the 2007 Massachusetts High School Drama Guild and placed in the finals of the Education 212 Town of Framingham State Champion Title. The FHS Jazz Band was selected to participate at the prestigious Berklee College Jazz Festival. The band also performed at the International Association of Educators Northeast Jazz Festival earning a Silver Medal. Framingham High School Television Studio earned two EMMY Awards at the National High School EMMY competition. Students placed first in Technical Achievement for their production of Flyer News, and first for the program "One Hundredth Meeting of Framingham and Natick Football ". The television studio has earned nine EMMY awards to date. Flyer News is broadcast LIVE Monday through Friday on RCN Channel 15, Comcast Channel 8 and Verizon Channel 39 at 7:15 AM. It is rebroadcast at 5:00 and 7:30 PM. I think it is important to mention the Framingham Adult ESL Plus Program and its continued success. While the majority of funding is from state and federal grants, community donations, private donations as well as fundraising activities, the district continues to support this program and its outreach by providing space and support for its classes. Framingham Adult ESL has been providing English language instruction for over twenty years and during that time has grown from thirty students to over six hundred and forty students each semester with morning and evening components. Of note, Verizon continues to provide financial support as a community partner. The program itself is housed at the Fuller Middle School and faculty and staff have been instrumental in the success of the program. The community at large has been a strong participant in increasing programs and activities at all academic levels. The partnership with the New England Eye Institute continues through the operation of a Vision Clinic at the Fuller Middle School. This was opened in 2004 and continues to be the only school -based vision center in 2007 Annual Report Massachusetts. Through a partnership with Boston University School of Dental Medicine, second grade students, with parental consent, receive dental screenings and dental sealants, if needed. Plans are underway with Great Brook Valley Health Center to open a health clinic at FHS. Metro West Community Healthcare Foundation has been a major financial support, particularly in the "Wellness" programs evident throughout the schools. I believe that community support is vital to school districts and I am proud of the relationships that the district has developed with numerous public and private companies, foundations and organizations over the last several years. It is also gratifying to participate in the strong collaborative relationship between the Framingham School Department, and the Police, Fire and the other Municipal Departments. In the major snowstorm near the end of December the Department of Public Works efficiently and with little fanfare did an excellent job of preparing the streets and sidewalks so that school did not have to be postponed, as it was in some surrounding towns. Based on conversations with people from Framingham and other communities the relationship in Framingham between municipal and school departments is one of the best in the Commonwealth and is something we can all be proud of. The Transportation Department provides a vital service for the Framingham Public Schools. Seven thousand students utilize bus transportation on a daily basis. The transportation office continues to work diligently to ensure our students safe transport. Massachusetts General Law requires School Departments to provide transportation to all children within each respective district. To that end, Framingham provides school transportation to six hundred students in non - public schools in Framingham. Due to budget constraints, the School Department moved to a fee -based Education 213 Town of Framingham transportation program four years ago for only those students in grades 7 -12. Fees are waived for special circumstances such as children placed in Framingham foster care homes, homeless students, special education students and students on medical waivers. In 2007, approximately twenty -two hundred students, of the forty one hundred plus students, in grades 7 through 12, purchased bus passes. Financially, the School Department's budget was in deficit due to a number of factors such as school revenue estimates not being realized, personnel accounting matters, special education costs being higher than what had been budgeted. However, in keeping with the tradition of excellent support for the education program the Town was able to provide funding to achieve a balanced budget for FY 07. The School Department is most appreciative of the Town's timely and adequate response to this problem. This year regular reports are being presented publicly to inform the School Committee and Town Officials of the financial status of the School Department. This is a major goal — to establish systems and monitor the finances to provide a transparent financial picture for the Community. In addition to the continued pursuit of educational excellence for our students through strengthening the curriculum and educational programs other goals begun in the latter part of 2007 were: to review and, if need be, to revise the School Choice and Student Assignment programs; to study and develop a plan for organizing the administrative structure of the School System and to engage in the collective bargaining process with the nine associations and unions in the department. In closing I would like to thank not only the entire staff for their diligent efforts on behalf of our students but also the School Committee and Town officials for their attention to the education of our students. I 2007 Annual Report appreciate everyone's willingness to work together in a positive and productive manner! Respectfully Submitted, Eugene F. Thayer, Interim Superintendent Adult ESL Program During the week of August 20, 2007 Framingham Adult ESL P "s began its 23r year of service to the greater Framingham community with 3 days of registration. Classes began on August 28 with 648 students enrolled in morning and evening ESOL, ABE, GED and Citizenship classes. Unfortunately, as has been the norm for several years, 500 students were wait - listed. The fall semester was a very successful one with several new initiatives, projects, and special events. Several of these are highlighted. 0 The program implemented "Pronunciation Power" computer labs at both a.m. and p.m. ESOL sites. This was made possible by a grant from Verizon. All classes had several opportunities to visit the lab and incorporate focused pronunciation instruction and feedback in to their lessons. The response from staff and students has been excellent. The United Way of Tri- County sponsored a woman's "Get A Better Job" class which helped 12 advanced a.m. ESOL students to fine tune their resumes, practice interview skills, and improve their understanding of the "American job search" process. 0 The Stress of Immigration Support Group, funded by The Metrowest Community Healthcare Foundation, shifted its focus to individual consultations as a response to the increased incidence of stress in the immigrant population. The presence of a bilingual clinician during p.m. ESL classes provided tremendous support to students dealing with issues of stress in their lives. 0 The Metrowest ESL Fundraising Group spearheaded by Middlesex Savings Bank, sponsored a kick -off wine tasting event at The Education 214 Town of Framingham Danforth Museum. This event featured "Faces of Metrowest" in the form of large portraits of several Framingham Adult ESL Plus students. This event generated tremendous interest in fundraising efforts for the coming year and was a great way to start the planning process for the March 24 fundraising dinner. 0 On November 11, students hosted their Fifth Annual Student Fundraising Dance at St. Tarcisius Church Hall. The event featured a band, raffles, food, and fun. Once again, students raised enough money to continue to support a p.m. ESL class. 0 Framingham Adult ESL P'IIS hosted 10 docents from the Danforth Museum who toured classes and had a presentation on student backgrounds, program history, and ESL curriculum. We have collaborated with The Danforth Museum for several years and are excited to hear that the Museum recently received a grant to expand this collaboration and allow for evening hours and guided tours for our p.m. classes. Counseling services continue to be an important component of the program. Students often have no other place where they can ask the variety of questions that arise in their daily lives. Counselors and teachers recorded over 500 separate counseling sessions for the fall semester. Questions included how to read medical prescriptions, where and why to purchase carbon dioxide detectors, the meaning of movie ratings, decoding cooking abbreviations, and determining the meanings of such common idioms as "from scratch," "RSVP," and "make a living." Graduation ceremonies were held on December 13 for morning ESL classes and on December 19 for ABE /GED classes. Unfortunately, p.m. ESL graduation was cancelled due to a snowstorm but the program plans to recognize graduates at the opening assembly in January. Attendance throughout the program was excellent this semester with 82.3% of students completed 2007 Annual Report the semester. As usual, the majority of students who needed to drop out of classes did so due to work schedule conflicts. Framingham Adult ESL ' is looking forward to beginning classes again with registrations the week of January 22. A modest budget increase from The Department of Education will allow us to offer 2 new "Introduction To Computers" classes for a.m. students. A number of students have already expressed an interest in participating in this important class. The program is also pleased to be able to offer tours of The Danforth Museum to our p.m. classes next semester as a result of a grant obtained by the museum. Finally, we are looking forward to the annual Metrowest ESL Fundraising Dinner on March 24. This year's event is themed "The Faces of Metrowest" and will highlight immigration in the past and today. This event provides critical support to Framingham Adult ESL P'IIS and helps the program to address the overwhelming need for English classes in our area. Civics education and the U S. electoral process will grow as a focus of classroom activities and instruction going into the spring semester. Students will benefit from the close -up view of political systems and functions. Civic engagement and community participation will continue to be an integral part of the curriculum at all levels. Framingham Adult ESL P'IIS looks forward to continuing to act as a vital resource to students, schools, and area organizations in meeting the education needs of adult learners and improving communication within the community. Respectfully Submitted, Christine Tibor, Coordinator of Adult ESL Bilingual, ESL, and Sheltered English Programs During 2007, the Framingham Public Schools has continued to serve as a leader in educating Education 215 Town of Framingham English language learners. With at least 60 different languages represented in our school district, it has been our goal to ensure that each student achieves in all academic areas while acquiring English. Again this year, the Department of Education's Annual Measurable Achievement Objectives (AMAO) report shows that the percentage of English language learners that made progress in learning English and the percentage that attained fluency in English surpassed the goal by 19 percentage points and 14 points respectively. We were pleased to receive special recognition for the high quality of two of our programs. The quality of our Two -Way program, which provides education in English and Spanish for both native English and native Spanish speaking students, was recognized again in a recently published book entitled, "Realizing the Vision of Two -Way Immersion: Fostering Effective Programs and Classrooms ". Our Bilingual and ESL programs at Fuller Middle School were profiled in a study by the Rennie Center entitled, "Seeking Effective Policies and Practices for English Language Learners." Staff from Fuller were subsequently invited to present their work at a state -wide conference highlighting effective educational practices for English language learners. Teachers across the district and those from other districts have participated in a wide variety of professional development opportunities offered by our staff. These include: assessing English language learners, sheltering content, and effective instructional practices for English language learners. This year, as in past years, we were pleased to have a number of staff members selected to make presentations at several important educational conferences. We also co- sponsored, with the Massachusetts Association of Speakers of Other Languages, a pre- conference institute on Dual Language Education. The mark of any effective program is continued analysis and self - reflection. This 2007 Annual Report year, as a result of the two -year study we had undertaken of our Two -Way elementary program, we received a $370,000 grant to share this information with other districts state -wide. Similar self - studies of the programs at Fuller and Walsh are now underway. The elementary Sheltered English Programs for Spanish and Portuguese speakers continue to be housed at Woodrow Wilson, Potter Road, and Brophy schools. Bilingual Spanish and Portuguese programs, which have been maintained for newcomers, continue to be offered at Wilson, Potter, Brophy, Fuller and Framingham High School. At the elementary level, English as a Second Language classes are based at Dunning. The co- teaching model is in its fourth year of implementation in grades 3 -5. In this model, native English - speaking students and English language learners are integrated and taught by highly qualified standard curriculum and ESL certified teachers. ESL programs at the secondary level continue to be offered at Fuller and Framingham High. Students develop their English skills by progressively advancing through five levels of ESL at Fuller and 6 levels at Framingham High. Our Spanish /English Two -Way Program is housed at Barbieri, Walsh, and Framingham High. Parent involvement is an important element in all four programs. Parent Involvement Facilitators at each school outreach to families throughout the year. Events that have been well attended include: Homework and Study Skills Workshop, Helping Children with Literature, Family Math Night, Benefits of Bilingualism, College Planning Night, MCAS planning at orientation, Two -Way self -study discussion and Brazilian family night. The success of our programs is due to the dedication and expertise of a highly qualified professional and paraprofessional staff. This past summer, over 50 staff members participated in workshops to develop and Education 216 Town of Framingham refine curriculum, as we continue to refine and improve the programs for the benefit of our students and their families. Respectfully Submitted, Susan J. McGilvray- Rivet, Ed.D. Director of Bilingual, ESL and Sheltered English Programs Buildings & Grounds 2007 was the first year of occupancy of the High School after the Renovations Project, Special Projects and several Capital Projects that were in progress throughout the school district. In addition, school utilization over the summer months by outside organizations, athletic programs and summer schools makes it a challenge to get the summer maintenance and cleaning completed in the short period of time we have over the summer months. The maintenance personnel were busy during the summer months remodeling, repainting and rearranging classrooms, installing new wiring, data and receptacles in numerous classrooms and offices throughout the school district. As usual, there were numerous staff moves over the summer due to program changes and classroom relocations in various schools. When it comes to the annual cleaning and sanitizing program in the schools, the requirements are becoming more difficult due to the extensive utilization of our facilities, but our custodians were able to pull it off again by rearranging their schedules and getting creative with down time due to program shifts or changes. I want to commend all the custodians for their hard work, diligence and dedication to their buildings in efforts to accomplish the exemplary results with short staff and the constant juggling of spaces and programs. Capital Projects: The Town approved Capital Projects for the past year consisted of the following: 2007 Annual Report Replacement of the damaged auditorium ceiling in the Fuller Middle School. 0 Replacement of the McCarthy Elementary School roof. Thayer Campus replacement of all windows, exterior trim, fascia, gutters and downspouts. 0 Continued phasing replacements of DDC heating controls in several schools. 0 Remove and replace McCarthy Elementary School fire alarm system. 0 Replacement of 3 maintenance vehicles for Buildings and Grounds. Special Projects: Even with a limited budget, numerous Special Projects were undertaken this past year and our maintenance staff was able to perform some minor miracles in time for the opening of school. Special Projects were undertaken at various other schools that are listed below. Barbieri Elementary School State mandated fire alarm testing of the entire system was accomplished over the summer involving our fire alarm contractor, elevator contractor, Framingham Fire Department and sprinkler subcontractor where applicable and our school department electrician to help coordinate all parties being present at one time. Barbieri School had repairs and repaving of numerous potholes. Repairs and new speakers were added to the PA system in several classrooms to upgrade communications in the school. Brophy Elementary School The Brophy Elementary School also had the entire fire alarm inspected and tested as described for the Barbieri School. We also contracted with a private contractor for some pothole and minor paving repairs to be completed over the summer months. New exit signs and emergency lighting units were installed through the school to upgrade the fire alarm system. Education 217 Town of Framingham A new handicap ramp and sidewalk was installed in front of the school as part of the Townwide ADA upgrades through a Block Grant secured by the Town. Dunning Elementary School The fire alarm was tested and certified over the summer and some minor repairs were done to the smoke detector part of the system. All emergency exit signs and lights were replaced over the summer to upgrade the fire alarm. A private General Contractor was hired to make repairs to several pothole areas in the parking lot and driveway areas around the school. Fuller Middle School A Capital Project to replace the damaged Auditorium ceiling was undertaken over the summer. The original ceiling was removed and a new suspended ceiling, lights stage curtains, new fire curtain and some new stage lighting was accomplished with the Capital Project funds. The Auditorium was repainted and a new stage lighting system was also done. Framingham High School The school is now fully occupied, but a substantial punch list of work remains to be completed before we will accept the building in it's entirety. Additional paving was done at the rear of the gymnasium wing and several areas of landscaping was replaced due to winter damage. The Wellness Center received a HVAC system that was part of the final punch list. Several roof hatches and ladders were installed for access to the numerous roof levels and was done through the project. A new trash recycling room was constructed and a new compactor was installed. The work 2007 Annual Report was done in conjunction with DPW and the Sanitation Department. Several new ActivBoard units were installed in several classrooms over the summer. B & G coordinated and supervised the sitework and concrete pier installation for a new playground for the Blocks children in one of the rear courtyards. Hemenway Elementary School Hemenway had numerous potholes and paving repairs done over the summer. Fire alarm testing of the entire system and modular classrooms was done over the summer. Several classrooms had the PA and sound systems upgraded over the summer. Jun per Hill School Juniper Hill also underwent the annual fire alarm testing that has been described above. Some tree pruning was done over the summer and several catch basins were cleaned over the summer. King Building In an effort to expand teaching space, the SPED Department was relocated to the Maynard Building suites 301 and 302 and the original kitchen area was transformed into a staff meeting and workroom. The old office spaces had the walls repainted, carpets cleaned and electrical and data upgrades were done in several of the old small offices in order to relocate the BLOCKS program. BLOCKS extended their playground at the rear of the building and B &G supervised and coordinated the site expansion and repairs. Education 218 Town of Framingham The King Building also had a complete fire alarm test and inspection this past summer as outlined above. Maynard Building Although the Maynard Building does not belong to the School Department, we received permission from the Town to utilize some vacant space on the second floor to house the Human Resources and Health Department in order to accommodate the expanding need for space of the BLOCKS Program at the King Building. We repaired the damaged walls left by previous tenants, repaired and replaced ceilings tiles as necessary, updated the data and phone systems, repainted the suites and cleaned and shampooed the carpets. As needed, we also replaced some old, damaged lighting fixtures. McCarthy Elementary School A new tremco ballasted roof was installed at McCarthy over the summer. The project included new metal fascia trim and new curbing for the rooftop HVAC units. The second floor corridor was recarpeted because of damage caused by the contractor during construction. A new AC system was installed over the computer room and head end closet to maintain cooler temperatures for the equipment. The fire alarm system was replaced in it's entirety over the summer as a result of past ongoing trouble calls and repairs to the system. The PA system was also upgraded throughout the building. Potter Road Elementary School: As with the other schools, Potter Road had it's entire fire alarm system tested and certified over the summer. 2007 Annual Report In conjunction with several other schools, a private contractor was hired to do minor repairs to numerous potholes in the parking lots. Stapleton Elementary School A new condensate pump system was installed over the summer as part of the heating system. The Stapleton School entire fire alarm system was tested and certified over the summer months as part of our annual testing program. Thayer Campus Thayer Campus received all new insulated windows and frames as part of the Capital Projects. In addition to the windows, the fascia, gutters and downspouts were replaced around the entire building. All new windows and trim were painted along with all other trim on the building. As part of the repairs to the building, we landscaped the front of the school and installed a new sign and flagpole. The Thayer Campus fire alarm system was also tested and certified during the summer. Transportation Office Fire alarm testing was done over the summer. Valsh Middle School Several roof fans were replaced over the kitchen and some classrooms to improve ventilation. The units that were installed are all energy efficient as part of our energy management program. Several classrooms were renovated and some partitions were removed, relocated and painted over the summer. The Fire Alarm system was tested over the summer. Education 219 Town of Framingham The air compressor for the pneumatic heating controls was replaced over the summer because of a major failure to maintain adequate pressure for heating control switches. Voodrow Vilson Elementary School The Fire alarm was tested during the summer We did some tree trimming around the school to improve clear visibility of all playground and walking areas. In closing, I would like to express the appreciation of all Buildings and Grounds personnel to the staff and administrators of all our schools for their patience and understanding during the constant disruptions and activity relocations caused by the increased use of our facilities during the summer vacation. For Matt Torti, Assistant Director, and myself, I want to offer our thanks and appreciation to our staff of custodians and maintenance personnel for their performance, professionalism and dedication during a very busy year. Respectfully Submitted, John T. Kubitza, Director Business Administration The School Business Administration Department provides support to the overall educational goals of the School Department. The primary functions of the office are to provide accounting for Town appropriated School Department budgeted funds, as well as, over 70 Revolving Funds and State and Federal Grants. Also, to provide direction /specifications for procurement issues by bidding and requests for proposals, management of Accounts Payable and Receivable funds, and purchasing and management of contracts. There are yearly end of the year fiscal reports that are given to the Department of Education. Food Services, Transportation and Building and Grounds 2007 Annual Report Departments report to the Director of Business Administration. The Town and School have worked together implementing new joint Accounting software called ( Munis). We are continuously working with Munis to fully utilize all features, including Payroll Projections and specialized Crystal reports. One important goal is to allow the RC Directors the capability to run financial reports through Munis for their own departments. Some RC Directors in FY07 have begun training to run their own accounting reports. This will give them more control of their budgets and the ability to provide better service to the students. A system wide grants process book was developed and given to grant managers to better apply for and utilize all grants. A new Director of Food Service for the school system was hired in May. Goals of the food service are to improve selection of food in the cafeteria and to work closely with the Health and Wellness committees to implement healthy choices in the menu selection. Special Education costs will continue to be monitored throughout the next fiscal year. The Circuit Breaker SPED State funding formula has helped Framingham support rising SPED costs. At this point we feel there will be no new funding or significant increase in the formula. The State will continue to adjust the formula for local school districts. This is an area that the School system will monitor in FY 07 -08. In FY 06 -07 there was a cost overrun in the school budget of $1,499,617 which the town transferred funds to the schools operating budget. We have seen a decrease in funding from State and Federal grants in the past year. These grants have supported many programs and salaries. We will continue to look for more funding through them as well as other sources. Education 220 Town of Framingham The School Business Office has computerized all accounting functions for school appropriations, grants and revolving accounts. The goal is to improve services and fiscal accountability. Respectfully Submitted, David Proule, Director Curriculum & Staff Development The major responsibilities of this department include 1) curriculum development, review and implementation; 2) assessment of student achievement and analysis of data; 3) resource and program support; and 4) professional development. Curriculum The Curriculum Frameworks from the Massachusetts Department of Education continue to guide our curriculum implementation and revision process. This year, all PreK through grade 12 teachers received a copy of the updated district English Language Arts Curriculum Guide, as well as a grade level folder with pertinent information for their one specific grade. Teachers worked this summer to create curriculum maps for each grade level that illustrate how teachers can include all standards in a systematic way throughout the school year. These maps will be revisited during the summer 2008 based on teacher feedback. A new writing program, "Units of Study for Teaching Writing" by Lucy Calkins, is being implemented at the elementary level. Teachers had an opportunity to attend a one - day training in August, as well as receive the materials for their classroom at that time. Each school has developed professional development experiences for their teachers, including study groups to review upcoming lessons and current student work. The district has offered a number of graduate level courses encompassing the Lucy Calkins materials throughout the school year. In addition, the district early release and full day 2007 Annual Report professional development sessions have been devoted to supporting this implementation process. Amanda Hartman, a senior staff developer with Lucy Calkins, presented a half - day session for teachers on conferencing with their student writers. Teachers have been submitting examples of student work that will be assembled into a district wide portfolio during summer 2008. "Write Traits: Six Traits for Effective Writing ", published by Great Source, is being adopted at the secondary level. Jeff Anderson, a consultant for the program, facilitated a full day training on December 17, 2007. Middle and high school teachers attended this workshop and are beginning to utilize these materials in their classrooms. The second half of the training is scheduled for November 4, 2008. The English Language Arts committee of PreK through grade 12 teachers continues to meet monthly to evaluate the implementation of the new curriculum guide and new writing programs, as well as beginning to align existing materials with the curriculum expectations. Karen Waldstein, K -8 English Language Arts /Social Studies Curriculum Specialist, chairs this committee. An Elementary Math Study Group is continuing its work from last year. The committee is chaired by Tracy Manousaridis, K -8 Math Curriculum Specialist. This committee is reviewing elementary math programs and will be making a recommendation to conduct a pilot program during the 2008 -2009 school year. The goal is to purchase one new program for all elementary schools in the 2009 -2010 school year. A professional development plan will be written to accompany this adoption. Impact math is in its second year of implementation at the middle school level. District -wide pre and post -unit assessments have been developed and implemented in grade 6. The development of these Education 221 Town of Framingham assessments is ongoing in grades 7 and 8. School- based professional development continues, as does district wide grade level sessions during early release days. The 2007 middle school math MCAS results were impressive. In grade 6, 54% of the students scored proficient or advanced in mathematics, as compared to only 35% in 2005 and 2006. As a result of the improved middle school math MCAS performance, Framingham has been removed from the Department of Education list of districts in need of improvement. The district has now met all Annual Yearly Progress targets for the No Child Left Behind in both English Language Arts and Mathematics. The K -12 Science Curriculum Committee continues to meet this school year. This committee is working to complete the K -6 curriculum alignment and is investigating the feasibility of developing common science assessments. A number of professional development experiences have been offered this year, including a graduate course with Garden in the Woods for elementary staff and MCAS Data Analysis for middle school teacher during the early release sessions with George Duane, the retired Framingham Science Curriculum Resource Specialist. A new K -12 Social Studies Committee has been formed this year, chaired by Karen Waldstein, K -8 ELA /Social Studies Curriculum Specialist. This committee will review the exiting Social Studies Curriculum to identify areas of need as well as strategies to meet these needs, including professional development. Through a partnership with Primary Source (a staff development organization), 30 teachers have participated in workshops and study groups focusing on global connections. During the summer 2007, one teacher traveled to Africa and three traveled to China on educational study groups. Teachers who have participated in these trips have shared many powerful experiences with their students. Framingham has been fortunate to participate in a three 2007 Annual Report year Teaching American History grant through the TEC Collaborative. This past summer, seven secondary teachers took courses that increased their content knowledge by working with experts at area museums. Eight elementary teachers are participating in similar courses during this school year. In addition, three elementary teachers participated in a grant to incorporate economics in the study of history. This opportunity was made possible by the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. Robert Davis, Director of Health and Physical Education, has planned staff visits to local organizations that service the students in Framingham. This professional development has provided the health and physical education staff an opportunity to better understand the services these organizations provide to Framingham children. Foreign Language teachers from the middle and high schools have been meeting to develop a common assessment for students entering the high school. This assessment should be completed by the spring. The Arts teachers have worked with ELL teachers this year during professional development early release days to develop strategies for successfully including ELL students in arts classes. One activity included the study of various Brazilian artists. The sessions have been held at the Danforth Museum and have been very well received. Donna Wresinski and Patricia Zucchi, Co- Directors of the Fine Arts, planned and facilitated professional development for these teachers. Technology Education teachers at the middle and high schools have been working together to align curriculum under the guidance of our returning department chair, David Bouvier. The middle school teachers have had the opportunity to preview high school technology programs so that they can provide guidance to current eighth grade students. Education 222 Town of Framingham The SAGE Department, Framingham's program for gifted and talented students, is currently providing direct services to more than 370 students in all schools, K -12. In addition, SAGE staff works with classroom teachers to differentiate learning experiences. For example, the SAGE department received a grant from the MA Department of Education to develop differentiated math centers, working with the district K -8 Math Specialist and classroom teachers. This program is called Step -Up -To -Math and is now available in elementary classrooms across the district. The SAGE staff has also worked with teachers and principals to implement the national competition, Word Masters, in grades 3 through 8. This program engages students in analytical thinking activities and enhances students' spelling and vocabulary skills. Many Framingham students have received awards for their achievement in this rigorous program. This year, SAGE has been awarded two MA Department of Education grants. One will provide middle school teachers with time and materials to develop differentiated reading units. The second grant will create a resource and support center for teachers and administrators from Framingham and other districts. Framingham SAGE staff will be available to work with educators as they develop a wide range of differentiated materials. Framingham is one of only three Massachusetts communities to receive this grant. The work of the SAGE department is overseen by Diane Modest, Department Head for Gifted and Talented Education, K -12, a recognized leader in her field. Assessment State MCAS results have been received, reviewed and analyzed for the district and each school. Twenty -one MCAS tests were administered in the spring of 2007. The English Language Arts MCAS is given in every grade from 3 through 8 and in grade 10. Scores for grades 3, 4, 5, and 6 improved over the previous year. Although the grade 10 score did not improve, 79% of students 2007 Annual Report scored proficient or advanced, compared to 71% at the state level. The Mathematics MCAS is given in every grade from 3 through 8 and in grade 10. Scores for grades 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 10 improved over the previous year. As a result of the improved math MCAS performance, Framingham has been removed from the Department of Education's list of schools in need of improvement. The district has now met all Annual Yearly Progress targets for the No Child Left Behind in both English Language Arts and Mathematics. General Science MCAS tests are given in grades 5 and 8. At the high school level, students may select a Biology, Chemistry, Intro to Physics or Technology Engineering end of course MCAS. This assessment is taken for the first time at the end of grade 9 or 10. Framingham High School students took either the Biology or Chemistry MCAS in 2007. Their results far surpassed the state results. In Biology, 72% of Framingham students earned Proficient or Advanced, compared to 42% at the state. In Chemistry, 73% of the Framingham students scored Proficient or Advanced, compared to 24% at the state level. The Science MCAS will become part of the high school competency determination beginning with the class of 2010. History MCAS assessments were given in grades 5, 7, and 11. These were pilot tests; individual student results were not given. The US History MCAS becomes part of the high school competency determination beginning with the class of 2012. Common grade level assessments that are aligned with curriculum standards are used across all schools in the district. These assessments, developed by committees of teachers, are used to identify specific strengths and weaknesses of students and the curriculum. Teachers use this information to plan their instruction and to provide support in areas of need. By providing targeted Education 223 Town of Framingham assistance in areas of demonstrated need, student achievement will improve. This is the second year "SchoolBrains" by Aptium is being used to analyze district assessments. This web -based analysis system enhances a teacher's ability to manage and analyze data, leading to differentiated instructional groupings. Resource and Program Support Curriculum and staff development in the district are enhanced through the expertise and efforts of support staff. Curriculum specialists, literacy specialists, teachers of gifted and talented, program directors, and librarians provide leadership in curriculum development and delivery through courses, workshops, study groups, as well as ongoing classroom support for teachers, students, and curriculum integration. Staff Development Professional development is ongoing and occurs in the classroom with curriculum support personnel and beyond school hours through courses, workshops, study groups and curriculum development committees. At all three levels, individual, building and district, staff has opportunities to improve their content knowledge and teaching skills. Approximately 45 graduate level courses will be offered during the 2007 -2008 school year, including "Strategies and Methods for Effectively Including Children with Behavioral Issues in the Classroom," "Launching the Writing Workshop with Lucy Calkins," "School Safety: Bias, Bullying, and GLBT Issues," and "Technology for Teachers." In addition, over forty workshops will be offered, many that are school based, developed to address the unique needs of a particular school. Examples of these workshops include "Getting to Know the FPS Webmail System," "Curriculum Map Revision for Algebra I and Geometry," "Developing a Graduate Course," and "Speech and Language: Research, Methodology and Practice." Some workshops were also offered 2007 Annual Report in conjunction with the Framingham Teachers' Association and the Massachusetts Teachers' Association, including License Renewal Workshops, an I Can Do It Classroom Management workshop, and Introduction to and Intermediate Excel were offered to secretarial/ clerical support staff. All professional development offerings are listed online at www.framingham.kl2.ma.us. Click "Professional Development" and then "About" to view this year's complete list of offerings. Respectfully Submitted, Nancy Sprague, Director Family Support Programs The department of Family Support Programs, which includes the: Parent Information Center, Framingham Community Partnership for Children, the McKinney —Vento Program for Homeless Children and Families and the Parent -Child Home Program continued to expand services and programs for families of young children in 2007. Over $800,00 in grant funding support the activities and programs under the Family Support Programs umbrella, a reduction in state funding available from the previous year. The Controlled School Choice program entered its ninth year in 2007. All families with incoming kindergarten children registered through the Parent Information Center. The Center continues to be the hub of a number of activities that meet the needs of families. Over 1300 students in grades K -8 registered through PIC in 2007. 650 children entered Framingham kindergartens, 90% received their first choice school as well as their request for a full day program. The demand for full day kindergarten continues to be strong and each year the district has added full day classes where space and funding would allow. The $2800.00 tuition plus a limited amount of state funding made it possible to cover the additional costs incurred for a full day program. A number of other programs including the Let's Go to Education 224 Town of Framingham Kindergarten program, the Fun Fair For Young Children, the annual Kindergarten Expo and the Let's Go to K newsletter continued to focus on providing families with the tools to transition to kindergarten and ensure that their children have successful and positive learning experiences. In the fall, a monthly Community Events calendar was posted on the Framingham Public Schools home page. The calendar includes both school and town activities and events that would be of interest to families with children in grades K -8. A Community Events Calendar for Young Children accessed through the FPS early childhood link, was also established and is shared monthly with community providers. The Community Partnership for Children, funded through the Massachusetts Department of Early Education and Care, served over 50 children by providing scholarship support for families seeking quality preschool and childcare programs. In addition to scholarships, the CPC also supported professional development activities for over 50 staff members, mentoring and consultation support for programs seeking National Association for the Education for Young Children (NAEYC) accreditation, a professional development series for community program directors and on -going mental health and behavior consultation for children identified by program providers. The CPC program plays a pivotal role in linking families, early education and care programs and the Framingham Public Schools. The Department of Early Education and Care (EEC) implemented changes in eligibility guidelines for families in July 2007. Families must meet the 50% state median income guideline to receive assistance. EEC also established a regional reimbursement rate for all community providers and revised the way in which funding is distributed to the lead agency. Funding will now be divided into three categories; Direct Service, Professional Development and Accreditation Support. The mission of the CPC is to support young families and children in our community. 2007 Annual Report The Parent Child Home Program (PCHP) provided critical literacy and language development support for families with children ages 18 months to 3 years of age. PCHP's mission is built around the concept that the parent is the child's first teacher. A well trained cadre of home visitors provide on site training and support for parents and their children in their own homes. In addition PCHP completed the 3r year of providing English as a Second Language classes for PCHP parents. This has been extremely successful and has helped the entire family build their literacy skills. The Department of Early Education and Care as well as a grant from the "Break the Cycle of Poverty Foundation" funded PCHP. The Department of Early Education and Care awarded a grant to the Framingham PCHP to expand services to Marlboro families as a collaborative effort between Framingham and the Assabet Valley Area Family Network. The program was launched in March 2007 and will be on -going in 2008. The program provides family outreach, early literacy, education and support for families with young children in both communities. The McKinney -Vento Program for Homeless Children continued to expand services for homeless children and families in 2007 and in an effort to increase access and services to families merged its efforts with the districts Safe and Supportive Schools initiatives. Both programs focus on supporting at -risk and vulnerable youth as well as providing training and consultation to school staff. Framingham Public School teachers and staff were recognized by the Department of Education for their part in creating a "Teachers Strategies Guide for Working with Children Exposed to Trauma ". The manual provides hands on, practical suggestions for school personnel working with children and will be shared with other districts throughout the Commonwealth. Professional development, on -site consultations, tutoring support, outreach and advocacy all played a role in Education 225 Town of Framingham supporting families and children in the community. Family Support Programs will continue to expand both its programs and services in 2008. Respectfully Submitted, Anna Carollo Cross, Director School Health Services School Health Services provides the students of the Framingham Public Schools (FPS) with comprehensive nursing care. Every school in the district has at least one nurse on site each day during school hours. The nurses manage the daily health and medical needs for students and staff as needed and students whose chronic medical issues include, but are not limited to, diabetes, cancer, allergies, asthma, and feeding tubes. The Essential School Health Services with Consultation ( ESHSC) grant, funded by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPI-1) since 1993, has allowed Framingham School Health Services to build and maintain a strong infrastructure. Funding provides personnel, services and equipment, including technology, a nurse practioner- managed school -based clinic at Woodrow Wilson School, and a Vision Coordinator who plans and facilitates annual vision /hearing screenings. The consultation portion of the grant has allowed Framingham to assist in the enhancement of school health services programs in 15 neighboring districts and participating non - public schools within Framingham. Funding for ESHSC will come to an end in June 2008. During January 2008, a new proposal will be submitted for funding through 2013. School Health Services has a long history of participating in research studies that examine issues important to the health and well -being of students and the community. School Health Services continues its collaboration with Boston University /New York University 2007 Annual Report on the SONIC study (a study investigating sun exposure, moles and melanoma in school - aged children) and CHEERS (a study investigating strategies to address obesity in school -aged children). Successful collaborations exist with FPS and the New England Eye Institute in the operation of the Vision Center at Fuller Middle School. The Vision Center provides a full range of services to Framingham Public Schools families and staff, including comprehensive exams, eyeglasses and vision therapy. The Metrowest Community Healthcare Foundation (MCHF) has funded programs initiated by school nurses, including "Girls on the Move ", designed and facilitated by Judy Wester at McCarthy School. This highly popular and growing program targets girls at risk for overweight and obesity. During Fall 2007, Framingham High School nurses Jane Spigel and Cheryl Aglio - Girelli, received funding from MCHF to purchase new AED's for every school building. The Teen Parenting and Pregnancy program (TPP), in its fifteenth year, is funded by the Massachusetts Department of Social Services. The focus of the program is to provide coordination of services to pregnant and parenting mothers and fathers. Services include, education, psychosocial /emotional support, medical referrals, and daycare. The goals of the program include healthy outcomes for mothers and babies and keeping mothers and fathers in school to graduate. School nurses are an active presence on the Health Advisory Council. Their participation during the past year was integral to the hiring of a new Food Services Director and the writing of a federally mandated district -wide Wellness Policy that was approved by School Committee in Spring 2007. During the Fall of 2007, nurses trained a number of teachers, administrators, and bus Education 226 Town of Framingham drivers in the administration of epi -pens for use in treating students with life- threatening allergic reactions. Epi -pen administration training will be ongoing as needed. Also, in the Fall of 2007, School Committee approved nurse - administration of over - the - counter medications during school hours. School Health Services is committed to providing pre- eminent nursing services to the FPS community. We look forward to another year of administering our program. Respectfully Submitted, Judy Styer, Director Human Resources We continue to be committed to getting the best educators for the best school system in Massachusetts. Our recruiting efforts this year began on January 30 Staff attended eight job fairs and three college campuses. Through these efforts, eighty -eight new teachers were hired. Of these new staff members, fifty -nine had a masters degree or higher. They truly are of a high quality. All nine collectively bargained agreements expired during 2007. Negotiations began and concluded with the Teachers Association, Custodian and Maintenance Personnel, and Food Services. Contract talks began in 2007 and will continue into 2008 with Administrators, Bus Drivers, and Educational Support Personnel. In 2008, negotiations will begin with Nurses, Secretaries, and Title I. Congratulations are extended to the following staff members whom attained Professional Teacher Status in 2007: Dalia Abrego- Rivera; Paulo Araujo; Alberto Barcenas; Lisa Barnes; Kristina Beattie; Nicole Becker; Jacob Bersin; Meesa Bowen; Margaret Cabot Rodriguez; Justin Casinghino; Virginia Catanese; Anastasia Catrickes; Christine Ciavarra; Glenda Cohen; Susan Colella; Erin Conway; Michael Crosby; Sara Cummins; Kristina Dahlen; Jeffrey Davis; Tracy Dennis; Kristen Dykeman; Andrea Farrar; Jennifer Ferreyra; 2007 Annual Report Katherine Fuentes- DeLima; Kevin Fox; Christine Gavrilles; Kevin Gill; Mark Goldschmidt; Elizabeth Goranson; Shawna Graham; Matthew Hanlon; Heidi Islas; David Johnston; Sommer Jones; Inna Kantor - London; Cynthia Krol; Sarah Lahey; Jennifer Levitan; Michelle Masella; Michelle Merusi; Anica Miller- Rushing; Maria Celia Moraes- Sorgman; Kelly O'Brien; Cynthia Page; Diane Parisi; Adrianne Paul; Wendy Perkins; Michaela Rosewell; Kate Sorgi; Christopher Strader; Karen Strader; Cora Stubbs -Dame; Anne Sullivan; Andrew Sullivan; Keith Truesdale; Thomas Warren; Joanne Weldon; Claire Winhold; Eric Wisneski; Lawrence Wolpe; and Susan Wood. It is a privilege at this time to express the School Department's gratitude to our retiring faculty of 2007: Susan Butler; Beverly Doll; William Doll; James Dumas; Pamela Ellis; Daniel Fleming; Marilyn Foley; John Foscaldo; Walter Gowey; Christopher Hill; Mark Iarussi; Nanci Keller; Katheryn Kiely; Marie Kosengarten; Ronee Krashes; Dolores Krasner; Linda Littleton; Laura Mahoney; Ellen Makynen; William Monnie; Frank Pula; Ray Rodriguez; Kevin Salvi; Linda Schiffman; Julie Stanton; Anna Thorpe; Josephine Webster; and Kathleen Whalen- Eaton. They have served our community with dedication and professional commitment. We thank them and we wish them the best in their future endeavors. Respectfully Submitted, Paula J. Ceglowski, HR Director Special Education Program The Department of Special Education provides a broad array of services for children and youth identified with disabilities from the ages of three through twenty -two. The referral, evaluation and placement procedures are governed by state and federal special education laws and regulations, namely The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Framingham Public Schools is Education 227 Town of Framingham committed to the goal of providing an appropriate education for students with special needs in the least restrictive setting. During the 2006 -2007 school year, the following array of programs and services were offered by the Framingham Public Schools from Pre - School to High School: Special Education Resource Rooms are available in each school. The Resource Room model provides direct teaching in both special and regular class settings, through inclusion, supportive teaching and /or consultation to the regular classroom teacher of identified children. There are thirty -eight Substantially Separate classes from Pre - School through High School. These students require comprehensive programming which is provided outside of the regular education classroom for more than 60% of the school day. These classes are located at the High School, three Middle Schools, at seven Elementary Schools, and at the Pre - School serving the special education needs of students throughout the District. Where appropriate, these students are included in standard curriculum classes and ancillary activities. Related services, namely speech /language therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, adaptive physical education and services from the teachers of the visually impaired may be included in a student's Individualized Education Plan JEP) and are available by itinerant personnel at all schools. Inclusion programs have been established using a variety of approaches throughout the district. Some classes are team - taught, some classes meet for specific periods, and some special education teachers are assigned to a group of classes. In addition, some teachers who are dually certified in special education and regular education have full time responsibility for inclusion classes at the elementary level. Woodrow Wilson has continued to increase co- taught Inclusion 2007 Annual Report Programs. Hemenway, McCarthy and Stapleton have co- taught inclusion classes at each grade level. Framingham High School and all Middle Schools have co- taught classes serving students on IEPs. Framingham is a model for Pre - School Programs for both children with special needs and typical children ages three to five. The placement of children with special needs in the Pre - School Programs emphasizes language, communication and social skills development. The majority of children with special needs in the BLOCKS Pre - School Program are integrated throughout their school day with children without special needs. In addition, Framingham increasingly has been serving young children with significant special needs within the BLOCKS Program, thereby reducing the number of potential out -of- district placements and promoting inclusion with typical peers. Framingham is providing special education programs and services to 21% of the total school population. It is important to note that nearly 70% of these students are spending most if not all of their school day in regular education classes with support. Of the one hundred and eighty students in out -of- district placements, Framingham has been successful in either cost sharing the cost of the program with Human Services agencies, such as the Department of Social Services or receiving funding from the State Department of Education to pay for some of the costs through the Circuit Breaker. Framingham received a grant for school year 2006 -2007 to provide training and consultation opportunities to selected schools and staff focused on the development of classroom instructional modifications in the regular education setting. This grant supported many summer workshops in which regular and special education teachers participated. Education 228 Town of Framingham Areas of Growth Framingham continues to see a significant increase in the number of children with autism, with multiple disabilities and medical needs, with significant social/ emotional disabilities, particularly at the Pre - School and Elementary level. The severity of these disabilities presents challenges to the school district to develop new and additional programs in order to maintain these children in the public schools. The continued increase of children with disabilities whose first language is other than English presents significant challenges in recruiting and hiring qualified Bilingual Special Education Staff. Areas of ongoing needs include: strategies for bridging and coordinating curriculum and materials among regular and special education staff; increased co- taught inclusion classes at the middle and high school levels and increased programming for children with autism at the elementary and middle school levels. Consultation and staff training are necessary in the areas o£ teaching students with learning disabilities, strategies for inclusion, community inclusion, strategies for classroom management and implementation of alternate assessment; ongoing coordination among the Bilingual and Special Education offices, particularly relating to assessment and identification of special education for students whose first language is other than English; students with disabilities participation in the statewide Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS), with particular focus on accommodations and alternate assessment. In conclusion, Framingham has continued to implement and provide a comprehensive continuum of programs, services, and placement options for students with disabilities. Framingham is fortunate to have an active Special Education Parent Advisory 2007 Annual Report Council whose role is to advise the special education department and to engage parents of children with disabilities in the schools through meetings and town wide newsletters. Respectfully Submitted, Pamela Kaufmann, Director Office of Technology The Office of Technology is responsible for all administrative and instructional technology for the Framingham Public Schools, and includes the Computer Center and the Television Production Studio. Seventeen locations are supported on our fiber optic wide area network (WAN), over 9,000 users (5,500 accounts) and almost 3,000 computers. The focus of the Office of Technology remains two -fold: 1) to address the continued consolidation of the district's network infrastructure and information management system, and 2) to address the issues surrounding integration of technology within the instructional environment to enhance students' educational experiences. The Office of Technology continues to advance the district's level of technology integration in day -to -day instruction by collaborating efforts with the Office of Curriculum and Professional Development. It also is responsible for ensuring the district remains in compliance with the Children's Internet Protection Act and other applicable regulations to promote a safe environment through the district's Acceptable Use Policy Guidelines for Internet Usage. The Framingham Public School system's Technology Plan establishes clear goals and strategies, specifically, strategies for using information technology systems and increasing professional development options. As required by the Massachusetts Department of Education, the evaluation of the district's progress toward meeting technology driven goals include submission of annual reports for each of the district schools by technology specialists. Framingham has had a strong history of supporting the purchase of Education 229 Town of Framingham technology for our schools. This technology plan is designed as a foundation to support the hardware and software that is in place, provide on -going Professional Development for all staff so the technology is effectively utilized, and provide a support network that will lead to seamless usage of technology in all schools and by all departments. As the Framingham Public School District moves ahead with many initiatives associated with education reform, our entire school community is aware that we can enhance learning opportunities for all students by providing enriched technology learning environments that support high performance teaching and learning in all disciplines. One of the guiding principles directing the district's technology plan is that the use of technology must be educationally driven. Making fundamental changes in teaching and learning that technology can provide and not simply trying to fit technology into current practices continues to be a primary goal. The Office of Technology is responsible for all data reporting to the Massachusetts Department of Education. These reports include student enrollment, special education, English Language Learner and staff statistics, all of which affect district funding directly. The Office of Technology continues to submit electronic reports to the state and provide statistical reports to departments within the school district regularly throughout the year. During the past year the Office of Technology developed an in -house data system to collect and report professional staff statistics to meet the requirements of the Department of Education's new Education Personnel Information Management System ( EPIMS). The EPIMS system replaces older, paper -based reports and plays an important role in the federal No Child Left Behind Act. Other projects included upgrading the in- district student data system to address recent 2007 Annual Report changes in Department of Education reporting requirements. The Office of Technology continues to support IP phones across the district. We are in the process of evaluating existing network infrastructure to determine needs for IP telephones. Furthermore, the Office of Technology is working with the Framingham Technology Department to implement a common dialing plan between municipal buildings and school locations. This will reduce calling costs town wide. The Office of Technology has hired outside consultants to audit what roles Technology has for the district. The Office of Technology is working on energy conservation through the use of technology. Each evening we turn off over a thousand computer workstations through an automation process. The department is also is the process of consolidating servers in the district to reduce energy costs. Respectfully Submitted, Stephen Yap, Network Manager Title I Title I is a federally funded program that provides financial resources to districts and schools with a high rate of students from low - income families. Four schools - Barbieri, McCarthy and Woodrow Wilson Elementary Schools, and Cameron Middle School - have "schoolwide Title I programs ". This means that all students in the school are eligible to receive support through the Title I program. Two schools - Brophy Elementary School and Fuller Middle School - have "targeted assistance Title I programs ". This means that support is provided to students with a demonstrated academic need. A majority of the Title I budget is used to hire additional staff to support struggling students. At the elementary level, there are 23 staff members who provide individual and small Education 230 Town of Framingham group instruction in literacy and mathematics. At the middle school level, there are two math specialists who serve two functions - remedial support to small groups of students, as well as coaching for the other math teachers in the school. All of these staff members meet the federal requirement of "highly qualified ", with most of them holding teaching certifications. Title I teachers are active participants in the Professional Development programs in the district. When the district adopted "Units of Study" by Lucy Calkins, many of the elementary Title I teachers enrolled in the courses offered to teachers. All Title I elementary teachers participated in the district -wide Professional Development sessions that provided further guidance on the use of the new writing program. These opportunities gave them the strategies to support both students and teachers as they adapt to the new materials. At the middle schools, the math specialists lead the implementation of "Impact ", the program that was first adopted for the 2005 -2006 school year. All Title I staff have pursued other workshops and courses that help them better meet the needs of their students. The Title I program also supports a variety of programs to support parents and families. Some workshops had an academic focus, such as strategies to help children learn mathematics. Other workshops provided parenting strategies, such as Building Self - Esteem. These workshops are coordinated through the Family Learning Center, a resource center for all parents located at the Juniper Hill Elementary School. Since Title I is a section of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), many provisions of NCLB are coordinated and implemented by the staff of the Title I program. For example, if a Tide I school is determined to be "in need of improvement ", parents have the option to transfer their students to a school that is not "in need of improvement ". During 2007, we clarified the procedures for "NCLB school 2007 Annual Report choice" so there is a consistent implementation of this mandate throughout the district. Another provision of NCLB is that schools in their second year of "improvement needed" are required to offer Supplemental Educational Services (SES) to all of their students who are from low- income families. These are tutoring services that are provided outside of the school day; providers are approved by the Department of Education, and enter into a contract with the Framingham Public Schools. This year, the Framingham Public Schools applied for and was approved to be an SES Provider; this will allow us to tutor more students at our most - struggling schools after the traditional school day has ended. We are excited for the opportunity to provide this additional service to our students. As we look back on 2007, we are proud of the excellent program we have created. We have outstanding educators in place who help parents, teachers and students meet the rigorous demands of the MCAS and No Child Left Behind. As we move forward into 2008, we hope to improve upon that excellence for the betterment of all of our students. Over the past several years, Tide I funding has decreased while the mandates and accountability levels have increased. To address these fluctuations, we must ensure that we are as efficient as possible with the resources we have. As we look at our current practices, we are guided by four major questions: 1. Who are we working with? 2. How were those students identified? 3. What is our focus with these students? 4. How do we know we are being effective? We are reviewing the research about different intervention models to identify those structures that will be most beneficial to our students. We are considering how technology can help us monitor student achievement and communicate student progress to everyone who works with that student. In addition, we Education 231 Town of Framingham are evaluating our parent involvement activities to make sure they are aligned with the requirements of NCLB and, more importantly, the needs of our families. Respectfully Submitted, Sarah Guernsey, Director Transportation Department The Transportation Department continues to provide safe school Transportation to nearly 7,000 students daily and is responsible for twenty three schools in the Town of Keefe Technical School 750 Winter Street Framingham, NIA 01702 This annual report is submitted by the members of the School Committee of the Joseph P. Keefe Regional Vocational Technical School in compliance with the provisions of the Agreement among the towns of Ashland, Framingham, Holliston, Hopkinton and Natick. The Report discusses from the perspective of the Committee the principle items with which the Committee was concerned during the year. It is a representative presentation of matters within the sole policy making authority of the Committee and of matters which the Superintendent /Director brought before the Committee for information and consultation. For greater detail and discussion, the reader may wish to consult the extended minutes of Committee meetings and the attachments thereto which are available at the School office. The Committee acknowledges with appreciation the service of its Superintendent /Director, Peter D. Dewar who will retire on April 18, 2008 and who has been retained on an interim basis through June 2008 during the search for his successor. 2007 Annual Report Framingham. With the increased congestion on town roadways and continued construction projects during drive time, this department continues to do a great job for the Framingham Community. Working with the Framingham Police department on communication during emergencies, this department also plays a key role with the Town of Framingham's Local Emergency Planning Committee (LEPC). Respectfully Submitted, Rick Gallagher, Director 508 - 416 -2100 info@jpkeefehs.org The Committee also acknowledges with appreciation the retirement in September of Karl D. Lord who served as Principal for ten years and in various administrative roles for thirty years. Mr. Lord was succeeded as Principal by James M. Lynch upon appointment by the Superintendent Director. The Committee received the retirements of Kenneth M. Whidden who had served the School since 1976, most recently as Building & Grounds Supervisor; of Robert W. Leonard who had served since 1971, most recently as Director of Special Needs; of James W. Blair, Athletic Director; of James F. Callahan, Continuing Education Director; of Christina R. Davenport, Athletic Trainer; of Stephen G. McNulty, Mathematics Instructor and coach; and of Mary G. Salvi, Graphic Arts Instructor. The Committee reorganized in June with the following results: Chairman, William N. Gaine, Jr.; Vice - Chair, Nelson Goldin; Secretary,Edward Burman; Treasurer,Jack Keating; Assistant Treasurer, Lawrence Cooper. Keefe students, including members of the Education 232 Town of Framingham Student Council and the Culinary Arts Department, participated in the inauguration of Governor Deval Patrick. The former attended the historic Youth Inauguration and met with the Governor. The latter responded to a call from the Inaugural Committee to provide and serve 500 pieces of pastry, including petit fours, cupcakes and cheesecakes. The balance of this report deals with eight major topics: Success of Graduates, Community Support, Status of the School, Administration, School Facilities, School & Personnel Security, Personnel Relations, Financial Affairs, and School Population. Success of Graduates Keefe graduated 168 students in June 2007, all of whom qualified for MCAS diplomas. The vocational /technical instruction and academic education these students received prepared them for entry into private industry, the pursuit of higher education and military service. Of those graduates, 40% entered post - secondary education, 58% began apprenticeships or obtained competitive employment, and 2% entered military service. Graduates were accepted at the following schools: University of Massachusetts, Johnson & Wales University, Regis College, Newbury College, Framingham State College, Massachusetts Bay Community College, Fisher College, Oregon State University, Pace University, Wentworth Institute of Technology, Salem State College, Mount Ida College, Becker College, Suffolk University, Savannah College of Art and Design, and Emmanuel College. Community Support Keefe has continued to receive widespread support from civic and business segments of the community. In particular, this year the Framingham Rotary Foundation awarded student scholarships; more than 100 members of the business community served on Keefe's vocational /technical advisory boards; 14 2007 Annual Report members serve on the General Advisory Board pertaining to the technical /vocational program; and other parents and students serve on the Parents' Advisory Council and the Principal's Parents' Advisory Council. Additional tangible program support was provided by Staples, Inc., Monnick Supply Co., The TJXCompanies,Inc., Comark Corporation and VelQuest Corporation. The School, following customary practice, engaged in several off - campus community construction projects that were begun or completed during the school year. These included: • Plumbing and electrical work on a church in Ashland • Foundation, rough carpentry and plumbing for the annual house building project in Natick • Remodeling of the public access TV studio at Fuller Middle School in Framingham • Installation of field lights at the Little League Baseball Field in Ashland • Constructed a deck for the clubhouse at the Sassamon Trace Public Golf Course in Natick Status of the School Early in the year the Committee was informed that the Education Management Audit Council had removed Keefe from "Watch" status as the consequence of the improvement in MCAS test scores and the changes in the school culture that have resulted in the development of a more challenging curriculum. The Administration continued to work with technical advisors from EMAC and submitted an Implementation /Action Plan to address outstanding issues. The major goals of that Plan are to: Incorporate a variety of instructional strategies in the curriculum, Education 233 Town of Framingham • Align the curriculum with appropriate academic and vocational standards, • Increase commitment to standards -based instruction and periodic assessment of progress, • Emphasize high academic expectations, and • Focus the climate and culture of the staff and students on collective efforts to achieve all components of the School's mission statement. The New England Association of Schools & Colleges Commission on Technical and Career Institutions continued the School's accreditation. It found a "healthy school on the verge of excellence, with faculty, administrative staff and students working well together for the benefit of students." This milestone was achieved as the result of a 15 month self -study to which the administration, faculty and staff devoted many hours. Among other points, the Commission commended Keefe for: • The commitment to data driven decision making to impact improvement in teaching and learning, • The positive school climate and pride in the school, • The plan to begin preparing grade 9 and 10 students for the MCAS science and social studies tests, *Aligning curriculum to the vocational - technical frameworks to meet the requirements of the Certificate of Occupational Proficiency, Recently completing an energy management program and on -going efforts to make the building more energy efficient. Administration The Committee received from the Superintendent /Director and reviewed his quarterly reports on his progress toward achievement of his performance based goals for the current year. 2007 Annual Report The Superintendent /Director reported to the Committee on his reorganization of the administrative staff to include the following positions: • Vocational Coordinator as a one -year internship subject to further evaluation, • Building and Grounds Coordinator, • Pupil Personnel Services Administrator, combining the former positions of Special Education Director and Director of Guidance. The Superintendent /Director reported quarterly to the Committee on the progress of the school toward his goals for the year which included as to academic achievement: • Developing a formal plan for student assessment, • Improving the ability to target needed instruction for MCAS low performing student subgroups, • Strengthening the connection between the academic and vocational instructional frameworks, • Preparing for vocational - technical assessments in anticipation of the Certificate of Professional Competency Program, • Increasing the competence of the faculty in using data to improve student performance, • Increasing the opportunities for students to pursue further higher academic programs. The results of the Committee's annual evaluation of the Superintendent /Director were reported at the June 2007 meeting. The evaluation was based upon five criteria with separate scores as follows: • Relationship with Committee = 4.2 • Community Relationships = 4.4 Educational Leadership = 4.4 Business and Finance = 4.3 Education 234 Town of Framingham 0 Personal Qualities = 4.4 Fourteen Committee Members participated in the evaluation. The numerical scores for each category were tabulated by the Chair. The Superintendent /Director received a composite score of 4.3 out of a possible total of 5.0. The Committee established a sub - committee to develop a new evaluation instrument and process for conducting the evaluation of the Superintendent /Director for consideration of the Committee. The sub - committee will proceed with all deliberate speed to produce a report. Michael Rossi was appointed Chair of the sub - committee. The other committee members include: A.J. Mulvey, Linda Fobes, Dr. Esther Hopkins and Dr. Stephen Kane. In January, the Superintendent- Director reported on the search for a successor to Principal Karl D. Lord and the recommendation of the review committee which included committee members, Tass Filledes and A.J.Mulvey. The Committee began the process of seeking a successor to the position of Superintendent /Director by retaining the Massachusetts Association of School Committees' Executive Director to advise the Committee on methods of conducting a wide- spread search for qualified candidates. A sub- committee was appointed to screen applicants and to recommend finalists to the Committee for interviews, verification of qualifications and final selection. The sub - committee consists of one School Committee Member from each town, one administrator, one faculty member, one parent and one student. Mr. Filledes was elected as its chair by the School Committee Members of the sub- committee. By year end, a sufficient number of applications had been received and interviews had been scheduled. School Facilities 2007 Annual Report The Siemens Technology Energy Project was completed and the Committee's consultant began the process of verifying that projected energy cost savings have and will be realized, and will be sufficient to offset the project costs. The final report of the consultant indicated that, as the result of the project, the School is using significantly less energy with savings better than the calculations originally submitted. The Committee received a report from the Superintendent /Director on the status of the Schools' existing pneumatic system which controls various elements of the energy management system. The report, prepared by Siemens Building Technologies, recommends replacing the pneumatic controls which will provide energy savings and will eliminate maintenance and repair costs for the system. The work is proposed to be accomplished by an addendum to the existing Siemens contract. School & Personnel Security The Committee received a report from the Superintendent- Director and Principal James M. Lynch on the school's security and emergency action plan and program relating to responding to incidents affecting school and student security. They reported that Committee Member, Edward Burman, a Framingham Police Officer, has been instrumental in creating the plan. The Principal reviewed both the security practices that have been implemented and plans for additional precautions. These include, but are not limited to, provisions for emergency drills, campus lockdown plans, counseling services, communication with students regarding security procedures and availability of the school resource officer under the Shannon Grant. The Superintendent /Director reported to the Committee that the Framingham Police Department, jointly with the Town of Ashland, had been awarded a grant under the Education 235 Town of Framingham state's Shannon Community Safety Initiative which aims to reduce youth violence through coordinated programs of prevention and intervention. The School has been provided with a police officer trained in such matters who has established a constructive and confidential relationship with staff and students. The Committee received a Security Overview Report from a representative of Siemens dealing with various aspects of security in premises such as Keefe's. The major elements of concern are access control, visitor management, and surveillance. Personnel Relations All three of the Keefe employee bargaining units: the Keefe Tech Educator's Association, the Secretarial Association and the Custodial Association chose to open negotiations for new contracts to follow expiration of their existing contracts on June 30, 2007. The Committee explored methods of conducting negotiations to assure that its policy role would be achieved and that a representative of the towns would have the opportunity to participate as required by state law. The Committee adopted an amended Non - Bargaining Personnel Policy which conforms the benefits available to non - bargaining personnel to the terms of the collective bargaining agreements with the three bargaining units. Financial Affairs The Committee reviewed the work of its Budget Sub - committee, under the Chairmanship of Nelson Goldin, which had held a series of working sessions and the required public hearing. The Committee scheduled an additional public informational meeting on the proposed budget (which represented an increase of 8.6% over the prior fiscal year) to consider reductions in the preliminary proposal. The Committee requested the Superintendent /Director to work with the member towns to achieve an 2007 Annual Report expense budget that would not compromise the quality of the educational experience of our students. After discussions between the Superintendent /Director and the financial authorities of the member towns, a final budget was approved by a 2 /3rds vote of the Committee in the amount of $14,472,513. The total amount of net school spending in the budget is $13,896,321, representing an increase of 4.46 %. After credits and adjustments, the amount to be allocated to the member towns according to the Regional Agreement is $11,024,766. The Committee reaffirmed its commitment remit to the towns their pro -rata shares of all credits received from the state that exceed the amount of such credits shown in the district budget approved by the towns. The Committee approved the recommendation of the Superintendent - Director to continue the policy of not participating in the state's School Choice Program due, in part, to the inadequate state reimbursement to the school of such students and the absence of funding for transportation of students in that program. The Committee adopted a revised policy regarding line item transfers in order to assure compliance with state law and Department of Education regulations which prescribe the manner of making and approving transfers among budget line items. The budget format was modified to specify categories of expense that together comprise line items within which the Superintendent /Director may make such transfers. Such transfers are to be reported to the Committee monthly. Transfers from one line item to another require the prior approval of the Committee. The School's independent auditors provided an unqualified report on the financial statements for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2006. The Management Letter recommended that the District contract with a qualified Education 236 Town of Framingham actuary to obtain an actuarial study of its liability for post - employment healthcare and other benefits, including life insurance, as required by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board. The results of this study will help the District to understand the financial impact of current decisions on the growth and possible management of this liability. After many years of holding the line on school lunch prices, the Committee recognized that it would be appropriate to increase the price paid by students purchasing their lunches from $1.50 to $2.00 to help defray the actual cost to the school of such lunches. The new price is less than the amount received by the school from the federal government for lunches and will not apply to students who qualify for free or reduced lunches. The Budget sub - committee for fiscal year 2009 completed its review of the preliminary budget and approved a preliminary budget of $15,260,019 representing a dollar increase of $787,506 or 5.44 %. This recommendation is subject to further consideration after the public hearing on February 4, 2008. School Population The Superintendent /Director reported on the student enrollment by member town and out - of- district. As of October 1, 2007 there were 665 "in- district" students and 13 "out -of- district." The town of origin of the "in- district" students governs the allocation of the district budget among the member towns. Addressing the causes of the enrollment decline in recent years, the Superintendent /Director presented the need of the administration and the Committee to address the issues of recruitment and enrollment. He forecast that over the next three to five years, due to changes in the demographics of the district, there will be fewer students in the eighth grade upon which to draw. While relations with the administrations and guidance personnel in the towns remain good, he said there is some 2007 Annual Report reverse pressure on towns to retain their own students, and there are a smaller number of students coming from towns that pay tuition. The Superintendent/ Director has plans to address these issues that will be presented to the Committee. Respectfully Submitted, Framingham: Argentina Arias Larry Cooper Linda Fobes Nelson Goldin Esther A.H.Hopkins John Kahn A.J.Mulvey Michael Rossi Ashland: Edward Burman William N. Gaine, Jr. Holliston: Yvonne Giargiari Richard Lanoue Hopkinton: Ruth Knowles Fayyaz Hussain Natick: Stephen M. Kane Tassos Filledes Education 237 Town of Framingham Framin8ham Public Library Franiinghani Public Librarj (Main) 49 Lexington Street Framingham, MA 01702 Improvements to facilities, advancements in technology, increases in programming, securing of grants and long -range planning highlighted a very successful 2007 at the Framingham Public Library. The Library was fortunate to realize several important budgetary advances at the 2007 Annual Town Meeting that provided resources to address ongoing facility, technology, and staffing challenges. Library trustees, staff, and patrons remain appreciative of the strong support received from Town Meeting Members, the Standing Committee on Education, the Finance Committee, the Capital Planning Committee, Board of Selectmen and Town Manager's Office, as well as the Office of Chief Financial Officer. Facility Challenges Building maintenance challenges continued to be at the forefront throughout the year. The Library continued to address issues such as leaky pipes, HVAC breakdowns, lighting issues in the parking garage, blocked drains, etc. Repairs were accomplished with the prompt and generous cooperation of the Town Building Services Department. Capital improvement projects completed at the McAuliffe Branch Library included: renovation of the staff room, installation of new carpeting, replacement windows, and a new building security system. These improvements addressed basic health, safety, security and operational issues at this facility. Capital improvements projects undertaken at the Main Library in 2007 included the re- 2007 Annual Report 508 - 552 -5570 508 - 820 -7210 (fax) lihrarij.puhhc@framinghamma.gov surfacing of the Lexington street parking lot and the lower level of the parking garage. Prior to construction, the Town's Department of Public Works generously cleared storm drains of debris, resulting in a considerable cost savings to the Town. Additional handicapped parking spaces were also realized with this project. The Town's Disability Commission assisted with this by providing appropriate signage. As with this, and all of the Library's capital projects, we continued to rely on the expert guidance of the Town's Purchasing Department, when seeking qualified vendors. Technology Improvements Enhancements to the library's computer network moved forward with the direction and cooperation of the Town's Technology Services Department. Additionally, Town Meeting generously funded the creation of a technology librarian position. The mission of the Framingham Public Library is to provide free access to materials and services to meet the information needs of people living in a complex and rapidly changing world, to stimulate the growth of individuals through all stages of life by making resources available to enrich all of the lives of all members of the dynamic community we serve. Information in electronic format is the fastest expanding service requested by our patrons. As a member of the Minuteman Library Network, the Library participates in a regional system consisting of 41 affiliate libraries, which offers both challenges and opportunities with technology. Most of the Minuteman libraries (and all of Framingham's size and complexity) have technology positions. Persons in these positions not only keep existing networks Library 238 Town of Framingham operating effectively, but they are essential when planning for the future and working cooperatively with other Town departments. We were pleased to announce in September, that Mr. Alan Mandel was hired as Framingham's first technology librarian. Mr. Mandel brings experience, energy, and creativity to this important position. Grants The Library received several grants in 2007. The Rotary Club of Framingham donated a new lectern for the Costin Room. The Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners awarded the Library a $40,000.00 Planning & Design project grant. This grant will allow for a comprehensive look at space allocation and future needs at the Main Library. The Library received a $23,461 grant from the Community Development Department to replace worn doors at the Main Library with automatic sliding doors. The new doors will improve access for all of our patrons. Friends of the Library The Friends of the Framingham Public Library Association, Inc. continued their long tradition of dedicated work on behalf of the Library. The Friends, through their monthly book sales, raised thousands of dollars to support collections, programs, and special projects. Please consider joining this special group of library supporters. Reaching Out To The Community The Community Services Department provided services to the community in a variety of ways during calendar year 2007. Staff conducted 11 library tours for a total of 200 participants, including one from the Simmons Graduate School of Library and Information Science. The In Home Program served 19 homebound patrons with a total number of 68 deliveries. Our 29 volunteers logged in a total of 993.75 hours. Library staff collaborated with many community organizations, including the Framingham Historical Society & Museum, Town -wide 2007 Annual Report PTO, the START Framingham Partnership and the Board of Health. Staff also attended registrations for the Framingham Adult ESL Program (FAESL), and provided library information at tables for a health fair, and the multicultural fair. We regularly attend meetings of the Framingham Community Partners. Currently, we deliver 1150 copies of our "Look Here First" library newsletter to 35 organizations throughout Framingham. A new relationship was developed this year with the Community Connections program and the Framingham Garden Club. These two organizations made significant improvements to the landscaping at the Main and Branch libraries, respectively. We are most appreciative of their efforts. The Library continued to do an outstanding job of meeting the needs of its patrons. In FY2007, the total system -wide circulation, including interlibrary loans was 913,207. A total of 368,686 visits were made to the Library this year, an average of 7,090 visits per week. A typical week recorded 1,825 uses of Internet and electronic resources and 2,175 reference transactions. Presently, there are 32,764 town residents with an active Framingham Public library card. Long Range Planning We were pleased to present to the patrons of the Framingham Public Library a new Long - Range Plan for our organization for the years 2008 through 2010. This Long Range Plan builds on the past successes of the Framingham Public Library and foresees a future in which the Library continues to uniquely contribute to the civic, intellectual and cultural pursuits of the community. Led by Vice -Chair of the Trustees Jan Harrington, we followed a new approach to planning which relied extensively on community involvement. The finished document expresses the vision and dedication of literally hundreds of people. We hope that you will take the time to read the document and learn how and by whom, it was developed. We Library 239 Town of Framingham think its content and contributors will impress you. It is our hope that by 2011 we will be able to look back and know that we have achieved our goals, and that we contributed to building a brighter future for the community of Framingham. Our sincere appreciation to the following individuals for generously serving on the Long Range Planning Committee: Jan Harrington (Chair) Mark Contois Gerald Couto Robert Dodd Carla Fink Melanie Goddard Alex Gray Donna Howland Jeanne Kelley Aimee Lambert David Magnani Laura Medrano Katherine Murphy Jane Peck Amy Rosenberg Richard Taplin Tim Sullivan We also wish to acknowledge the following, for their participation in the long -range planning process: Nancy Coville- Wallace, Cary Gifford, and Ruth Winett Framingham Board of Selectmen: Dennis L. Giombetti, Chair Jason A. Smith Charles J. Sisitsky Ginger A. Esty John H. Stasik Duane Dale, Focus Group Facilitator Focus Group Participants Jay Grande, Planning Administrator Mary Ellen Kelley, Chief Financial Officer Mass. Board of Library Commissioners Online Survey Contributors Julian M. Suso, Town Manager 2007 Annual Report Joel Winett, Town Moderator Library Trustees News At the annual town election in April 2007, Trustees Danielle Barney, Robert Dodd, Jo- Anne Thompson and Ruth Winett were re- elected. Ann Dickson and Elizabeth Fideler were elected to the Board. The Board of Trustees saw the departure of three dedicated and hard - working Trustees - Donna Howland, Phyllis Jackowicz and Karen LaChance. At the annual re- organization meeting in April, the Trustees elected the following officers: Jo -Anne Thompson, Chair; Jan Harrington, Vice - Chair; Ruth Winett, Treasurer; Ann Arvedon, Secretary. This year, the Trustees launched several new initiatives and increased the scope of their work, which is reflected in an expansion of committee assignments. Thanks to: Jo -Anne Thompson for her work as Chair of the Fundraising Committee; Kurt Samuelson, Chair of Building and Grounds Committee; Jan Harrington, Chair of the Long -Range Planning Committee; Ann Arvedon, Liaison to both Literacy Unlimited and the Newcomers and Neighbors Center; Sheila Fair, Chair of the Personnel Committee; Danielle Barney, Chair of the new Governance Committee. Thank you, also to Nancy Coville- Wallace, Ruth Winett, Ann Arvedon, Liz Fideler, Jo -Anne Thompson and Marjorie Sisitsky for their service on the Framingham Reads Together Committee. Respectfully Submitted, Jo -Anne Thompson, Chairperson Mark J. Contois, Director of Libraries Library 240 Town of Framingham AGRIcuuuRAL ADvIs®Ry COMMITTEE The Agricultural Advisory Committee was established by vote at the 2007 Annual Town Meeting. The Committee is an advisory committee without regulatory powers. The Committee's charge is to: 0 Represent the Town's farming and forestry community; Encourage, promote, and support the pursuit of farming and forestry in the Town both as a business and a community resource; and Promote the protection, preservation and economic use of farmland and foresdand within the Town. Seven members were appointed by the Board of Selectmen in October and the Committee held its first meeting on November 20, 2007. Among the issues considered at the meeting: 0 Traffic in northwest Framingham was discussed. The conflict between slow moving farm equipment and vehicles using the local roads as by- passes was noted as a public safety concern. Installing traffic signs on several local roads will be explored. 0 The need to have a Committee representative on the Open Space and Recreation Plan Committee was discussed. George Harrington was unanimously endorsed. 0 The Committee discussed the Right -to- Farm bylaw that was adopted at Town Meeting in May. This bylaw declares Framingham's support for farming. The bylaw encourages the pursuit of agriculture and promotes agriculture -based economic opportunities. The Committee decided to post the Right -To -Farm disclosure notice in Town Hall and look into mailing it out in the tax bills. The disclosure notice states: 2007 Annual Report "It is the policy of the Town of Framingham to conserve, protect and encourage the maintenance and improvement of agricultural land for the production of food, and other agricultural products, and also for its natural and ecological value. This disclosure notification is to inform buyers or occupants that the property they are about to acquire or occupy lies within a town where farming activities occur. Such farming activities may include, but are not limited to, activities that cause noise, dust and odors. Buyers or occupants are also informed that the location of property within the Town may be impacted by commercial agricultural operations." Looking forward to 2008, the Committee will begin to discuss preparing a work plan that will identify ways to support the farming community, educate the residents of Framingham about farming as a natural and community resource and interact with other boards and commissions on farming and forestry issues. Respectfully Submitted, Eugene Kennedy, ZBA Administrator CABLE ADvisoRy COMMITTEE The Cable Advisory Committee negotiated a contract for cable TV service with Verizon Communications. The Selectmen signed the contract in August 2007. The following were the key points of the 15- year contract: 0 Verizon Communications will pay the town 5% of the annual gross revenues received from its Framingham cable customers. 0 Framingham will receive $562,500 capital, which will be paid out over a seven -year period beginning 90 days from the effective date of the contract. 0 Verizon agreed to open a Customer Service office in Framingham prior to October 1, 2008. General Committees 241 Town of Framingham 0 Verizon will provide free cable service to town buildings. Verizon will provide its cable TV over fiber optic cabling, which they will make available to substantially every household in Framingham within 12 months of the Effective Date of the contract. It will be available to 100% of households no later than three years of the Effective Date of the contract. There are currently households with no cable TV service available in their neighborhood The members of the Cable Advisory Committee were: W. Peter Barnes, Jim Divver (Chair), Annabel Dodd (Vice Chair), Valerie Mulvey (Clerk), and Russ Ohanian. Respectfully Submitted, Annabel Dodd, Chair CAPITAL BUDGET COMMITTEE The Capital Budget Committee (CBC) consists of six Town Meeting Members appointed by the Town Moderator, and one representative from the Finance Committee. The role of the CBC is to recommend to Town Meeting for approval all capital projects with a cost of at least $25,000 and an expected useful life of five years. This year at the Annual Town Meeting, the CBC recommended for approval fifty -four General Fund projects. The total amount of these projects amounted to $12,841,098. The actual projects ranged from a $30,000 truck to $4,000,000 for Bowditch Field Phase L The source of funding for these General Fund projects was $199,350 from free cash and $12,641,748 from bonding. The fifty -four requested projects included the following departments: Fire, Building Services, Library, Parks and Recreation, Elections, Police, Public Works, Highway, Sanitation, Schools and Tech Services. In addition the CBC recommended to Town Meeting a total of twenty -eight Enterprise Funds projects totaling $27,186,840. The projects were as follows: Water Enterprise 2007 Annual Report Fund $5,963,385 and Sewer Enterprise Fund $21,223,455. The projects ranged from a $25,700 water main replacement design to a pumping station replacement project in the amount of $8,009,800. The sources of funding were $1,809,665 from Water and Sewer retained earnings and $25,377,175 from bonding. A substantial portion of the bonding projects will be at interest rates of 2% or less. It was a very challenging year for the CBC. The Committee made some very difficult decisions due to limited Town funds and a never ending list of capital projects requested by the various Town departments /divisions. The Committee plays a very critical role in the long -term future of the Town's infrastructure. We will continue to work closely with the Chief Financial Officer in order to make recommendations of projects that benefit our Town, while maintaining fiscal responsibility. Bill McCarthy thanks all members (Jeanne Bullock, Ted Cosgrove, Kevin Crotty, Tom O'Neil, Brian Sullivan and Linda Dunbrack) for their time and efforts during the year. It is a privilege to serve with such dedicated members. Respectfully Submitted, Bill McCarthy, Chair CUSHING CHAPEL ADVISORY COMMITTEE Report not submitted FRAMINGHAM CELEBRATION COMMITTEE The Framingham Celebration Committee was pleased to sponsor the 2007 Flag Day Festival for the second year after 20 years of sponsoring the Flag Day Parade. The scheduled Saturday start of the festival at Tercentennial Park was delayed due to severe weather conditions that included heavy rains, thunder and near miss lightening strikes. The entire program of the festival was held the next day on Sunday June I o th , 2007. We thank those flea market vendors, musical groups, jeep enthusiasts and volunteers who came General Committees 242 Town of Framingham back on our rain date to make the festival a success on Sunday. After the storm clouds departed, those in attendance enjoyed blue sky and sunshine after the day of blustery weather. The first Flag Day Festival, held in 2006, was the model for continuing the tradition with a flea market promenade with more than 50 vendors, live local entertainers, food, fun and games for the kids. The festival included a colonial fair with the Sudbury Militia, Fife & Drum Corps providing displays and playing authentic colonial music. The Framingham Historical Society provided an exhibit of the Town Clerk's original entry of the Declaration of Independence which was logged into the records of the town in 1776 and was recently restored. A commemoration ceremony was held at Cushing Chapel which featured a display of the 230 year old text and a discussion of the restoration process by Valerie Mulvey, Town Clerk. The Historical Society also provided a colonial period re- enactor who read excerpts and commented on the declaration. The ceremony was closed by a volley of colonial era musket fire provided by the Sudbury Militia group. Our patriotic procession honored all veterans, past & present. The parade around the park included fife & drums, musket fire and marching music provided by the Natick American Legion Band. There was entertainment for all ages, including performances from the Framingham High School Band, MetroWest Performing Arts Center (PAC), the Natick American Legion Band as well as a much enjoyed magic act. Once again the traditional Flag Retirement Ceremony was the closing event of the festival at the end of the day and was a moving end to a day celebrating our flag. Thank -you to those veteran's who assisted in the ceremony. Thanks also go to the following organizations for their support and assistance: Framingham Park & Recreation, Framingham Selectman, 2007 Annual Report Framingham Elks, Framingham Rotary, Framingham Building Services, Friends of Park & Recreation as well as the Framingham Fire & Police Departments. Additional thanks go to the TJX companies for their financial sponsorship. We hope that Flag Day in Framingham serves as a town wide display of patriotic spirit and pride in our community. Respectfully Submitted Doug Freeman, Chair CULTURAL COUNCIL With the receipt of $17,070 from the Massachusetts Cultural Council, and other funds raised locally, the FCC is pleased to have awarded $18,900 to our schools and cultural institutions for events and projects that further the appreciation of arts and culture in the town of Framingham. We appreciate the dedicated work of our administrative assistant, Rita Collins. Respectfully Submitted, John Steacie, Chair Sarah Donato Janice Kiley Jim Rizoli Karen Avery DISABILITY COMMISSION This year marked the 5` anniversary of the Disability Commission since its formation on May 8, 2002. Over the past 5 years we have enjoyed the continued support of Town Meeting and its' various standing committees. Following are some of the activities the Disability Commission has been involved with to ensure access for all residents, and compliance with disability laws. With the completion of the ADA Self - Evaluation and Transition Plan last year and the implementation of the ADA Transition Plan Sub - Committee, the Sub - Committee is General Committees 243 Town of Framingham going through the recommendations outlined in the ADA Report with a goal of implementing all of the recommendations by the year 2011. Upon completion of all the recommendations this will enable all residents with Disabilities equal access to all the things On June 27, 2007 Tom Hopkins, Director of the MA Architectural Access Board (MAAAB) and Mike Foley, Building Inspector met with the Commission regarding MAAAB Rules & Regulations. On September 12, 2007 the Disability Commission invited Jeffrey Dougan from the MA Office on Disability and Mark Dempsey from the MA Architectural Access Board to conduct curb cut training on ADA & AAB laws. The training was well attended by many town employees. We continue to spend monies from the Handicapped Parking Fine account toward various programs, activities and services that benefit residents with Disabilities. Funds went to projects which include: emergency management website, hearing aid devices, emergency transportation. The hearing aid devices and emergency transportation are through the Callahan Senior Center in memory of Sara Ludwig, a long time disability advocate. The Commission will reach out to various town departments, organizations, individuals, and programs etc. that may benefit from funding assistance through the Handicapped Parking Fine account. 2007 Annual Report Another important issue the Disability Commission is involved with is the MetroWest Regional Transportation Authority (MWRTA). On September 26, 2007 the Commission met with Ed Carr, Administrator for the MWRTA regarding our concerns and questions. We are working with the MWRTA and the town to ensure that this transportation service be accessible to, and useable by individuals with Disabilities. Though we are excited to have more transportation options available to persons with Disabilities, we will continue work with the MBTA to ensure the same level of service currently provided by "The Ride" to our residents with Disabilities. Also, the Commission is working with the Open Space and Recreation Plan Committee on what access improvements have been done, as well as what needs to be done to make the community more accessible. The Disability Commission would like to thank former members, Marilyn Cohen and Kathy Hughes for their dedication and service to the Commission. We would also like to thank the following town employees and departments for their continued support and efforts on behalf of the Disability Commission; Julian Suso, Town Manager, Tim Goddard, Asst. Town Manager & ADA Coordinator, Mary Ellen Kelley, CFO, Steven Carl, Police Chief, Bob Merusi Parks and Recreation, Valerie Mulvey Town Clerk, Peter Sellers Director DPW, Sam Swisher Planning & Economic Development, Jay Grande Planning Board, Jim Egan Building Services, Mike Foley Building Inspector, Jim Steele Engineering, and Ron Rego Director of Media Services. We also wish to thank the Board of Selectmen Dennis Giombetti, Jason Smith, Charles Sisitsky, A. Ginger Esty, John Stasik as well as Town Meeting members for their continued support of our activities. General Committees 244 Front row (L to R): Debra Freed, Dennis Polselli, Karen Foran Dempsey, Kathleen McCarthy. Back row (L to R) Timothy Goddard, Elise Marcil, Rose Quinn Town of Framingham The Disability Commission looks forward to 2008 and working with town departments. One major goal will be to collaborate with LT Services to make the town's website accessible for persons with print disabilities so they too can have equal access to government programs and services. Respectfully Submitted, Dennis Polselli, Chair FINANCE COMMITTEE The Finance Committee consists of nine members, each of whom is appointed by the Town Moderator for a term of three years. The Finance Committee works with the Chief Financial Officer, the Town Manager, the Board of Selectmen and other administration officials, and town boards and committees, monitors the budget process, reviews all departmental budgets, and considers requests for additional appropriations outside the regular budget process. The Committee authorizes disbursements from the Reserve Fund for emergency expenses, monitors and appropriates funds for emergency winter related expenses, approves the expenditure ceiling for revolving funds and works with the Town's auditors to facilitate the annual audit, and reviews audit results. The role of the Finance Committee is primarily advisory. It is the responsibility of the Finance Committee to advise Town Meeting regarding financial issues that come before it, and to recommend action on warrant articles based on these issues. When appropriate the Finance Committee can propose amendments or make additional motions at Town Meeting. The Committee also may make motions to Town Meeting for or against appropriations. The Finance Committee is primarily concerned with the financial impact of various warrant articles and other matters. There is less focus by the Finance Committee on non - fiscal aspects of these matters and the committee strives to be non - political in its deliberations. The Finance 2007 Annual Report Committee also reviews and approves all requests for transfers from the Reserve Fund. The Finance Committee may consider any matter that will have a financial impact on the Town, as well as any other matters the Committee feels are relevant. The Committee has the authority at any time to investigate the books, accounts, and management of any department of the Town, and to require officers and employees of the Town to appear before it and provide information reasonably related to any matter within the responsibility of the Finance Committee. The books and accounts of all departments and officers of the Town shall be open for the inspection by the Committee and of any persons employed by it for that purpose. As FY07 drew to a close in Spring 2007, the School Department recognized a deficit due to increased costs in Special Education. The Finance Committee was part of negotiations to balance FY07 utilizing transfers from accounts in which appropriations remained as well as a transfer from Free Cash. In a plan to reduce reliance upon the property tax, lawmakers at the State House proposed a local option in which municipalities would be able to raise revenues with a local meals tax. A version of the budget was built utilizing this potential revenue but as action was never taken on Beacon Hill, the budget was revised accordingly. Finance Committee worked closely with CFO, Capital Budget Committee and other Boards and Committees to craft a revised FY08 budget. The Committee met several times with officials from Joseph P. Keefe Technical School to review its budget, fully understand both local and state methodology in budgeting and to make recommendations to the school regarding budget issues. As a result of extensive discussion and negotiation between the Finance Committee and the Keefe Superintendent and staff, Keefe Tech agreed to significantly reduce its requested General Committees 245 Town of Framingham appropriation. The final amount represented a 7.6 % increase over the FY 07 appropriation, much less than the 14.4% increase originally proposed in the Keefe Tech budget. Members are also called upon to act as a liaison to other Town committees from the Finance Committee. These committees include Capital Budget, Housing Policy, Keefe Tech School Committee, Library Liaison, Litigation Liaison, Real Property, Memorial Building Study Group, School Committee and ADA Transition Team. Multiple issues necessitated several Special Town Meetings in 2007, in addition to the Annual Town Meeting beginning in April 2007. Issues that had financial implications for Framingham were brought before the Finance Committee. Sponsors presented information, public comment was encouraged and the committee deliberated all aspects of the issue. Written reports were prepared for Town Meeting, as well as recommendations made on the floor of Town Meeting. In 2007, in addition to recommending favorable action on the Operating and Capital Budgets, the Finance Committee recommended favorable action on such issues as accepting funds from Ashland IMA for sewer improvements, $360,000 to fund ceiling repairs to Fuller Middle School, vehicle replacement, as well as litigation costs regarding Paolini Loam. Framingham continues to seek a balance between providing essential services and funding those services increasingly from the property tax. While there are many places to put each municipal dollar, the finite amount of funds available dictates that hard choices, ones in the best interest of Framingham, be made. It is this principle that guides the decision of the Finance Committee as it votes against appropriating funds in certain circumstances. 2007 Annual Report In years past, the need to seek additional revenue sources has been promoted by many officials. Closing the telecommunications tax loophole and local options meals tax would be favorable options for Framingham, but have not moved forward in the Legislature. The Finance Committee worked with the CFO and Board of Selectmen to revise the Free Cash Policy which was amended last year decreasing the percentage allocated to the Capital Budget as our debt service ratio is favorable and increasing the Stabilization Fund allocation from 30% - 40 %, in keeping with the financial policy goals of the Town. Moody's Investor Services assigned an Al rating to Framingham, which is a downgrade from Aa3, while removing the negative outlook. Among the factors involved in this bond rating, Moody identified the town's limited financial flexibility, and expectations that the town will face challenges in restoring its financial position to previous levels in the face of ongoing expenditure pressures, the appropriation of free cash to support operations as well as several reserve draws to finance unforeseen events. Moody's noted that "Framingham will be challenged to achieve structural balance in the medium term as expenditure growth, particularly related to education and employee benefits, outpaces revenue growth ". These ratings must be taken into account during the budget process. Additionally, skyrocketing health insurance costs, and the unfunded liability of pensions are continue to be a challenge in each budget cycle. The Finance Committee is committed to reviewing and providing recommendations to Town Meeting that are rooted in reality and take a long -term view of a healthy town financial process. During 2007 the Committee approved Reserve Fund transfers of $29,826 Library; $40,000 Veterans; $12,000 School, $12,000 General Committees 246 Town of Framingham Property & Liability Insurance; $82,683.15 Snow & Ice; $384,641 School. The Finance Committee wishes to express its gratitude to CFO Mary Ellen Kelley for her expertise and support as well as Assistant CFO Jennifer Pratt. The professionalism and knowledge they bring to Framingham is greatly appreciated. It is important to thank Nancy Wilson for her stellar role as Chair of the Finance Committee for the past several years and to acknowledge those members who have served so well and have now moved on to other endeavors: Mary Z. Connaughton, Denis Black, Elyzabeth Sheehan. Respectfully Submitted, Katie Murphy, Chair GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE The Government Study Committee continued its mission to review proposed bylaw changes and to study the form and function of Town Government with the intent to recommend improvements. During FY07, the Committee reviewed the roles of the Finance, Ways and Means and the Capital Budget Committees and determined that all continue to provide unique and relevant service within Town government. No recommendation was made for change. Discussions continued on the use of electronic voting in Town Meeting, a concept generally supported by this Committee. The Committee continues to review recommendations for structural changes to the Zoning Board of Appeals. In addition, efforts to enhance the efficacy of the Technology Advisory Committee have resulted in an article to allow selection of members from the community at large, not limited to Town Meeting members. This article will appear on the FY08 town warrant. 2007 Annual Report A variety of articles were offered and approved at FY07 Spring Town Meeting: 0 A provision to have Town Meeting literature provided to the Town Clerk and the Town Library for archival purposes 0 Articles to change responsibility for preparation and distribution of the annual warrant and annual report from Town Clerk's office to the Board of Selectmen 0 A change to posting Town Meeting adjournment to a future date on the Town website and in Town Hall rather than published in the newspaper to improve notification and save money 0 Permission for Finance Committee members to serve on an expanded list of committees and commissions. 0 A reduction of the quorum requirement for the Real Property Committee 0 The removal of the Permanent Building Committee from the bylaws, as this committee no longer exists The Committee's article to increase the term of the Moderator from one to two years was not passed by Town Meeting. The most critical item under discussion before this Committee is the possibility of creating a Town Charter. Efforts to codify our current form of government, as well as review of alternative forms and structures, continues to be actively debated The FY07 Committee, chaired by Christine Long, with Vice Chair Ed Levay, Clerk Richard Lee and members Ted Anthony, Michael Bower, Joel Feingold, Melanie Goddard, Bill Haberman, Wes Ritchie, Larry Schmeidler, Christopher Walsh and Mel Warshaw has devoted many hours of research and discussion towards clarification and improvement of Town government. I take this opportunity to express my appreciation for their work. Respectfully Submitted, Bill Haberman, Chair General Committees 247 Town of Framingham GREENER FRAMINGHAM COMMITTEE The Greener Framingham Committee (GFC) was created by Town Meeting in May 2007 with the following charge: The Greener Framingham Committee shall be tasked with reviewing energy related expenses, including but not limited to new construction, new vehicle purchases, building maintenance and other energy related costs and making recommendations and suggestions to Town Meeting, the Board of Selectmen, the School Committee and other town departments as appropriate with the aim of integrating renewable energy and green technology into Framingham's infrastructure so as to reduce the town's long term energy expenses and negative impact on our environment. Sponsored by Town Meeting Members Dawn Harkness and Wesley Ritchie The three appointing authorities completed their appointments in September 2007. On October 9 1h, , we met for the first time, elected officers, and proceeded to create an action plan on how to bring our committee up to date on the state of the Town's energy costs and fuel consumption in municipal buildings. The establishment of these benchmarks is only the first step in helping us prioritize what buildings and technology need to be addressed sooner rather than later. We intend to address the fuel consumption and costs associated with Town owned vehicles after we complete our assessment of town owned buildings. The Town Manager's office has been very helpful in aiding our collection of data from the Financial Office, and from the various departments in Town. Special thanks go to Angie Sottile, Framingham's former Recycling Coordinator and Jim Egan, Director of Buildings and Grounds for their insight and presentations that helped us understand the array of heating, lighting, air conditioning, and 2007 Annual Report general electrical systems currently in use in Framingham municipal buildings. GFC member Matt Torti, who is also the Assistant Director of Building and Grounds for Framingham Public Schools, has also stood out in his efforts to collect data from the School Department and present it to the committee in a way that has made the technology easily understandable to those of us with technological expertise. After we have completed the data collection and analysis phase of our research, we will begin making recommendations to the Board of Selectmen, the School Committee and Town Meeting on how to reduce energy consumption as well as what we recommend for technology upgrades. Vind Turbine Bylaw In December, the GFC, began looking into the creating of a wind turbine by law. Since wind turbine power has the significant potential to create non - polluting renewable energy, it must be considered an important option for the Town of Framingham's plan to adopt greener energy practices. Unfortunately, without a bylaw that spells out exactly what kind of turbine system is permissible in Framingham, any entity contemplating adopting wind turbines as an energy alternative faces the kind of uncertainty that may discourage them from pursuing this option. This includes the Town of Framingham. Since it is the general consensus of the Greener Framingham Committee that we would like to be able to recommend that the Town of Framingham install wind turbines where appropriate, it is our view that we should aid in the drafting of a wind turbine bylaw for consideration by Town Meeting as well as other appropriate boards and committees in Town Government. Toward that end, we have begun researching how other towns similarly situated to Framingham have addressed the creation of their wind bylaws so that we may draft and recommend a wind turbine bylaw for the General Committees 248 Town of Framingham Town. We are still at the initial stages of our research and we welcome input from the community or collaborating with any other interested committees. It is also worth noting that that many members of the community have encouraged in the expansion of the scope of our research to include improving air and water quality as well as waste recycling and disposal. We are open to such expansion. Respectfully Submitted, Dawn Harkness, Chairwoman FRAMINGHAM HISTORICAL, COMMISSION 2007 was a busy year for the Framingham Historical Commission. We reviewed dozens of applications for demolition that were subject to the Town's Demolition Delay Bylaw. Many of these reviews were handled very quickly and demolition was allowed because the FHC determined that the structures in question were not significant. For those buildings that were determined to be in need of preferential preservation that Commission worked with the applicants to seek alternatives to demolition. In most cases a viable alternative was found and demolition was avoided. Of special note, a property that was thought to be on the path to demolition has been purchased by a new owner and restoration work is underway. Proof positive that our bylaw works to protect Framingham's historical, cultural and architectural heritage. In addition to being a member of the commission, Fred Wallace was appointed by the BOS to serve as Framingham's Town Historian. The FHC saw the resignation of two long- time and dedicated members of the commission- Elizabeth Funk and Robert Snyder. Their contributions to the FHC have 2007 Annual Report been of immense importance and will be greatly missed. There will be challenges in the year ahead, but the FHC stands dedicated to undertake the important task of protecting those buildings that help define who we are and where we came from. Respectfully Submitted, David Marks, Chair Todd Robecki, Vice -chair Perry Bent, Secretary Gerald Couto Fred Wallace HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION The Historic District Commission administers both the Jonathan Maynard Historic District and the Center Common District. The purpose of the Commission is fivefold: To preserve the historically important structures and relationships that compose the historic landscape that Framingham Town Meeting has established as culturally significant. To ensure that changes and additions are compatible with the existing structures and pattern ensuring and that they enhance rather than detract from the aesthetic and historic character of the districts. To conduct public hearings in response to applications for changes to the visible nature of the protected buildings and patterns by conferring with applicants on the proposed changes and issuing a Certificate of Appropriateness for work that meets the by- law's criteria. To act as a resource and knowledge base on architecture, landscaping and construction for residents of the Districts and as general consultants for the town on such matters. To propose the expansion of the existing districts and creation of new districts as the General Committees 249 Town of Framingham situation warrants and to act as an advocate for the culturally significant historic fabric of the town. The Commission typically meets on an as needed basis when there are proposals to review, on the second Tuesday of the month at 7:30 in the Memorial Building. This last year the Commission continued the process of filling in "missing" properties to the Centre Common District, advocating a refurbishing of the Centre Common and working with the Town, the First Parish Church and the Historical Society in their efforts to renovate significant buildings around the Common. Respectfully Submitted, Christopher Walsh, AIA, Chair REAL PROPERTY COMMITTEE The Real Property Committee is entrusted with the responsibility of advising Town Meeting on all matters involving the sale, transfer, acquisition or lease of real property by the Town. It is composed of ten Town Meeting members appointed by the Moderator and seven representatives of Town boards. The Committee met seven times and these recommendations for approval were made and followed by Town Meeting: 0 amendments to the Real Property Committee by -law including a change in the quorum to six out of the ten Town Meeting members 0 a permanent Preservation Restriction for the Village Hall, Edgell Memorial Library and the Old Academy Building 2007 Annual Report authorization for the Board of Selectmen to enter into fifty -year leases of the Hollis Street Community Center (old fire station) to Amazing Things Arts Center; of the Village Hall, Edgell Memorial Library and the Old Academy to the Framingham Historical Society and Museum; and of the old Farley Memorial Annex (known as the Old Callahan Senior Center) to the Boys and Girls Club of Metrowest. 0 several articles authorizing the Board of Selectmen to acquire necessary easements for water and sewer projects 0 transfer of a small strip of land from the Park and Recreation Commission to the Board of Selectmen so that it could be sold (with a deed restriction to prevent the creation of a buildable lot) The Committee also proposed a resolution requiring the Board of Selectmen to present for Town Meeting approval plans for the disposition of all real property held for more than three years including tax title property. The Committee later recommended approval of an article with similar intent that changed the time held to five years and added both a value (property over $15,000) and a requirement for Real Property Committee review. Both the resolution and article were approved by Town Meeting. The Committee's recommendation to transfer three parcels of land in the Water Street area to the Conservation Commission was not followed by Town Meeting. Respectfully Submitted, Linda M. Romero, Chair General Committees 250 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Town Meeting Moderator Joel Winett io Berkeley Road Framingham, MA 01701 During 2007 there were 6 special Town Meetings in addition to the spring Annual Town Meeting which met for 17 sessions. To summarize the activities of Town Meeting in 2007, I have grouped the warrant articles into five categories. The following significant issues were voted. Bylaws Articles Town Meeting approved (with a ballot vote) a bylaw requiring Lodging Houses to be registered. Town Meeting also created an Agricultural Commission to represent the Town's farm and forestry community, established a Right to Farm bylaw requiring sellers of property abutting a farm to notify the buyer, and updated the sign bylaw to replace the 1996 sign bylaw (approved with amendments by Town Meeting Members). Zoning Articles Town Meeting passed a land disturbance bylaw to control building on sloped land. Town Meeting also added a bylaw requiring a two- thirds vote by Town Meeting for a change to the Housing Plan. The Attorney General interpreted this bylaw to mean that Town Meeting could vote to provide an advisory opinion on changes to the Housing Plan. Operating Budget Articles Town Meeting made adjustments to the FY2007 budget to accommodate increases in special education expenses. Town Meeting passed the FY2008 budget with significant increases in the following items: 5o8- 877 -1627 jwinett @rcn.com www.Framingham-Moderator.com 0 Additional head count in the Selectmen, Police, and Inspectional Services departments, 0 A 7.5% increase in the Health Insurance budget, 0 A 7.6% increase in the Keefe Vocational School budget (after reductions negotiated by the Finance Committee), 0 A 6.1% increase in the Framingham School Budget (after reductions to balance the budget). Town Meeting appropriated an additional $175,000 to the legal budget to defend ongoing litigation. Town Meeting also transferred $150,000 from the Reserve Fund to a new account to fund the initial litigation costs of the lawsuit filed by the South Middlesex Opportunity Council and the South Middlesex Non - Profit Housing Corporation. Capital Budget Articles Town Meeting authorized funds to replace voting machines, develop Callahan Senior Center Phase 3, and implement Phase 1 plans for complying with the American Disability Act (ADA). Town Meeting also funded new Web and Public Safety management systems, a remote controlled meter reading system, and demolition and replacement of the Winch Park grandstands. However, Town Meeting deferred funding for improvements to Bowditch field grandstands. Administrative Articles Town Meeting authorized leasing the Village Hall, Edgell Memorial Library, and Academy Buildings to the Historical Society; leasing the Town Meeting 251 Town of Framingham Hollis Street Fire Station to Amazing Things with an amendment to add a permanent preservation restriction; and leasing the "Old Callahan Senior Center" to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Metrowest. Town Meeting recommended approval of the Housing Plan prepared by a joint subcommittee of the Planning Board, the Board of Selectmen, and a consultant, after Town Meeting reduced the percent of affordable housing from 40% to 10 %. Greener Framingham Committee Town Meeting created the Greener Framingham Committee with the Selectmen, the School Committee and Moderator, each appointing three members. The Greener Framingham Committee will review energy expenses relating to new construction, new vehicle purchases, and building maintenance. The committee will meet for three years reporting to Town Meeting annually. Town Meeting Timekeepers I would like to thank Gloria Geller, the chair of the Rules Committee, and the other volunteers who operated the time clock during Town Meeting to help enforce the 10 minute and 3 minute time limits on speaking. Town M Forum On October 14, 2007 the Moderator hosted a Town Meeting Day Forum at the Main Library. Panelists included the Moderators from Lexington and Stoughton, plus an active Town Meeting Member from these towns and from Framingham. They described town meeting in their towns and issues of current 2007 Annual Report concern. Stoughton is the only town besides Framingham to have Town Meeting Standing Committees. Lexington has a Town Meeting Members Association that prepares a summary of the issues relating to warrant articles. Town Meeting Support The Moderator appreciates the support of the Town Manager, the Assistant Town Manager, the Town Counsel, and the Town Clerk in preparing for, conducting, and recording the actions of Town Meeting. The Building Services Director obtained tables for Town Meeting Members to sit at and the Technology Services Director set up the facility to post the actions taken by Town Meeting on the town website. Respectfully Submitted, Joel Winett, Town Moderator Town Meeting 252 At the Town Meeting Day Forum Framingham, Stoughton and Lexington Panelists at Meeting Day Forum Town of Framingham STANDING COMMITTEE REPORTS STANDING COMMITTEE ON COMMUNITY SERVICES The Standing Committee on Community Services is responsible for Parks Recreational and Cultural Affairs division, the Edgell Grove Cemetary, The community Development Block Grant Committee, Council on Aging, Human Relations, Veteran Services and Fair Housing. This year the SCCS met to discuss several articles related to our charge. Of particular note were budget items related to the new Bowditch Field project. Director of Parks and Recreation Bob Merusi and his staff delivered detailed reports in support of the new Bowditch Field project. While the proposal was supported by the SCCS, ultimately, it was rejected at Town Meeting. The SCCS looks forward to reviewing the revisions on which Mr Merusi, his staff and others have been working diligently. As was often repeated during the debate at TM, Bowditch Field is a jewel of Framingham, and we all have a stake in seeing this project completed to not only restoring it, but to make it safe and accessible for all. The Standing Committee on Community Services had the pleasure of hearing the thoughtful and well prepared presentation of the Director of Veterans Services, Paul Raffa. It was with sadness that our community learned of his death in November. By clearing up a $300,000 backlog in state reimbursements for veterans benefits in his short tenure, Mr. Raffa demonstrated his tenacious commitment to supporting our veterans. SCCS deeply appreciated his work on behalf of our veterans and our community and he will be missed. Lastly, the SCCS was very fortunate to have been lead for many years by our long time Chairman, David Hutchinson. With his incomparable style, David chaired meetings, instigated robust debate and steered our very diverse committee through the thicket of 2007 Annual Report many complicated and occasionally thorny issues. David resigned in the fall from the SCCS to spend more time with his wonderful wife, Alma and their family. We all look forward to seeing him wearing any one of his many other hats in town and offer him our gratitude for his many years of leadership of the Standing Committee on Community Services. Respectfully Submitted, Dawn Harkness, Vice Chair STANDING COMMITTEE ON EDUCA"T"ION The Standing Committee on Education met eight times during 2007. Meetings were held on February 13, April 10, April 26, May 14, May 17, May 21, May 24, and October 23. Melanie Goddard provided exceptional leadership to the committee in the absence of a Chair and Vice Chair during the early part of the year. The committee heard testimony from the School Department and voted favorably to support Article 5 of the February 13 Special Town Meeting for the Fuller Middle School auditorium ceiling repairs at its meeting held that evening. The April 10 and April 24 committee meetings were held to discuss the Special Town Meeting article presented by Mr. Steven Hakar relative to special education funding. The committee ultimately did not take a vote on the matter as the article as originally drafted did not propose an action for Town Meeting to take. The members of the committee elected the following slate of officers at the caucus held on Tuesday May 1, 2007: Michael Bower, Chair, Melanie Goddard, Vice Chair, and Philip Romine, Clerk. The officers assumed their responsibilities immediately due to vacancies in the various positions. The four May meetings were held to hear testimony from Library Director Mark Town Meeting 253 Town of Framingham Contois, Keefe Technical School Superintendent Peter Dewar, and Framingham School Superintendent Christopher Martes relative to the FY08 budgets for their departments. The budgets of both Keefe Tech and the Public Library were presented and discussed in detail. The committee voted to support the recommendation of CFO Mary Ellen Kelley in both cases. The Framingham Public School budget for FY08 and the issue of the budget deficit in the FY07 budget were discussed in depth by the committee at three of its meetings. The committee ultimately endorsed the recommendations of CFO Mary Ellen Kelley. The Board of Selectman requested assistance from the School Department and the Standing Committee on Education in drafting a letter to our state and federal legislators. This request was a follow -up to the Special Town Meeting warrant article drafted by Mr. Steven Hakar, presented by Mr. Frank Reilly and approved with amendment on April 26, 2007 relative to special education funding. The committee acknowledges and commends the efforts of Vice Chair Melanie Goddard and Clerk Philip Romine, with input and assistance from Town -wide PTO Vice President Kristin Romine and Framingham Public Schools Special Education Director Pam Kaufmann, for the eloquent letter to our legislative delegation on the matter of special education funding. The committee looks forward to working with the Framingham School Department and School Committee, the Finance Committee and the Standing Committee on Ways and Means in keeping abreast of the FY08 school budget. Quarterly budget status meetings will be held as a result of discussions at the annual town meeting. We expect that the coming year will be additionally challenging and we will continue 2007 Annual Report to work with the Schools and Library to present the most fiscally prudent budgets to the town. I would like to thank the members of the Standing Committee on Education for their support of me as Chair during these past eight months, their attendance at various meetings and their insightful participation during our deliberations. Respectfully Submitted, Michael J. Bower, Chair STANDING COMMITTEE ON PLANNING & ZONING During this past year we have reviewed several changes to the ZBL. We are sponsoring one of special interest requested by a citizen group. This will be the addition of the requirement that any change or extension of a "Special Permit" will specify that a "Special Permit Granting Authority" vote in the affirmative with all 3 members of a 3 member board and 4 of 5 votes for a 5 member board. During latter part of 2007, SCP &Z began an effort to establish a Wind Turbine Bylaw. Hopefully both articles will be on the 2008 Annual Town Meeting Warrant. The greatest challenge for the immediate future is for the municipalities to resist the state mandates to control all zoning at the state level. Our committee meeting attendance has been consistently at 12 to 14. Respectfully Submitted, Tom O'Neil, Chair STANDING COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC SAFETY Report not submitted Town Meeting 254 Town of Framingham STANDING COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC WORDS Department of Public Works Annual Spring Town Meeting 2007 found the SCPW very actively supporting many DPW Capital Improvement projects that the Town has long needed. Stormwater improvements included Sucker Brook Drainage, as well as Eames Brook Pump Support Structure. Water St. Sewer Main Replacement and Gregory Rd. Sewer Relief projects in addition to several wastewater pumping station replacements such as Michaud Drive, Cypress Street and Ransom Road were also highlights of this year's budget approvals. One of the most interesting projects approved was the SCADA (supervisory control & date acquisition) control system improvements for both water and sewer monitoring. Funding initiates the first year of a three year project which once completed will provide secured remote access for monitoring water and sewer problems as well as provide increased public safety. Lastly, but high on the priority list, was the appropriation of $1.4 million towards the continued reactivation of the Birch Rd. wells project. The projected completion date is sometime in 2011 at which time the town will begin to benefit by having a supplemental water source at a greatly reduced cost to fee payers as well as working towards becoming less dependent on the MWRA. The SCPW continues to research and review the Natick billing matter in cooperation with the DPW staff. The committee is committed to keeping town meeting as well as the public apprised of findings and potential resolutions. Department of Building Services The Memorial Building was the most critical capital project in 2007 for this department. Town meeting approved requests for window replacement, stage renovations as well as front stair replacement. Among other projects were the window, door and gutter replacements to the Maynard building, the razing of the Badger Road dog pound and a new emergency generator for the main Library. 2007 Annual Report In summary, and on behalf of the SCPW, I wish to extend the committee's continued support and appreciation to both the DPW Director, Peter Sellers and Building Services Director, Jim Egan as well as their highly professional staffs. The SCPW continues to enjoy a most congenial relationship with both departments and wishes to express their gratitude for all the time, effort and level of commitment as well as dedication that they demonstrate in their daily work, always striving for excellence in public service. Respectfully Submitted, Christine Long, Chair SANDING COMMITTEE ON RULES This year has seen a change in leadership for the Rules Committee: Gloria Geller, chair, Amy Weader , vice chair, and Don Chute remaining as our Secretary. We also have several new members added to the committee. Our hardworking core members of the committee includes, Bernice Strom, Ed Kross, Larry Griffin, Mark Lamkin, Michael Berrardi, Yaakov Cohn and Janet Trombino... Bernice Strom works diligently to make the information table orderly and efficient. Our annual budget is $50.00. We are an active committee and meet once a month throughout the year. We meet on the second Monday of the month for all but one month in the summer. Our mission is to enhance the function of the Town Meeting Sessions. As such we have worked closely with Moderator Joel Winett to continually update Bylaws and rules for the betterment of each session. In addition to our work with Bylaws we have updated the `Town Meeting Handbook' to reflect the changes in procedure and Bylaws since last year's edition. This has been worked on by Gloria Geller, Amy Weader and Moderator Joel Winett. Town Meeting 255 Town of Framingham In an effort to continue to encourage cooperation and communication with various groups of citizens and other parts of Town Government we have met with the Government Study Committee, Precinct Chairs, Standing Committee Chairs and individual citizens. One of our missions is to continue developing a plan for sharing information on, and implementation of, electronic voting. We plan to present an article in an upcoming Warrant for the approval of Town Meeting Members. With that in mind we have continued to consult with the Technology Advisory Committee. There are many issues affecting how this technology would be implemented and we continue to study various options. We have prepared a Bylaw on holding a meeting in the fall as well as the spring. It should be ready for implementation for the next Fall Town Meeting. Hand in hand with this change is a change in the wording of the Bylaw on the timely adjournment of meetings. The relatively new Reporting Bylaw at the beginning of our Town Meeting Sessions is well received by our Town Meeting Representatives. We are considering adding to the items reported on in that article. We continue to encourage Town Meeting Members to attend all meetings. Failure to attend can result in the removal from office. We wish to remind all Town Meting Members to list a phone number and e -mail address, if available, for the benefit of our precincts' citizens and fellow meeting members. The Rules Committee looks forward to continuing our work on Town Meeting's work. We welcome ideas and comments from the public as well as our fellow Town Meeting representatives. Respectfully Submitted, Gloria Geller, Chair 2007 Annual Report STANDING COMMITTEE ON WAYS & MEANS As defined in the Town by -laws, the Standing Committee on Ways and Means (SCW &M) is responsible for making recommendations to town meeting on warrant articles sponsored by and /or related to the Finance Committee, the Finance Division, the Human Resources Division, the Information Services Division, the Selectmen, the Town Clerk, Town Elections, the Legal Department, the Retirement Board, the Capital Budget Committee, and the Government Study Committee. One town meeting member from each of the 18 precincts in town can be elected to serve on the committee. All precincts except for 15, 16, and 18 (which have high vacancy rates) were represented on this committee in 2007. The committee held 18 meetings during the year to review the Annual and Special Town Meeting warrant articles, and other issues under its purview. Of the many articles considered by this committee in2007, several required extensive discussion and research due to their complexity and /or implications. An article town meeting voted against in 2006 was brought back in the 2007 annual town meeting warrant. The article proposed a new benefit for Framingham employees who are veterans and whom become disabled from an injury suffered on the job as an employee of the Town. That same proposed benefit would not be provided to other town employees injured on the job whom were not veterans. The State had passed legislation allowing cities and towns to adopt this fixed amount benefit at their own expense. The amount of the benefit could not be modified at the local level, but could be subject to change by a vote of the State legislature. Although the rate had not changed since the benefit was implemented, the committee recognized that it could change without any town input. Although proponents indicated that many communities had adopted the benefit, upon further due diligence, the committee discovered that 77% of the towns and cities across the state chose not to adopt the Town Meeting 256 Town of Framingham legislation. The committee report to town meeting pointed out that if the State legislature genuinely wanted to provide an additional benefit to Veterans, and /or specifically those Veterans who become disabled after serving in the military, legislation could have been passed to fund and provide an equitable, mandatory benefit. Putting the emotional and political intensity of this proposal aside, The SCW &M recommended against the article, a recommendation town meeting chose to support. Another item greatly influenced by the SCW &M was the proposed capital expense for Bowditch Field. Back in 2005 the Parks and Recreation department made a presentation to Town Meeting on the deteriorating grandstands at Bowditch Field. Safety concerns over crumbling grandstands were cited as the main cause of concern. In response, town meeting authorized $500K to create a master plan to correct the problems. This year, at the annual town meeting, a master plan was presented along with a request for an initial $4M, accompanied by an implied commitment to spend $7.3M for the entire project, with all but $500K of the funding coming from the Framingham taxpayers. The SCW &M felt it was critical to conduct extensive due diligence on this proposed taxpayer commitment. Over the course of four meetings, the committee analyzed the plan, compared it to the data originally presented in 2005, identified differences and discrepancies, and sought additional information. The committee concluded that the plan was too costly and did not solve the problems which triggered the overall project, in a timely and cost efficient manner. The proposed plan included a new, half -acre vehicle maintenance and office /kitchen facility adjacent to Loring arena. The town spent $4M several years ago on a new vehicle maintenance facility for the Department of Public Works (DPW). The DPW repairs most of the Parks and Recreation department's vehicles, so the committee recommended that the town seek 2007 Annual Report ways to combine resources and /or consider use of other existing town owned garage appropriate facilities which could accommodate vehicle maintenance and repair, instead of building another costly facility. The committee also discovered that the proposed costs for the project were estimates, not based on actual bids. This meant that town meeting would vote to authorize an initial $4M expense without an actual cost basis. This is not normal procedure for town meeting and would have been fiscally irresponsible. There were also issues with the flow of the project. After the first two years of work, and $4M in expenses the visitors' grandstand would remain in disrepair. The committee took issue with this since the safety concerns were a driving force behind the entire project, and because town meeting had been told in 2005, and again at this 2007 town meeting that the visitors' grandstand was in worse condition than the home grandstand. The committee suggested that new plans be submitted giving top priority to the stands. For these reasons and others, the SCW &M recommended the project be referred back to the sponsor. Town meeting voted against the funding by failing to achieve the required 2/3 vote for approval. The SCW &M's criticisms of the plan were provided along with recommendations the committee hopes to see incorporated into new Bowditch proposals brought to Town Meeting. The SCW &M recommended that town meeting support three articles authorizing the Board of Selectmen to enter into 50 -year lease agreements on specific town owned buildings. This included The Framingham Historical Society and Museum leases on the Village Hall, the Edgell Memorial Library, and the Old Academy buildings; The Amazing Things Arts Center lease on the Hollis Street Community Center; and the Boys and Girls Club (B &GC) lease on the Farley Memorial Annex (the Former Callahan Senior Center). The committee acknowledged that successful fundraising is a key component of these organizations' ability to upgrade these town owned buildings, and the long -term leases will Town Meeting 257 Town of Framingham facilitate those fundraising efforts. The primary reservation the committee had was with the lease for the Farley Memorial Annex requested by the B &GC. The concern was for the increased traffic from student pick -up during rush hour, and the demand for parking from the volume of anticipated participants in programs to be offered at this new B &GC location. The SCW &M requested that the B &GC open a dialogue with the Police Department, the Performing Arts Center, the Library, and the Museum in an effort to recognize each other's impact on parking and traffic flow in the immediate area. The committee was satisfied with the resulting collaboration between those organizations which are all located on the same block. In the final analysis, the committee recommended favorable action on the three articles pertaining to long -term leases. Each of the organizations will lease the properties for $1 /year. The long -term leases will facilitate fundraising efforts which will support improvements to the buildings. The buildings will no longer require town funds for operational expenses and /or capital improvements, and rent savings will 2007 Annual Report contribute to the financial condition of the organizations. Town meeting voted to approve these articles. In 2007 the SCW &M reviewed and reported on 38 articles. All but one of the committees' recommendations was supported by Town Meeting. During the normal course of its business, the SCW &M works with representatives from nearly every department, board, committee, and commission in town, of which the efforts of all are greatly appreciated. The committee works diligently to conduct thorough analyses, and to compose detailed, fact based reports and recommendations for town meeting which consider the overall well -being of the Town. This committee is comprised of people who make a tremendous commitment and take great pride in what they do. Special thanks to the dedicated volunteers who serve on Town Meeting and this productive Standing Committee on Ways and Means. Respectfully Submitted, Audrey M. Hall, Chair Town Meeting 258 Town of Framingham TOWN MEETING JOURNAL VALERIE MULVEY, TOWN CLERK LISA FERGUSON, ASSISTANT TOWN CLERK 2007 Annual Report Town Meeting 259 Town of Framingham TowN MEETING ATTENDANCE 2007 Annual Report Name Address Term Expires Meetings Attended Eligible Meetings Precinct t R. Kathy Vassar 22 Carter Drive 2010 22 23 Mark S. Lamkin 495 Edmonds Road 2010 21 21 Theodore C. Anthony, Jr. 111 Ed ell Road 2010 22 23 Teri S. Bonerjee 248 Winch Street 2010 20 23 Steven W. Orr 41 Wayside Inn Road 2009 21 23 Margaret E. Groppo 301 Brimstone Lane 2009 10 23 J anet L. Gill 32 Wayside Inn Road 2009 18 23 Christopher S. Lorant 1806 Windsor Drive 2009 17 23 John R. Dwyer 51 Eaton Road West 2008 23 23 Sheila Ann Pinn 29 juniper Lane 2008 21 23 Laurie A. Lee 25 Carter Drive 2008 22 23 Roberta C. Flax 1010 Windsor Drive 1 2008 1 2 1 2 Brenda M. Dostie 385 Edmonds Road 2008 14 20 Anne F. Nicholas 9 Hiram Road 2007 2 2 Precinct 2 Stephen Shull 16 Sloane Drive 2010 22 23 Christine A. Long 10 Hemenway Road 2010 19 23 David J. Lon den, Jr. 1070 Old Connecticut Path 2010 15 23 Gloria H. Geller 3 Lowry Road 2010 23 23 Kenneth M. Schwartz 14 Hillside Street 2009 13 23 Melanie L. Goddard 43 Little Farms Road 2009 18 23 Leonard J. Hoffman 4 Corrine Drive 2009 13 23 Stephen W. Dressler 41 Hemenway Road 2009 13 23 Nancy Cooper 9 Griffin Road 2008 14 23 Harold J. Geller 3 Lowry Road 2008 23 23 Linda A. Hom 66 Hadley Road 2008 18 21 Maryelaine F. Sullivan 24 Griffin Road 2008 16 23 Laurence Herson 8 Murphy Circle 1 2008 2 2 preeinct 3 Karen Foran Dempsey 10 Bellefontaine Avenue 2010 14 23 Linda Panzera 10 Chouteau Avenue 2010 19 21 George T. Dixon 56 Delmar Avenue 2010 23 23 Marilyn Zimmerman 875 Old Connecticut Path 2010 16 23 Mark E. Dempsey 10 Bellefontaine Avenue 2009 10 23 Patricia E. Woodward 3 Springhill Road 2009 16 23 Mary McCarty 45 Chouteau Road 2009 17 23 Harold J. Moran 7 Chouteau Road 2009 20 23 Carol E. Casselman 48 Florissant Avenue 2008 21 23 Audrey M. Hall 18 Salmi Road 2008 22 23 Andrew R. Ferguson 22 Bellefontaine Avenue 2008 2 2 C. William Cook 148 Danforth Street, #2 2008 20 23 Patricia C. Koninsor 24 Lakeview Road 1 2008 1 16 1 21 Joshua K. Mulready, II 3 Brownlea Road 1 2007 2 2 Precinct 4 Laurence M. Schmeidler 27 Claudette Circle 2010 18 23 Henry E. Valfides 56 Led ewood Road 2010 12 21 Diane Z. Pabst 18 McAdams Road 2010 16 23 Amy M. Weader 24 Amy Road 2010 23 23 Paula L. Schmeidler 27 Claudette Circle 2009 16 23 Dawn F. Harkness P. O. Box 1723 2009 23 23 Arlene V. Semefian 13 Janice Circle 2009 12 23 Karl B. Thober 502 Grove Street 2009 17 23 Scott D. Estes 37 Winch Street 2008 21 23 Thomas J. Sherwin 7 Lavelle Lane 2008 21 23 Richard J. Weader, II 24 Amy Road 2008 20 22 Waldo B. Lon 1 Rolling Drive 2008 0 23 James M. O'Loughlin, Sr. 444 Grove Street 1 2008 1 2 2 Katherine Murphy 16 Powder Mill Road 1 2007 1 2 2 Town Meeting 260 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Name Address Term Expires Meetings Attended Eligible Meetings precinct 3 Janet Leombruno 2 Cider Mill Road 2010 22 23 Rebecca A. Connelly 20 Francine Road 2010 19 23 Amelia Jacob 9 Alfred Road 2010 14 21 Judith M. Perry 4 Doris Road 2010 16 23 Elizabeth K. Sleczkowski 27 Townsend Terrace 2009 19 23 Richard A. Finlay 11 Francine Road 2009 14 23 Michael Bower 18 Edith Road 2009 22 23 Norma B. Shulman 13 Alfred Road 2009 21 23 J eanne I. Bullock 22 Pinewood Drive 2008 23 23 J ames P. Ca obianco 5 Chesterfield Street 2008 12 23 Yaakov Z. Cohn 5 Harvard Road 2008 19 23 Paul King 62 Linda Avenue 2008 0 23 Adam S. Blumer 27 Lowe Circle 2007 2 2 Precinct 6 Antoinette K. Burrill 5 Myrna Road 2010 11 23 Thomas W. MuLLhy 60 Hi Road 2010 15 21 Jennifer A. Trombino 67 Leigh Street 2010 16 21 Nancy A. Sweeney 29 Brook Street 2010 14 23 Nicholas J. Pa anella 20 Antrim Road 2009 15 23 J ohn D. Styles 23 Terri Road 2009 13 23 Kathleen M. Stefanini 15 Cunningham Drive 2009 5 23 Mary C. Healy 3 Poplar Street 2009 13 23 Peter J. DeVito 9 Gilmore Road 2008 13 23 John Speranza 66 Spruce Street 2008 20 23 Edward T. Leva , Jr. 13 Summer Street, #2 2008 22 23 Robert H. Bolles 35 North Lane 2008 10 23 David E. Morales 2 Henderson Circle 1 2007 0 2 Elizabeth L. Funk 1242 Concord Street 1 2007 2 2 precinct 7 Francis X. Reilly 534 Edgell Road 2010 16 23 Edward J. Noonan 346 Belknap Road 2010 19 21 Penny W. Wortham 4 Warren Place 2010 10 20 Kathleen J. Reilly 534 Edgell Road 2010 16 23 Melvin S. Warshaw 149 Maynard Road 2010 3 3 Henry W. Ohrenberger 16 John M. McQuinn Circle 2009 22 23 Peter A. Poulos 41 Pleasant Street 2009 15 23 Lawrence J. Griffin 38 Pine Lane 2009 10 23 Morton J. Shuman 582 Pleasant Street 2009 2 23 Kevin P. Crotty 79 Pleasant Street 2008 21 23 Janice L. Kiley 146 Maynard Rd., #503G 2008 15 23 J ohn Christopher Walsh 113 Pleasant Street 2008 12 23 Richard E. Paul 10 Aspen Circle 1 2008 1 19 1 23 Paul J. McGowan 6 Joanne Drive 1 2007 1 2 Precinct S Wolf Haberman 41 Crestwood Drive 2010 20 23 Joseph B. Connolly 3 Sylvester Drive 2010 20 23 Michael J. Boyle 4 McLaughlin Street, #3 2010 10 21 Nancy J. Rogerson 18 Hastings Street 2010 17 21 Arthur J. Mills 79 Beacon Street 2009 11 23 Laurie jean Carroll 57 Indian Head Road 2009 17 23 Paul J. Jasper 11 Hastings Street 2009 7 23 Dorothy Collier 146 Lockland Avenue 2009 22 23 Thomas H. O'Neil 107 Lockland Avenue 2008 23 23 Linda M. Romero 20 Donna Road 2008 21 23 Philip Romine 6 Pitt Road 2008 19 23 Marshall D. Krashin 58 Lohnes Road 2008 20 23 Douglas S. Rich 96 Oaks Road 1 2007 2 2 Town Meeting 261 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Name Address Term Expires Meetings Attended Eligible Meetings preernct 9 Steven H. Friedman 2 Woodward Road 2010 16 23 Bernice W. Strom 12 Longview Road 2010 23 23 Casey Dylan 16 McPhee Road 2010 5 12 Rita K. Blum 60 Dinsmore Avenue 412 2010 17 23 Dennis J. Paulsen 829 Concord Street 2009 20 23 C. Patrick Dunne 174 Old Connecticut Path 2009 12 23 Kimberly Ann Lombardo 345 Old Connecticut Path 2009 1 23 Kitty Crone 165 Old Connecticut Path 2009 17 23 Maureen E. Dunne 174 Old Connecticut Path 2008 12 23 Brian C. Sullivan 16 Olympic Street 2008 2 2 Bruce Leish 7 Randy Road 2008 10 23 Pablo Maio 50 Dinsmore Avenue, 311 1 2008 1 1 1 Shelley R. Strowman 9 Longview Road 2008 17 23 Phyllis A. Dunn 50 Williams Street 2007 0 2 Precinct 10 William G. McCarthy 25 Westgate Road 2010 22 23 Kathleen T. McCarthy 25 Westgate Road 2010 23 23 Clifford Moreland 1321 Worcester Road, 104 2010 18 23 J oseph A. Mola 18 Westgate Road 2010 8 23 Anne E. Mola 18 Westgate Road 2009 10 23 Diana Bailey 26 Westgate Road 2009 13 23 Pamela V. Roberts 1321 Worcester Rd., 605 2009 23 23 Gwendolyn Holbrow 65 Gates Road 2009 17 23 Margo B. Deane 1500 Worcester Road, 615E 2008 22 23 George L. Drummey 10 Woodlei h Road 2008 12 23 Lloyd Kaye 1400 Worcester Road, 110 2008 20 21 Clennie M. Burnett 1321 Worcester Road, 111 2007 0 2 precinct ll Peter C. Adams 222 Edgewater Drive 2010 18 21 J udy B. Leerer 395 Winter Street 2010 16 21 Diane M. Montgomery 3 Badger Road 2010 11 23 Martin F. Mulvey, Jr. 7 William J. Height 2010 15 23 Cynthia J. Laurora 11 Winter Lane 2009 23 23 Edward V. Cosgrove 597 Winter Street 2009 12 23 Christopher A. McGinty 49 Salem End Lane 2009 16 23 Peter Pleshaw 10 Gryzboska Circle 2009 20 23 Enzo F. Rotatori 550 Winter Street 2008 19 23 Arsene G. Bajakian 34 Gryzboska Circle 2008 15 23 Debbie Chase 85 Salem End Lane 2008 16 23 Robert Snider 11 Cahill Park Drive 2008 13 23 Philip R. Ottaviani, Jr. 1 228 Salem End Road 1 2007 1 2 1 2 Bradford Dou as Freeman 28 Hodder Lane 1 2007 0 2 preeinct 12 Cheryl L. Gordon 600 Union Avenue 2010 15 23 Michael A. Quinlan 66 Prescott Street 2010 1 1 Harold E. Johnson 16 Neville Road 2010 17 23 Robert L. Goodman 26 Neville Road 2010 2 22 J ohn Eric Doherty 30 Warren Road 2010 20 21 Edward J. Kross 559 Union Avenue 2 2009 19 23 Mark W. McClennan 14 Trafton Road 2009 19 23 Caroline R. Levy 73 Barber Road 2009 17 23 Allan D. Smith 568 Franklin Street 2009 17 23 Betty H. Muto 35 Neville Road 2008 23 23 David I. Hutchinson 36 Day Hill Road 2008 21 23 Veronica A. Smith 568 Franklin Street 2008 18 23 Thomas Scionti 12 Maple Street 2008 15 23 Glenn R. Chambless 54 Prescott Street 2007 0 2 Town Meeting 262 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Name Address Term Expires Meetings Attended Eligible Meetings Pr eeinct 13 Elizabeth J. Stone 14 Arthur Street 2010 18 23 J ohn B. Steacie 35 Hartford Street 2010 21 23 Wesley J. Ritchie 5 Deloss Street 2010 17 21 Michelle McElroy 30 Myrtle Street 2010 17 20 Philip L. Reitz 34 Shawmut Terrace 2009 14 23 Faith C. Tolson- Pierce 4 Arch Street 2009 13 23 Elsa Hornfischer 29 Arch Street 2009 16 23 Michael J. Campion 26 Arthur Street 2009 0 23 Louis V. Cintolo 358 Grant Street 2008 5 23 Gerald Couto 25 Dennison Avenue 2008 20 23 Anita P. O'Neil 49 Warren Road 2008 20 23 J une P. Robertson 69 Dennison Avenue 1 2008 1 11 1 23 Jeffrey WT Buck 2 Belvidere Road 2007 0 2 Charles E. Brody 278 Bishop Street, #1 2007 0 2 Precinct 14 Donald R. Chute 36 Event Avenue 2010 23 23 Daniel D. Gittelsohn 16 Bishop Drive 2010 20 23 J ames M. Rizoli 94 Pond Street 2010 22 23 Richard J. Pelletier, Jr. 81 Wilson Drive 2010 3 3 J ames C. Bauchman 53 Clinton Street, #1 2009 22 23 Isabel L. Chute 36 Event Avenue 2009 18 23 Jamie M. Ordway 199 Bishop Drive 2009 14 23 J udith P. Callahan 158 Arthur Street 2009 10 23 Robert B. DeShaw 124 Lawrence Street 2008 9 23 Agnalclo Lopes Da Cruz 107 Mansfield Street 2008 1 23 Courtney El art 45 Lawrence Street 2008 13 23 Robert D. Cushing P. O. Box 225 2008 23 23 Cheryl A. Greene 98 Bishop Drive 1 2007 0 1 2 Precinct 15 Albert Q. Roos 14 Harmony Lane, B 2010 17 21 Mary P. Bushart 995 Waverly Street 2010 2 23 Thomas J. Driscoll, Jr. 89 Bethany Road 402 2010 17 23 Beverly C. Good 24 Hayes Street 2 2009 11 23 Harold Weaver 133 Winthrop Street, #3 2009 0 2 Sidney Pires 24 Coburn Street 2008 1 2 Michael G. Berardi 78 Bethany Road 1 2008 1 19 1 23 Roberta Roberti 101 Winthrop Street, #2 2008 2 19 Alexander R. Capone 29 Seminole Avenue 2007 0 2 Precinct 1� William J. LaBarge 11 East Street 2010 23 23 J eff M. Convery 15 Alla Street 2010 19 20 David T. Marks 82 Leland Street 2009 17 23 Kathleen T. DeMarco 92 South Street 2009 19 23 Frank N. DeMarco 92 South Street 2009 20 23 Catherine T. Bohn 75 Irving Street, #309 2008 0 23 Precinct 17 Richard J. Baritz 1 Marion 2010 8 21 J oe C. Fonseca 248 Beaver Street 2008 21 23 Martin Ned Price 250 Beaver Street 2008 22 23 Isabel Fonseca 248 Beaver Street 2008 10 23 Gigi Anita Rust 22B Interfaith Terrace 2007 1 2 Precinct 18 Alan Crane 43 Pratt Street 2010 15 23 Victor A. Ortiz 45 Alexander Street, #1 2010 3 23 Kevin D. O'Neill 42 Lake Avenue 2010 18 23 Norman L. Snow, Jr. 35 Lindsay Street 2009 20 23 Ilene Hofrenning 24 Wood Avenue, 1 2009 13 23 Town Meeting 263 Town of Framingham FEBRUARY 13,. 2007 SPEciA . TowN MEETING ARTICLE 1 2007 Annual Report To see if the Town will hear the following reports from various Boards, Committees and Commissions: 1) Report from the Board of Selectmen /Building Commissioner on the extent of building use and sign violations in existence in Framingham and a recommended plan of action to address them, along with projected revenue from imposing fines for violations on such properties and report back to Town Meeting in the fall on the expense it will take to impose the violations and the revenue that will be generated from imposing such penalties 2) Report from the Committee on Overcrowding 3) Report from the Police Chief on the police budget in specified areas including the medical fund and overtime budget 4) Report from the Police Chief regarding towing by the town vs. by private tow companies 5) Report from the Police Chief regarding a study of alternatives to the services provided by crossing guards, 6) Report from the Board of Selectmen or Fire Chief on use of AMR vs. the Fire Dept. to provide ambulance services 7) Report from the Town Manager /CFO on policy for the division of the budget between the Town and the School and a comparative study with other towns 8) Report from Selectmen /Town Manager /Lift Bus Management on opportunities for advertising on the Lift bus service 9) Report from the Town Manager /CFO on Long Term Financial Forecast for the Town. Pass any vote or take any action in relation thereto. Sponsor: Town Meeting Standing Committee on Rules February 13, 2007 Voted: That Town Meeting authorize the hearing of the following reports, with the exception of item 5, from various boards, committees and commissions: 1) Report from the Board of Selectmen /Building Commissioner on the extent of building use and sign violations in existence in Framingham and a recommended plan of action to address them, along with projected revenue from imposing fines for violations on such properties and report back to Town Meeting in the fall on the expense it will take to impose the violations and the revenue that will be generated from imposing such penalties 2) Report from the Committee on Overcrowding 3) Report from the Police Chief on the police budget in specified areas including the medical fund and overtime budget Town Meeting 264 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report 4) Report from the Police Chief regarding towing by the town vs. by private tow companies 5) Report from the Police Chief regarding a study of alternatives to the services provided by crossing guards 6) Report from the Board of Selectmen or Fire Chief on use of AMR vs. the Fire Dept. to provide ambulance services 7) Report from the Town Manager /CFO on policy for the division of the budget between the Town and the School and a comparative study with other towns 8) Report from Selectmen /Town Manager /Lift Bus Management on opportunities for advertising on the Lift bus service 9) Report from the Town Manager /CFO on Long Term Financial Forecast for the Town. ARTICLE 2 To see if the Town will hear a progress report on the Bowditch Field Master Planning project as voted at the 2005 Annual Town Meeting. Pass any vote or take any action in relation thereto. Sponsor: Parks and Recreation Department Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. February 13, 2007 Voted: That Town Meeting authorize the hearing of a progress report from the Director of Parks and Recreation on the Bowditch Field Master Planning project as voted at the 2005 Annual Town Meeting. ARTICLE 3 To see if the town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by gift, purchase, or eminent domain, permanent sewer easements and temporary construction easements for the replacement of the Water Street sewer main, said easements as shown on a plan entitled "Town of Framingham Gregory Road Relief Sewer and Water Street Sewer Replacement Project ", dated 1/05/07, as revised, prepared by Taj Engineering, and further to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or borrow a sum of money for said purpose; and further to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take all actions to carry out the purposes of this Article. Pass any vote or take any action in relation thereto. Sponsor: Board of Selectmen February 15, 2007 Voted Unanimously: That Town Meeting authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by gift, purchase, or eminent domain, permanent sewer easements and temporary construction easements for the replacement of the Water Street sewer main, said easements as Town Meeting 265 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report shown on a plan entitled "Town of Framingham Gregory Road Relief Sewer and Water Street Sewer Replacement Project ", dated 1/5/07, as revised, prepared by Taj Engineering, and further to charge all costs associated with the acquisition of these easements to the appropriation voted for said purpose under Article 2 of the June 8, 2006 Special Town Meeting; and further to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take all actions to carry out the purposes of this article. ARTICLE 4 To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, borrow or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money to design certain sewer improvements at Herbert Street and Eames Street in Framingham, and to further authorize the Town to accept funds from Ashland for said purposes, with said funds to be expended in accordance with the terms of the Intermunicipal Agreement between the Town of Framingham and Town of Ashland for Wastewater Reception from Ashland's Sewerage System dated January 1, 2007. Amount Requested: Not to exceed $125,000.00 Pass any vote or take any action in relation thereto. Sponsor: Board of Selectmen February 15, 2007 Voted Unanimously: That the Town transfer and appropriate the sum of $125,000.00 from Sewer Retained Earnings to the Department of Public Works — Sewer Division in order to design certain sewer improvements at Herbert Street and Eames Street in Framingham, with said funds to be expended in accordance with the terms of the Intermunicipal Agreement between the Town of Framingham and Town of Ashland for Wastewater Reception from Ashland's Sewerage System dated January 1, 2007. ARTICLE 5 To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, borrow or otherwise provide a sum or sum of money for auditorium ceiling repairs at Fuller Middle School. Amount Requested: $360,000.00 Pass any vote or take any action in relation thereto. Sponsor: School Committee February 15, 2007 Voted: That Town Meeting appropriate the sum of $360,000.00 for the purpose of funding repairs to the auditorium ceiling at the Fuller Middle School; said funding to be expended under the authority of the Chief Procurement Officer, and that for this appropriation, the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow said amount under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(3A) of the Mass. General Laws, or pursuant to any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds and notes of the Town therefore. 90 voting in favor, 4 opposed. Town Meeting 266 Town of Framingham ARTICLE 6 2007 Annual Report To see if the Town will vote to determine what sum or sums of money the Town will transfer from available funds from the Receipt Reserved for Appropriation Insurance Proceeds Greater than $20,000 Account, to the Police Division to replace a vehicle which was considered a total loss in an accident. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Board of Selectmen February 15, 2007 Voted Unanimously: That Town Meeting authorize the transfer of $25,407.50 from the Receipt Reserved for Appropriation Insurance Proceeds Greater than $20,000.00 Account to the Police Division to replace a vehicle which was considered a total loss in an accident. ARTICLE 7 To see if the Town will raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money to settle eminent domain litigation pending in Middlesex Superior Court in case styled as Route 30 LLC v. Town of Framingham, Civil Action No. 2005 - 01737, and to approve said settlement pursuant to Article II, Section 1.4 of the General Laws. Pass any vote or take any action in relation thereto. Sponsor: Board of Selectmen Amount Requested: $40,000.00 to be paid From Chapter 90 Funds February 15, 2007 Voted Unanimously: That Town Meeting, pursuant to Article II, Section 1.4 of the General Laws, approve the settlement of pending eminent domain litigation entitled Route 30LLC v. Town of Framingham as more fully described in the background materials to Article 7 prepared by the Town Counsel, and further to authorize the transfer of $40,000.00 from Chapter 90 funds to fund said settlement. ARTICLE 8 To see if the Town will raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money to the legal budget for the Town of Framingham for purposes of funding the following matters: (a) Pay for experts, legal fees and associated legal expenses in the cases of Paulini Loam v. Town of Framingham pending in Massachusetts Land Court, Misc. Case Nos.318083 and 325212, incurred in FY 2007 and to be incurred in future fiscal years; Town Meeting 267 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report (b) Pay for experts, legal fees and associated legal expenses in the case of NEXUM v. Framingham Planning Board Middlesex Superior Court Civil Action No.004 -1628, incurred in FY 2007 and to be incurred in future fiscal years; and (c) Fund general outstanding unfunded obligations for legal fees, settlements and expenses incurred or to be incurred in the legal budget for FY 2007. Amount Requested: $325,000.00 Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Board of Selectmen February 15, 2007 Voted: That the Town appropriate the sum of $325,000.00 to the legal budget for the Town of Framingham for purposes of funding the following matters: (a) $125,000.00 to pay for experts, legal fees and associated legal expenses in the cases of Paulini Loam v. Town of Framingham pending in Massachusetts Land Court, Misc. Case Nos.318083 and 325212, incurred in FY 2007 and to be incurred in future fiscal years; (b) $75,000.00 to pay for experts, legal fees and associated legal expenses in the case of NEXUM v. Framingham Planning Board Middlesex Superior Court Civil Action No.004 -1628, incurred in FY 2007 and to be incurred in future fiscal years; and (c) $125,000.00 to fund general outstanding unfunded obligations for legal fees, settlements and expenses incurred or to be incurred in the legal budget for FY 2007. Further, that $123,125.39 of the required funding be transferred from funds remaining in a reserve account created by vote in Article 1 of the March 9, 2004 Special Town Meeting to fund certain wetlands and related litigation involving Winch Pond Trust, and that $201,874.61 be transferred from free cash for this purpose. Town Meeting 268 Town of Framingham APRIL 24, 2007 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 2007 Annual Report Article Subject Vote Date I Reports from Departments, Boards, etc. Voted 5/8/07 ......................... 2 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... .............................................................. General Bylaw Amendment — Distribution of Literature to TMM Voted .. ........................... 4/24/07 ........................ 3 ............................... .................................................................................................................................................................................. ................................................................ General Bylaw Amendment - Town Meeting Literature . Voted ........................... 4/24/07 ......................... 4 ............................... ............................................................................................. ................................ ............................................... ...................................... General Bylaw Amendment — Posting Adjournments of Town Meeting . .......................... Voted ........................... 4/24/07 ......................... 5 ............................... .................................................................................................................................................................... • ........... ................................................................ Reports General Bylaw Amendment —Annual Reports Committees, etc. Voted w/ A jp�nd. ........................... 4/24/07 ......................... 6 ... ............................ ................................................................................... ......... General Bylaw Amendment — Finance Committee .............................. ................ Voted ........................... 4/24/07 ......................... 7 ............................... .................................................................................................................................................................................. ................................................................ Property General Bylaw Amendment — Real Property Committee Voted ........................... 4/24/07 ......................... 8 ............................... ............................................................................... ...................................................................................... ................................................................ General Bylaw Amendment — Housing Authority, Permanent Bldg. Voted w/ Amend. ........................... 4/25/07 Committee ......................... 9 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ................................................................ Moderator — Change term from I year to 2 year Indefinitely ........................... 4/24/07 ......................... ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ................. ..... �P.�q ..... ................. ........................... 10 A ceptance of Mullin Rule (MGL Ch. Ac ceptance 9, sec I Failed 4/25/07 ...................- ....... ................. ...... ...3 ..23D) ......................................................................................................................................................................................... ................................................................ Petition to change membership of ZBA Referred Back w/ ........................... 5/9/07 concurrence of ......................... ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......... p nsor .2 ........... S ................................. ........................... 12 General Bylaw Amendment— Registration of Lodging Houses . . Voted w/ Amend. 5/1/07 ......................... 13 ............................ ............................................................. ........................................... . ....... ........................................................... ................................................................ General Bylaw Amendment - Penalties for violation of Lodging House Voted ........................... 5/2/07 .......................... ........................ -By la ... py.la .............................................................................................................................................................................................. ..................................... ........................... ........................... 14 Petition Legislature — Lodging costs for displaced tenants Referred Back w/ 512H07 concurrence of ......................... ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ................................................................ Sponsor ........................... 15 General Bylaw Amendment — Alcoholic Beverag w/ Amends. 4/26/07 ........... .............. 16 ... ......... .... .... . ............................ ...................................................................................... ................................................................. ................................................................ General Bylaw Amendment — Sign Bylaw Referred Back ........................... 4/25/07 w/ concurrence of ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. ......... ........... Sp .2nsor ................................. ........................... 17 General Bylaw Amendment — Clean Indoor Act Voted 4/25/07 120 in favor, 2 202��q ......................... 18 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... .................... 1 Lease Authorization for Village Hall, Edgell Mem. Library, Academy .................... Voted ........................... 5/1/07 Bldgs. 130 in favor, 2 ......................... ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... .................... 202seq .................... ........................... 19 Lease Authorization for Hollis Street Property Voted w/ Amend. 4/25/07 130 in favor, I ......................... .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. ........... ............. ........................... 20 Grant Authorization for Library Trustees Voted 4/25/07 ......................... 21 ........................................................................................ ......................................................................................................................... ................................................................ Home Rule Petition to Allow Construction on Town land at Referred back w/ ........................... 5/30/07 Dudley/Fountain concurrence of ......................... .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. ........... ............. ........................... 22 Zoning Bylaw Amendment — Land Disturbance Voted 5/2/07 120 in favor, 2 ......................... ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... .................... 202seq .................... ........................... 23 Zoning Bylaw Amendment — Background Materials Voted 4/26/07 125 in favor, 0 ......................... ................................................................................................................................................................................. .................................. ......... ........... ............. ........................... 24 Zoning Bylaw Amendment — Site Plan Review Approval Expiration Voted 4/26/07 125 in favor, 0 ......................... ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... opposed 25 Zoning Bylaw Amendment — Municipal Services Voted 4/26/07 125 in favor, 0 opposed Town Meeting 269 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Article Subject Vote Date 26 Zoning Bylaw Amendment — Expiration of Special Permit Voted w/ Amend. 5/2/07 114 in favor, 0 °PPosed 27 ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... ..............................- Zoning Bylaw Amendment — Site Plan Review Contents/Lighting ................................. Voted ............................... 4/26/07 Definitions 124 in favor, 1 ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... ..............................- °PPosed 28 General Bylaw Amendment — Hours of Operation for Outdoor Referred Back 4/26/07 Construction w/ concurrence of Sponsor ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 29 .........?....................- Annual Town Report Acceptance........................................................................................................... .............................:... ............................... € 5/2/07 ...................- 30 .............................. Personnel Bylaw Amendment Pay Plan -Voted .................................:... Referred Back ............................... 5/2/07 w /concurrence of ............................................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................... ............. ........... Sponsor ............................. ............................... ..... 31 € Collective Bargaining Agreements Referred Back to 5/2/07 concurrence of ............................. ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......... ..........- Sponsor 32 Authorization of Operation of LIFT p................................................................... Voted 5/3/07 .............................:.................................................................................................................................................................................... 33 ............................... Funds - Annual Community Development Voted ............................... 5/3/07 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 34 Housing Plan Voted ............................... 5/9/07 w /amendments 110 in favor, 8 opposed, labstention ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 35 General Bylaw Amendment — Standing Committee on Planning /Zoning a Voted ............................... 5/8/07 ........ ....:... 36 ..... .......... Funds — Cochituate Rail Trail p................................................................... Voted 5/3/07 .............................:.................................................................................................................................................................................... 37 ............................... Funds — Transfer Fu Handicapped Fines to Disability Commission b Voted ............................... 5/3/07 ............................. 38 ..... . ............... Disability Benefits for Veterans Failed - 5/3/07 ............................ 39 y ................................................................................................................................................................................... ............................... p................................................................;... Retroactive Disability Benefits for Veterans Referred Back to ............................... 5/3/07 ............................. ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ ............................... Sponsor 40 Deferral of Real Estate Taxes for Active Duty Veterans Voted 5/8/07 ............................................................................................................................. 41 .................. ............................... ................ p................................................................;... ................................................ Rescind Authorized but Unissued Borrowing Votes Referred Back w/ ............................... 5/8/07 concurrence of ............................. ......... ........... Sponsor 42 Unpaid Bills of Prior Years Voted 5/8/07 110 in favor, 4 ............................. ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ......... ........... °PPosed ................................. ............................... Town Budget...................................................................................................................................................... 5/30/07 ....43 ................... 44 -FY07 ..a.......................Voted FYO7 Water Dept. .................................:... Referred Back w/ ............................... 5/8/07 concurrence of ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... ..............................- Sponsor ..............................:... ............................... 45 FY07 Sewer Dept. Referred Back w/ 5/8/07 concurrence of ............................. ......... ........... Sponsor Loring. 5/8/07 ....46 .................. 47 ..FY07 .Arena ....................................................................................................................... ............................... ..........................Voted Funds — Legal Fees for Great Brook Valley Health Center .................................:... Referred Back w/ ............................... 5/8/07 concurrence of ............................. ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... b......... ........... Sp onsor 48 Funds — Legal Fees for Calvao Litigation Referred Back 5/8/07 w/ concurrence of .............................................................................................................................................................................................................. ............................... ...;....................Sponsor ..............................:... ............................... 49 — Capital Budget...................................................................................................................................... : 5/17/07 ................... 50 -FY08 ............................... — Water. Projects............................................................................................................... -Voted ................................. ... ............................... 5/10/07 - ................... 51 -FY ............................... ..;.......................Voted FY08 — Sewer Projects .................................... Voted ...... ........................ 5/16/07 Town Meeting 270 Town of Framingham Article 52 .................. 53 .................. 54 .................. 55 .................. 56 .................. 57 .................. 58 .................. 59 .................. 60 ................... ........ ......... 62 .................. 63 ................... 64 65 2007 Annual Report Subject Vote Revolving Funds Voted .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... Revocation of Arena Enterprise Fund Authorization .......................... ............................... Voted ............................... FY08 Town Budget .................................................................................................................. ............................... ..;.......................Voted FY08 — Water Budget Voted................ .................................................................................................................... ............................... ......................... FY08..- Budget ............................... ..Sewer ................................................................................................................ ............................... ..........................Voted Open S Fund Voted . .Stabilization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . a . . . FY08 Community Econom ic Dev. Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Voted .......................................................................................... General Bylaw Amendment — Agricultural Commission .......................................................................,....................... ............................... Voted ............................... General Bylaw Amendment —Right to Farm Voted ...... Amend ch 143 of the Acts of 1949, s. 5 — Fillin of Town Meetin g Voted .......... ....... ...... ....... .. ......... .... ... ....... .................... ....g..... ...... Amend ch. 143 of the Acts of 1949, s. 5a ... Fillin of Town Meetin 5 .. g g ................. .. ................. .. ............ Voted ................................................................................................................................... ............................................... ....................................... Penn Central Easement , ............................... Voted Unanimous ................................................................................................................................................................................. ............................... .......................... Acceptance of Provisions of Municipal Partnership Act ............................... Referred Back w/ concurrence . of Sponsor .............................. Street Acceptances Referred Back w/ concurrence of Sponsor Date L...... 5/8/07 .5/8/07 . 5/30/07 . 5/22/07 . 5/22/07 . 5/8/07 . 5/9/07 . 5/9/07 . . 5/9/07 . . 5/10/07 . 5/10/07 5/10/07 ........................... 5/10/07 5/10/07 Town Meeting 271 Town of Framingham ARTICLE 1 2007 Annual Report To see if the town will hear reports from various Boards, Departments and Committees and commissions including, but not limited to, the following: 1. Capital Budget committee in regard to the disposition of past capital budgets that town meeting has voted on. 2. Report of the Town Clerk on the status of bylaw changes approved by Town Meeting 3. Report from the Board of Selectmen on petitions to the legislature approved by Town Meeting 4. Report by the CFO on transfers in the FY2007 budget 5. Report from the Director of Parks and Recreation or Council on Aging on the Callahan Senior Center 6. Report from the High School Building Committee on the High School building project 7. Report from the Planning Board on the Master Plan 8. Report from the Planning Board regarding plans and costs for development in the town 9. Report from the Library Trustees on the progress of the Library Long Range Planning Committee Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Standing Committee on Rules May 8, 2007 Voted: That Town Meeting hear the following reports: 1. Capital Budget committee in regard to the disposition of past capital budgets that town meeting has voted on 2. Report of the Town Clerk on the status of bylaw changes approved by Town Meeting 3. Report from the Board of Selectmen on petitions to the legislature approved by Town Meeting 4. Report by the CFO on transfers in the FY2007 budget 5. Report from the Director of Parks and Recreation or Council on Aging on the Callahan Senior Center Town Meeting 272 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report 6. Report from the High School Building Committee on the High School building project 7. Report from the Planning Board on the Master Plan 8. Report from the Planning Board regarding plans and costs for development in the town 9. Report from the Library Trustees on the progress of the Library Long Range Planning Committee Further, that after all reports are given, Town Meeting acknowledges that these reports were heard and the article was disposed. ARTICLE 2 To see if the Town will amend the bylaws Article I Town Meeting § 1.8 Distribution of Literature by adding a new section 1.8.6 as follows: 1.8.6 For each session of Town Meeting the Moderator or the Moderator's designee shall supply a package containing a copy of each handout to both the Town Clerk and the Town Library for archival purposes. These packages shall be made accessible to those who would like to view the contents. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Standing Committee on Rules April 24, 2007 Voted: That the General Bylaws of the Town, Article III, §1.8 Distribution of Literature be amended by adding a new section 1.8.6 as follows: 1.8.6 For each session of Town Meeting the Moderator or the Moderator's designee shall supply a package containing a copy of each handout to both the Town Clerk and the Town Library for archival purposes. These packages shall be made accessible to those who would like to view the contents. Approved by the Attorney General on September 12, 2007. ARTICLE 3 To see if Town Meeting will vote to amend the Town Bylaws, Article III, section 1.8.5 as follows: 1.8.5 The Moderator shall announce, prior to the debate on each article, what written literature was included in the mailing by the Board of Selectmen or placed on a table in the Town Meeting Room. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Town Meeting 273 Town of Framingham Sponsor: Government Study Committee 2007 Annual Report April 24, 2007 Voted: That the General Bylaws of the Town, Article III, § 1.8.5 be amended as follows: 1.8.5 The Moderator shall announce, prior to the debate on each article, what written literature was included in the mailing by the Board of Selectmen or placed on a table in the Town Meeting Room. Approved by the Attorney General on September 12, 2007. ARTICLE 4 To see if Town Meeting will vote to amend the Town Bylaws, Article III, section 1.3.2 as follows: 1.3.2 Whenever a Town Meeting shall adjourn to a future date, the Town Clerk shall cause a notice of the time and place of adjournment to be posted in Town Hall and on the Town web site. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Government Study Committee April 24, 2007 Voted: That the General Bylaws of the Town, Article III, § 1.3.2 be amended to read as follows: 1.3.2 Whenever a Town Meeting shall adjourn to a future date, the Town Clerk shall cause a notice of the time and place of adjournment to be posted before 12:00 noon in Town Hall and on the Town web site. Approved by the Attorney General on September 12, 2007. ARTICLE 5 To see if Town Meeting will vote to amend the Town Bylaws, Article I, section 5.12 as follows: 5.12 Each appointed committee, board or commission shall provide a report of its activities to the Board of Selectmen for publication in the annual Town Report by the date and in the format established by the Board of Selectmen. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Government Study Committee Town Meeting 274 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report April 24, 2007 Voted: That the General Bylaws of the Town, Article I, §5.12 be amended as follows: 5.12 Each appointed committee, board or commission and standing committees shall provide a report of its activities to the Board of Selectmen for publication in the annual Town Report by the date and in the format established by the Board of Selectmen. Approved by the Attorney General on September 12, 2007. ARTICLE 6 To see if the town will vote to modify Article II Section 10 entitled "Finance Committee" of the Town Bylaws with respect to the Finance Committee members serving on certain committees of the Town (Section 10.1). Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Government Study Committee April 24, 2007 Voted: That the General Bylaws of the Town, Article 11, § 10.1 be amended by deleting the second sentence and inserting in place thereof the following: Any member who shall be elected or appointed to another Town office or committee, board or commission shall, upon qualification in such position, cease to be a member of the Finance Committee, unless such member is otherwise directed by statute or bylaw or such member is acting as a liaison from the Finance Committee to a special committee appointed for up to one year by the Board of Selectmen, the Town Manager, the Town Moderator, or a vote of Town Meeting. Approved by the Attorney General on September 12, 2007. ARTICLE 7 To see if the town will vote to modify Article 11, Section 16 of the Town Bylaws, entitled "Real Property Committee ", as follows: By deleting the first sentence in Section 16.2 and in the following sentence by changing `Thereafter, the" to "The "; By changing the last sentence of 16.2 to "The term of the remaining seven members shall be for a period of up to one (1) year ending the first of July following appointment by their respective board, committee or commission; By replacing Section 16.3 with the following: Town Meeting 275 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report 16.3 The Real Property Committee shall choose its own officers from the ten (10) Town Meeting Members. A quorum of said committee shall be six (6) of the ten (10) Town Meeting Members. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Government Study Committee April 24, 2007 Voted: That the General Bylaws of the Town, Article 11, § 16.2 and § 16.3 be amended as follows: By deleting the first sentence in Section 16.2 and in the following sentence by changing `Thereafter, the" to "The "; By changing the last sentence of 16.2 to "The term of the remaining seven members shall be for a period of up to one (1) year ending the first of July following appointment by their respective board, committee or commission; By replacing Section 16.3 with the following: 16.3 The Real Property Committee shall choose its own officers from the ten (10) Town Meeting Members. A quorum of said committee shall be six (6) of the ten (10) Town Meeting Members. Approved by the Attorney General on September 12, 2007. ARTICLE 8 To see if the town will vote to modify Article I, Section 1 of the Town Bylaws, entitled "Permanent Officers, Boards and Committees ", as follows: By replacing the entry for Housing Authority in Article I, Section 1.2 with the following: Housing Authority Four One Five Years One in 4 years None in 1 year Five Years One in 5 years Appointed by the Governor By deleting the following entry for Permanent Building Committee in Article I, Section 1.3. Permanent Six Members Three Years Moderator Two Building Committee One Member Project Project Oversight Not Applicable Town Meeting 276 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Duration Authority By deleting the following entry for Permanent Building Committee in Article I, Section 1.4. Body Name Appointing Authority Permanent Building Permanent Building Committee Committee Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Government Study Committee April 25, 2007 Voted: That the General Bylaws of the Town of Framingham, Article I, entitled "Permanent Officers, Boards and Committees" be amended by replacing the entry for Housing Authority in Section 1.2 with the one stated in Article 8 of the 2007 Annual Town Meeting Warrant and by deleting the entry for Permanent Building Committee in Section 1.4 as stated in Article 8 of the 2007 Annual Town Meeting Warrant. Approved by the Attorney General on September 12, 2007 with the following exception: The Attorney General has disapproved and deleted the below underlined text: Housing Authority Four Five Years One in 4 years None in 1 year One Five Years One in 5 years Appointed by the Governor ARTICLE 9 To see if the Town will vote to change the term of the office of the Town Moderator from one year to two years the first such term of two years to commence with the Annual Town Meeting Election of March 2008. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Government Study Committee April 24, 2007 Voted: That this article be indefinitely postponed. 59 voting in favor, 58 opposed. Town Meeting 277 Town of Framingham ARTICLE 10 2007 Annual Report To see if the Town will vote to accept M.G.L. Chapter 39, section 23D, which would permit members of local boards, committees and commissions who miss a single session of an adjudicatory hearing before their board to be able to vote on the matter provided that they review the evidence submitted at the missed hearing session and file a certificate to said effect. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsors: Board of Selectmen April 25, 2007 Voted: This article failed. ARTICLE 11 To see if the Town will vote to authorize and approve the filing of a petition by the Board of Selectmen, with the General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, under Section 8 of Article 2 of the Amendments to the Constitution of the Commonwealth, as amended by Article LXXXIX (89) of those Amendments, known as the "Home Rule Amendment" to amend Chapter 143 of the Acts of 1949 (An Act establishing in the town of Framingham Representative Town Government by Limited Town Meetings) to adding a Section that changes the composition of the Zoning Board of Appeals from a 3 full voting member Board to a 5 full member voting Board with a reduction in the number of Associate members from four (4) members to two (2) members. This change will commence upon approval of the State Legislature and Attorney General's office as early as fiscal year 2007. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Government Study Committee May 9, 2007 Voted: That this article be referred back to the Sponsor with the concurrence of the Sponsor to address procedural issues. ARTICLE 12 To see if the Town will adopt a new Bylaw, to be codified as Article 5, § 24 of the General Bylaws, to provide for a registration system for properties used as lodging houses in the Town, as set forth in the background materials, and to impose a $300 fine or alternative penalty for each violation thereof under G.L. c. 40, § 21D for violations of registration and licensing requirements set forth under said Bylaw. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Board of Selectmen Town Meeting 278 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report May 1, 2007 Voted: That the General Bylaws of the Town of Framingham, Article V, Health and Safety be amended by adding the following new Section 24, Bylaw Concerning Lodging Houses as set forth in the background materials for Article 12 of the 2007 Annual Town Meeting Warrant as attached. 117 voting in favor, 18 opposed, 5 abstentions. ARTICLE 12 (ATTACHMENT) Section 24. Bylaw Concerning Lodging Houses 24.1 Purpose This Bylaw is intended to supplement the provisions of G.L. c. 140, § 22, et seq. and G.L. c. 140, § 33 et seq. and all other statutes and State regulations pertaining to lodging houses, for the purpose of ensuring the maintenance and protection of the health, safety and welfare of all persons and the health, safety and general welfare of the public. 24.2 Definitions 1) Lodging House: Every dwelling or part thereof which contains one or more rooming units in which space is let or sublet for compensation by the licensee, owner or operator to four or more persons not within the second degree of kindred to the person compensated and every building not licensed as an inn in which ten or more persons are lodged free or for a charge of twenty -five cents or less for each person for a day of twenty -four hours or for any part thereof. The term Lodging House shall include but not be limited to boarding houses, rooming houses, inns, bed and breakfast establishments, dormitories, fraternity houses, sober houses and other similar dwelling places, but shall not include dormitories of charitable or philanthropic institutions or convalescent or nursing homes licensed under section seventy -one of chapter one hundred and eleven or rest homes so licensed, or group residences licensed or regulated by agencies of the commonwealth. 2) Lodger: A lodger is any person residing in a rooming unit including any person listed as a lodger on any lease agreement for said unit. 3) Rooming Unit: The room or group of rooms let to an individual or household for use as living and sleeping quarters. 4) Licensee: That person (s) or entity listed on the lodging house license and the owner (s) of the land and building where the lodging house is operated. 24.3 Responsibilities of Licensee The licensee shall be responsible for the proper supervision, operation and maintenance of the lodging house in accordance with the requirements of this Bylaw and of all other pertinent State laws, regulations and other Town By -laws. The appointment of an agent shall in no way relieve the licensee from responsibility for full compliance with all the foregoing laws and regulations. Town Meeting 279 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report This Bylaw and the penalties imposed by them shall apply with equal force to the keeper of any lodging house required to be licensed. 24.4 Aunt s If the licensee, because of health, other employment, non - residence on the premises, frequent or extended absences from the premises or other reasons, is unable to exercise proper supervision of the premises, he /she shall designate one or more agent (s) to carry out all or part of his /her responsibilities. The owner of any lodging house that contains twelve (12) or more units shall be required to have an agent residing on the premises. Upon the recommendation of the Chief of Police for reasons of public safety, the Board may require the owner of a lodging house that contains less than twelve units to have an agent residing on the premises. Based on the qualifications of the agent(s) designated and the extent of their responsibilities, the Board may require that more than one agent be provided. If, for any reason, an agent ceases to exercise his /her responsibilities, the licensee shall at once notify the Board of Selectmen and take immediate steps to provide proper interim supervision and obtain a suitable replacement. The agent (s) shall be available on a 24 -hour basis and must post his /her telephone or beeper number in a conspicuous place inside the Lodging House. The agent must also notify the Selectmen's Office, Police Department, Health Department, Fire Department and Building Department Of his /her beeper or telephone number. 24.5 Registers, Card Files and Rosters The licensee of every lodging house shall keep or cause to be kept, in a permanent form, a register. Such register shall contain the true name or name in ordinary use and the last residence of every person engaging or occupying a private room together with a true and accurate record of the room assigned to such person and of the day and hour of check -in and checkout. The entry of the names of the person engaging a room and the lodgers of said room shall be made by said person engaging said room or by any lodger thereto. Until the entry of such name and the record of the room have been made such person shall not be allowed to occupy privately any room upon licensed premises. In addition, each licensee shall keep or cause to be kept a card file or database containing current information on each lodger including full name, date and time of registration, room number, former address, registration number, state of registration, and make of automobile, and the name and telephone number of the person to be notified in case of emergency. These cards should be kept for a minimum of one year after departure of the lodger. The register, card file, and roster required in this section shall be available for inspection at all times by the Board of Selectmen, its agent(s), the Building Commissioner and his designee(s), the Director of Public Health and his designee(s), and any officer of the Framingham Police Department. 24.6 Minimum Standards Town Meeting 280 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report This Bylaw sets forth the minimum standards intended for the maintenance and enforcement required for the protection of health, safety and welfare of all persons concerned. If there is any conflict with state or local law the stricter provision shall apply to the extent legally permissible. All lodging houses shall comply with the requirements of Article II of the State Sanitary Code, Minimum Standards of Fitness for Human Habitation, and to the requirements of this Bylaw, whenever they are in addition to or more stringent than the requirements of Article II of said code. All lodging houses in which meals are served to lodges shall comply with the requirements of Article X of the State Sanitary Code, Minimum Sanitation Standards for Food Establishments, or to such additional standards as may be approved in writing by the Director of Public Health. 24.7 Bathroom Facilities Bathroom facilities, as required by the Sanitary Code, shall be located on the same floor as the individuals who are to use them. 24.8 Lighting and Electrical Facilities The electrical service to the building shall conform with the rules and regulations issued by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Department of Public Safety, Board of Fire Prevention Regulations, known as the Massachusetts Electrical Code, which is incorporated herein by reference. Specific questions regarding the requirements of the Massachusetts Electrical Code may be directed to the Town of Framingham Electrical Inspector. 24.9 House Rules & Supervision Licensees and their agent (s) must: Exercise due care in the selection of lodgers. 2. Inspect all common areas at least daily and all occupied rooms at every change of lodger to insure that all such areas are in a clean and orderly condition and without violation of regulations pertaining to obstruction of egress, cooking in rooms, and other health and safety hazards. A schedule of inspections must be posted at least forty -eight hours prior to said inspection. Posting of the schedule for inspections shall not apply in the case of an emergency. Institute and enforce such house rules as are necessary to prevent the lodging house from being a cause of nuisance or annoyance to the neighborhood. 4. Ensure that House Rules are in writing and at a minimum contain rules adequate to address the following matters: Town Meeting 281 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report a. Noise Control including use of audio or other equipment which may disturb the peace ; b. Disorderly behavior; C. Adherence to this Bylaw and the consequences for repeated violations; d. Proper garbage disposal; and e. Cleanliness of rooming units and common areas. File a copy of the House Rules with the Board of Selectmen as part of the Licensee's license application or renewal thereof. 6. Post a copy of the House Rules in a common area of the lodging house. 7. Provide every lodger who intends to remain for thirty (30) days or more with a copy of the house rules. Meet with the lodgers at least annually to discuss house rules. 9. Take whatever steps necessary to stop Lodger(s) from repeatedly violating house rules or the requirements of this Bylaw, up to and including eviction. 24.10 Housekeeping It shall be the duty of the licensee and /or his /her agent to provide or cause to be provided: Daily cleaning of all common bathroom facilities and of community kitchen or laundry facilities, 2. Cleaning of all occupied rooms and private bathroom facilities at the change of each lodger or as otherwise necessary for sanitary purposes. Cleaning, as necessary, of all other common areas. 24.11 Storage, Collection & Disposal of Waste The Licensee and his /her agent (s) shall comply with the Town of Framingham's Regulations Governing the Handling, Storage Collection and Disposal of Waste and all other state or local laws pertaining to the proper storage, collection and disposal of waste. Responsibilities of the Licensee and Agent (s) include but are not limited to following: Storing waste in watertight, rodent -proof receptacles with tight fitting covers. 2. Providing as many receptacles as are sufficient to contain accumulation of all waste before final collection. Town Meeting 282 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Locating waste containers in an area where objectionable odors will not enter any dwellings, preferably in the rear of the building. 4. Informing all lodgers of the rules regarding proper storage, collection and disposal of waste. Placing waste for collection in the designated location no earlier then 6:00 am on the day of the scheduled collection. 6. Removing all empty containers of any kind from the area of collection no later than midnight of the collection day. 24.12 Egress Facilities There shall be at least two separate and adequate ways of egress from each occupied story of a lodging house. The number and location of such ways of egress shall allow every lodger to reach the outside at ground level by a second way of egress if the principal or customary egress is blocked by fire or smoke, or is otherwise obstructed. At least one of the required ways of egress shall be a protected interior egress and additional required ways of egress shall be either protected interior egress or approved fire escape, in accordance with Section 24.14 hereof, that lead to a place of safety. 24.13 Protected Interior Egress A protected interior egress shall be: An interior stairway including all halls or corridors connecting the flights of stairs or leading to an exterior door at ground level, or providing access from any room, group of rooms, or apartment, which interior stairway is provided with an automatic sprinkler installation approved by the Building Commissioner. 24.14 Approved Fire Escape An approved fire escape shall be an exterior stairway with balconies or landing at each floor, and having clear egress to a street, way or place of safety at ground level. Stairs, balconies and landings shall be constructed of non - combustible materials and landings shall be 2 feet in width of passage. Balconies and landings shall be not more than 9 inches below the top exterior doorsills with which they connect. Access from any occupied story to an approved fire escape shall be through a door with approved hardware, T -turn knob, lever or push bar which by one operation will release the door from the inside. Doors shall be a minimum of 5 feet in height and 24 inches in width or as otherwise approved by the Building Commissioner, and shall open in the direction of egress so as to allow clear passage. If the top of the doorsill is more than 18 inches above the floor, approved steps permanently attached to the structure shall be provided. No storm or screen door Town Meeting 283 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report shall be used in such locations. Except as above provided no devices that require unlocking from inside shall be used. Access to fire escapes shall be from a common hall or corridor, or otherwise accessible room, not a toilet or bathroom. Such common or accessible room shall lead directly to the aforementioned common hall or corridor having a door with hardware allowing release by one operation with no locking device, permitting opening at all time in the direction of egress. No private room shall be used as access to a required fire escape unless the door to the room is equipped with an emergency exit lock of the type and model specially approved by the Building Department. No obstruction shall be permitted in the path of egress to a fire escape. Fire escapes are to be used for emergency purposes only. Use of fire escapes for general access to rooms is strictly prohibited. 24.15 Exit Sims Continuously illuminated red signs bearing the word "EXIT" in plain block letter at least 5 inches high shall be provided over the doors opening into stairways or leading to fire escapes, and at every change of direction of a corridor or hallway leading to such egress doors. 24.16 Emergency Lighting Approved emergency lighting shall be provided along ways of egress. The number, type and location of emergency lighting units shall be as designated by the Building Commissioner. 24.17 Basements and Basement Stairs Basements and cellars shall be protected by automatic sprinklers. An automatic sprinkler shall protect interior stairs leading from a basement or cellar to the floor above. Any new licenses /buildings and /or change in use of a building or structure for the uses as a lodging house shall require the installation and maintenance of an automatic fire suppression system which shall be provided throughout all buildings or spaces of lodging houses in accordance with 780 CMR 906.2.1 or 906.2.2. 24.18 Portable Fire Extinguishers Portable fire extinguishers of a type and capacity approved by the Chief of the Fire Department, shall be provided for each story and basement, one for each 2500 square feet of the floor area or portion thereof and maintained in a fully charged and operable condition at all times and kept in their designated places when not being used. Such fire extinguishers shall be inspected and serviced annually and after use in accordance with NFPA 10. Fire extinguishers shall be conspicuously located where they will be readily accessible and immediately available in the event of fire. Preferably they shall be located along normal paths of travel, including exits from areas. Fire extinguishers shall not be obstructed or obscured from view. Town Meeting 284 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Portable fire extinguishers other than wheeled types shall be securely installed on the hanger or in a bracket shall be securely and properly anchored in the bracket supplied, placed in cabinets or wall recesses. The hanger or bracket shall be securely and properly anchored to the mounting surface in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. 24.19 VerticalOpenin2s All vertical openings, including stairs other than the required stairs, dumbwaiters, vent shafts, and laundry chutes, shall be provided with sprinklers. 24.20 Hazardous Areas and Combustible Storage The Building Commissioner or the Fire Chief may require that kitchens, work shops, heater rooms, storerooms containing combustible materials, or other areas constituting a special hazard be protected by automatic sprinklers, fire resistive construction, additional approved portable fire extinguishing equipment, or other means as directed. Combustible or flammable material shall not be placed, stored or kept in any portion of an exit or elevator car or hoist way or at the bottom of a stairway, fire escape or other means of escape. 24.21 Cooking in Rooms The use of electric hot plates, gas plates, stoves using sterno or other fuel, electric percolators, grills, and toasters, are prohibited in any room other than a kitchen approved by the Building Commissioner. Lodgers may use microwaves in their rooming units with the approval of the Licensee. The use of appliances for the preparing or serving of food shall not be permitted in rooms used for sleeping. 24.22 Portable Heaters The use of portable heaters is strictly prohibited. 24.23 Heating Systems The owner shall provide and maintain in good operating condition the facilities for heating every habitable room and every room containing a toilet, shower or bathtub to such temperature as required by the State Health code. Central heating systems shall be provided with all the safety devices required for new installations under all applicable laws, by -laws, and regulations of any authority having jurisdiction thereof. The heater should be located in an area suitably ventilated to ensure the safe operation of the heater or burner. 24.24 Maintenance Town Meeting 285 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report The building and all parts thereof shall be kept in good general repair and properly maintained. All exterior surfaces shall be kept painted where necessary for the purposes of preservation of structural elements or appearance. Interior walls and ceilings shall be periodically refinished in order to maintain such surfaces free from stains, marks or visible foreign matter. 2. All outdoor areas not devoted to walks and drives or otherwise paved shall be landscaped and adequately maintained to prevent overgrowth of unsightly conditions. Outdoor walks, drives and exterior ways of egress shall be kept unobstructed, free of litter, and clean. Accumulation of ice and snow shall be removed from such areas, including required ways of egress to provide safe walking surfaces and shall be removed. 4. The exterior front entrance will be provided with adequate illumination and the property address number will be maintained in a clear visible location on or near the front entrance. 24.25 Automatic Fire Alarm System All lodging house shall be protected throughout with an adequate system of automatic sprinklers in accordance with the provisions of the state building code. Fire protection systems shall not be disconnected or otherwise rendered unserviceable without first notifying the fire department. The design, installation and performance of required fire warning systems, pursuant to M.G.L. c.148, sec. 26C, shall be in accordance with NFPA 72. 24.26 Care and Maintenance of Fire Protection System The Licensee shall be responsible for the care and maintenance of all fire protection systems, including equipment and devices, to insure the safety the safety and welfare of the lodgers. If required fire protection systems are temporarily out -of service for maintenance or repair, the licensee or his /her agent (s) shall immediately advise the fire department and shall diligently restore the system to working order. Installation of, or modification to, any automatic fire protection system shall require a permit from the Chief of the Fire Department or his /her designee. Aisles, floors, halls, stairways, fire escapes, doors and windows shall be kept in good repair and ready for use, and shall be kept properly lighted. No person shall shut off, disconnect, obstruct, remove or destroy, or cause or permit to be shut off, disconnected, obstructed, removed or destroyed, any part of any sprinkler system, water main, hydrant or other device used for fire protection in any building owned, leased or occupied by such person under his control or supervision, without first procuring a written permit to do so from the Chief of the Fire Department or his /her designee. Town Meeting 286 Town of Framingham 24.27 Egress From and Access to a Building 2007 Annual Report Any obstacle, which may interfere with the means of egress or escape from any building or other premises, or with the access of any part of said building or premises by the fire department in the case of fire, shall be removed from aisles, floors, halls, stairways and fire escapes. Doors and windows designated as exits shall be kept clear at all times. No person shall at any time place encumbrance of any kind before or upon any fire escape, balcony or ladder intended as a means of escape from fire. The means of egress from each part of the building, including stairways, egress doors, and any panic hardware installed thereon, aisles, corridors, passageways and similar elements of the means of egress, shall at all times be maintained in a safe condition and shall be available for immediate use and free of all obstructions. All exterior bridges, steel or wooden stairways, fire escape and egress balconies shall be maintained in accordance with 780 CMR 1028.0 and shall be examined and or tested, and certified for structural adequacy and safety every five years, by a Massachusetts registered professional engineer, or others qualified and acceptable to the Building Commissioner or his /her designee. The engineer or other party shall after inspection submit an affidavit to the building department. 24.28 Conflict With Other Laws or Regulations Whenever any provision of this Bylaw is in conflict with another law, by -law or regulation, the more restrictive provision shall apply, unless a contrary intent is clearly stated. 24.29 Certificates of Inspection The Board of Selectmen may require certificates of inspection certifying compliance with the various requirements of this Bylaw, in addition to the required minimum yearly inspection pursuant to 780 CMR Table 106. 24.30 Severability of Provisions The invalidity of any provision of this Bylaw shall not affect the validity of the remaining sections of this Bylaw, if so declared by a Court of competent jurisdiction. 24.31 Penal The Board of Selectmen and its agents including any police officer of the Town of Framingham shall be charged with the authority to enforce the terms of this Bylaw, in addition to the authority provided to the Board of Selectmen pursuant to the provisions of G.L. c. 140, § 22, et seq. to award, restrict, revoke and otherwise regulate licenses to operate lodging houses. Town Meeting 287 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Any person violating any provision of this Bylaw shall be punished by a fine of three hundred dollars ($300.00) per violation. Each day that the violation continues shall constitute a separate offense. As an alternative to initiating criminal proceedings, the Board of Selectmen Agent may elect to utilize the non - criminal disposition procedure set forth in M.G.L. Ch. 40, § 21D and Article X of the General Bylaws. For purposes of non - criminal disposition, the penalty shall be three hundred dollars ($300.00) for each offense. Approved by the Attorney General on November 5, 2007 with the following exceptions: The Attorney General has disapproved and deleted the below underlined text: 24.12 Egress Facilities There shall be at least two separate and adequate ways of egress from each occupied story of a lodging house. The number and location of such ways of egress shall allow every lodger to reach the outside at ground level by a second way of egress if the principal or customary egress is blocked by fire or smoke, or is otherwise obstructed. At least one of the required ways of egress shall be a protected interior egress and additional required ways of egress shall be either protected interior egress or approved fire escape, in accordance with Section 24.14 hereof, that lead to a place of safety. 24.13 Protected Interior Egress A protected interior egress shall be: An interior stairway including all halls or corridors connecting the he flights of stairs or leading to an exterior door at ground level, or providing access from any room, group of rooms, or apartment, which interior stairway is provided with an automatic sprinkler installation approved by the Building Commissioner. 24.14 Approved Fire Escape An approved fire escape shall be an exterior stairway with balconies or landing at each floor, and having clear egress to a street, way or place of safety at ground level. Stairs, balconies and landings shall be constructed of non - combustible materials and landings shall be 2 feet in width of passage. Balconies and landings shall be not more than 9 inches below the top exterior doorsills with which they connect. Access from any occupied story to an approved fire escape shall be through a door with approved hardware, T -turn knob, lever or push bar which by one operation will release the door from the inside. Doors shall be a minimum of 5 feet in height and 24 inches in width or as otherwise approved by the Building Commissioner, and shall open in the direction of egress so as to allow clear passage. If the top of the doorsill is more than 18 inches above the floor, approved steps permanently attached to the structure shall be provided. No storm or screen door shall be used in such locations. Except as above provided no devices that require unlocking from Town Meeting 288 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report inside shall be used. Access to fire escapes shall be from a common hall or corridor, or otherwise accessible room, not a toilet or bathroom. Such common or accessible room shall lead directly to the aforementioned common hall or corridor having a door with hardware allowing release by one operation with no locking device, permitting opening at all time in the direction of egress. No private room shall be used as access to a required fire escape unless the door to the room is equipped with an emergency exit lock of the type and model specially approved by the Building Department. No obstruction shall be permitted in the path of egress to a fire escape. Fire escapes are to be used for emergency purposes only. Use of fire escapes for general access to rooms is strictly prohibited. 24.15 Exit Signs Continuously illuminated red signs bearing the word "EXIT" in plain block letter at least 5 inches high shall be provided over the doors opening into stairways or leading to fire escapes, and at every change of direction of a corridor or hallway leading to such egress doors. 24.17 Basements and Basement Stairs Basements and cellars shall be protected by automatic sprinklers. An automatic sprinkler shall protect interior stairs leading from a basement or cellar to the floor above. Any new licenses /buildings and /or change in use of a building or structure for the uses as a lodging house shall require the installation and maintenance of an automatic fire suppression system which shall be provided throughout all buildings or spaces of lodging houses in accordance with 780 CMR 906.2.1 or 906.2.2. 24.19 Vertical Openings All vertical openings, including stairs other than the required stairs, dumbwaiters, vent shafts, and laundry chutes, shall be provided with sprinklers. 24.20 Hazardous Areas and Combustible Storage The Building Commissioner or the Fire Chief may require that kitchens, work shops, heater rooms, storerooms containing combustible materials, or other areas constituting a special hazard be protected by automatic sprinklers, fire resistive construction, additional approved portable fire extinguishing equipment, or other means as directed. Combustible or flammable material shall not be placed, stored or kept in any portion of an exit or elevator car or hoist way or at the bottom of a stairway, fire escape or other means of escape. 24.25 Automatic Fire Alarm System All lodging house shall be protected throughout with an adequate system of automatic sprinklers in accordance with the provisions of the state building code. Fire protection systems shall not be Town Meeting 289 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report disconnected or otherwise rendered unserviceable without first notifying the fire department. The design, installation and performance of required fire warning systems, pursuant to M.G.L. c.148, sec. 26C, shall be in accordance with NFPA 72. ARTICLE 13 To see if the Town will amend Article 10, § 1 of the General Bylaws by striking out the phrase "Except as otherwise provided herein," in the first sentence of said Bylaw and substituting in its place the phrase "Except as otherwise provided in these General Bylaws," and further amend the Table of Town of Framingham Bylaw fines contained in Article 10, § 1 of the General Bylaws by inserting reference in said Table to the $300 fine set forth in Article 5, § 24 relating to the registration of lodging houses. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Board of Selectmen May 2, 2007 Voted: That the General Bylaws of the Town of Framingham, Article X, § 1 be amended by striking out the phrase "Except as otherwise provided herein" in the first sentence of said bylaw and substituting in its place the phrase "Except as otherwise provided in these General Bylaws," and further to amend the table of Town of Framingham bylaw fines contained in Article X, § 1 of the General Bylaws by inserting reference in said table to the $300 fine set forth in Article V, § 24 relating to the registration of lodging houses. Approved by the Attorney General on September 12, 2007. ARTICIT 14 To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the General Court for enactment of a special act of the legislature that will allow the Town to require the owners of lodging houses determined by the Building Commissioner to be operating illegally to pay for the lodging costs of displaced tenants of said lodging houses. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Board of Selectmen May 2, 2007 Voted: That this article be referred back to the Sponsor. ARTIC'IT 15 To see if the Town will vote to delete Article V, Section 1 of the General Bylaws, Alcoholic Beverages, and replace it with the following Sections 1.1 — 1.4: Article V: Health and Safety Town Meeting 290 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Section 1. Alcoholic Beverages 1.1 Introduction 1.1.1 This Bylaw relative to Alcoholic Beverages ( "Bylaw ") is promulgated by Framingham Town Meeting to memorialize, enumerate and describe the authority of the Board of Selectmen, serving as the Town of Framingham's Liquor Licensing Authority (hereinafter, the "Board" or "licensing authority "), to the fullest extent permitted by Chapter 138 ( "Chapter 138 ") of the Massachusetts General Laws, as amended, and other powers or provisions of the Massachusetts General Laws. This Bylaw and the Town of Framingham's Rules and Regulations Governing Alcoholic Beverages ( "Rules and Regulations ") that may be promulgated by the Board from time to time shall supersede all previous regulations or policies issued by the Town of Framingham. 1.1.2 The Town intends that the Board shall have the full power available under Chapter 138, the Massachusetts General Laws to issue all liquor licenses allowed by law or this Bylaw, and to establish reasonable fees therefor. The Selectmen may from time to time adopt Rules and Regulations relative to the business of persons licensed by them under the General Laws or this Bylaw and to the supervision thereof, including the imposition of lawful penalties for violations of such rules, regulations and restrictions. The rules, regulations and restrictions adopted by the Selectmen shall be provided in writing to all applicants for such licenses. The Board of Selectmen shall have the power to modify the Rules and Regulations from time to time, and shall provide licensees with copies of any future amendments to the Rules and Regulations at least seven (7) days prior to the date such amendments go into effect. 1.1.3 Any license issued for the sale in any manner of any alcoholic beverages shall be issued on the condition that there will be strict compliance with Chapter 138, the Massachusetts General Laws, this Bylaw and the Rules and Regulations as described herein. Failure to comply with Chapter 138, the Massachusetts General Laws, this Bylaw and the Rules and Regulations described herein shall be sufficient grounds for refusing to grant the license, or for suspending, canceling, or revoking an existing license. 1.2 This By -law Shall Apply To: a) License transfers involving a change of location, ownership, or business; Town Meeting 291 Town of Framingham b) New Licenses; C) One Day or Special Licenses; and d) Current Alcohol Licenses (of any type) within the Town of Framingham. 1.3 Applicability of State and Local Laws 2007 Annual Report 1.3.1 Applicability of State and local laws and regulations, and permit requirements. All Alcoholic beverage licenses shall also be issued contingent upon continued compliance with all appropriate state and local laws and regulations and all permits and licenses which may pertain to the operation of the premises, including, but not limited to, the State Building Code, State or Board of Health Regulations, common victualer license requirements, entertainment and /or amusement licenses and the Town of Framingham Bylaws. 1.3.2 Availability of rules and regulations. All licensees shall ensure that a copy of the Town's Rules and Regulations and the applicable regulations promulgated by the Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission are kept on the premises at all times and are immediately available for inspection upon request by a member of the public or an agent of the Board. Licensees also shall ensure that copies of the Board's Rules and Regulations shall be given to each employee who is responsible for the sale or service of alcoholic beverages. 1.3.3 Responsibility for knowledge of rules and regulations. Licensees must be familiar with Chapter 138, this Bylaw and the corresponding Rules and Regulations, as well as applicable state statutes and regulations promulgated by the Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission. A plea of ignorance will not be considered a justification or defense for a violation. 1.4 Prohibition of Consumption of Alcoholic Beverages in Public Places 1.4.1 No person shall drink any alcoholic beverages as defined in Chapter 138, Section 1 of the Massachusetts General Laws while on, in or upon any public way or upon any way to which the public has a right of access, or any place to which members of the public have access as invitees or licenses, park or playground, or private land or place without consent of the owner or person in control thereof All alcoholic beverages being used in violation of this section shall be seized and safely held until final adjudication of the charge against the person or persons arrested or summoned before the court, at which time they shall be returned to the person entitled to lawful possession. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Town Meeting 292 Town of Framingham Sponsor: Board of Selectmen 2007 Annual Report April 26, 2007 Voted: That the General Bylaws, Article V, Section 1, Alcoholic Beverages be amended by deleting it and replacing it with a new Article V, Sections 1.1 — 1.4, as set forth in Article 15 of the 2007 Annual Town Meeting Warrant and with the change of the word "licensees" in the fourth line of Section 1.4.1. Further, that the first sentence of Section 1.1.3 be amended by striking from the word "beverages" the letter "s" so that the first line shall read: "1.1.3 Any license issued for the sale in any manner of any alcoholic beverage..." Further, that Section 1. 1.2 be amended by deleting the words "The Town intends that" and capitalizing the first letter of "the ". Further, that the title of 1.2 be changed to "Application of Bylaw ". Approved by the Attorney General on September 12, 2007. ARTTCIT 16 To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of Framingham By -laws by deleting Article VII "Signs and Districts ", Section 1, Sign By -law, and Appendices A & B in their entirety and replacing them with a new Article VII, "Signs and Districts ", Section 1, Sign By -law, and Appendices A & B, as further described in the background materials. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsors: Sign Bylaw Review Committee April 25, 2007 Voted: That this article be referred back to the Sponsor with the concurrence of the Sponsor. ARTTCIT 17 To see if the Town will vote to delete Article V, section 5, Clean Indoor Air Act, from the General Bylaws of the Town. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Board of Health April 25, 2007 Voted: That Article V, Section 5, Clean Indoor Air Act be deleted from the General Bylaws of the Town. Approved by the Attorney General on September 12, 2007. Town Meeting 293 Town of Framingham ARTICLE 18 2007 Annual Report To see if the Town will vote to authorize a permanent Preservation Restriction for the Village Hall, Edgell Memorial Library and Old Academy buildings on Framingham's Centre Common and to also authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into a fifty (50) year lease or leases with the Framingham Historical Society and Museum for the use of these historic buildings, and further, to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds and /or borrow the sum of $300,000.00 to provide for the Town's share of necessary capital repairs. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Board of Selectmen May 1, 2007 Voted: That Town Meeting authorize a permanent Preservation Restriction for the Village Hall, Edgell Memorial Library and Old Academy buildings on Framingham's Centre Common and to also authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into a fifty (50) year lease or leases with the Framingham Historical Society and Museum for the use of these historic buildings, and further, to raise and appropriate, the sum of $300,000.00 to provide for the Town's share of necessary capital repairs and the Treasurer be authorized, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue from time to time bonds or notes in the amount of $300,000 pursuant to the provisions of MGL, Chapter 44, Section 7 and 8 or any other enabling authority. 130 voting in favor, 2 opposed. ARTICLE 19 To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into a fifty (50) year lease with Amazing Things Arts Center for the use of the Hollis Street Community Center, 160 Hollis Street, Framingham, Mass. and further, to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds and /or borrow the sum of $90,000.00 to provide for the Town's share of necessary capital repairs to the property. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Board of Selectmen April 25, 2007 Voted: That Town Meeting authorize the Board of Selectmen to enter into a fifty (50) year lease with Amazing Things Arts Center for the use of the Hollis Street Community Center, 160 Hollis Street, Framingham, Mass. And further, to raise and appropriate, the sum of $90,000.00 to provide for repaving and other necessary capital repairs to the property and the Treasurer be authorized, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue from time to time bonds or notes in the amount of $90,000 pursuant to the provisions of MGL, Chapter 44, Section 7 and 8 or any other enabling authority. Town Meeting 294 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Further, that a permanent preservation restriction be included as a section of the fifty (50) year lease between the Town of Framingham and the Amazing Things Art Center for the use of the historic Hollis Street Community Center, 160 Hollis Street, Framingham, MA. 130 voting in favor, 1 opposed. ARTIC.I.F, 20 To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Trustees of the Framingham Public Library to apply for, accept, and expend any state grants which may be available for facility planning for the Main Library Facility. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Board of Library Trustees April 25, 2007 Voted: That Town Meeting authorize the Board of Trustees of the Framingham Public Library to apply for, accept, and expend any state grants which may be available for facility planning for the Main Library Facility. ARTICI.F, 21 To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the General Court for a special act providing that legislation be adopted allowing the Park and Recreation Commission to construct, maintain and use a maintenance garage on land owned by the town for park purposes located at the corner of Dudley Road and Fountain Street; provided that the General Court may make clerical or editorial changes of form only to the bill, unless the Board of Selectmen approve amendments to the bill before enactment by the General Court; and provided further that the Board of Selectmen is hereby authorized to approve amendments which shall be within the scope of the general public objectives of this petition. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Parks and Recreation Commission May 30, 2007 Voted: That this article be referred back to the Sponsor with the concurrence of the Sponsor. ARTICLE 22 To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By -Law of the Town of Framingham as follows: Delete Sections IV.H.2. Earth Removal, IV.H.3. Erosion Control and IV.H.4. Land Clearing, and insert a new IV.H.2. Land Disturbance as described in the background materials. Town Meeting 295 Town of Framingham Pass any vote or any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Framingham Planning Board 2007 Annual Report May 2, 2007 Voted: That the Zoning Bylaws of the Town of Framingham be amended as set forth under Article 22 of the April 24, 2007 Annual Town Meeting by deleting Sections IV.H.2. Earth Removal, IV.H.3. Erosion Control and IV.H.4. Land Clearing and inserting a new IV.H.2. Land Disturbance with the substitute language provided in the handout dated May 1, 2007 and attached. 120 voting in favor, 2 opposed. ARTICLE 22 (ATTACHMENT) 2. LAND DISTURBANCE a. Purpose The purpose of this by -law is to protect natural resources including but not limited to land, water, wetlands, trees and vegetation, wildlife, and scenic vistas and historic resources and to prevent or minimize the negative impacts of Erosion, Sedimentation Clearing, Earth Removal and Fill, Earth Moving and Stormwater Runoff both on and off of the project site. b. Definitions Best Management Practice (BMP): A structural, nonstructural, or vegetative measure which reduces Erosion, Sediment, peak storm discharge, and /or improves the quality of Stormwater Runoff as described in the Stormwater Management Handbook and any other applicable local regulations. Clearing: Removal or causing to be removed or destroyed, through either direct or indirect actions, trees six inches (6 ") in diameter or larger at four and a half feet (4 1 /2') above the ground (DBH) and shrubs at four feet (4') tall or taller. Actions considered to be Clearing include, but are not limited to: causing irreversible damage to roots or trunks; destroying the structural integrity of vegetation; and /or any Filling, excavation, grading, or trenching in the root area of a tree which has the potential to cause irreversible damage. Diameter Breast Height (DBH): The diameter of the trunk of a tree four and a half feet (4 1 /2') above the existing grade at the base of the tree. Disturbed Area: An area, man -made or natural, where the existing condition has been or is proposed to be altered. Earth Fill: The addition of earth materials to a Lot or parcel, including but not limited to, sand, gravel, stone, soil, loam, sod, clay and mineral products. Town Meeting 296 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Earth Moving: The addition, removal or relocation of earth materials within the boundaries of a Lot or parcel, including but not limited to, sand, gravel, stone, soil, loam, sod, clay and mineral products. Earth Removal: The removal of earth materials from a Lot or parcel, including but not limited to, sand, gravel, stone, soil, loam, sod, clay and mineral products. Erosion: A condition in which the earth's surface, including vegetation, soil or rock fragment, is detached and moved away by the action of water, wind, ice, gravity or other natural means Fill: Any Fill used in connection with this project shall be clean Fill and may not contain any trash, refuse, rubbish, or debris, including but not limited to lumber, bricks, plaster, wire, lath, paper, cardboard, pipe, asphalt, concrete, tires, ashes, refrigerators, motor vehicles, or parts of any of the foregoing. Hazardous Tree: A tree with a structural defect or disease, or that impedes safe sight distance or traffic flow, or otherwise currently poses a threat to life or property as verified by a certified arborist or Town Tree Warden. Landscaping: Improvements made to a Lot or parcel through treatment of the ground surface with planting materials including but not limited to trees, shrubs, grass, ground cover or other growing horticultural material, as well as wood chips, stone or decorative rock. Lot: For the purposes of this Land Disturbance By -Law, Lot shall be defined as an area of land in one ownership, with definite boundaries ascertainable by recorded deed or recorded plan and not divided by a public street or public way, including land under the control of the same person and land under the ownership of related or jointly owned entities, in existence as of the effective date of this Land Disturbance By -Law (By -Law). Sediment: Solid material, whether mineral or organic, that is in suspension, is transported or has been moved from its site of origin by Erosion. Significant Forest Community: Unfragmented forests including forest types that provide habitat for rare species, unusual ecological processes, highly diverse forest communities, rare forest types, and those forest types which maintain connections between similar or different habitat areas. Slope: Any elevation change across a horizontal distance of one hundred feet (100'), as measured perpendicular to the contour line. For Lots lacking a horizontal distance of one hundred feet (100'), the Slope will be calculated as any elevation change across a horizontal distance of fifty feet (50'), as measured perpendicular to the contour line. Soil Disturbance: Clearing, grading, regrading, excavation, stockpiling or Filling of six inches or more. Town Meeting 297 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Specimen Tree: A native, introduced or naturalized tree which is important because of its impact on community character, its significance in the historic or cultural landscape or its value in enhancing the effects of wildlife habitat. Any tree with a diameter of eighteen inches (18 ") at DBH or larger is presumed to be a Specimen Tree. Trees that have a small height at maturity or are slow growing, such as Flowering Dogwood or American Holly, with a diameter of six inches (6 ") at two feet (2') above the ground or larger are presumed to be considered Specimen Trees. Stabilization: The elimination and prevention of Erosion. Stormwater Management Handbook: " Stormwater Management Handbook," Volume One and Volume Two, prepared by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management dated March 1997 as the same may be from time to time revised. Stormwater Runoff: Water from precipitation or snow melt that does not evaporate or infiltrate into the ground. c. Applicability (1) Land Disturbance Permit This By -Law shall apply to any proposed Land Disturbance activity on all existing Lots and new Lots created by plan as follows: (a) Any Soil Disturbance greater than 4,000 square feet on an existing or proposed Slope of more than fifteen percent (15 %); (b) Any Earth Removal or Earth Fill of more than 400 cubic yards; (c) Any Earth Moving activity of more than 1,000 cubic yards; (d) Any Clearing of more than fifty percent (50 %) of the Lot's area or more than 40,000 square feet, whichever square footage is less, but not including Lots with an area of 10,000 square feet or less. (2) Exemptions The provisions of this by -law shall not apply to the following activities: (a) Construction of walkways, patios, driveways, gardens, Landscaping, walls, swimming pools, or replacement of wells or septic systems on Lots having an existing dwelling providing the activity is on an existing or proposed Slope of fifteen percent (15 %) or less; (b) Construction, reconstruction, maintenance or resurfacing of any public way or the installation of drainage structures or utilities within roadway layouts and easements, provided the activity is undertaken by the Town of Framingham, or Town Meeting 298 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report the stockpiling of sand, gravel, stone, soil and salt at facilities operated by the Town of Framingham; (c) Activities undertaken in connection with the refurbishing of an existing athletic field, or with the management of town owned park, or with the management of privately owned lands held by non - profit conservation organizations, or in connection with the management and operation of golf courses; (d) Activities undertaken in connection with any existing sand and gravel operation or similar enterprise where such activity is allowed by zoning, but shall not include expanded operations; (e) Work in connection with an agricultural use directly related to planting, cultivating or harvesting or the raising or care of animals, or conducted in accordance with an approved Natural Resource Conservation Service Agricultural Plan, or agricultural uses on parcels of land of more than five acres as specified in M.G.L. Ch. 40A, §3, or harvesting of trees on property under M.G.L. Ch. 61 approved by a State Forester; (f) Activities in accordance with the terms of an Order of Conditions issued by the Conservation Commission pursuant to M.G.L. Ch. 131 §40, or Framingham Wetlands Protection By -Law, Article V, § 18 of the Framingham General By- Laws or mosquito control projects under the jurisdiction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, except for land disturbance activities on uplands adjacent to a wetland resource area; (g) Removal of Hazardous Trees, as defined herein; (h) Removal of a tree following a tree removal public hearing, pursuant to the Public Shade Tree Act M.G.L. Ch. 87, when required; (i) Routine maintenance of vegetation, removal of dead or diseased limbs and /or trees necessary to maintain the health of cultivated plants, containment of invasive or noxious weeds and /or vines in accordance with a Department of Environmental Management (DEM) approved Forest Management Activities, or Conservation Commission Order of Conditions, or remediation of an identified fire or health hazard or threat to public safety or property; (j) Non - commercial cutting for fuel, provided that clear - cutting does not occur as provided herein. (3) Non - Avoidance of Provisions of By -Law The provisions of this By -Law shall apply to all Lots in existence on (insert date of TM vote). Any segmentation or phasing of a development, or the subdivision or division of land subsequent to the effective date of this By -Law, unless otherwise exempted by law, shall be subject to and must comply with the provisions herein. All thresholds established in Town Meeting 299 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Section(c) of this By -Law shall be calculated based upon the Lot(s) in existence as of the effective date of this By -Law. The Planning Board shall not approve any Land Disturbance application if the land or parcels of land were deemed one Lot on the effective date of this By -Law or at any time subsequent thereto, except after considering the compliance of the entire Lot with the provisions of this By -Law. d. Special Permit Application and Procedure The Planning Board shall be the special permit granting authority for the issuance of a Special Permit for Land Disturbance. Such special permit applications shall be submitted, considered, and issued only in accordance with the provisions of this Section IV.H.2 and M.G.L. Ch. 40A, § 9. Prior to filing an Application for Special Permit for Land Disturbance, potential Applicants are strongly encouraged to meet in a pre - application conference with the Planning Board to discuss the review process. (1) Any person who desires a Land Disturbance Special Permit shall submit a plan prepared and stamped by a Professional Engineer and a Professional Land Surveyor each registered in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, at a scale of one inch equals twenty feet (1 " =20') showing: (a) North arrow, scale, and date; (b) Locus map showing the parcel in relation to the surrounding properties; (c) Name of record owner(s)of land shown on the plan; (d) Boundaries and existing and proposed topography of the property, including contours at a 2 -foot interval, using (National Geodetic Vertical Datum 1929) NGVD29 as it may be updated from time to time and specifying NGVD29 on all elevation drawings, specifically indicating the areas on which the activity is proposed to occur, and clearly noting if the activity is on an area greater than 4,000 square feet or on Slopes 15% or greater; (e) The size and location of all existing and proposed buildings, structures, utilities, roads, driveways, parking areas, and areas of cut and fill on the site and the location of all structures on abutting properties within 100 feet of the property lines of the parcel; (f) Property lines, easements and /or other legal rights within the property lines; (g) All wetlands and wetland resource areas as defined in M.G.L. ch. 131 §40, and the Framingham Wetlands Protection Bylaw, Article V, § 18 of the General Bylaws, drainage patterns, and watershed boundaries. Also include a delineation of the 100 -year floodplain and all bodies of water, including vernal pools, streams, ponds, and coastal waters within 125 -feet of the project site /limit of work and the delineation of a 30 -foot no- cut/no alteration zone; Town Meeting 300 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report (h) Submission of a scaled landscape plan that delineates on a single sheet the existing vegetation both on the Lot and in the right -of -way, the vegetation to be removed or relocated, the re- vegetation and the limit of work. The limit of work shall include all building, parking, and vehicular use areas, and any grading associated with the proposed development. Include a planting plan to ensure permanent re- vegetation of the site except for Disturbed Areas that will be covered by gravel, hardcape or a building or structure. If applicable, include: (i) Upland vegetational communities, including trees, shrub layer, ground cover and herbaceous vegetation; (ii) Size and height of trees, of Specimen Trees and /or significant forest communities; (iii) Location of any rare and endangered species as mapped by the Massachusetts Natural Heritage Program; (i) The location of any proposed stockpile locations; (j) Detailed drawings and design calculations of all temporary and permanent stormwater management and Erosion and Sediment control structures and devices; (2) Applications for a Land Disturbance Special Permit must be accompanied by a narrative containing the following elements: (a) A narrative description of the methods to be employed and the means proposed to provide Erosion and Sedimentation control, to protect groundwater, to control dust and to protect abutting properties and /or adjacent areas; (b) A description of the project's phases as they relate to land disturbance, including a tabulated sequence of construction and a construction schedule which must include the inspection and maintenance of Erosion Control Measures for the project throughout the construction period and the timing of vegetation Clearing, transplanting or replacement in relation to other construction activities; (c) A description of BMP as they relate to Erosion control to be employed as the standard of performance in development of the project site; (d) A narrative description of pre and post - construction Stormwater Runoff Analysis showing that Stormwater Runoff will be controlled as required by the Findings and Conditions of Approval, accompanied by design calculations using generally accepted analytical tools; Town Meeting 301 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report (e) Information on predominant soil types and Erosion potential on the site from the Natural Resource Conservation Service; (f) A detailed description of the type of Fill to be used on site; (g) A narrative documenting the species and quantities of Specimen Trees and /or other vegetation to be removed or relocated within the project area; (h) If applicable, include a statement prepared by a certified arborist for the proposed relocation of any existing Specimen Tree explaining how said tree is to be relocated and maintained. (3) Photographs of the site prior to disturbance shall accompany the application. (4) Based upon the size or character of the project including the scope of activity, area of disturbance and the percent Slope on which the work is to occur, the Planning Board may require additional information or may waive some or all of the requirements of the Land Disturbance application. (5) The Planning Board, at its sole discretion, may determine that a proposed project's size, scale, complexity or potential impact warrants the use of outside consultants. Such consultants shall provide comment upon the project in plan review, impact analysis, inspection or other technical or legal assistance necessary to ensure compliance with all relevant laws and regulations. Such assistance may include, but shall not be limited to, analyzing an application, providing legal counsel for decisions and covenants, and monitoring or inspecting a project or site during construction or post - construction for compliance with the Board's decisions or regulations. Such consultants shall be selected and retained by the Planning Board, with the actual and reasonable costs for their services to be paid by the applicant in accordance with Article 16 of the Planning Board Rules and Regulations. (6) The applicant shall make all requests for waivers in writing. The Planning Board may require the applicant to submit supporting technical information and documentation to demonstrate why such waiver /s should be granted. The Planning Board's decision to grant or deny waivers shall be in writing and shall set forth the reasons for the grant or denial. e. Findings and Conditions of Approval The Board shall not approve any application for a Land Disturbance Special Permit unless it finds that, where applicable, the following requirements shall be met: (1) Site Management and Control Town Meeting 302 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report (a) Building envelopes for structures, driveways, wastewater disposal, lawn areas and utility work are designed and delineated in a manner to limit land disturbance to the greatest extent possible; (b) Suitable areas are designated for temporary uses such as the parking of construction vehicles, trailers and stockpiling of equipment and materials; (c) All waste products, grubbed stumps, slash, construction materials, etc., shall be lawfully disposed of and shall not be in any manner incorporated into the project site with the exception of the reduction of stumps and slash to mulch; (d) During construction, temporary Erosion and Sedimentation control measures are employed in accordance with the approved plan and the BMP until a Disturbed Area is permanently stabilized; (e) Permanent Erosion control and vegetative measures are in accordance with the BMP; (f) The duration of disturbance is set forth in a written timetable; (g) Dust control is used throughout construction; (h) Throughout the duration of construction, a gravel apron of at least fifteen (15) feet wide and at least twenty -five (25) feet long is required at any site access from a paved public way to prevent unstable material from being transported onto the roadway by vehicle tires. (2) Control of Stormwater Runoff (a) Whenever possible, the natural topography of a site is preserved so as to reduce unnecessary land disturbance and to preserve natural drainage patterns on the site; (b) The project does not increase the rate, concentration or velocity of runoff from the site, and the project shall minimize the volume increase of runoff from the site to adjoining properties; (c) There is no adverse impact to abutting properties from any change in volume of Stormwater Runoff resulting from land disturbance activities including but not limited to Erosion, silting, flooding, Sedimentation, subsidence or impacts to wetland, groundwater resources, septic systems or wells; (d) There is no adverse impact to groundwater resources in terms of quantity or quality. (3) Protection of Natural Features and Vegetation Town Meeting 303 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report (a) Endangered species and wildlife habitats and corridors, natural landscape features, and scenic vistas and views are protected to the maximum extent feasible. Buildings, structures or parking facilities are sited away from the crest of hills in a manner not to detract from the site's scenic qualities; (b) Open space and Specimen Trees are preserved in the site's design and development, giving priority to retention of existing stands of trees, trees at the site perimeter, and contiguous vegetation with adjacent sites (particularly existing sites protected through conservation restrictions); (c) Forested areas are preserved to the maximum extent feasible if they are associated with significant forest communities as defined herein; wetlands, waterbodies and their buffers; critical wildlife habitat areas; and Slopes over 15%; (d) During Clearing and /or construction activities, all vegetation to be retained will be surrounded by temporary protective fencing or other measures before any Clearing or grading occurs, and maintained until all construction and site work is completed and all construction equipment and debris is removed from the site; (e) Where the site is not proposed to be covered with gravel, hardscape or a building or structure, a planting plan to ensure permanent re- vegetation of the site, including but not limited to providing a loam depth of not less than six inches (6 ") for areas to be planted, has been provided by means of adequate revegetation techniques; (f) Existing grade will be maintained around trees such that the ground level is not raised over the root area. (4) Protection of Historic Resources (a) Reasonable measures are employed to protect historic resources including but not limited to historic landscape features both above and below ground, buildings, structures, objects, stone walls, foundations, designed landscapes and gardens. f. Additional Requirements, Conditions, Limitations and Safeguards In granting approval of an application the Planning Board may impose additional requirements, conditions, limitations and safeguards which shall be in writing and shall be a part of such approval. Such conditions may include but are not limited to: (1) Controls on the location and type of access to the site during all site activity; Town Meeting 304 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report (2) Controls on the number of vehicles that arrive or depart during the morning and /or evening peak hours during all site activity (including controls on the maximum number of vehicles which may use the off - street parking areas during said periods); (3) Conditions to minimize off -site impacts on traffic and environmental quality during site activity; (4) Requirements for screening from adjoining premises or from the street by walls, fences, plantings or other devices to mitigate adverse impacts; (5) Conditions to mitigate adverse impacts to the neighborhood and abutters, including but not limited to adverse impacts caused by noise, dust, fumes, odors, lighting, headlight glare, hours of operation or snow storage; (6) Compliance with all applicable federal, state and local regulations and guidelines, including but not limited to the Stormwater Management Handbook as it may be amended; (7) Submission of a response from the Massachusetts Historical Commission (MHC) and the Framingham Historical Commission regarding the potential for archaeological or historical resources on the site, as may be applicable; (8) Submission of homeowner's or condominium documents which shall provide for the long term operation and maintenance of all permanent Erosion control and stormwater management measures; (9) Requirement of a cash performance guarantee to ensure compliance with these requirements. With the approval of the Board, the applicant may substitute an irrevocable letter of credit or performance bond from a bond company or financial institution acceptable to the Town of Framingham in lieu of the cash performance guarantee. Any performance bond or letter of credit shall be executed and maintained by a financial institution, surety, or Guarantee Company qualified to do business in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. (10) Requirement to record the Special Permit decision with the Registry of Deeds or Registry District of the Land Court prior to commencement of any land disturbing activity authorized under this Special Permit, the applicant shall submit to the Planning Board written proof of such recording. (11) Submission in writing of the name and contact information of the person who is responsible at all times for the land disturbing activity that is the subject of the application. Said person shall ensure that the approved activity takes place in accordance with the application, plan and special permit requirements. Town Meeting 305 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report The applicant, when other than the owner(s), and the owner(s) of land will be responsible for conditions which are required as part of a favorable decision for issuance of the Special Permit. g. The Planning Board may deny a Land Disturbance Special Permit if it determines: (1) The requirements of Section IV.H.2. herein are not met, or (2) The project violates or circumvents other provisions of any Town zoning by -law or regulation, or (3) The project received a variance issued by the Zoning Board of Appeals from the requirements of Section IV.H.2. herein without first receiving a favorable recommendation from the Planning Board. h. Enforcement The Building Commissioner shall have the power and duty to enforce this by -law, and special permit decisions, violation notices, and enforcement orders, and may pursue all civil and criminal remedies for such violations. (1) Penalties. Any person who violates any provision of this By -Law, regulation, or permit issued hereunder, shall be subject to fines, civil action, and criminal prosecution as appropriate. (2) Non- Criminal Dispostion. As an alternative to criminal prosecution or civil action, the Town may utilize the non - criminal disposition procedure set forth in M.G.L. Ch. 40, Sec. 21D. If non - criminal disposition is used, any person who violates any provision of the Bylaw, regulation, order or permit issued hereunder, shall be assessed a penalty of $25 for the first offense, $100 for the second offense, $200 for the third offense, and $300 for subsequent offenses. Each day or part thereof that such violation occurs or continues shall constitute a separate offense. (3) Remedies Not Exclusive. The remedies listed in this By -Law are not exclusive of any other remedies available under any applicable federal, state or local law. i. Severability Any determination that a particular provision or set of provisions in this Section IV.H.2 are invalid or unenforceable shall not render ineffective, unenforceable, or inapplicable the remainder of this Section. Approved by the Attorney General on September 12, 2007. ARTTC.I.F, 23 Town Meeting 306 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By -Law of the Town of Framingham as follows: Amend Section IV.I.4.b. by striking the words "ten (10) copies of and replacing with "and as specified on the application" at the end of the sentence, as further described in the background materials; And further amend Section IV.I.5. second paragraph by including the words "or 2.d," as further described in the background materials. Pass any vote or any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Framingham Planning Board April 26, 2007 Voted: That the Zoning Bylaws of the Town of Framingham be amended as follows: Amend Section IV.I.4.b. by striking the words "ten (10) copies of and adding the words "and as specified on the application" at the end of the sentence as shown below. The applicant shall submit to the Planning Board the application for site plan approval, conforming to the requirements of this Section IV.I. and as specified on the application. And further amend Section IV.I.5. second paragraph by including the words "or 2.d," after the words "or 2.c" as shown below. An application for site plan review and approval under Section IV.I.2.b or 2.c or 2.d shall be prepared by qualified professionals, including a Registered Professional Engineer, a Registered Architect, and /or a Registered Landscape Architect, and shall include: 125 voting in favor, 0 opposed. Approved by the Attorney General on September 12, 2007. ARTICLE 24 To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By -Law of the Town of Framingham as follows: Amend Section IV.I.7. by adding a new subsection d. as follows: d. Expiration Town Meeting 307 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report A site plan review approval granted under this section shall lapse within two (2) years, not including such time required to pursue or await the determination of an appeal as referred to in MGL, Chapter 40A § 17, from the grant thereof, if a substantial use thereof has not sooner commenced except for good cause, or in the case of a permit for construction, if construction was not begun by such date except for good cause. Pass any vote or any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Framingham Planning Board April 26, 2007 Voted: That the Zoning Bylaws of the Town of Framingham, Section IV.I.7 Site Plan Review Decision be amended as set forth under Article 24 of the April 24, 2007 Annual Town Meeting as provided in the warrant. 125 voting in favor, 0 opposed. Approved by the Attorney General on September 12, 2007. ARTTrT.r 2 1 ; To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By -Law of the Town of Framingham as follows: Amend Section I.E.1. by adding the following definition: Municipal Services: Public utilities furnished by the Town of Framingham and /or by publicly owned utility companies such as water systems, sanitary sewerage systems, storm drainage systems, gas pipes, electrical lines, telephone lines, cable television and other communication lines, fire alarm systems and their respective appurtenances. Pass any vote or any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Framingham Planning Board April 26, 2007 Voted: That the Zoning Bylaws of the Town of Framingham, Section I.E. Definitions be amended as set forth under Article 25 of the April 24, 2007 Annual Town Meeting as printed in the handout dated April 19, 2007 and attached. 125 voting in favor, 0 opposed. ARTICLE 25 (ATTACHMENT) Amend Section I.E.1. by adding the following definition: Municipal Services: Public services and infrastructure furnished by the Town, including but not limited to, police, fire, schools, public works, inspectional services, finance, water systems, Town Meeting 308 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report sanitary sewerage systems, storm drainage systems, communication services, and fire alarm systems. Approved by the Attorney General on September 12, 2007. ARTICLE 26 To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By -Law of the Town of Framingham as follows: Amend Section V.E. Special Permits to insert a new subsection as follows: IV.E.S. Expiration of Special Permit Pursuant to MGL, Chapter 40A §9, a special permit granted under this section shall lapse within two (2) years, not including such time required to pursue or await the determination of an appeal as referred to in MGL, Chapter 40A, §17, from the grant thereof, if a substantial use thereof has not sooner commenced except for good cause, or in the case of a permit for construction, if construction was not begun by such date except for good cause. Pass any vote or any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Framingham Planning Board May 2, 2007 Voted: That the Zoning Bylaws of the Town of Framingham , Section V.E. Special Permits be amended as set forth under Article 26 of the April 24, 2007 Annual Town Meeting as provided in the warrant with the heading citation changed from "Section IV.E.5. Expiration of Special Permit" to "Section V.E.S. Expiration of Special Permit ". 114 voting in favor, 0 opposed. Approved by the Attorney General on September 12, 2007. ARTICLE 27 To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By -Law of the Town of Framingham as follows: Amend Section IV.I.5.10. Site Plan Review Contents and Scope of Application by deleting the existing text and replacing, And to amend Section I.E. Definitions by adding new terms for "glare," "light trespass" and "luminaire," And to amend Section IV.B.3.f. Lighting in Off - Street Parking Design Standards by deleting the existing text and replacing, Town Meeting 309 Town of Framingham as further described in the background materials. Pass any vote or any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Framingham Planning Board 2007 Annual Report April 26, 2007 Voted: That the Zoning Bylaws of the Town of Framingham, Section I.E.1., IV.B.3.f, and IV.I.5.a. to regulate Outdoor Lighting be amended as set forth under Article 27 of the April 24, 2007 Annual Town Meeting as printed in the handout dated April 24, 2007 and attached. 124 voting in favor, 1 opposed. ARTICLE 27 (ATTACHMENT) That Section I,E.1. of the Zoning By -Laws be amended by adding the following new definitions: Glare - Light emitted from a luminaire with intensity great enough to produce annoyance, discomfort or visual impairment. Fixture - The assembly that holds the lamp (bulb) in a lighting system. It includes the elements designed to give light output control, such as a reflector (mirror) or refractor (lens), the ballast, housing, and the attachment parts. Lamp - The component of a luminaire that produces the actual light. Light Trespass - The shining of direct light produced by a luminaire beyond boundaries of the lot on which it is located. Lumen - A measure of light energy generated by a light source. One footcandle is one lumen per square foot. For purposes of this By -Law, the lumen output shall be the initial lumen output of a lamp, as rated by the manufacturer. Luminaire - The complete lighting unit, including the lamp, the fixture, and other parts. And further, that Section IV.B.3.f. Lighting of the Zoning By -Laws be amended by deleting the existing paragraph f. and replacing with the following new paragraph f.: Lighting shall not be directed or focused such as to cause direct light from the luminaire to be cast toward buildings on adjacent or nearby land, or to create glare perceptible to persons operating motor vehicles on public ways. The luminaire shall be redirected, shielded, or its light output controlled as necessary to eliminate such conditions. There shall be no light trespass by a luminaire beyond the property boundaries of the lot on which it is located. Further, lighting shall be designed to complement the character of the Town or neighborhood. Town Meeting 310 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report 1. Wall Mounted Fixture - The Planning Board may permit a wall mounted fixture attached to the exterior of a building or structure for area lighting at a maximum mounting height of fifteen feet (15') above the finished grade if the Planning Board determines such action is in the public interest. A Wall Mounted Fixture shall be shielded to control glare. 2. Pole Mounted Fixture - The Planning Board may permit a pole mounted fixture height up to twenty -five feet (25') above the finished grade if the Planning Board determines such action is in the public interest. All bases shall be flush with the ground and located in landscaped areas setback a minimum of three feet (3') from the curbline. The Planning Board may permit lamp(s) of up to 1200 watts per pole mounted fixture and up to four (4) pole mounted fixtures per luminaire if the Planning Board determines such action is in the public interest. 3. Ceiling Mounted Fixture - A luminaire mounted on an exterior ceiling such as under a canopy shall be mounted with the refractor or lens flush with or recessed in the ceiling or fixture. 4. Security Lighting - Low -level lighting sufficient for the security of persons or property on the lot is permissible, provided the average illumination on the ground or on any vertical surface is not greater than one half (5) footcandle. Based upon the nature of the application the Planning Board may impose reasonable requirements or limitations to minimize the impacts on abutting properties or uses. The Planning Board reserves the right to limit and regulate the amount and timing of illumination on a project site. And further, that Section IV.I.5.a.10. of the Zoning By -Laws be amended by deleting the existing paragraph 10. and replacing with the following new paragraph 10.: Photometric plan showing the intensity of illumination expressed in footcandles at ground level within the interior of the property and at the property boundaries; location, orientation, height, wattage, type, and style of outdoor luminaire. Approved by the Attorney General on September 12, 2007. ARTICLE 28 To see if the Town will vote to amend Article V: Health and Safety of the General By -Law of the Town of Framingham by adding a new Section 24: Hours of Operation for Outdoor Construction as follows: Town Meeting 311 Town of Framingham Section 24: Hours of Operation for Outdoor Construction 24.1 Purpose 2007 Annual Report This by -law is intended to prohibit preventable and unnecessary noise and is not intended, nor shall it be construed, to regulate the usual and customary noise incidental to suburban life. These provisions do not negate more restrictive or project - specific hours imposed pursuant to another permit, decision or approval of a Town Official, Board or Commission. 24.2 Outdoor Construction It shall be unlawful to operate or permit the operation of any tools, pile drivers, hammers, or heavy equipment used in construction, drilling, or demolition work as part of any outdoor construction Monday through Saturday between the hours of 7:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m. Absent an emergency condition, no construction is permitted on Sunday or national holidays. No vehicles are to arrive at the construction site earlier than one half hour before the designated construction hours, which includes vehicle parking, standing, or idling on adjacent streets. 24.3 Exceptions The Board of Selectmen may vary the permitted hours of outdoor construction. The Board of Selectmen may consider such variation in permitted hours of outdoor construction, upon receipt of a written request from the property owner. The written request shall identify the conditions that warrant said variation in outdoor construction hours. 24.4 Definitions 24.4.1 Outdoor Construction Any site preparation or assembly, erection, substantial repair, alteration, or similar action, including demolition and road infrastructure improvements excluding road and public property work for the benefit and safety of the public. 24.4.2 Emergency Work Any work performed for the purpose of preventing or alleviating the trauma or property damage threatened or caused by fire, flood, weather related and any other natural catastrophe. 24.5 Enforcement Town Meeting 312 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report The Building Commissioner shall have the power and duty to enforce this by -law, and violation notices and enforcement orders, and may pursue all civil and criminal remedies for such violations. 24.5.1 Penalties Any person who violates any provision of this By -Law, regulation hereunder, shall be subject to fines, civil action, and criminal prosecution as appropriate. 24.5.2 Non - Criminal Disposition As an alternative to criminal prosecution or civil action, the Town may utilize the non- criminal disposition procedure set forth in M.G.L. Ch. 40, §211). If non - criminal disposition is used, any person who violates any provision of this By -Law, regulation, order or permit issued hereunder, shall be assessed a penalty of $25 for the first offense, $100 for the second offense, $200 for the third offense, and $300 for subsequent offenses. Each day or part thereof that such violation occurs or continues shall constitute a separate offense. 24.5.3 Remedies Not Exclusive The remedies listed in this by -law are not exclusive of any other remedies available under any applicable federal, state or local law. 24.6 Severability Any determination that a particular provision or set of provisions in this by -law are invalid or unenforceable shall not render ineffective, unenforceable, or inapplicable the remainder of this by -law. Sponsor: Framingham Planning Board April 26, 2007 Voted: That this article be referred back to the Sponsor with the concurrence of the Sponsor. 110 voting in favor, 7 opposed. ARTICLE 29 To see if the Town will hear the Annual Report of the Board of Selectmen for the year preceding this Annual Meeting. Printed copies of this report shall be made available to the inhabitants of the town pursuant to MGL C. 40 §49. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Board of Selectmen Town Meeting 313 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report May 2, 2007 Voted: That Town Meeting hear the Annual Report of the Board of Selectmen for the year preceding this Annual Meeting. Printed copies of this report have been made available to the inhabitants of the town pursuant to MGL, C. 40 § 49. ARTICLE 30 To see if the Town will vote to adopt for FY08, the FY07 pay plans as listed: Schedule M — Municipal Employees Schedule T — Temporary Employees Schedule DH — Division Heads Schedule PSM — Public Safety Management Schedule LO — Library Pages Schedule DPS — Dispatchers Schedule FF — Firefighters Schedule FDC — Deputy Fire Chiefs Schedule L — Library Schedule PS — Police Superiors Schedule PD — Police Officers Schedule PW — Public Works Supervisors Schedule V — Crossing Guards Schedule W —General Local 1156 Schedule WH — Police and Fire Mechanics Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Human Resources May 2, 2007 Voted: That this article be referred back to the Sponsor with the concurrence of the Sponsor. ARTICLE 31 To see if the Town will vote to approve all Collective Bargaining Agreements that have been settled. Pass or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Human Resources May 2, 2007 Voted: That this article be referred back to the Sponsor with the concurrence of the Sponsor. ARTICLE 32 Town Meeting 314 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report To see if the Town will vote to authorize the extension of the current public transportation contracts with Mass Bay Limousine for LIFT Public Transit fixed bus route service and Busy Bee Transportation for paratransit service beyond the term of three years for a period not to exceed one year, with said contracts to be assignable to the Metro West Regional Transit Authority. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Division of Planning and Economic Development May 3, 2007 Voted: That Town Meeting authorize the extension of the current public transportation contracts with Mass Bay Limousine for LIFT Public Transit fixed bus route service and Busy Bee Transportation for paratransit service beyond the term of three years for a period not to exceed one year, with said contracts to be assignable to the Metro West Regional Transit Authority. ARTICLE 33 To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept and expend funds in accordance with the provisions of Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended, and regulations promulgated thereunder by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Board of Selectmen May 3, 2007 Voted: That Town Meeting authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept and expend funds in the amount of $730,202 in accordance with the provisions of Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended, and regulations promulgated thereunder by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, and in accordance with the "Proposed Statement of Community Development Objectives and Uses" approved by the Board of Selectmen on March 20, 2007 as shown in the attachment. ARTICLE 33 (ATTACHMENT) NUMBER AMOUNT ITEM 119,569 ADMINISTRATION AND PLANNING 2 HOUSING REHABILITATION HOUSING REHABILITATION/ HOMEOWNERSHIP 2.1 321,590 ASSISTANCE PROGRAM 2.2 54,920 CODE ENFORCEMENT 3 MICROENTERPRISE ASSISTANCE 3.1 ACCION FRAMINGHAM OUTREACH AND LENDING 1,997 INITIATIVE Town Meeting 315 Town of Framingham 4 PUBLIC FACILITIES IMPROVEMENTS ARLINGTON STREET PLAYGROUND EQUIPMENT 4.1 20,379 UPGRADE 2007 Annual Report 5 REMOVAL OF ARCHITECTURAL BARRIERS 5.1 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC LIBRARY SLIDING AUTOMATIC 23,386 DOORS 5.2 23,965 VILLAGE HALL HANDICAP ACCESSIBILITY 5.3 37,333 FRAMINGHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS ADA UPGRADES 5.4 37,333 MEMORIAL BUILDING ADA TRANSITION 6 PUBLIC SERVICES 6.1 14,971 LITERACY UNLIMITED 6.2 24,357 FRAMINGHAM ADULT ESL PROJECT 6.3 25,451 COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS SUMMER WORK PROGRAM 6.4 4,990 RESILIENCY FOR LIFE 6.5 4,990 CAREER RESOURCE FOR YOUTH 6.6 14,971 HOMELESS PREVENTION PROGRAM 730,202 GRAND TOTAL ARTICLE 34 To see if the Town will vote to adopt the Housing Plan entitled "Framingham Housing Plan" dated February 2007 as prepared by the Housing Liaison Committee pursuant to Article 3 of the October 2004 Town Meeting. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsors: Board of Selectmen Planning Board May 9, 2007 Voted: That Town Meeting recommend adoption of the Housing Plan entitled "Framingham Housing Plan" dated February 2007, as prepared by the Housing Liaison Committee, with a revised Chapter 8 as described in the handout dated May 3, 2007 as attached. 110 voting in favor, 8 opposed. ARTICLE 34 (AMENDMENTS) May 9, 2007 Voted: That the Town approve the following amendments to Chapter 8 of the Housing Policies & Plan Recommendations, revised on May 3, 2007: On page 75, in the second paragraph, under Framingham Housing Policy change "shall" to "will" and "policies" to "objectives ", and in the subsequent 8 bullets delete the words "The Town shall" and capitalize the first word in each bullet. 2. On page 77 under the section Affordable Housing in the 5` bullet add the words "and public" after the words "Assure that affordable" and before the word "housing" so that the sentence reads: Town Meeting 316 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Assure that affordable and public housing is made available to Framingham residents first, to the maximum extent allowed by law. 3. On page 77 under the section Affordable Housing in the 2nd sub - bullet of the 6` bullet change 25% to 10% so that the sentence reads: Allow multi- family housing in targeted overlay districts, such as along route 9, in exchange for the provision of at least 10% affordable units. Town Meeting 317 Town of Framingham Sub=mod kj= ffhmamq tLii� C mmmi ee HOUSING POLICIES & PLAN RECOMMENDATIONS Ub aeodnb of the honftpim IftChWU t m p.m 'no fist idaecifm ?teat" e ria uWasobd lnwft dt+eadty aed affin&WItF the to atte thmm tie *xRty o iu bdzp60rh004L - nem wmd ottfihm a ad u aF iboOOMMUan M=Uf a that A la autld tttlm m adr hm the ponds. Framingham Housing Policy The emtunk daldlty afFmn ndatea dtnectly to the provb hm *fm apprup4wk • mhr of hotdntg end that umh pr wwMm la a Maas ptiodty of the fawn. To nntabttabt and pmww Fmntdntghmn am a tawnwith a highq�kyafllfeforall Itormkk nt; theattpplyof hudr4iti tghamdtdladnieaatfwnmdaofhoth btdiddula mid houeh*W& in a noo-witlt the foFlowbtg pdidm . TheTmm droll ptoledtwd wiFam* the dnarwd m ofthenealdentialwthhuhoufaand anal htadna u rwtteraand*maunWthe1ndk4 ttalkhwdUeaaf Fmn*dvmhr fthba me& . ThaTmm droll enmuagetheadapUn ofmtkg, mUdatmy. pamdWntg and usher prmadnaara tlwt prunoa reakhwAul datdup maitthskia apprttprbte to is 6adkn and h in am amwith the Phn. . TheTmm dull adlaely advucWm and iw.tpportihe devdopmart mid mdn bmwnm of a dame horadM abxk thmLglhmk Ftambtgham tnereum Omt graaity hudn9 h awlahle to huuehol* and kdhdduah at al age, mammk and nodal hndL dIIM E 34 at�lrlr CIL%FTM s Y Y 3 20MY . 7heTown dial arthdy ptamota the dn*wtlan af ndwWtdatdaaernvwdedaratherundu ahleIhdrg MnIldwu . VwTawn Zplhnmwitha honer ieearchrm tuml awbnr urk . TF&Town dial wxateage houtbtg tlmtpmmrm antd pmbwb� upm apace ard marital hrda. . 7heTown dial mipputthe ptean wUm and Impmaa wk *feaiatkgpnblrandpdaatttlyawned alfurrivhle hmdmjjL . 7heTown dral Join kw-al ramartluma and argatbutbnte ba dandup rneadm appneadtea to houbtg afal types and prke mnUm in uwnRm *g taws w. 2007 Annual Report Town Meeting 318 Adu*imIno mfFania*ardsUsdi1om1 aaf0huho=. Town of Framingham SabaalWhqd kjo thmEamO ldi� C mmmiH Recommendations Fiam wmm to puate bmft d°*AvW opt+ma thm adds "bomb ebd hale to pte &re abd ehl, to Um4k m d aruaige Am a aiALmmWly de.dep.d &WK. m beech ANUIEWr dwt c g1ft&r oh +h a dF fthdlt auau, ebooWebe 4 oe dory. abd protect ph� -h ML M& mcdnb ugdlbs the implmm&mtivb attateyts that TKthdbCham U n1d U&P to addtsa the abwv =d pAds. Some of thepropoad M1 P&&Mkrtfythe ft" myd had we feo tftMWN HkW. dMM be Gtraher ntlPsd abd adep W dnttb fl the q--Abg boast pl. wm heed Town Me" apptatl (a epc .-t db4 VO4D V fec wbW for =mug muds) harore thee pngmah arm m.eba General Implementation Strategies Thafoflowftaecdohk bEmdzgmetal that epPly UNWO V dde. Thee Mftuels ark to tbpLmmt ohs or bob a'the amt.d polds. The MMdge ba ate hot ItMal od�f uFlmpotmhcr. iy6WWPmfia d CmusrvaMon Feam ft approlutata feulhle ways to —hmC9 tedM --Ma- IMMft CWMd+dma Md ehmWaVbdkhhorhood Ihrutma t The Huutt Plan. temkmma the fella" atshom in ed,tere thse mde • &ftftg hm CAN ehfocanmt Ib a &ft beqhholhooda. mft local fsoW= sad C BQ fumb who app mPdam • EftmmeW hommifte"p as a way to asldtm • Deli myd - tyoW a attaeracapa p nown to tmlatore the and Edon. oFeatatlb� betkhhodhuoda. RWOft ot<atteet tft1%pdeautmi -CM& k-] path. ko tp; and Mdw4y npr C ft • Cimdder rabulmtow to bnh paramaht for off mt pmletd� wlthlb 8ot<t and dde yard aatbada. • Cam+dm r W*t1oha to MMtful ftwhdabbsd MLK as by eashlahlht bmv*n Wa floor ors tuba of rmlNle hnlldlht =Tames ttdm thm fit■ wNh _76- Affn E 34 aaFtrlr CILLRTM s Y Y 36 2OW lot mew CIF dslp atab4a4. Co MMmE b wMdvm ands m mod t demlty lntws w beke It wzmwadnly fmAhle to prsefrr htatmtc hgtkU&. AflfnoWn AtddmM dDmwkp mart Am at! lmcd by pn.opoo mxh u The Am* and the Dm haaftr Ftmndefham hem 'Stmt Gtocwh' upporaO dsm W Cate hest hMUMz by bderekp ft eda ft pmpwdm. Tha umm heed, dFwdve tool to Fanner ahmgltee rslerdo(�att and teym tf +4� pwpeftls end to e.+ne eppeoptiaa °*a�� aFtna)or nddmrdd derdupmmt .curttyc The Hendht Ft- mcomtsM4 thm FetblhZIMM ' Cohdder o. by dtatttcu or 4 pamtt rabnk dow to furore lm fle.aatd ream sew radardopmebt d'propnedm that hale become obadate for thetf hymm d uaa+wh u: * OMO h dwtdd or ammaetdd h • l�lat>*Icpeoprtt+s • NUbfthobea • C agXrU t b da.dopad fiat rdtglarm ar other tudDAlmd pgrpoaM AbM taQOPPortonfly A mt ht—dC dereim— pattrtba pare feox+d a w+de ttbr of km . "Who- and nppm Ihomne hstdtCgPM mrd mad. tt Pie for peopb of afl %m and +booms to Um In. tha toeL Chu e& ft tabft . do bola to the WNU of huydbz that lkamlt flham —M W- to --W-LL Ahhoc& hmaft armity Ia mmdd m ptorkUtt hmuft affin4ddlq; +t alas beau other type of hmuft bred~ fiom thorn a'yoap gpsFsdoh h and yoWig fie, to empty beats a A atlod. The HocWht Pkm moobbebda thm the hew MRwr Phb pmosa epk*e hKWdO1 a abd atau tb m for iha fol m ft types of houdag lftldm+ ' Co m*t d k-ft wuUZLblly derdopwmn by apedal petm+t tb some bmlhe dbtdm mxh s the 2007 Annual Report Town Meeting 319 Town of Framingham SubooNfimd bW xeoming Liai� per AIM 34 ee�rl CILLPTM s t Y 36 2007 e■ C—r 0-4 omdct [-1deh T h&). pm lded that de HM aft UIMPlu Imh thdr M*ftWv ft OWnM c ' Usect OM for teswhhMW 4wo>Qpmeht; tvw.fandlfhomY Lbd mylt�- fandl v9dm.atllehmxftvlth Lb emphede IM hhlp. • Fiuhlleh hn�tlrY that ehankaee homeowmehidp. • �hwde �plabce wlth applloolie sate steel fidenl teaylatluhe perrindr� to hu�m� fiu people wlth • Fiublleh reeylatlute steel hnomtleee for artlet llee! •Fwd the name ee 4"olop eowt ultkm th a cap W4 RxbW th the CW Wd Blothee alenlct to other ammeedd arose. ' F derdq�emt of hi�ehd, hog -+tp hugdt� to nealh HBher.le�e hoyeehold, steel eomgta�e dh Im><Irg fiu hth-M4 6xv*B th the hdethaweet ft&ft to aetde th FAaditZIam • kateae hoft d6wEu fiu `empty beQUrir • Fun doe om ta= tide pmperdY ebd el for llmlted derolopmenr e.B., one or em famdy onme aa:gpted huudbG 09t; for dffi24 d k-*& madcle.lhmme homd ft or aehlor h no ft • Cotatdee indft cbarn to anon weary q-M-Wu by aped pemdt wheys appro(erlat6 AAbrdabk ilottt RUIWAIMM ahudd fix= Ld affinddhb h mx td ftidauves c m pmoofft -bft Udo oh the &AKMBMI HUU ft bMMWq m~d the mompondl. dder homy that uedmcftd y aypply avEhIpea to >ufteewhedhtp abd to h.atm>dh acompbaKm with the auto heandamd 1016 effondandky m"MEbt. 'Ihe Homft Plate ideht fes the fdln" ptloddY: + Prserre the a�dehRtf of ed.tlhB ayhddltsd • Spppatt the Feamth�p� Iley,h� A�uy � m effuru m rehaldlmte steel rehow<tr iu agbeldhed hugdh� • Iwo& Whk amtd and fi4md Ksoden to ■.qte comith�lott of hoyelhB aYleuhe mhltam. ' f'"vet that aeme of the edeftaghaldhed derdolMmu m Irl's- apadty to anppatt ftK* —,d dmdt}c • AuLpe d ma af'o "t hmft Ia eauk avwkhle to FremlhZIabt fine to the mmdbiglm ea - - - dueed hf hie: ' C+ob�lrt the fiilowlhB hogdt�derdopmemt attate�Y: * Rroos uldet: ahoohno pm a fur hew a&udahb ur MhBa lhoome hugdtB. ' Albn -Ad f-* b-v th tad --&y dletdcu. aoch u ah"RaMM 9. ten MdMUNP fur the pftnIdM of at Isaet 25% affa"t xo�1u. + E60MM abe tieame to Yuhluh ¢ Mhdd3Mt polcy fiu -out" Min k nohfcohiprehehd�e Pvto t mhml o for eaahfple *U&W nB he hoc IhM t.d to ncule 5eouoh a tee to dkrw for *U&"* h Im the & *dlwad HoydnB hnrehturl + s Sate hoktlort that et — OVE mhipabdr to a�armntr to the tesehl aBodd,hle hm ft W— Y6 -bmher 6-4b cash paTmend to the tewhS dNoW lie bo' foul ce cf a Drum- or off she tt du. • adrbtB a modes demettfhon� � the mo6 apm apa:s.reddent W derdnpkn*W bylaw to emorytaye dR*d,hle »tee th small derelupmefm. Rudd y forAbLs h3 Frnndna is dqI--[IObMfttplaft t 10-1 m t" to -deft tmpandh ty for.mluq, "Manomyeattohe untlhe l In thle minyt 'Ihe HwtdtB Plate name alm thse Amp: • MWtTcWft Mro ft the Boatel of selectmen and Pkhndtt Board adopt the [- q FbMM a actual, lu thi Hugdhff Plate. • I1Y�hate the Departmetrt �PlathltB � -77- 2007 Annual Report Town Meeting 320 Town of Framingham SubmMed bW xems1y Liai w tonmmmittuet AIM E 34 rr�rl CILLPTM s FRALUBMEW EUXIMitc rrata Y V 3, 20*7 Embah& Dewdupd,rdt u the bcl ae" nq oddb foe o-kft -o ft urr eau add repor ft petlod MUy to the Board of &dwuned. tdocadue umiw= � to help MdoMm wd fills W Mamhle uttm f thole rzrdne epa unwu cdut be mpa u]4 The Huu tePlm mmmmEbcb ihr • Cobtdttte oteoft in ddodrT wdd that taffy i hdeare town fide foe axte MAncolon LM a va" fiu the &"used HwtJde ldwrtrmrf bmt of MMM* dot amo tmt by ihr amid. ad admuty prezwam do taq*M • Support the Comdt Dewdgemmi Bhxk tai � mplawdih a d t [C Mq Peegab< and lu otteetbe beudtie peeeeam h, cdo< actlwldn • Dewabp eta fia prapertir Mgltdtld Car rwhikur to JUPPn thr homeowdedbtp [a hotel P-M WIM obJr d— rf tf tr plate. hS+ PMPMT a3wou006 hMU*c IVIN Ioo<ddm. in mrt. • Sgppoet the otmdod oFa lnnf Hoad ft f m m admltdat.e huu ftftpdt d aid by df eAffid*blr • Adopt the Ccazmgdtty PmKT&dob Aot [CPA] to pm fl� fith* thatagppoet kwd h-v pdteramr. pts.rrr htattttOd ptapertir and pa,.mct open 4— • Edmgtaee MxMWndlte oodtmttdME to moot th.tr &b ha. oFWEnA" bogdteeeal by ot* p o dpadot hi melutd m mda1nr atd cz& Erdb 3f t Fe■dtleeIMM hu idetidfied a need fot anateet U3& etCaraamt to addrsr M AW=4 rd hmft add ow�dotded boq� ooddMdoba Sr.etal mbAmWddm wlth rddhr awdi harr gaed CamftKmdty Ha'defmatt BIn& Batt [CDBq ftitdr to pay fi* codr EffurahNibt db knot area;' dam., dr�dued bedahhorhodr wuh m�yM�.mddatd or detedOnW buLkb v W ueor With eabaftmud lewf ar uu4v atr-Iwo pap t&aDw. CDBG fitbdi ma be ued m pay fia mde ebfoeonwzht la nNgU utreet aeu; am awdly arear del whkh more ihadhalfoFall oemodeuuAbowne hoga1Ud4e, as worn ar bwA ft rebihokEtlob m addtse M61 wlelatdohr m died ?"EM . Id addkba. CDBG fixbcb may be uml foe melewebpMMftt and mmtfietpattod oFedatltB t"db to ovate better hou ft fi* edetide tedadta, or fi* _78- * Tueet CDBG ha& ffn mde etfoeaftLett and • Aewtety htadticmde t reoordr [bmilod dMI. add drrewt CDBG futda fi* oodr Hsu td tear wdth hteb luddroos of Hoch UEMphdtn utd lied petastmeer of km or modetatr.tdmme k=dz ld,. • Target CDBG fuwU fiu hoyloe teh.bfllmdob to aewr with a later wal,td•r eFmdd mfeeramffht Lrdv4 Lg- by ft ih r iv ft l 4m%a c emammitbS CDBG fibcb m Lb mpabdd hourde rebdAbudob program. * pemL aGISCMINettfiunEw utckft . do utdP to dommmibt q.e cfCDBG find•. Targeted Implementation Strategies The fitlutrdoe Id- to WM d tdt�m --v- WO W--ft ft fee apedfic pepdatded■ wltbtd gym. Thse or deer of the Maud pdtt&a The anent ets are bw uaud dti odirt oFtdtpOfthm ilomamitrtttm*&Lftt � -0— LIt T' — Homeb, pdtgatit urr luemn poetlun of tl a tawdl abngat CDBG alucatiob Wxma $1IWB -DXDU abduatW to offer dowdpqftMt add ode mat aaddom to kw. - atad t uxtentaltcot w fi Wt atmr hunwhuyea ]e adadcU Raftftkft poidpatw m thr Ma.adtturod HogaitB Solt Srmtd laud PnW adt. Thh year, the am dr ahe drwotttB a Mubffdthl ponhib [4W oFtdbrw HOMEPdretam al6oidm foe hnftudn er rabtffioe m ihr form of 2007 Annual Report Town Meeting 321 0 m do km Ir f g �f3� 61 j$ R Wit Y i y 0 0 w crc w 5 0 Town of Framingham SutmMed hW xemm1y Liai w tonmmmittee AIM E 34 CILLRTM s FIALUBMEW EUXIMrdc Hain Y V 3, 20*7 r kMhi- and Uppm 4fiv d ilomn h3 Pmk mbmnlfyitttmv4nt3omiArm Cobomtxitoha of lowar.tnoome houft are afifim damqaeed withlb a CmmftuodrF VW6 It V dO&Wt to OEM ttppd+mulut tower.dhoome bd#borhoodawlthont —oft tlob RhA dtgLcrosmt of tewer4hmme haumb" W den cab etfmufale hdmi4becint hoxbl lb thse ste • hlmtlfymem.owbed Lbdlh""v kwood to lowKgh=m aff that maybe a7athb16 for tnlndrlhobme deadopmmt 7hroglh a Regmt fin Pmrpbal pmc=. d dnrdopn to Mattnct mul.dhnom flu. • Tart Fmdglam5 HOME PATmm dkKudm to aulmktmdetdVMmW aFMWsd mtm ulta. • Eubllh d� lhs for mb<.d- tbom,e derokpmentao that new mMaurdm Heh& with -U ft tgtips am Unrats wdthAt a miog f b do cfthe bwtlbothoud, • CSm J_ m , O _�_ t � .t � dth the Runibdum Hum ft lndcwky m y�wm.ua fealty UftbU%uLsl ft homft thto to m A=Wm IorSd rfyflaetramrira Feam"Osm hu approd o my 1.7110 tow.dbmme ddwlyhcmaowhed. 7h.Towb offift tf K relayfor 9&rly am 6&W pd hmfeowbm dmwo pMVama ands u CAmu ]a. Clara #1P -C [Pmpehty Tax R morph glam). and threnah gvILOnim to the Tax RmUmER d. MMO an of thrr p ho rams hdp m fedum the cm of pmpehy mm. thefe an oddtthmd war � t t aedrt L dd my homeowbm. OHeNbt - - ..�. fetid ibbLtion aa,amb m er eddtttohd tax mnkmptima are tm sample, ofacdma d eTmft anM mko a apedal act W'ihe hgWu e, l3.minphm coWd ,der pmpehy t r to phq mny owmrta who febt to ddnly .OM®.AM, at to ells* homm ubos who ift t aft Rommly apattme5t to low er hmmtMta' thoome ubmu. + FmIm1e the e9'e2 bm cfphWLtm aOhWiy ofassl by t6 Too m to offiet amu oFpbfpatty tam for ddmiy andtor dadM pmp" urAkEm AKh as 4W IT7 r. � Z.s1J' ld-dy t" to -- boudhg —A-- l —ma abd war in whidl pm ama may be mpa uW m a,� ihaTmtk hun ft d bWtbflltp u4eAf° fin the nXedy. • Amfthb ob m&&ftwImhhmmP4m Ift fin ddnly hommbmely, prorlrlttg td bt wtkh ob eft Tuvvh Phwha a a. wnm u huabl aEIKRbm pmdrama idl'n+d by loo] m f h - az-d- abd • pimldea+pta�m ddttlyh�eawbm thtoy� M" ftTowb depmunmu, axfi u the Beard of Amsm ta, t6 Cogdd m A4ft er iha Ckmamouy Dwo6p nom 0ffim A dmhmm forirnr crAbdmm&N umrnte ilomamt m law. [amodnata tboomeghd ddekbComaowhebt ofteh have xkdke bead+, bta low- or modaeat 4&aame hmfeowmon iodide many hob ddelyhoQdfolda aft o• aft %6 -P eht EUMMM kwdmkb handed by Pumcbm wlth a dbdZBq or pm&p WMWO to hrk a decmt amndmrd crib the doe m hag-tetm ummO metia. A—ft bgto BUIX Ramk&Lm hu 1.4,61 tow' er modrtue hw ma bob -ddrtly homeowdaM& and 7116 on ybaffim�lbly hogM4 The Tawas i tegtdhd bylaw m oohdler t,squmn fiam hMnaewned m dd'et pup" m. dM m fimh�l hard. hip [C arts ]b). lk"Mil km4bmme humom men han more mm#m mmeb then pmpEny tax felef and low theyare dduly the vu eaDFihey rwW" i a temporary defetral, hot ah eaemptmb Hmtdhl rel mmuUon aura=" help, tow.dbmme homeowmad pay ff- hob ud ffguatltTftq etmedu dma dWcmxh t affh&d eb thm mub. item Ib sRhog IL bean mmv -ffidemt heating arteta to rpkdnt a domknmd roo$ mpgadlralald TAft smd Om mift or ramo.Jhl Lad pmht hawz}. bf "*Boa. kw,, I ha feowmed oFhft boat kelp to b I a their mm * hnudblm" mKh as a mdmk and UmMVp 02 hmmme fima an any apafthl ML • Esdmao thr dKdvmm of pmbrama oynmdy U&tvd by d e'Tawn to aadat lorv er foo401itr income hommwmrta with pop aytn rdid: 2007 Annual Report Town Meeting 323 Town of Framingham SubmMed bW xummimM Liai m dotter AIM C 34 awlrlr CtLLRTM a tr v 3,2m • r� � a�.ma� pm�aflat and w'aP th Wilds pfnei.mu would fedgm fit l cktft r of bmaft port htt d a fie Lew- or modmamabmma hommemm. • AmEhbla kit for lu%r them! poopettrawam. Pmd4 ftihfetmmlua oti amretitTawa Pbagna . u wdl m beuft adrtab s pmt uffiud by toted m tgomad .rodm. • AWdCk ogtleab thfegah the CDMW4ft De rdop mmt Offim m kcd boa.pm& duAndila ArW LkWI1m* Urdtr yWmb o mm a%w atdn 1Iv&wrtkapa= th ohnlau nommefdd or bW4K ld hulhly. Ab aftdat 1hwVmkap� V a dwaft utdt cankmd with a 'U" VPL-k th th opeb ffEw Ptah nft ft fl-b "for um .lad a - gpi*cr by - d" to a p"*aul dmd matdo m of mhrt me4whd<m to ILmdt it foe ime hraethu. W&eimwmdt r delroed u a mama Phd6w oady Ebvplopwt iti the nbWL pdfu br." dm�p m mdl4 am. The >m MarIm QIM*d tww. 'Mott to stnP1m Rudm. or hr5p•dd Pmmlt Cdblt v dth argaftwdum mvh W the Featidbgham ❑tdhad Gniba the RUM&gbsm mkw G141M. SW E. the Pelf em ftAfv C of MetroWm% of the C OM f1w the Am Ia blurb. to: • Duum d" tie tarot Of L mmrt Ia arch lre<wo& LK rhadhghmil WIML • rd prt> nra�mhla Loc dWm. • ldmurr4my =adttdt .lad actin Y&TAMoMU ilmtaho A be iddmmmt iti amn lire W nkap mm • CUMLCIO adopft totidhg to pmtdl� fit Qutd.t lirr- Vert 4mm dh appogtitte Iocatloba AmtspPrtu rvalmn ShKE WEM fitmlat mub= for lane p*ic hmu ft aim *my ladtml. hugdht a Analdw m� leek elewise to dh.ryea•r t1vB Iarremorls. [a addltioa. •mPmft ime rsnieuom tint are tint UMMMt Ottld rsUt th a l= off bbd »W fimm F"m"Siob 5*dIhe4 HopthG lbwMENT. By e.mhll hft a NMI pr W-di h Puorahx FmnimZba lab wink to pram.! in KfforrMa h but mock clad umi mb Im am w a■ a m mgdnrthat tiMU tie 10%MXUO]3]r tdhlmgm nmdrt Ghgmm 4. • CAmtlltiva with tha Fia da&am Hogddg AgtherAr to 6-mbp a pmmdnme her pgr�amu ttbd UMqft WAL • Ccaxkw v ft 5eothm a h.MI derdopmtdu to ptsern mo mm umu. • Mcbl=mdtlmq•r tz • 7 m y � fi � a I y d ,, Omkm fia mhL dwmgm tmm to du wkWa w JkL ft damam in 4mwuwm. • Somme fumb that cza he mmily awahhb to pgtchue "tL Chbddft smhILd ft a Sot -+ddb of GDBG of HOME Pbgmts f+a4. of law tadm bddgt oh Gi" or CPA nwmm dFthe Iowa daddm in adopt CPA Ib the fguX6 ComprdmnLhw Amodf Gm b r M hdow tha 1016 ftrw , the mRm WILL had Wage to WO& wuh dowdopmu m Awmee this hart podhb ogamme Bum lane nompnhmtlra pmmtt de.dopm.am. E r smbKddhC a net V&&d- I?mmk P'r P-W rA"M. a Omft1hKtftq CIa adore hetlrt ct2tful iifde 4UR ph m . ThmeguLdtNhmAnild: • Ploelde a ffWnmm& for a smooth apnpNnUea pith. Ladm a dsr dmddpunb of the appll -a Md—.lad m pmmm. • Dania dwdephmbt m PreG.rhd kadom by Idtbt fyft aampmhle arwra for mmpmehddw prima de.dqinwu. • Emma d at a dnmkpmmbt mmngmm Whk in phldcd -O-Od br. • L]gtlim tie towal U4-d— wdgfmagdz topdo u anmpml" dmdtr rams. Phfie ■d typo' of 4n- 2007 Annual Report Town Meeting 324 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report SvbmiNked ire xemsimS Liai w Witter AIM C 34 a+�r1 CILLPTM s FshtttMEMtt EUXIMM nafa Y V 3, 20*7 a tq Mgm. eaa hlr se- for -PMdt U6 dedv fwwm. "kadioop q mattnibu. Fides md5ts& Fmtfr IorAAbrdobk H=dny i)MMAN and Rmotw= min on the Wad abd ama hRdl to lean pe�tam. daeob,d ta.ntd pNn� dardeprta andaome UffO 4LtMa "dffMncr m cofedMadsm. In aomr cum. 5*4 art uLdeapadfinArf t H-Udit DU -kPMW CarpaoUom (CMQ). In adddtiM. IIrWhKU= HegJrg'Is: Cbadfu on vmflahb fi* wr by ped.m dwdoprtaaadaomeCHDOa. ALuhotltyfoe = IanoNay that mcmankV afokkbLe b'om'b der dopm abt canbeaou&tbmgftAtM"MW *MH u lViawre. Aa feq,dftdbyfedetal fegatcM FeambaaumMm FY I HOME fWx6 d kmda r Far the dewdepmam of avl.homtlob. with C 4DGL • A■rtdhle a fia4ftzknd&kd oadalbbm tmoom 4koowry for w. by hxO d n&pow abd s Cl DC;. • &[M*U em.owbed land tld may he H *U"M fer affiydab>d m mkodlboema hWWWftdd de.elQpment; and dhhi. a dbpodtlon c m msdbi pfopmqf anWhlr m pfl.oa dardoprta • Cmdhw toy a<plae pm odd rmjl*A 1p *dth area CHDCr m,d ayppmt patchmah" hewom CHDCh and the Ramb dum Hnxt gAWborrkyc • Eaph*e paWflid u= dfcftdm to pfmbo� admrdabb hoydnboppmru�ltle� Town Meeting 325 Town of Framingham ARTICLE 35 2007 Annual Report To see if the Town will vote to amend the Bylaws of the Town by deleting the current Article II, Section 1.1.3 and replacing it with the following: Article II, Section 1. 1.3 "Said Board of Selectmen shall be the chief policymaking board of the town and shall act by the issuance of policy statements and guidelines to be followed and implemented by all town agencies serving under said board. However, notwithstanding the provisions of this Section 1.1.3, all aspects of a housing Policy or Plan shall be developed jointly under the jurisdiction of the Board of Selectmen and the Planning Board in a form suitable for inclusion in the Town's Master Plan. Said policy or plan shall not be considered, implemented or represented as an official policy of the town until a public hearing, noticed in a local newspaper in accordance with Chapter 40A, Section 11 of the General Laws has been approved by a majority vote of both boards and subsequently adopted by a two thirds vote of Town Meeting." Further that the Board of Selectmen petitions the General Court to enact special legislation that amends Section 3 of Chapter 27 of the Acts of 1996, The Town Manager Act, to accomplish the corresponding changes to the Town Manager Act as set forth above. Pass any vote or take any action in relation thereto. Sponsor: Standing Committee on Planning and Zoning, Dave Hutchinson, Ned Price, Betty Muto, Hank Moran, Ed Levay, Tom O'Neil, Jake Bajakian, Ted Anthony, Pam Roberts May 8, 2007 Voted: That the Zoning Bylaws be amended by inserting the following: Under Section l.b, add the following as a third paragraph: Any new Housing Plan/Policy or change to an existing Plan/Policy, shall be submitted to the Town Meeting for approval by a two - thirds vote of Town Meeting. 116 voting in favor, 11 opposed. Approved by the Attorney General on September 12, 2007. ARTICLE 36 To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money to develop the Cochituate Rail Trail. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Chief Financial Officer Town Meeting 326 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report May 3, 2007 Voted: That the Town appropriate the sum of $100,000.00 to help fund the development of the Cochituate Rail Trail. ARTICLE 37 To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum of $12,975.00 from the handicap parking fines receipt reserved for appropriation fund, for expenditure by the Disability Commission on projects for the benefit of persons with disabilities. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Chief Financial Officer May 3, 2007 Voted: That the Town appropriate the sum of $12,975 from the handicapped parking fine account established under Article V, Section 9.6 of the Town Bylaws, to be expended by the Framingham Disability Commission to benefit persons with disabilities in the town. ART7r7.F IR To see if the Town will accept the provisions of Chapter 157 of the Acts of 2005, an Act that provides Section 7 accidental disability retirees with a veteran's benefit and to fund such acceptance. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Board of Selectmen May 3, 2007 Voted: This article failed. ARTICLE 39 To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money to make retroactive payment due upon acceptance of Section 2 of Chapter 157 of the Acts of 2005. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Board of Selectmen May 3, 2007 Voted: That this article be referred back to the Sponsor. ARTICLE 40 To see if the Town will accept the provisions of Chapter MGL Chapter 59 Section 5L, an Act that provides a deferral of real estate taxes for reservists while on active duty. Town Meeting 327 Town of Framingham Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Board of Selectmen 2007 Annual Report May 8, 2007 Voted: That the Town accept the provisions of MGL, Chapter 59, Section 5L, an Act that provides a deferral of real estate taxes for reservists while on active duty. AuTrrr F 11 To see if the Town will vote to rescind various authorized, but unissued borrowing votes of the Town. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Chief Financial Officer May 8, 2007 Voted: That this article be referred back to the Sponsor with the concurrence of the Sponsor. ARTICIN d7 To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of prior years of the Town. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Chief Financial Officer May 8, 2007 Voted: That the Town raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of prior years of the Town as listed below: NStar (Gas): $49,569.54 NStar (Electric): Water Enterprise Fund $18,419.56 Sewer Enterprise Fund $14,640.27 TransCanada (Electric): Water Enterprise Fund $16,320.83 Sewer Enterprise Fund $18,695.45 Direct Energy (Electric): $ 6,146.49 MA Interlocal Insurance Agency: $10,000.00 Town Meeting 328 Town of Framingham USI Insurance Services (Bond): $ 100.00 Bob's Stores (Clothing/Uniforms): $ 1,210.87 Veterans Benefits: $ 713.79 Printing and Phone Bills: $ 100.63 110 voting in favor, 4 opposed. 2007 Annual Report To see if the Town will vote to determine what sum or sums of money the Town will appropriate and raise, or transfer from available funds, for the operations of the Town of Framingham, including debt and interest for FY'07 (July 1, 2006 — June 30, 2007) and to see what budgets for Fiscal Year 2007 will be reduced to offset said appropriations. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Chief Financial Officer May 30, 2007 Voted: That the Town amend the vote under Article 26 of the April 2006 Annual Town Meeting by: Increasing the following line items: Framingham School Department $ 800,466 Reserve Fund $ 211,161 And, decreasing the following items: Debt Service $ 215,000 Fire $ 32,348 Police $ 29,098 Public Works $ 8,686 Planning Board $ 1,108 Town Clerk /Elections $ 1,808 General Government $ 1,776 Parks & Recreation /Cultural Affairs $ 1,782 Finance $ 2,144 Inspectional Services $ 3,714 Town Meeting 329 Town of Framingham Planning & Economic Development Information Services And transferring from Free Cash ARTICI.F, 44 2007 Annual Report $ 1,050 $ 1,952 $ 711,161 To see if the Town will vote to determine what sum or sums of money the Town will appropriate and raise, or transfer from available funds, for the operations of the Water Department, including debt and interest for FY'07 (July 1, 2006 — June 30, 2007) and to see what budgets for Fiscal Year 2007 will be reduced to offset said appropriations. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Chief Financial Officer May 8, 2007 Voted: That this article be referred back to the Sponsor with the concurrence of the Sponsor. ARTICIT 45 To see if the Town will vote to determine what sum or sums of money the Town will appropriate and raise, or transfer from available funds, for the operations of the Sewer Department, including debt and interest for FY'07 (July 1, 2006 — June 30, 2007) and to see what budgets for Fiscal Year 2007 will be reduced to offset said appropriations. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Chief Financial Officer May 8, 2007 Voted: That this article be referred back to the Sponsor with the concurrence of the Sponsor. ARTICLE 46 To see if the Town will vote to determine what sum or sums of money the Town will appropriate and raise, or transfer from available funds, for the operations of the Arena Department, including debt and interest for FY'07 (July 1, 2006 — June 30, 2007) and to see what budgets for Fiscal Year 2007 will be reduced to offset said appropriations. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Chief Financial Officer Town Meeting 330 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report May 8, 2007 Voted: That the Town transfer from Arena Retained Earnings the sum of $15,000 for the operations of the Arena Department, for FY07 (July 1, 2006 — June 30, 2007). ARTTC.I.F, 47 To see if the Town will raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money to pay for experts, legal fees and associated legal expenses in the cases of Great Brook Valley Health Center, Inc., et al. v. Town of Framingham United States District Court Civil Action No. 06 CA 11546 JLT and Murphy & McManus, LLC, 380 Waverly Street, LLC and Great Brook Valley Health Center, Inc. v. Susan P. Bernstein, Andrea Carr- Evans, Sidney Gorovitz, Thomas F. Mahoney, Carol J. Spack, and Ann V. Welles, as they are members of the Town of Framingham Planning Board, and not individually, Middlesex Superior Court Civil Action No. 06 -1483, incurred in FY 2007 and to be incurred in future fiscal years. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Chief Financial Officer May 8, 2007 Voted: That this article be referred back to the Sponsor with the concurrence of the Sponsor. ARTTC IT 4R To see if the Town will raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money to settle litigation pending in the United States District Court and entitled Duarte Calvao, et al. v. Town of Framingham, U.S.D.C. No. 05 -10708 GAO, and to approve said settlement pursuant to Article 11, Section 1.4 of the General Bylaws. Pass any vote or take any action in relation thereto. Sponsor: Chief Financial Officer May 8, 2007 Voted: That this article be referred back to the Sponsor with the concurrence of the Sponsor. ARTTC IT 49 To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for various capital projects including purchase of equipment, purchase of land, repair, rehabilitation, design or construction of buildings and infrastructure. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Chief Financial Officer Town Meeting 331 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report May 17, 2007 Voted: That the Town raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds or borrow the sum of $8,420,540 for the projects in the attachment dated May 8, 2007, to be spent under the direction of the Town Manager or his designee, with the exception of items proposed by the School Department, which will be spent under the direction of the School Superintendent or his designee, and further, that the Town Manager or School Superintendent shall be allowed to exceed the appropriation for individual capital projects to be spent under his direction as long as the total amount to be spent does not exceed the total amount appropriated and that such adjustments are in compliance with M.G.L., Chapter 44. And to meet said appropriation, the Treasurer is authorized, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue from time to time bonds or notes in the amount of $8,420,540 pursuant to the provisions of M.G.L., Chapter 44, Section 7 and 8 or any other enabling authority. 119 voting in favor, 0 opposed. Project Department FY08 Voted /Amend. Vote Recommended A Accu -Vote Machines Elections $117,000 $117,000 110 -3 Replacement (20) B Main Library Renovations — Library $44,893 $44,893 112 -0 Doors & Windows C Main Library Renovations — Library $75,750 $75,750 112 -0 Parking Lots D Main Library Renovations — Library $66,650 $66,650 112 -0 Restroom & Community Room E Replace SCBA Units Fire $356,545 $356,545 112 -0 F Replace Engine 3 Fire $474,000 $474,000 112 -0 G Replace Maintenance Fire $65,550 $65,550 112 -0 Truck H Voice Over Internet Town Fire $64,248 $64,248 112 -0 Phone Integration I Memorial Building Window Building $280,500 $280,500 112 -0 Replacement Services J Memorial Building Stair Building $199,500 $199,500 125 -3 Replacement Services K Nevins Hall Stage Building $280,500 $280,500 125 -3 Renovation Services L Maynard Chimney Building $50,000 $470,000 120 -4 Repointing and Repair Services M Energy Management Building $146,000 $146,000 139 -0 Upgrade for Police Services Headquarters N Emergency Generator Building $60,000 $60,000 112 -0 Systems for the Callahan Services Senior Center Town Meeting 332 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report O Demolition of Badger Road Building $50,000 $50,000 139 -0 Dog Pound Services P Old Senior Center Roof Building $59,500 $59,500 112 -0 Repair Services Q Maynard Window, Gutter Building $201,500 $201,500 139 -0 Replacement Services R Maynard Building Front Building $27,000 $27,000 140 -1 and Rear Door Services Replacement S ADA Phase 1 Compliance, Asst. Town $228,000 $228,000 112 -0 Multiple Buildings & Manager Schools T Callahan Phase 3 Council on $468,268 $468,268 122 -20 Aging U Arena Condenser Loring Arena $37,167 $37,167 112 -0 V Bowditch Phase I Parks and $1,700,000 $0 FAILED Recreation 57 -51 W Bowditch Phase IA Parks and $2,300,000 $0 FAILED Recreation X Winch Grandstand Parks and $147,275 $147,275 143 -0 Demolition & Replacement Recreation Y V #2 F550 Crew Cab Parks and $49,350 $49,350 112 -0 Dump Truck Recreation Z V #3 Ford F350 Extended Parks and $29,794 $29,794 112 -0 Cab, 4x4, 10,000 GVW Recreation AA V #4 Ford 650 Dump Parks and $56,174 $56,174 112 -0 Truck, 4x2, 26,000 GVW Recreation BB Communication Center Police $355,000 $355,000 112 -0 Upgrade CC Sucker Brook Drainage Engineering $50,000 $50,000 112 -0 Improvements - Design DD Roadway Improvements Highway $450,000 $450,000 143 -0 2008 EE 40,000 GVW Cab and Highway $168,360 $168,360 138 -1 Chassis with Dump Body and Plow FF 70,000 GVW Cab and Highway $100,000 $100,000 137 -0 Chassis with Dump Body and Plow GG 40,000 GVW Cab and Highway $168,360 $168,360 135 -0 Chassis with Dump Body and Plow HH 35,000 GVW Cab and Highway $181,200 $181,200 135 -0 Chassis with Aerial Lift #440 II 40,000 GVW Cab and Highway $168,360 $168,360 135 -0 Chassis with Dump Body and Plow JJ 8,800 GVW Pick -up Truck Highway $35,442 $35,442 135 -0 with Plow #402 Town Meeting 333 Town of Framingham KK 8,800 GVW Pick -up Truck ARTICLE 50 2007 Annual Report Highway with Plow #405 LL 68,000 GVW Cab and Sanitation Chassis with Refuse $211,327 Packer and Plow MM 15,000 GVW 4 -Wheel $61,841 Drive Cab and Chassis Sanitation with Rack NN Roof Replacement School Transfer Station 00 Repairs to Fuller School Auditorium Plaster Ceiling PP McCarthy School Roof School Replacement — Phase I I $255,000 (From 1994) QQ DDC Energy Conservation $118,000 Controls, Phase 1 of 3 RR Replace Fire Alarm at $85,045 McCarthy Elementary Tech. Services School SS Vehicle Replacements: 3 Tech. Services Utility Pick -ups, 2 cars TT Web Content Library Management System UU Public Safety System Highway Upgrades (Police & Fire) VV Library Generator WW Bombadier Sidewalk $153,920 Tractor XX Front End Loader #455 YY Thayer Campus Paint, Highway Windows ZZ Sidewalk Accessibility General Fund Capital $8,420,540 Projects ARTICLE 50 2007 Annual Report Highway $35,442 $35,442 112 -0 Sanitation $211,327 $211,327 132 -0 Sanitation $61,841 $61,841 131 -0 Sanitation $126,000 $126,000 130 -0 School $360,000 $360,000 130 -0 School $560,000 $560,000 126 -3 School $255,000 $255,000 112 -0 School $118,000 $118,000 120 -3 School $85,045 $85,045 112 -0 Tech. Services $107,873 $107,873 122 -1 Tech. Services $243,761 $243,761 112 -0 Library $30,000 130 -9 Highway $120,445 135 -0 Highway $153,920 133 -0 School $120,000 118 -8 Highway $100,000 98 -19 $11,476,175 $8,420,540 To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or borrow a sum of money for the purpose of the design and construction, including any related engineering and legal services, of the following water projects, and the acquisition of any necessary permanent and /or temporary easements or other interests in land for said projects: William J. Heights water pump station; Pershing Avenue water main replacement design; Cove Avenue water main replacement; Town Meeting 334 Town of Framingham Fay Road area water main replacement; Waverley Street water main replacement; Grove Street water pumping station rehabilitation; Goodnow Water storage tank rehabilitation design; Water Street water main replacement design; Prospect Street water main replacement design; Birch Road well reactivation; Brigham Road water main replacement design; Other water projects as set forth in the background materials; 2007 Annual Report and further to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by gift, purchase, or eminent domain, permanent easements and temporary construction easements or other interests in land for said projects and as further described in the background materials; and further to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take all actions to carry out the purposes of this Article. Pass any vote or to take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Chief Financial Officer May 10, 2007 Voted: That the Town raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or borrow the sum of $7,246,335, for the projects in the attachment dated May 10, 2007, to be spent under the direction of the Town Manager or his designee, and further, that the Town Manager shall be allowed to exceed the appropriation for individual capital projects to be spent under his direction as long as the total amount to be spent does not exceed the total amount appropriated and that such adjustments are in compliance with MGL, Chapter 44, for the purpose of the design and construction, including any related engineering, personnel and legal services, of the following Water Department projects, and the acquisition of any necessary permanent and /or temporary easements or other interests in land for said projects: William J. Heights water pump station; Pershing Avenue water main replacement design; Cove Avenue water main replacement; Fay Road area water main replacement; Waverley Street water main replacement; Grove Street water pumping station rehabilitation; Goodnow Water storage tank rehabilitation design; Water Street water main replacement design; Prospect Street water main replacement design; Birch Road well reactivation; Brigham Road water main replacement design; Other water projects as set forth in the background materials; and further to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by gift, purchase, or eminent domain, permanent easements and temporary construction easements or other interests in land for said projects and further to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take all actions to carry out the purposes of this Article. Town Meeting 335 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report To meet said appropriation, $718,260 be appropriated from Water Retained Earnings for items 50A, 50F, 50H, 50N, 50R and the Treasurer is authorized, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue from time to time bonds or notes in the amount of $6,528,076 pursuant to the provisions of MGL, Chapter 44, Section 7 and 8 or any other enabling authority. 136 voting in favor, 0 opposed. Project Title Department FY08 Vote 50 -A Pershing Avenue Water Main Replacement Water $39,250 136 -0 Design 50 -B Cove Avenue Area Water Main Replacement Water $1,011,500 136 -0 50 -C Fay Road Area Water Main Replacement Water $1,006,375 136 -0 50 -D Waverly Street Water Main Replacement Water $552,250 136 -0 50 -E Grove Street Water Pumping Station Water $235,000 136 -0 Rehabilitation 50 -F Goodnow Water Storage Tank Rehabilitation Water $107,500 136 -0 Design 50 -G Automated Meter Reading Water $1,282,950 120 -8 50 -H Water Street Water Main Replacement Design Water $372,625 128 -0 50 -1 11,000 GVW 4 -Wheel Drive Cab & Chassis Water $47,500 136 -0 with Utility 50 -J 11,000 GVW 4 -Wheel Drive Cab & Chassis Water $47,500 136 -0 with Utility 50 -K 11,000 GVW 4 -Wheel Drive Cab & Chassis Water $47,500 136 -0 with Utility 50 -L 11,000 GVW 4 -Wheel Drive Cab & Chassis Water $47,500 136 -0 with Utility 50 -M Electronic Message Board #694 Water $37,500 136 -0 50 -N Prospect Street Water Main Replacement Water $173,185 136 -0 Design 50 -0 William J. Heights Booster Station Water $765,000 128 -0 Rehabilitation 50 -P 11,000 GVW 4 -Wheel Drive Cab & Chassis Water $47,500 136 -0 with Utility 50 -Q Birch Road Well Reactivation Water $1,400,000 128 -0 50 -R Brigham Road Water Main Replacement Water $25,700 136 -0 Design Water Enterprise Fund Project Total $7,246,335 ARTICLE 51 Town Meeting 336 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or borrow a sum of money for the purpose of the design and construction, including related engineering and legal services, of the following sewer projects, and the acquisition of any necessary permanent and /or temporary easements or other interests in land for said projects: Vaillencourt Drive sewer pump station elimination project; Michaud Drive, Cypress Street, and Ransom Road pump station replacement projects; Water Street sewer main replacement and Gregory Road; Concord and School Street sewer improvement project; Prospect Street sewer replacement project design; East Framingham sewer improvement project phase I; Cove Avenue area sewer replacement project; Herbert Street sewer improvement project; Other sewer projects as set forth in the background materials; and further to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by gift, purchase, or eminent domain, permanent easements and temporary construction easements or other interests in land for said projects and as further described in the background materials; and further to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take all actions to carry out the purposes of this Article. Pass any vote or to take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Chief Financial Officer May 16, 2007 Voted: That the Town raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or borrow the sum of $22,506,405, for the projects in the attachment dated May 10, 2007, to be spent under the direction of the Town Manager or his designee, and further, that the Town Manager shall be allowed to exceed the appropriation for individual capital projects to be spent under his direction as long as the total amount to be spent does not exceed the total amount appropriated and that such adjustments are in compliance with MGL, Chapter 44, for the purpose of the design and construction, including any related engineering, personnel and legal services, of the following Sewer Department projects, and the acquisition of any necessary permanent and /or temporary easements or other interests in land for said projects: Vaillencourt Drive sewer pump station elimination project; Michaud Drive, Cypress Street, and Ransom Road pump station replacement projects; Water Street sewer main replacement and Gregory Road; Concord and School Street sewer improvement project; Prospect Street sewer replacement project design; East Framingham sewer improvement project phase I; Cove Avenue area sewer replacement project; Herbert Street sewer improvement project; Other sewer projects as set forth in the background materials; Town Meeting 337 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report And, further, to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by gift, purchase, or eminent domain, permanent easements and temporary construction easements or other interests in land for said projects, and further to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take all actions necessary to carry out the purposes of this article. To meet said appropriations, $1,091,405 be appropriated from the Sewer Retained Earnings for items 51A, 51D, 51I, 51L, and the Treasurer be authorized, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue from time to time bonds or notes in the amount of $21,415,000 pursuant to the provisions of MGL, Chapter 44, Section 7 and 8 or any other enabling authority. 111 voting in favor, 1 opposed. Project Title Department FY08 Vote 51 -A Wastewater Pumping Stations Elimination Sewer $405,000 110 -2 Project 51 -13 Water Street Sewer Main Replacement and Sewer $1,592,000 110 -2 Gregory Road 51 -C Concord and School Streets Sewer Sewer $5,557,500 110 -2 Improvement Project 51 -D Prospect Street Sewer Replacement: Project Sewer $200,000 110 -2 Design 51 -E SCADA Improvements/Wireless Mesh Sewer $351,000 110 -2 Networking 51 -F Sewer System Evaluation Survey: Phase 2 Sewer $540,000 110 -2 51 -G East Framingham Sewer Improvement Project: Sewer $2,708,500 110 -2 Phase 1 51 -H Automated Meter Reading Program Sewer $1,282,950 105 -7 51 -1 Cove Avenue Area Sewer Replacement Sewer $200,000 110 -2 Project 51 -J Wastewater Pumping Stations Replacement Sewer $8,009,800 111 -1 Project 51 -K Herbert Street Sewer Improvement Project Sewer $1,373,250 110 -2 51 -L 70,000 Cab and Chassis with Vactor #741 Sewer $286,405 110 -2 Sewer Enterprise Fund Project Total $22,506,405 ARTICLE 52 To see if the Town will vote to authorize or re- authorize several revolving funds as defined by M.G.L, Chapter 44, Section 53 E' /2 for FY 07 beginning July 1, 2006, including but not limited to the following: Town Meeting 338 Town of Framingham A) B) C) D) E) F) G) H) Town Owned Building Civic Use (Maynard Building) Fund; Town Owned Building Civic Use Fund; Town Owned Building Civic Use (Cushing Chapel) Fund; Concert on the Common Fund; School Bus Fees Fund; Pavement Management Fund; Town Wetland Protection Fund; Vaccine Administration Fund Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Chief Financial Officer 2007 Annual Report May 8, 2007 Voted: That the Town establish revolving funds for certain town departments under MGL, Chapter 44, Sec. 53E'/z for the following purposes for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2007, with the specific receipts credited to each fund, the purposes for which each fund may be spent and the maximum amount that may be spent from each fund for the 2008 fiscal year and the disposition of the balance of each fund at the end of the 2007 fiscal year as described on the attachment for the following funds and the indicated spending ceiling: TOWN OWNED BUILDING /CIVIC USE FUND - MAYNARD BUILDING S175,000 TOWN OWNED BUILDING /CIVIC USE FUND - DANFORTH AND MEMORIAL S75,000 BUILDINGS AND OTHER SIMILAR CHARGES FOR THE TOWN OWNED BUILDING /CIVIC USE FUND - CUSHING CHAPEL S20,000 TOWN OWNED BUILDING /CIVIC USE FUND - CONCERTS ON THE COMMON S6,000 FRAMINGHAM SCHOOL COMMITTEE - SCHOOL BUS FEES S280,000 TOWN WETLAND PROTECTION FUND S10,500 PAVEMENT MANAGEMENT FUND S50,000 VACCINE ADMINISTRATION FUND S20,000 FUND TOWN OWNED BUILDING/CIVIC USE FUND - MAYNARD BUILDING MANAGER PURPOSE BUILDING TO RECEIVE FUNDS FROM RENTAL FEES SERVICES AND OTHER SIMILAR CHARGES FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF USE OF THE JONATHAN MAYNARD THE GENERAL BUILDING AND TO AUTHORIZE THE GOVERNMENT BUILDING SERVICES DEPARTMENT TO DIVISION SPEND THESE FUNDS FOR DIRECT EXPENSES ASSOCIATED WITH THE GENERAL MAINTENANCE OF THIS FY08 SPENDING CEILING $175,000 DISPOSITION OF FY07 FUND BALANCE BALANCE AVAILABLE FOR EXPENDITURE BUILDING SUCH AS CUSTODIAL COSTS, UTILITIES, MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES AND TOWN OWNED BUILDING/CIVIC USE FUND - DANFORTH AND MEMORIAL BUILDINGS $75,000 BALANCE AVAILABLE FOR EXPENDITURE Town Meeting 339 OTHER SIMILAR EXPENSES BUILDING TO RECEIVE FUNDS FROM RENTAL FEES SERVICES AND OTHER SIMILAR CHARGES FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF USE OF THE DANFORTH AND MEMORIAL THE GENERAL BUILDINGS AND TO AUTHORIZE THE GOVERNMENT BUILDING SERVICES DEPARTMENT TO DIVISION SPEND THESE FUNDS FOR DIRECT EXPENSES ASSOCIATED WITH THE GENERAL MAINTENANCE OF THESE BUILDINGS SUCH AS CUSTODIAL COSTS, UTILITIES, MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES AND $75,000 BALANCE AVAILABLE FOR EXPENDITURE Town Meeting 339 Town of Framingham TOWN OWNED BUILDING BUILDING/CIVIC SERVICES USE FUND - DEPARTMENT OF CUSHING CHAPEL THE GENERAL GOVERNMENT TOWN WETLAND DIVISION TOWN OWNED BUILDING BUILDING/CIVIC SERVICES USE FUND - DEPARTMENT OF CONCERTS ON THE THE GENERAL COMMON GOVERNMENT DIVISION FRAMINGHAM FRAMINGHAM SCHOOL SCHOOL COMMITTEE- COMMITTEE - SCHOOL BUS FEES SCHOOL DEPARTMENT TOWN WETLAND CONSERVATION PROTECTION COMMISSION FUND PAVEMENT DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT PUBLIC WORKS FUND VACCINE HEALTH ADMINISTRATION DEPARTMENT FUND ARTTCT,F, 53 OTHER SIMILAR EXPENSES TO RECEIVE FUNDS FROM RENTAL FEES AND OTHER SIMILAR CHARGES FOR THE USE OF THE CUSHING CHAPEL AND TO AUTHORIZE THE BUILDING SERVICES DEPARTMENT TO SPEND THESE FUNDS FOR DIRECT EXPENSES ASSOCIATED WITH THE GENERAL MAINTENANCE OF THESE BUILDINGS SUCH AS CUSTODIAL COSTS, UTILITIES, MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES AND OTHER SIMILAR EXPENSES TO RECEIVE FUNDS FROM THE SALE OF FOOD AND OTHER SIMILAR CHARGES DURING CONCERTS ON THE COMMON AND TO AUTHORIZE THE BUILDING SERVICES DEPARTMENT TO SPEND THESE FUNDS FOR DIRECT EXPENSES ASSOCIATED WITH THE SALE OF FOOD AND OTHER CONCERT- RELATED CHARGES SUCH AS STAFF COSTS, UTILITIES, MAINTENANCE SUPPLIES AND OTHER SIMILAR EXPENSES. TO RECEIVE AND SPEND FUNDS FOR DIRECT EXPENSES ASSOCIATED WITH THE TRANSPORTATION OF STUDENTS TO AND FROM SCHOOL. TO RECEIVE AND SPEND FUNDS TO PAY SERVICES ASSOCIATED WITH PROCESSING PERMITS AND REQUESTS FOR DETERMINATION. TO USE FUNDS SECURED FROM CONTRACTORS AND UTILITY COMPANIES TO COMPLETE THE REPAIR OF ROADS AT PERMITTED LOCATIONS WHERE THE APPLICANT HAS FAILED TO PERFORM, OR MAINTAIN, THE WORK IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE TOWN OF FRAMINGHAM'S STREET OPENING PERMIT REQUIREMENTS, OR IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE TOWN'S ESTABLISHED MINIMUM CONSTRUCTION STANDARDS. TO USE FUNDS SECURED FROM REIMBURSEMENTS FROM MEDICARE, OTHER PRIVATE INSURANCE CARRIERS AND NON - RESIDENTS, FOR INFLUENZA VACCINE ADMINISTRATION TO THOSE CITIZENS OVER 65 YEARS OF AGE. THE FUNDS WILL BE USED TO BUY ADDITIONAL VACCINES AND SUPPLIES TO EXPAND THE PURCHASE OF FLU VACCINE FOR TOWN EMPLOYEES. OTHER PROGRAMS COULD INCLUDE THE MENINGOCOCCAL VACCINE FOR HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS AND COLLEGE FRESHMEN AND THE NEW HPV VACCINE FOR CERVICAL CANCER. 2007 Annual Report $20,000 BALANCE AVAILABLE FOR EXPENDITURE $6,000 BALANCE AVAILABLE FOR EXPENDITURE $280,000 BALANCE AVAILABLE FOR EXPENDITURE $10,500 NEW FUND $50,000 NEW FUND $20,000 NEW FUND To see if the Town will vote to revoke the authorization which established an Enterprise Fund, pursuant to MGL Ch.44, Section 53F '/2 , for the operation of the Loring Arena, as previously voted by Town Meeting, effective in Fiscal Year 2008. Pass any vote or take any action in relation thereto. Town Meeting 340 Town of Framingham Sponsor: Chief Financial Officer 2007 Annual Report May 8, 2007 Voted: That the Town revoke the authorization which established an Enterprise Fund, pursuant to MGL, Ch. 44, Section 53F '/2, for the operation of the Loring Arena, as previously voted by Town Meeting, effective in Fiscal Year 2008. ARTICLE 54 To see if the Town will vote to hear and act on reports and recommendations of the Selectmen and other officers and committees of the Town and Boards of Trustees and to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for the support of the operations of the Town, for a Reserve Fund, for any other purposes included in said reports, for the payments of notes and bonds of the Town, if any, which mature before the next annual meeting, for the payment of pensions and for all other necessary expenses of the Town for the Fiscal Year 2008 (July 1, 2007 — June 30, 2008). Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Chief Financial Officer May 30, 2007 Voted: That Town Meeting hear and act on reports and recommendations of the Selectmen and other officers and committees of the Town and Boards of Trustees and to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for the support of the operations of the Town, for a Reserve Fund, for any other purposes included in said reports, for the payments of notes and bonds of the Town, if any, which mature before the next annual meeting, for the payment of pensions and for all other necessary expenses of the Town for the Fiscal Year 2008 (July 1, 2007 — June 30, 2008). Unclassified $30,044,038 Retirement $10,239,161 Debt Service $8,154,180 Fire $11,594,856 Police $11,407,276 Public Works $9,363,874 Framingham Public Library $2,522,111 Planning Board $211,367 Town Clerk/Stipend $82,587 Town Clerk/Elections $299,265 General Government $2,855,219 Parks & Recreation /Cultural Affairs $2,897,839 Town Meeting 341 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Finance $1,616,254 Inspectional Services $1,522,866 Planning and Economic Development $869,996 Information Services $1,111,290 Human Resources $657,393 Framingham Public Schools $82,952,631 Keefe Technical Assessment $8,499,255 Stabilization Fund $0 Reserve Fund $400,000 Snow & Ice $641,500 Total Town Meeting Appropriation $187,942,958 and to meet said appropriations, the Town approves the following to support the budget, Transfer from Free Cash $1,728,759 Transfer From Parking Meter Receipts $66,000 Transfer From Stabilization Fund $198,958 Transfer from Sewer Enterprise Fund Revenue $1,022,336 Transfer from Water Enterprise Fund Revenue $1,114,212 Transfer from Consumer and Merchant Protection Act Funds $24,029 And the balance to be raised from taxation. ARTTCIT 55 To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for the operation of the Water Department, including capital outlay and debt service, and for all other necessary expenses for the Fiscal Year 2008 (July 1, 2007 — June 30, 2008) Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Chief Financial Officer May 22, 2007 Voted: That the Town expend $11,945,627 in FY08 in the Water Department for the cost of personnel, operating expenses, MWRA Assessment and debt service, under the direction of the Town Manager or his designee; And, that the $11,945,627 be raised from water receipts. Town Meeting 342 Town of Framingham ARTICLE 56 2007 Annual Report To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money for the operation of the Sewer Department, including capital outlay and debt service, and for all other necessary expenses for the Fiscal Year 2008 (July 1, 2007 — June 30, 2008) Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Chief Financial Officer May 22, 2007 Voted: That the Town expend $13,443,050 in FY08 in the Sewer Department for the cost of personnel, operating expenses, MWRA Assessment and debt service, under the direction of the Town Manager or his designee; And that the $13,443,050 be raised from sewer receipts. ARTICLE 57 To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or otherwise provide a sum or sums of money to establish a Stabilization fund for the purposes for open space acquisition, pursuant to MGL Chapter 40 Section 5B. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Chief Financial Officer May 8, 2007 Voted: That the Town appropriate the sum of $152,000.00 to the Open Space Stabilization fund, for the purposes for open space acquisition, pursuant to MGL, Chapter 40, Section 5B and $2,000 be transferred from Free Cash. ARTICLE 58 To see if the Town of Framingham will vote to approve the Fiscal Year 2008 Work Plan submitted to it by the Economic Development and Industrial Corporation of the Town. The Fiscal Year 2008 Work Plan is included in the back up materials. In addition, copies may be examined at the Office of the Board of Selectmen, Town Clerk, Planning and Economic Development Department and the Main Branch of the Library. Pass any vote or take any action relative thereto. Sponsor: Economic Development and Industrial Corporation May 9, 2007 Voted: That the Town approve the Fiscal Year 2008 Work Plan as submitted by the Framingham Economic Development and Industrial Corporation and adopted by the Board of Selectmen on April 17, 2007, as described in the background materials and attached. Town Meeting 343 Town of Framingham ARTICLE 58 (ATTACHMENT) ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL CORPORATION FISCAL YEAR 2008 PLAN Fiscal Year 2008 Work Plan 2007 Annual Report Goal 1. Implement projects and programs that will bring to life our Downtown Framingham vision and expand the tax base. Objective 1 -A: Continue to sponsor and promote Framingham Downtown Renaissance (FDR) Actions Timeline Responsible Party Implement FDR Work Plan, develop FDR meeting Monthly EDIC member appointed as FDR agendas, and chair meetings. Chair; DPED staff, and FDR member Identify grants and other funding sources for physical Ongoing organizations. Hire contractor to conduct a downtown market Commence DPED staff with assistance from FDR analysis and develop a business recruitment strategy April 2007, Chair and FDR organizations improvements, and for programming that will promote complete DPED Staff, EDIC and FDR members cultural economic development in the Cultural September as needed Triangle. Assist with grant preparation. 2007 Hire contractor to develop membership campaign and Commence DPED staff with assistance from FDR membership packets April 2007, Chair and FDR organizations Work with the hospital, our principal healthcare complete EDIC September 2007 Hire legal consul and work towards formalizing FDR Commence FDR April 2007 Objective 1 -C: Leverage development of the Cultural Triangle to generate economic benefits. Actions Timeline Responsible Party Support the START Partnership on activities relating Ongoing FDR members, DPED staff, EDIC to business promotion and development. members as needed. Identify grants and other funding sources for physical Ongoing DPED Staff, EDIC members as improvements in the Cultural Triangle, including Ongoing needed Nevins Hall, Danforth Museum, and streetscape needed improvements, and for programming that will promote Commences DPED Staff, EDIC and FDR members cultural economic development in the Cultural July 2007 as needed Triangle. Assist with grant preparation. Objective 1 -D: Continue to encourage mixed -use and institutional development in Downtown Framingham Actions Timeline Responsible Party Continue to assist with the Arcade development Ongoing DPED Staff, EDIC members as project, including permitting and rent up of needed commercial space Market Downtown Framingham to potential Ongoing DPED Staff, EDIC members as developers needed Work towards implementation of the $50,000 FY07 Commences DPED Staff, EDIC and FDR members TOD Planning Grant for pedestrian and streetscape July 2007 as needed enhancements. Identify and seek funding for additional Transit July — Dec DPED Staff Oriented Development (TOD) projects. 2007 Work with the hospital, our principal healthcare August 2007 EDIC Town Meeting 344 Town of Framingham employer in downtown Framingham, to develop a long range plan and to coordinate with other healthcare providers. 2007 Annual Report Work with educational institutions such as Mass Bay August 2007 EDIC Community College and Framingham State College to develop a long range plan for expansion in downtown Framingham. Objective 1 -E: Assure that the railroad crossing at Routes 126 and 135 and related traffic problems are properly addressed, and a plan to solve problems is implemented Actions Timeline Responsible Party Serve on the Downtown Railroad Crossing Ongoing EDIC appointed member Committee, and its Steering Committee staff assistance as needed. southeast Framingham. Work toward development Coordinate with DRC Task Force on economic Ongoing EDIC appointed member potential of railroad crossing project viable. Work with Urban Design consultant team, particularly Commences EDIC appointed member FXM, on the development of the economic July 2007 Southeast Framingham development strategy, which will provide a real estate staff assistance as needed. development strategy and business attraction strategy for downtown. Technology Park Goal 2. Expand focus to other areas of Town, to begin to develop individualized redevelopment plans to generate jobs and income, and expand the tax base for certain key industrial and commercial areas in Town Objective 2 -A. Develop individualized redevelopment plans for the following target areas: Actions Timeline Responsible Party Railroad /industrial corridors and related properties. 3 rd quarter EDIC appointed member with DPED Explore freight village concept for applicability in FY08 staff assistance as needed. southeast Framingham. Work toward development and implementation of plan if concept found to be viable. Industrial and Commercially Zoned property in In concert EDIC appointed member with DPED Southeast Framingham with Master staff assistance as needed. Plan timeframe Technology Park 1 St quarter EDIC appointed member with DPED FY08 staff assistance as needed. Rugg Gates House and adjacent properties: work 1 St quarter EDIC appointed member with DPED with new owner of property to maximize development FY08 staff assistance as needed. potential of this site. Goal 3. Work to develop (or redevelop) vacant or underutilized properties. Objective 3 -A. Identify vacant and underutilized industrial and commercially zoned properties that present opportunities for possible future redevelopment. Actions Timeline Responsible Party Identify properties with highest potential for reuse and Ongoing DPED Staff redevelopment and assess need for redevelopment of vacant and underutilized parcels, brownfield sites, and tax title properties. Pursue grants and other funding sources as appropriate. Goal 4. Use technical and financial resources that can be made available to retain and expand current Framingham businesses. Town Meeting 345 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Objective 4 -A. Continue to support CDBG managed small business assistance programs Actions Timeline Responsible Party Fagade Improvement Program Ongoing DPED Staff (CDBG) Sign Improvement Program Ongoing DPED Staff (CDBG) Micro - enterprise Loan Program Ongoing DPED Staff (CDBG) Objective 4 -13: Continue to support Downtown merchant outreach Actions Timeline Responsible Party Market business assistance programs through mailings and door to door distribution of Merchant Outreach Packets. Ongoing DPED staff Conduct workshops for small businesses Quarterly DPED staff Objective 4 -C: Implement the MassDevelopment Business Visitation Program Actions Timeline Responsible Party Research Framingham businesses that could benefit Ongoing, with DPED staff, DPED Assistant Director, from MassDevelopment programs. Contact business quarterly MassDevelopment Senior Vice owners or upper management to inform them of updates President, and EDIC MassDevelopment programs and to arrange Quarterly and editing as necessary meetings. review Objective 4 -D: Educate and inform the public about the EDIC and related economic development issues. Actions Timeline Responsible Party Edit Downtown Framingham Business Web Site, and 2 nd quarter DPED staff and FDR link to EDIC and FDR web pages FY08 Update EDIC, FDR, and DPED related web pages Ongoing, DPED staff, EDIC and FDR review Quarterly and editing as necessary review Objective 4 -E: Develop informational documents and other activities that will attract new business and guide new businesses through the development and permitting process. Actions Timeline Responsible Party Develop and distribute Permitting Handbook 4 t " Quarter DPED staff FY08 Develop Development Incentives Brochure /Package 1 St Quarter DPED staff FY08 Goal 5. Be a catalyst for driving discussion about economic development issues and the role they play in generating tax revenue and income for the Town. Objective 5 -A. Obtain input from organizations and general public regarding economic development issues Actions Timeline Responsible Party Obtain input from business owners and residents on As Needed EDIC issues and projects impacted by potential EDIC projects. Objective 5 -13: Provide resources to educate Elected Officials, Town Meeting members and boards about economic development issues. Town Meeting 346 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report Actions Timeline Responsible Party Complete the Northeastern University Center for Fourth quarter EDIC members, DPED staff, Board of Urban and Regional Policy's Moving to FY07 Selectmen Massachusetts Self- Assessment Tool Development, rezoning of mill village centers and Plan Review Self- Assessment results and develop policies First half of EDIC members, DPED staff or procedures that will better position the Town to for FY08 industrial recruitment. Framingham to better reflect current uses. Hold forums and workshops with Massachusetts 3 per year EDIC and DPED staff Alliance for Economic Development (MAED) and other organizations on economic development topics Objective 5 -C: Provide Input into Master Planning Process Actions Timeline Responsible Party Take lead on economic development issues during In concert EDIC members Master Plan process, including Transit Oriented with Master Development, rezoning of mill village centers and Plan other important underutilized commercial centers, timeframe and rezoning of manufacturing zones in southeast Framingham to better reflect current uses. ARTTC IT 59 To see if the Town will vote to amend Article 11 of the General By -Laws of the Town of Framingham, Functions and Authority of Permanent Officers, Boards and Committees of Town, by adding the following new section: Section 24. Agricultural Commission 24.1 The purpose of the Commission shall be to: a) Represent the Town's farming and forestry community both internally and externally; b) Encourage, promote, and support the pursuit of farming and forestry in the Town both as a business and a community resource; and c) Promote the protection, preservation and economic use of farmland and forestland within the Town. 24.2 The duties and responsibilities of the Commission shall include, but not be limited to: a) Serving as representatives, advocates, educators, facilitators and /or mediators on farming and forestry issues both within the Town and externally; b) Advising the Board of Selectmen, Planning Board, Conservation Commission, Board of Assessors, Board of Health, and other Town bodies on all matters pertaining to farming or forestry activities or lands in Town; c) Engaging in projects and activities, including educational programs and community events, to promote the business, activities and traditions of farming and forestry, as well as farm and forestland protection in Town; Town Meeting 347 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report d) Developing warrant articles, policies and procedures advocating and promoting agriculture and forestry; and e) Reporting to Town Meeting on its projects and activities on an annual basis. 24.3 Membership. The Commission shall consist of five members appointed by the Board of Selectmen. At least three of the members shall be actively engaged in farming, forestry, or related activities. The members shall serve staggered terms of three years each, with two of the initial members serving three -year terms, two of the initial members serving two -year terms and one of the initial members serving a one -year term. Up to four alternates may also be appointed by the Board of Selectmen. Any vacancy shall be filled by the Board of Selectmen, based on recommendations of the Commission, for the unexpired term of the vacancy. Pass any vote or take any other action relative thereto. Sponsor: Board of Selectmen May 9, 2007 Voted: That the Town amend Article II of the General Bylaws by adding a new Section 24 Agricultural Advisory Committee as shown in the warrant with the following changes and attached: 1. Change the title of Section 24 "Agricultural Commission" to "Agricultural Advisory Committee ". 2. Change the word "Commission" to "Committee" throughout the bylaw. 3. In Section 24.3, delete the title "Membership" and delete the third sentence which reads "The members shall serve staggered terms of three years each, with two of the initial members serving three -year term, two of the initial members serving two -year terms and one of the initial members serving a one -year term." And in the last sentence delete the words ", based on recommendations of the Commission, ". Further, that Article I, Section 1.3 be amended to add: Board Members Term Appointing Number Appointed/ Authority Year Agricultural Five with up Three Yrs. Board of Selectmen Two in two years Advisory to four One in one year Committee alternates ARTICLE 59 (ATTACHMENT) 24. Agricultural Advisory Committee 24.1 The purpose of the Committee shall be to: Town Meeting 348 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report a) Represent the Town's farming and forestry community both internally and externally. b) Encourage, promote, and support the pursuit of farming and forestry in the Town, both as a business and a community resource. c) Promote the protection, preservation and economic use of farmland and forestland within the Town. 24.2 Duties and responsibilities of the Committee shall include, but not be limited to: a) Serving as representatives, advocates, educators, facilitators and /or mediators on farming and forestry issues both within the Town and externally. b) Advising the Board of Selectmen, Planning Board, Conservation Commission, Board of Assessors, Board of Health, and other Town bodies on all matters pertaining to farming or forestry activities or lands in Town. c) Engaging in projects and activities, including educational programs and community events, to promote the business, activities and traditions of farming and forestry, as well as farm and forestland protection in Town. d) Developing and recommending warrant articles, policies and procedures advocating and promoting agriculture and forestry. e) Reporting to Town Meeting on its projects and activities. 24.3 The Committee shall consist of five members appointed by the Board of Selectmen for terms of three years each. At least three of the members shall be actively engaged in farming, forestry, or related activities. Up to four alternates may also be appointed by the Board of Selectmen. Any vacancy shall be filled by the Board of Selectmen for the unexpired term of the vacancy. Further, that Article I, Section 1.3 be amended to add: Board Members Term Appointing Authority Agricultural Five with up Three Yrs. Board of Selectmen Advisory to four Committee alternates Approved by the Attorney General on September 12, 2007. ARTICLE 60 Number Appointed/ Year Two in two years One in one year Town Meeting 349 Town of Framingham 2007 Annual Report To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By -Laws of the Town of Framingham by adding the following